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Siemens Middle East Headquarters by Sheppard Robson

Siemens Middle East Headquarters by Sheppard Robson | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

By 2025, Abu Dhabi’s Masdar City (planned by Foster and Partners) will have 50,000 inhabitants and be the world’s first zero-carbon community. Sheppard Robson’s latest addition to the plan, Siemens Middle East Headquarters, is one of the project’s most sustainable buildings to date – realised at a cost of a conventional office

The optimisation of the office’s interior – being wholly column-free, divisible into 32 separate offices and punctured with shaded light-wells, as well as highly efficient use of building materials – meant that more budget could be allocated to the much-needed, high-performance envelope. Furthermore, it is hoped that the spatial flexibility of the interior will expand the building’s functional lifespan.

This results in the use of highly insulating, airtight façade and aluminium fins that block out direct sunlight.

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Solar Ambitions: 6 Projects Powered By The Sun

Solar Ambitions: 6 Projects Powered By The Sun | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The city of London has covered the roof of its Blackfriar's Bridge (part of the Blackfriar's Railway Station) with 4,400 photovoltaic solar panels. The new solar array will have the capacity to convert enough solar energy to make 80,000 cups of tea a day. Since the energy created is entirely carbon free, the photovoltaic cells will reduce the station's carbon footprint by 511 tons, or an average of 89,000 car trips per year.

Solar arrays usually appear on the rooftops of buildings, or as part of large solar farms outside of cities–which makes the Blackfriar's Bridge all the more impressive. The project marks an ambitious effort to convert rail infrastructure—which itself consumes a sizable about of energy each year—to help solve the complex climate puzzle.

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Arianna Smith's curator insight, February 11, 11:40 AM

Solar energy being used to dazzle the people. Not only does it look awesome but it's heading the world in the right direction. It's carbon free, which means it helps the environment. I'm  not entirely sure if it can generate a lot of energy, but it's defiantly a path I'm willing to follow. The buildings they created look like something out of a science fiction film! It's crazy. Not everyone nor every country has solar energy accessible to them(whether it's climate or price). But the people that can, should use it. I think this is a great way to showcase Solar Energy to the world.

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Ecorium of the National Ecological Institute, South Korea

Ecorium of the National Ecological Institute, South Korea | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Ecorium of the National Ecological Institute in Seocheon-gun, South Korea promotes a design concept by SAMOO Architects and Engineers that reflects three key concepts:

"From the Nature," "Be the Nature," & "With the Nature." 


The first is expressed by the dynamic, organic lines of the Institute and its grounds.  The second uses cutting-edge technology to recreate ecological environments by aligning greenhouses with the optimal amount of sunlight for each one.  The third includes visitors who immerse themselves in the complex ecological experience.  The Ecorium is poised to become a landmark in green research, education, and exhibitions.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 11, 11:23 AM

Very cool but probably too large to ever become reality

Joseph Vancell's curator insight, January 11, 1:33 PM

Wow! Sustainable architecture in South Korea

Mark Warren's curator insight, January 17, 12:40 AM

Wow!

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Going Green at the Great Park: Solar Decathlon 2013

Going Green at the Great Park: Solar Decathlon 2013 | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

For the first time since its inception in 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Decathlon is being held at a location other than the mall in Washington D.C.

The competition challenges collegiate teams to 'design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive', and the twenty projects featured this year do just that by showcasing innovative green building technologies, products and strategies that visitors can incorporate into their own homes.

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JMS1kiddz's curator insight, October 1, 2013 4:17 PM

-Nonhlanhla Mahlobisa

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SHADE: A Solar Home Adapts for Sustainable Desert Living

SHADE: A Solar Home Adapts for Sustainable Desert Living | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Team ASUNM, a collaborative effort between Arizona State University and University of New Mexico, has come together to address the inefficiencies of urban sprawl and to create a model for sustainable desert living, dubbed SHADE (Solar Home Adapting for Desert Equilibrium), which is an entry in the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition that takes place on October 3-13, 2013 in Irvine, California.


Using external vertical screens and a solar canopy for shade, the SHADE home experiences a stable, consistent temperature with the use of a radiant cooling system used alongside an air cooling unit. Team ASUNM is exploring the residential application of thermal storage to chill water at night to create ice that cools a glycol solution during the day.

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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, July 18, 2013 1:15 AM

Exploring the deserts as a place to live may be a trend for the next decades or centuries. Here is one of the best approaches

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com | www.theendoffacebook.com

gawlab's curator insight, July 18, 2013 12:28 PM

would love to know about existence of such solutions in Africa..

http://youtu.be/3AvjpnYE1gQ

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5 Examples of Sustainable Roof Design Strategies

5 Examples of Sustainable Roof Design Strategies | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

As we move further into the early years of the 21st century, there is a growing consciousness of the need to create more sustainable systems to maintain our society.


Natural resources have for too long been exploited and utilized with little regard for posterity. Our cities and towns require large amounts of outside support, but there are many minds coming together to develop new plans and techniques to revitalize our civilization and reduce our environmental impact. One of the major trends leading this movement is to create change from the top down, and make our rooftops pull their weight ecologically and economically.

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ESTAR's curator insight, May 29, 2013 2:58 PM

Los números no mienten, la temperatura del aire puede bajar con techos verdes

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New NASA Base Shapes the Future of Green Building Technology

New NASA Base Shapes the Future of Green Building Technology | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

NASA's new Sustainability Base was designed by William McDonough + Partners to embody the spirit of NASA while fostering collaboration, supporting health and well-being, and exceeding the requirements of LEED® Platinum.

An exoskeleton approach provides for structural stability during seismic events, facilitates glare-free daylighting and shading, natural ventilation and connection to the outdoors, and flexibility of the workspace with its column-free interior.

Atop the two-story 50,000-square-foot building is a solid-oxide fuel cell and rooftop solar arrays, supplying the building with more energy than it requires and sending surplus back to the grid at Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Currently running on natural gas, the fuel cell is ready to be converted to landfill gas when a source is available...

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Norm Miller's curator insight, May 14, 2013 7:48 AM

Very cool integration of technologies and here we see an emphasis on work environments as well wit a lot of collaborative space, no pun intended.

RealCorp.lu's curator insight, May 22, 2013 11:42 PM

Un nouvel exemple de batiment "green".

Sumaiya Banu's curator insight, August 22, 2013 10:34 PM

Software as a Service (SaaS) is the next generation technology that is being embraced widely by businesses today as it is cost efficient, maintenance free, flexible, and adaptable. PeopleWorks’ SaaS based application and software solutions with its cloud based platform offers mobility and ease of use, and can be accessed by employees anywhere and at any time. This helps businesses reduce turnaround time and save costs.

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Floating Light Park Skyscraper Uses Solar Power & Helium to Hover Above Beijing

Floating Light Park Skyscraper Uses Solar Power & Helium to Hover Above Beijing | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Light Park is a skyscraper that hovers over the streets of Beijing like a giant airship. Architects Ting Xu and Yiming Chen have conceived the future of high-rises to be a conglomerate of mega-structures that make up for the shortage of urban open spaces on the ground by lifting them up in the air.


The Light Park skyscraper is lifted off the ground with a helium-filled balloon, and it uses solar energy for propulsion, enabling it to function as a non-polluting transportation deck as well as a floating urban park. The technology is based on existing helium balloon designs, using solar-powered propellers, airbags and atmospheric pressure for takeoff and cruise flight. Solar power is utilized to power the uses below, with translucent solar panels located on the top of the aircraft. In order to avoid additional weight and decrease wind resistance, the skyscraper uses a cable-suspended structure to attach the slabs to the mushroom-like cap. The planting slabs are irrigated with rainwater collected on the large cap surface and are distributed in a way which allows maximum exposure to sunlight on each level...


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Amber Qureshi's curator insight, April 8, 2013 10:19 AM

Daaamnnn :O 

Noor Fatima's comment, April 9, 2013 7:01 AM
incredibleeeee
Amber Qureshi's comment, April 12, 2013 12:12 AM
Ikr :D
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Case Study in Efficiency: SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea

Case Study in Efficiency:  SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

SOM’s Diagonal Tower in Yongsan International Business District of Seoul, South Korea, is a case study in efficiency – the 343 meter tall tower successfully minimizes wind loads, reduces construction costs, provides dramatic views and meets strict energy codes by integrating massing, structure and performance.


The design of this landmark skyscraper, with glazed triangular facets, employs passive environmental control strategies within and on the façade – sunshades are positioned at varying angles on each building exposure, mitigating heat gain in the summer and permitting direct sunlight to warm the building’s interiors during the cold winter months. Triple pane glazed exterior curtain wall decreases energy loss, while active chilled beam system surpasses traditional air driven systems, using water as a medium for transferring heating and cooling energy, which results in less energy consumption along with great environmental comfort for building users...


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Natalie Curtis's curator insight, March 22, 2013 6:10 AM

A really interesting and amazing building. Very self sufficient and really quite fascinating. It's enery-efficient and great to look at simultaneously.

Kang ji yun 's curator insight, May 25, 2013 8:59 PM

It is very wonderful building!! when it comes to the diagonal tower, it serves more than visual stimuli. Even though the Diagonal Tower is similar to Norman Foster's Hearst Tower in New York, it's megaframe reduces the amount of steel required by over 25% when compared to conventionally framed buildings.

Amelia's comment, May 26, 2013 6:59 AM
I hope we have one also in Daejeon.. hehe..
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Singapore's Archifest Zero Waste Pavilion

Singapore's Archifest Zero Waste Pavilion | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

WOW Architects was selected to design and build the first-ever Pavilion for Singapore’s Archifest last year.


The aesthetic design of the pavilion was a response to the duality of the site, while the zero waste and buildability strategy was developed around two highly rapid deployable and re-useable systems. The first is the main structure, composed of box-truss systems, and the second is a polymer mesh developed for slope control that has unique attributes that enhance the usability and interaction of the space.

To achieve zero-waste, the design team considered time, materials, cost and the afterlife of the elements, with a . The box-truss system, including the roof takes a maximum of approximately 7 days to deploy, while the membrane takes a maximum of approximately 3 days to install. Overall time frame to complete construction is 10-15 days.

The cellular membrane can be re-used in Fort Canning Hill’s other areas requiring slope protection and stabilization or it will be donated to a nearby country whose village/farmland has been affected by soil erosion from slopes.

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Phoenix Observation Tower by Bjarke Ingels Group

Phoenix Observation Tower by Bjarke Ingels Group | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Located in downtown Phoenix, the 70,000 sf Observation Tower shall add a significant structure to the Phoenix skyline from which to enjoy the city’s spectacular views of the surrounding mountain ranges and dramatic sunsets. Phoenix-based developer Novawest, commissioned the team to create a destination event to provide tourists and citizens of Phoenix alike the chance to enjoy the unique features of the Valley of the Sun.

The future observation tower is conceived as a tall core of reinforced concrete with an open-air spiral sphere at its top, resembling a metaphorical pin firmly marking a location on a map.
Walking downwards from the top through a continuous spiral promenade, the visitors of the observation tower experience all of the building’s programs in a constant motion, while enjoying dynamic 360 degree views of the city of Phoenix and the Arizonian landscape.  
 
The base of the tower will serve as a public plaza offering shade, water features and a small amount of retail together with a subterranean queuing area. The tower will serve as a working model of sustainable energy practices, incorporating a blend of solar and other technologies.

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Solar Carve Tower at the High Line | Studio Gang Architects

Solar Carve Tower at the High Line | Studio Gang Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Chicago-based architect, Jeanne Gang, just unveiled the latest project planned to border New York City’s beloved High Line. The 180,000 square-foot office tower with ground level retail will replace an existing, disused meatpacking plant along 10th Avenue between 13th and 14th streets. It will feature a glass facade that is intelligently shaped to avoid the disruption of light, air and views from the High Line.

The gem-like façade displays the exciting architectural potential of expanded notions of solar-driven zoning—and a skyscraper that enhances the public life of the city in ways that a stand-alone icon cannot. 

Dubbed the Solar Carve Tower, the mid-rise structure is currently pending city approval and is planned for completion in 2015.

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The World's First Algae-Powered Building Grows in Germany

The World's First Algae-Powered Building Grows in Germany | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Splitterwerk Architects have designed a building that, when completed, will be powered by algae bioreactors that capture and release energy.


Splitterwerk Architects have designed just such a structure, dubbed BIQ, which will be the very first of its kind. Covered with a bio-adaptive façade of microalgae, the distinctive building has been designed for the International Building Exhibition in Hamburg, and is slated for completion next year.

The building is covered in bio-reactive louvers that enclose and allow the algae to survive and grow faster than they would otherwise, while also providing shade for the building's interior. Additionally, the bio-reactors trap the heat energy created by the algae, which can then be harvested and used to power the building. Once completed, it will be a resource for scientists and engineers  for future research.

The project is a collaboration between Spitterwerk Architects, Strategic Science Consult of Germany, ARUP and Colt International...

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Morphosis’s Emerson College Los Angeles Building set to open in March

Morphosis’s Emerson College Los Angeles Building set to open in March | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
The project gives the Boston-based communications and arts school a permanent home on the west coast.

The 10-story, $85 million project will accommodate 217 students in suite-style housing located in the two vertical towers. These living spaces flank the academic and administrative core, which include classrooms, a state-of-the-art digital screening room, a lecture hall with distance-learning capabilities, performance spaces, editing suites, and more. 

Designed by architect Thom Mayne of Morphosis, the dynamic, aluminum-clad structure—really a self-contained campus—stands poised to become a symbol of its rapidly changing neighborhood.

Technological innovations echo the school’s own zeitgeist. Among the building’s energy-saving systems are exterior louvers that open or close automatically in response to the weather and the sun’s intensity. And two intriguing metal scrims, made from 17 different aluminum shapes that were digitally generated and manufactured, shade the interior faces of the residential towers.

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Catherine Devin's curator insight, March 14, 6:59 AM

Sustainability will progress  if  embedded  in universities and school programs... as mentioned earlier in the article on Business Schools ( Sce : Guardian)

What a great experience to be able to live a few years in a sustainable building, if  occupants promote simultaneously  green behaviours.

Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 14, 8:48 AM

I found this project really amazing!

Designed by architect Thom Mayne of Morphosis, the dynamic, aluminum-clad structure—really a self-contained campus—stands poised to become a symbol of its rapidly changing neighborhood.

Technological innovations echo the school’s own zeitgeist. Among the building’s energy-saving systems are exterior louvers that open or close automatically in response to the weather and the sun’s intensity. And two intriguing metal scrims, made from 17 different aluminum shapes that were digitally generated and manufactured, shade the interior faces of the residential towers.

scarlettarch's curator insight, March 14, 6:29 PM

The Boston- LA film connection just solidified a little more.

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Materials Of The Future: 7 Amazing Trends For 2014 And Beyond

Materials Of The Future: 7 Amazing Trends For 2014 And Beyond | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The history of architecture is deeply engrained in technological developments of the time. Skyscrapers would have never reached such heights without developments in steel, for example, and facades would have never slimmed down without thin-shell concrete.


In a time that is so buzzing with technological development, we cannot help but salivate a little at the material prospects for architecture that are just on the horizon. With 2014 just beginning, we want to take a moment to see what drastic innovations may be leaking into the world of architecture in the near future.

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A Tech-Savvy, LEED-Certified Residential Tower Complex for San Francisco

A Tech-Savvy, LEED-Certified Residential Tower Complex for San Francisco | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Designed by SF-based Handel Architects, the complex holds 754 units in four towers, and is located in the newly up-and-coming mid-Market neighborhood, nestled between tech giants like Twitter and Spotify.


Although NEMA has a lot going for it in the LEED-Certified design department (polished concrete or wood floors, quartz countertops, soaking tubs and Hansgrophe faucets in every unit, a forthcoming outdoor Public Art Plaza, and Club Solarium inspired for NorCal wineries) it's the tech innovations offered by NEMA that really demand attention. With an eye on the next generation of renters, NEMA has positioned itself wisely to appeal to both those who are able to fork over a little more for sleek, modern design and urban techies who will be wowed by the impressive digital amenities - to say this place is "fully wired" would be a vast understatement...

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Dalian International Conference Center: Technology, Construction & Sustainability

Dalian International Conference Center: Technology, Construction & Sustainability | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Dalian International Conference Center has both to reflect the promising modern future of Dalian and its tradition as an important port, trade, industry and tourism city, which is undergoing a wave of transformation on coastal brownfield and reclaimed land which will entirely change the city’s face within the next decade.

For this building, the focus of the architectural design and project development lies on technology, construction and their interplay. The technical systems fulfil the tasks required for the spatial use of the building automatically, invisibly and silently, working like a hybrid city within a building.
For the technical infrastructure of the building this means, that we have to consider a huge amount of people circulating inside the building at the same time, who expect high standards in circulation and comfort as well as a state of the art building with respect to high flexibility, low energy consumption and low use of natural resources...
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The Solar Decathlon's Net-Zero Solar-Powered Start.Home Aims to Transform Green Home Building

The Solar Decathlon's Net-Zero Solar-Powered Start.Home Aims to Transform Green Home Building | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Start.Home is the Stanford University entry in the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon.


Integrating technology into a home that can grow as needs change, the Start.Home design allows for customization and additions that are based on a pre-engineered, pre-fabricated start.core that can meet net-zero energy efficiency standards.

The Stanford design team aims to provide “efficiency without sacrificing creativity” such that each house can be an expression of its owner. The 12’x15’x10’ start.core features natural lighting, open spaces, a high roof that permits passive ventilation, and an emphasis on connecting the interior to the outdoors. The basic unit provides for a bathroom, kitchen, mechanical component access, and living areas. The start.core can be shipped on a standard truck trailer and installed on a lot for construction and customization.

Learn more and view images at the original article...

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CAEXI BEST's curator insight, June 10, 2013 6:45 PM
Net-Zero Start.Home à énergie solaire du Solar Decathlon vise à transformer Green Building d'accueil
GeoMeek's comment, June 13, 2013 5:08 AM
Is habitat building any of these homes?
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Taiwanese Wind Tower is Covered with Thousands of Wind Turbines and LED Lights

Taiwanese Wind Tower is Covered with Thousands of Wind Turbines and LED Lights | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Beijing-based Decode Urbanism Office has designed a tower with a façade composed of multiple wind-driven generators.


Thousands of wind turbines will produce enough energy to power the entire building. At night, the diamond-shaped generators are lit with thousands of LED lights incorporated into the building envelope.

The 350-meter (1,150-foot) structure, in Taichung City, China, will house the city’s Department of Urban Development, as well as commercial activities.

The tower’s façade, inspired by the plum blossom — China and Taiwan's  national flower – reacts to changes in direction and intensity of the wind, creating a truly dynamic visual effect. Similarly, mechanical wind power generators have LEDs, illuminating the façade and producing a pulsating flow of light, whose intensity and color adjust to correspond to changes in temperature and season.


The wind harnessing capability, along with the lighting that responds to local atmospheric conditions, makes this conceptual tower a true “decoder of nature.”

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Federico Morabito's comment, May 18, 2013 2:41 AM
This is an example of "Smart Progress" is in an effort to channel the interests of research towards evolutionary solutions, through systematic monitoring of the quality process of mental and physical state of the individual with the 'environment.
Edmund Chan's comment, May 18, 2013 9:45 PM
What about routine maintenance ?
Clem Stanyon's comment, May 30, 2013 8:17 PM
Fantastic!
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Green Innovation: First Bio-building Powered by Algae Opens in Hamburg

Green Innovation: First Bio-building Powered by Algae Opens in Hamburg | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The world's first algae-powered building is being piloted in Hamburg.

Designed by multinational firm Arup, features panel glass bioreactors on a facade containing microalgae that generate biomass and heat, serving as a renewable energy source.


The systems provide insulation for the building- 129 bioreactors have been fitted to the southwest and southeast faces of the building. They are controlled by an energy management center in which solar thermal heat and algae are harvested and stored to be used to create hot water.


Jan Wurm, Arup’s Europe Research Leader, said: 'Using bio-chemical processes in the facade of a building to create shade and energy is a really innovative concept. 

'It might well become a sustainable solution for energy production in urban areas, so it is great to see it being tested in a real-life scenario.'


The news comes after Arup announced their vision for the future of skyscrapers which suggested that buildings would be 'living' buildings powered by algae that respond automatically to the weather and the changing needs of inhabitants...

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 11, 2013 4:05 PM

I am interested to follow this story and to learn more details about the specific sources for the algae and a bit more of the science behind it.

ParadigmGallery's comment, April 11, 2013 7:59 PM
Thanks so much for your thoughts.....
Noor Fatima's comment, April 12, 2013 8:32 AM
welcome:)
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Earth Sciences Building / University of British Columbia

Earth Sciences Building / University of British Columbia | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Earth Sciences Building is located on the Vancouver campus of the University of British Columbia. It is the new home for three of UBC’s Science departments—Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Statistics, and the Pacific Institute of the Mathematical Sciences.


In addition to enhancing the growing links between each department by providing valuable opportunities for shared learning and collaboration, the ESB expands the Faculty of Science’s public face and helps to create a vibrant and animated centre for the Faculty on campus.

The wood structure provides a welcoming environment, and as an added environmental benefit, the 1,317 cubic meters of wood in the structure store 1,094 tonnes of carbon, the equivalent of taking 415 cars off the road for a year. To provide rain cover for pedestrians, a solid wood canopy wraps three sides of the project. It extends from inside the building, where it forms the interior ceiling finish of the museum and cafe, blurring the boundaries between interior and exterior space...

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Agora Tower, Taipei: A Twisting Skyscraper Wrapped With Vertical Gardens

Agora Tower, Taipei: A Twisting Skyscraper Wrapped With Vertical Gardens | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Taipei just broke ground on a twisting skyscraper that is wrapped with a jungle of vertical gardens...

Designed by Vincent Callebaut Architecture, the 455,000-square-foot Agora Tower will have an orchard, a vegetable garden, space for aromatic and medicinal plants, and a compost and rainwater capture system.

Designed to mimic two encircling hands and the helical structure of DNA, the towers are organized a central core that allows for a “hyper-abundance of suspended gardens.” These will spill over with edible and decorative plants, enabling residents of 40 luxury apartments to harvest a great deal of their own food (except for protein.) Plus, the rainwater capture system alleviates pressure on the municipal water supply and gives the complex even greater independence.

Each 540 square meter apartment will have an interior green wall as well, ensuring optimum air quality and a great green aesthetics. A circular light funnel will push daylighting right down to the basement of the building, a solar roof will provide energy, and low E glass will mitigate excess solar gain and prevent thermal loss.

Complete with nanotechnology and a host of other high-tech features, this one-of-a-kind tower may well be the greenest of its kind when it is completed circa 2016....

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Florence @ddline2020 's curator insight, March 10, 2013 1:20 AM

Designed by Vincent Callebaut Architecture, the 455,000-square-foot Agora Tower will have an orchard, a vegetable garden, space for aromatic and medicinal plants, and a compost and rainwater capture system.

Pagina Uno's curator insight, March 10, 2013 3:10 AM

Progettato per imitare la struttura elicoidale del DNA, le torri sono organizzate intorno ad un nucleo centrale che ha permesso la realizzare un "iper-abbondanza di giardini sospesi." Questi traboccano di piante commestibili e decorative, che consentono ai residenti dei 40 appartamenti di lusso di raccogliere una grande quantità di cibo. Inoltre, un sistema di raccolta delle acque piovane allevia il peso sulla rete idrica comunale e dà indipendenza al complesso.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, March 10, 2013 10:30 AM
This is a real fad now, skyscrapers that twist toward the sky like that, isn't it? I can't help but wonder about the legacy. Are we entering a new era where the species is losing its self consciousness, or have these architects simply not heard the old limerick about the heartbreak when the man who was threaded one way fell in love with the woman who was threaded the other way?
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Intelligent Shading System at Abu Dhabi's Al Bahar Towers

Intelligent Shading System at Abu Dhabi's Al Bahar Towers | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Abu Dhabi’s new inspiring architectural design might lead to even further research into the world of transforming interior and exterior environments with ingenious creativity. Al Bahar Towers housing the Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters are now part of Aedas Architects' portfolio, rising tall to shape a new era in modern office building design. Inspired by a traditional Islamic lattice shading device named “mashrabiya”, the interesting geometric shapes enveloping the towers offer a powerful visual impact while intelligently protecting the interiors from excessive heat gain. Each of the 25-story high twin office towers in the United Arab Emirates will accommodate approximately 1,000 employees, who will be working in an inspiring, environmentally appropriate atmosphere...

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 24, 2012 8:46 PM

What a sight to behold and this article tells us more details of these amazing structures.

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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.

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Daylighting + Innovative Facade Technology at the Nantong Museum by Henn Architekten

Daylighting + Innovative Facade Technology at the Nantong Museum by Henn Architekten | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

As part of the master plan designed by HENN, the new Nantong Urban Planning Museum is located prominently along the central river.

The museum is characterized as a floating volume, resting on a glass pedestal, with space for special exhibitions, a café and bookstore. The overall dominant form which cantilevers above the glass entry contains the primary exhibition space, offices, and conference rooms.
Its distinctive façade is composed of two layers: the inner thermally seals the building envelope, and the outer is a reticulated metal structure with varied panels. The façade’s diamond-shaped grid is comprised of seven different panels that allow for varying degrees of opening from 9%-60%. This provides for the controlled regulation of sunlight in fine increments, to accommodate the needs of the interior program. The exhibition spaces are therefore, characterized by a predominantly closed façade with minimal openings, and the offices with maximum levels of natural daylight...

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