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design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Agora Tower, Taipei: A Twisting Skyscraper Wrapped With Vertical Gardens

Agora Tower, Taipei: A Twisting Skyscraper Wrapped With Vertical Gardens | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Taipei just broke ground on a twisting skyscraper that is wrapped with a jungle of vertical gardens...

Designed by Vincent Callebaut Architecture, the 455,000-square-foot Agora Tower will have an orchard, a vegetable garden, space for aromatic and medicinal plants, and a compost and rainwater capture system.

Designed to mimic two encircling hands and the helical structure of DNA, the towers are organized a central core that allows for a “hyper-abundance of suspended gardens.” These will spill over with edible and decorative plants, enabling residents of 40 luxury apartments to harvest a great deal of their own food (except for protein.) Plus, the rainwater capture system alleviates pressure on the municipal water supply and gives the complex even greater independence.

Each 540 square meter apartment will have an interior green wall as well, ensuring optimum air quality and a great green aesthetics. A circular light funnel will push daylighting right down to the basement of the building, a solar roof will provide energy, and low E glass will mitigate excess solar gain and prevent thermal loss.

Complete with nanotechnology and a host of other high-tech features, this one-of-a-kind tower may well be the greenest of its kind when it is completed circa 2016....

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Florence @ddline2020 's curator insight, March 10, 2013 1:20 AM

Designed by Vincent Callebaut Architecture, the 455,000-square-foot Agora Tower will have an orchard, a vegetable garden, space for aromatic and medicinal plants, and a compost and rainwater capture system.

Pagina Uno's curator insight, March 10, 2013 3:10 AM

Progettato per imitare la struttura elicoidale del DNA, le torri sono organizzate intorno ad un nucleo centrale che ha permesso la realizzare un "iper-abbondanza di giardini sospesi." Questi traboccano di piante commestibili e decorative, che consentono ai residenti dei 40 appartamenti di lusso di raccogliere una grande quantità di cibo. Inoltre, un sistema di raccolta delle acque piovane allevia il peso sulla rete idrica comunale e dà indipendenza al complesso.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, March 10, 2013 10:30 AM
This is a real fad now, skyscrapers that twist toward the sky like that, isn't it? I can't help but wonder about the legacy. Are we entering a new era where the species is losing its self consciousness, or have these architects simply not heard the old limerick about the heartbreak when the man who was threaded one way fell in love with the woman who was threaded the other way?
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Dublin’s Beautiful 3 Mews Houses Weave Natural Daylight and Lush Gardens Into Their Industrial Aesthetic

Dublin’s Beautiful 3 Mews Houses Weave Natural Daylight and Lush Gardens Into Their Industrial Aesthetic | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
3 Mews project in Dublin, Ireland by ODOS Architects is woven with natural daylighting and ventilation and features rainwater harvesting and grey water recycling.

Before these homes were built, the area located on an industrial laneway in Dublin 8 was not known for its residential buildings and was basically devoid of life. Rather than building a traditional residential structure, ODOS Architects opted to help ease the transition from an industrial aesthetic to a cozy place to call home. From the outside, the homes feature a cantilevered upper section built from powder coated metal industrial flooring planks arranged in a structural steel frame. The slatted exterior creates a sense of privacy without blocking views or light. Foliage and treetops are visible from the street and bring a piece of nature to the area.

Inside, the layout affords each space with easy access to the adjacent room as well as plentiful light and fresh air.

In addition to the use of air and light, the homes makes use of an air-to-water heat pump and a boiler for energy-efficient heating and cooling. Rainwater is collected from the courtyards and recycled into a grey water system that is used to irrigate all the courtyards and to supply water for the bathrooms and washing machines.

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Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture

Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

San Francisco-based Feldman Architecture have designed the Caterpillar House.


The design for the Caterpillar House, sited on the softly rolling hills of the Santa Lucia Preserve, sought to accentuate a connection to the land.  Having lived in a Cliff May home, the client came to the project with a love of modern ranch houses and looking for an environmentally-conscious response to a beautiful site.

The Caterpillar House implements sustainable elements while exploring a contemporary version of the ranch ideals: massing that is low and horizontal, an open plan with a strong connection between indoor and outdoor spaces, and main living areas which center informally on the kitchen...

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Drew House by Simon Laws

Drew House by Simon Laws | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This holiday house aims to create a kind of luxury campsite amongst mature Bloodwoods and Cabbage Palms near the ocean at, Seventeen Seventy, a town just south of Gladstone and the most northerly surf break on the east Australian coast.

Living and sleeping pods along with a bath house were built in Brisbane, close to construction services and transported the 500km to site fully completed. The prefabricated parabolic roofed structure and decks were erected onsite and connect the various pods through a large central outdoor living and dining area. Aramax roof sheeting free spans the two identical, but reversed, hardwood self-braced trusses.

Natural oiled timbers and other low-finished materials create a neutral environment that along with the dynamic indoor/outdoor spaces, allow the maximum enjoyment of the wonderful bushland setting and mild sub-tropical climate. Rainwater tanks, solar hot water and electrical panels and a passive energy efficient design make the house largely self sufficient.

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Anne Pals Bleeksma's curator insight, February 6, 2013 2:16 AM

Goes a long way towards being totally cintextual. Not sure how local the naterials are but then again zero tolerance is not a good idea.