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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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A 10,000-Square-Foot Smart-Glass Canopy for the US Pavilion at the Milan Expo

A 10,000-Square-Foot Smart-Glass Canopy for the US Pavilion at the Milan Expo | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

International expositions have long pushed boundaries in design and engineering, and will be the case with the 2015 Expo Milano in May and 147 countries worldwide will share culture through construction in the form of innovative pavilions and installations. Representatives from the U.S. Pavilion—titled American Food 2.0 and aims to discuss the global food supply chain—recently shared a behind-the-scenes look at one of the architectural features: a smart-glass roof canopy.

The application seeks to align with the expo’s broader theme—“Feed the Planet, Energy for Life”—by functioning as a digital interface that encourages visitor interaction. The canopy comprises 312 glass panels, each measuring 3.3 feet by 9.8 feet, and totals roughly 10,000 square feet in area. The nonprofit representing the pavilion, Friends of the U.S. Pavilion Milano 2015, says that this application will be the largest smart-glass roof structure to date, with the panels planned to transition in seconds from opaque to transparent states in response to environmental conditions as well as prompts from visitors via a touchscreen.

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Borrowing From The Rich Personality of Its Surroundings: Pobble House in England

Borrowing From The Rich Personality of Its Surroundings: Pobble House in England | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Pobble House is an original looking timber frame residence paying tribute to the qualities and architectural history of its special location in Ashford, Kent, England: “Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age. Whilst being designed to a tight budget, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate”, explained the team at Guy Hollaway Architects.

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A cross-shaped, self-sufficient micro home built from containers

A cross-shaped, self-sufficient micro home built from containers | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Georgian architect Dachi Papuashvili has developed a concept for a cross-shaped micro home built from shipping containers to house a member of the church.

Papuashvili, who is based in Tbilisi, wanted to design a residence that could accommodate either a cleric or a layman as a retreat for study. The intention is to use waste materials, including shipping containers, to produce a prototype that can be easily constructed and would be entirely self-sufficient.

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Catherine Devin's curator insight, May 12, 2014 5:30 AM

Autre projet encore de résidence temporaire ultralégère en énergie grise et en consommation énergétique (autosuffisante) au quotidien.  Plutôt qu'un lieu de vacances, un lieu de retraite et d'étude.

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Sustainability From Top To Bottom: Locally Sourced Timber Clad Homes

Sustainability From Top To Bottom: Locally Sourced Timber Clad Homes | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

When designing a home according to high standards of sustainability, an architect must consider all details of construction, from the way the structure absorbs and releases solar energy, to rainwater collection, to incorporating double-paned windows to reduce heat transfer.

They must also consider the environmental impact of the materials used to construct the home itself. Transporting resource-intensive materials across long distances significantly increases the home's overall carbon footprint.

To mitigate these adverse effects, the solution is much closer than one might think: opting for locally sourced and responsibly harvested timbers and woods. Instead of cutting down pines and oaks in sensitive forests to use for hardwood floors and cabinets, architects can make use of already fallen trees near the construction site to source their design needs. The following homes, façades, floors, and products come from wood found nearby, and are either left untreated for a rustic appearance or milled and cured on-site for a richer finish. Sustainability from start to finish.

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mickelin burnes-browne's curator insight, November 8, 2013 4:02 PM

Think Green and save the environment.

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Foldes Architects: Volcano Visitor Center

Foldes Architects: Volcano Visitor Center | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The iconic Kemenes Volcanopark Visitor Center by Foldes Architects lays west of Budapest. After a design competion with over 40 proposals, the chosen plot for the center highlighted a flat area between the city of Celldomolk and the 5 million years old Sag Hill, a former volcano.

“Instead of the straight translation of the brief, such as creating a volcano shaped museum building, we wanted to capture the true substance of the location. According to our concept, the raw materials, the homogeneous grey of the concrete, the lava inspired colour of the Corten steel, and the flue-like arrangement of the space, deliver the spirit and essence of a volcano”, says Laszlo Foldes, Foldes Architects's chief designer.
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Gareth Williams-Wynn's curator insight, September 19, 2013 6:07 AM

Nice ..... I like using Corten in structures and the interpretation of homogeneous grey in the concrete is a great choice

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Sustainability, Simplicity and Natural Materials at New York's Won Dharma Center

Sustainability, Simplicity and Natural Materials at New York's Won Dharma Center | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

A retreat designed by Hanrahan Meyers Architects reinforces the Buddhist mantras of simplicity and nature in upstate New York at this beautiful, simple and green meditation center.


Located in the Hudson River Valley, New York, the 22,000 sf project was under construction when Chung Ohun Lee, of the organization's leaders, attended the UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. She was so inspired by Obama's speech—in which he vowed to cut emissions by 8% over 40 years—that she asked the architects to switch from conventional building systems already ordered to such energy savers as geothermal heating and solar hot water.

While many of the building systems were changed after Lee's trip, the architecture itself needed few adjustments- wood framing (dimensional lumber and glulam beams) was used rather than steel, and interiors used locally harvested oak for flooring with furniture made of FSC-certified, formaldehyde-free apple plywood. LEED certification would have added $50,000 to the cost, so the client instead opted to spend the funds on green features. It helps, Hanrahan says, that "reducing their carbon footprint is part of their philosophy."

But the real lesson is that even the most advanced systems require the client's participation to achieve significant energy savings...

Lauren Moss's insight:

A beautiful structure that aptly reflects the philosophy of its users serves as an architectural manifestation of key Buddhist principles and values. The minimalist design is an inspiring example of a fundamental commitment to sustainability and environmental stewardship- the building employs modern technology and innovative green systems, in conjunction with passive design strategies and the use of locally-sourced materials...

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 5, 2013 4:22 PM

inspiring design, philosophy and implementation...enviable commitment to going greener and owning the responsibility we all have to adapt our approach to new builds....

 

Jasbin's comment, April 22, 2013 2:31 AM
A beautiful photography
Snow Lion Crystals's comment, September 7, 2013 4:14 AM
Lovely article, simply inspiring.
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Minimalism & Playfulness Define a Contemporary Shipping Container Residence

Minimalism & Playfulness Define a Contemporary Shipping Container Residence | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The WFH House in China, designed by Copenhagen-based studio, Arcgency is a contemporary design, constructed of three stacked shipping containers.


The house surrounded by lush vegetation  ”was designed to produce more energy than it consumes through the use of upcycled shipping containers as a steel frame, a sustainable bamboo facade, a rainwater collection system, solar cell-clad green roof and permeable paving.”

The interior is neat, dressed up in impeccable white, yet with splashes of color here and there. The main floor is envisioned as one singular space that accommodates the kitchen, dining area and the living room. The main advantage is that, this type of space delimitation allows a seamless transition between the indoor environments...

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Immotopic's curator insight, March 4, 2013 4:06 AM

Le moins c'est le mieux*

Immotopic's comment, March 4, 2013 4:07 AM
Less is better*
Natalie Curtis's curator insight, March 6, 2013 9:18 AM

The WFH House is a perfect example of my inspiration for my Architecture Repurposing topic... it's sustainable, energy-efficient and innovative. It is a elegant representation of repurposing materials to be used in creative and intelligent alternate spacial use and design. The interior design is just as seamless and minimalistic as the outside and creates an open feel, as well. If you're at all curious about how the masterminds behind shipping container homes, do what they do, you'll find this blog interesting. The small array of pictures goes from the finished product all the way down the skeleton of the home and it's really quite fascinating to see the actual raw, industrial looking shipping containers being transformed into a modern, minimalistic and elegant home. 

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Swooping Bamboo Structure Highlights Innovative Use of Local Materials

Swooping Bamboo Structure Highlights Innovative Use of Local Materials | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Using local materials, this impressive bamboo structure features a microcosm of imaginative spaces designed for a range of playful activities.


This incredible bamboo structure, by Dutch firm 24H-architecture, is part of the Soneva Kiri eco-resort on the island of Koh Kood, Thailand. Designed as a children's activity and learning center, the fantastic interiors are bound to impress even the most stoic grown-up.

Evoking the fluid shape of a manta ray, the center is located on a rocky slope overlooking the bay, with a large canopy of bamboo shingles sheltering the open interior of "mini-structures". The structure uses locally-sourced bamboo stalks of all sizes, ranging from the large main columns that are anchored into concrete footings to the other structural members that are grouped together using nuts and bolts and natural fiber lashings.


From the architects:

The design adopts all bioclimatic aspects to suits its humid tropical environment. The roof cantilevers up to 8 metres, acting like a big umbrella providing shade and protection from the heavy rains. The open design with the translucent elevated rooftop and setback floors allow a natural airflow inside and the use of natural daylight, limiting the building’s energy consumption.

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Contemporary Farmhouse in Victoria: Designed for flexibility & sustainability

Contemporary Farmhouse in Victoria: Designed for flexibility & sustainability | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This contemporary farmhouse in Victoria, designed by Doherty Lynch, was a complete rebuild after the original farmhouse was destroyed in a fire. The clients wanted a modern and relaxing holiday home for 4 families, including 17 grandchildren.


Therefore, the design needed to expand and contract to accommodate a fluctuating flow of guests as well as be durable, insulate against noise and be completed within a tight budget.


A layered approach to textured, robust and honest materials called for cabinetry that is a mix of Japanese Sen ash, ‘Moleskin’ by Laminex, and other laminates with exposed ply edges. Walls & ceilings were painted out in Dulux ‘Natural White’ with recessed areas (for electronic equipment) in Dulux ‘Luck.’ Other materials include double-glazed glass, concrete slab, fire-resistant timbers, porcelain tiles and plywood substrates at joinery locations.

Additional sustainable features include passive temperature control from the thermal mass of the concrete slab and low-e glass, while resource-conserving sustainable features include water harvesting, solar power, and energy-efficient windows.


View more images of this beautiful, sustainable and contemporary farmhouse at designhunter.net.

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Ecologia Montréal: a contemporary LEED Platinum home by Gervais Fortin

Ecologia Montréal: a contemporary LEED Platinum home by Gervais Fortin | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Ecologia Montréal, designed by Gervais Fortin, is the first single dweling home in Montreal, Canada aiming for a Platinum LEED certification.

The owner, in collaboration of the Ecologia Foundation, had the objective to reduce the home's ecological footprint by using healthy, local and non-toxic materials. The team demonstrated that it’s possible to build an ecological house without sacrificing good, contemporary design. All the materials were hand-picked from the most ecoresponsible suppliers of Quebec and featured a combination of exposed beams, large windows and an inner courtyard, creating a cozy and modern living space.

In addition to utilizing a geothermal system, he structure of the house is built with insulating concrete forms, mostly constituted of 100% recycled materials. As for the concrete used for the structure and as thermal mass, concrete contains 39% recycled materials. Ideal in an urban setting, a green roof completes it all.

Ecologia Montréal is the first house in Quebec to integrate the BioGeometry™ science, to control electromagnetic fields, to consider the energy of the earth and to infuse domestic water. The combination of all these factors harmonize the emotional, vital and spiritual levels of the home and its occupants...

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Sculptural architecture blurs the division between built form and landscape...

Sculptural architecture blurs the division between built form and landscape... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Barwon Heads in Victoria is undergoing a period of significant change. Heritage restrictions currently protect older fishing shacks whilst the remainder of the seaside town is progressively being redeveloped.

The architecture now emerging is significantly contributing to the evolution of this small coastal township. The interesting circular building form of this house emerged from the architects Jackson Clements Burrows exploring circular forms, which resulted in a circular skylight over the first floor living areas and the overall shape of the house mirroring and immersing the structure into the Ti-tree dominated landscape.

The house is wrapped in a skin of vertical cedar battens, which not only provide privacy and solar protection but also blur the division between the built form and the landscape...

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Modular materiality at House K by Auerbach Halevy Architects

Modular materiality at House K by Auerbach Halevy Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

A unique example of sustainable and modular design influenced and reflective of the vernacular and local tradition, while incorporating modern materials and concepts...


In a rural area in Israel, Auerbach-Halevy has designed a distinctive house.  The design is a concrete block, and the north elevation facing the street and both side facades seem completely opaque, yet they are not alienated to their environment.
The entire structure is covered with a uniform system of prefabricated exposed concrete panels, which are integrated with heavy wood Latticework – A reminder to the traditional oriental element – the eastern trellis (“mashrabia”). The combination of materials and distribution arrangements add warmth, and ease the rigid system.


In HOUSE K the pre-cast concrete panels participate in the interior design, dictate the rhythm in the house and affect its scale.
The unique appearance of the house expresses locality, and by combining the exposed concrete elements with the trellis wooden work, creates a unified and coherent language. This combination of elements transcends beyond the contrasting and complementary nature of the materials, resolves the symbolic collision produced by the components, and therefore creating a unity between tradition Arab style and modernist building.

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Tasmanian Beach House: Sustainable shipping container-style architecture

Tasmanian Beach House: Sustainable shipping container-style architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Dutch owners of this beach house in Tasmania asked their architect Daniel Haskell of Haskell Architects to design a functional, efficient and inexpensive shack that was sustainable and maximised the views and environment. It also needed to be durable for extended periods while the owners were back at their base in the Netherlands. Ideally the building would appear as thought it could be picked up and removed without a trace.
In the words of architect Daniel Haskell, "The building is elevated above the sloping ground by slender steel posts and touches the ground lightly at the entrance. Externally, the building is a simple rectangular form, reminiscent of a shipping container, and clad with a simple palette of inexpensive & durable materials. The main exterior cladding was Zincalume corrugated steel primarily for economy, durability and low maintenance, with patches of cedar cladding to help visually break up the facades. The windows facing the sea are made of aluminium to provide maximum weather protection."

Internally, large windows provide expansive views to the “Bay of Fires” and the bushland behind the house. The remote location influenced the materials to those readily available locally or otherwise easily transported to site. European fixtures and fittings add some luxury touches. When the owners pack up and return home, they do so safe in the knowledge that the beach house will look after itself until their return...

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Marlboro Music: Five Cedar-Clad Cottages, designed by HGA

Marlboro Music: Five Cedar-Clad Cottages, designed by HGA | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
These cedar-clad dwellings for music residents in Marlboro, Vt., take an iconic house form and update it with minimal detailing and a palette of local materials.

The cottages play on the 400-year-old Cape Cod typology, which features low sidewalls (a mere 7 feet tall) and steeply raked roofs. “We decided to use those classic proportions,” Soranno says, “but put a contemporary spin on the interiors and detailing.”

A simple palette of local materials—stained cedar cladding, white pine interior walls and ceilings, and slate floors—is rendered in natural finishes and with an almost compulsive lack of detail. Window and door casings—in fact, all trim—are verboten. And while the presences of chimneys is a nod to the vernacular, they don’t connect to fireplaces—instead, they conceal plumbing vents and boiler stacks.

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Building 347 Parking Garage: Bamboo + Innovation by Vittorio Lampugnani

Building 347 Parking Garage: Bamboo + Innovation by Vittorio Lampugnani | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Bamboo poles are not uncommon in construction, though they typically conjure thoughts of tropical huts and tiki torches rather than large-scale utilitarian structures. Architect Vittorio Lampugnani envisioned something quite different, however, seeing incredible promise in the sturdy, inexpensive material to bring warmth to an often overlooked, and more often unattractive, building type. When asked by Novartis to design a parking garage for its East Hanover, New Jersey, campus—his first—he came up with another first: he sheathed the six-story, 633,000-square-foot structure with precisely aligned rows of the woody stalks.

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Materials Of The Future: 7 Amazing Trends For 2014 And Beyond

Materials Of The Future: 7 Amazing Trends For 2014 And Beyond | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The history of architecture is deeply engrained in technological developments of the time. Skyscrapers would have never reached such heights without developments in steel, for example, and facades would have never slimmed down without thin-shell concrete.


In a time that is so buzzing with technological development, we cannot help but salivate a little at the material prospects for architecture that are just on the horizon. With 2014 just beginning, we want to take a moment to see what drastic innovations may be leaking into the world of architecture in the near future.

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Second Life: Using Recycled Materials For Architecture

Second Life: Using Recycled Materials For Architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Using salvaged stuff not only has a positive environmental impact by reducing waste, it also offers architects materials typically unavailable.

According to the National Association of Homebuilders, “If all the lumber used to build the 1.2 million new homes constructed in the U.S. each year were laid end to end, it would extend 2 million miles—a sobering statistic.

Dutifully sorting waste, separating the metal and plastic from the paper for different recycling streams is part of modern life. Some areas even have food waste collection for community compost.

Architects and designers are taking notice of the opportunities offered by recycling and reuse. Using salvaged materials not only has a positive environmental impact by reducing waste, it also offers architects materials typically unavailable, such as old growth lumber.

Visit the link for some prescient products and projects using recycled materials for architectural purposes.

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Amber Harsnett's curator insight, September 23, 2013 10:09 AM

I love this look of this building! It looks so organic and natural

Catherine Devin's curator insight, September 27, 2013 5:41 AM

La démarche requiert une structuration des filières de tri, collecte et recyclage sur les matériaux clefs, à une échelle industrielle et régionale si l'on veut généraliser l'emploi des matériaux recyclés et avoir un impact positif significatif sur plusieurs critères de développement durable qu'on pourrait associer au projet.

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, September 28, 2013 4:07 PM

We need to find uses for 100% of our "waste" and resources that end up in architectural structures will tend to stick around longer before being recycled yet again.

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Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability?

Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability? | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

A new breed of high-rise architecture is in the process of being born, thanks to the collaborative efforts of modern design pioneers. Envisioned as the best sustainable option for meeting world housing demands and decreasing global carbon emissions, wooden mega-structures are now one step closer to becoming a reality.


Big Wood,” a conceptual project to the eVolo 2013 Skyscraper Competition, builds on the premise that wood, when harvested responsibly, is one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and creating healthy communities. Aspiring to become one of the greenest skyscrapers in the world, Big Wood challenges the way we build our cities and promotes timber as a reliable platform to support tomorrow’s office and residential towers...

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, April 20, 2013 4:47 PM

Whoa..Chicago!

Geovanni's curator insight, May 8, 2013 9:32 AM

Fascinating place. Must of been a lot of wood to be created.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, May 13, 2013 11:44 AM
It takes around 30 years for a seedling to grow into the kind of wood that can be used in construction. A little maintenance is required during that period. Meanwhile it's soaking up CO2 and making oxygen. The only industrial processes required are to cut it down and cut it into boards and 2 x 4s. If you stagger your planting you have an endless supply.
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Adaptive Reuse + Environmental Architecture at Claremont University's New Campus

Adaptive Reuse + Environmental Architecture at Claremont University's New Campus | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This new Administrative Campus Center for the Claremont University Consortium (CUC) consolidates the majority of CUC departments and services into a single location through the adaptive re-use of an under-utilized 42,000 square feet maintenance building.


The new Center allows CUC to create a unique and vibrant work environment with a well-defined public character in an environmentally sensitive manner, and provides a collective gathering place for both the Colleges and the broader community.

The project deploys a series of intertwined, materially rich, tactical architectural elements that reprogram the existing facility and redefines its public presence. These include a continuous 740 foot long cedar screen, a custom ceiling cloud, a digital garden, and a field of 168 solar chimneys that providing natural light through the space...

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Sonoma Mountain House by Nielsen Schuh Architects

Sonoma Mountain House by Nielsen Schuh Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Sonoma Mountain House is organized to enhance this experience of drama and discovery, as an integral part of daily life.


A single fold in the uplifting roof allows the house to pan across the immediate setting, and expand outward, while embracing the upslope. A continuous deck extends the from the pool along the length of the house, bridging over the driveway to the guest house. The curved terrain drops abruptly where the guest house tower floats over the slope.

Guests arrive to find they are in the treetops. Spaces that occupy the sheltering structure are open and flowing, so that boundaries dissolve both inside and outside. Materials and finish balance comfort and refinement with the rustic setting. An exuberant structural framework knits into the forest surrounding the house...

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Climate Responsive Pavilion Uses Laminated Metal to “Bloom” in the Sun

Climate Responsive Pavilion Uses Laminated Metal to “Bloom” in the Sun | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Architecture has long been valued for its static nature and sense of permanence. Increasingly, however, architects are working to make buildings more responsive to users and to the climate.


Often this is accomplished through mechanical means, but architect Doris Kim Sung, of LA-based DOSU studio architecture, looks building materials themselves can be responsive, integrating changeability into the structure itself.

The dramatic shell-like form of her recent pavilion, Bloom, suggests, an interest in cutting-edge digital design. While this is also the case, Bloom’s true innovation happens more slowly, through the bending of 14,000 metal tiles according to heat levels generated by the sun. With an aluminum frame supporting the panels, the design is a monocoque structure with a load-bearing skin.


For Sung, Bloom is just the beginning of what responsive architecture could be. Harnessing digital technology, advanced fabrication, and new materials point to dynamic new possibilities for the discipline.

Lauren Moss's insight:

A very interesting exploration of material and technology, in the architectural context of a unique and innovative pavilion installation.

The implications of new, climate-responsive building materials are vast, and it should be fascinating to see what the future holds for their applications in the built environment...

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Living Within Nature: A Contemporary Farm House in Sweden

Living Within Nature: A Contemporary Farm House in Sweden | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

This house on the west coast of Sweden is a family retreat and is a contemporary interpretation of the vernacular Swedish farmhouse, while living in close contact with nature.


The house is clad with untreated wood on the outside that will turn grey over time. The inside of the house is more delicate. The large living room / kitchen can be opened up with large sliding glazed doors so the inside becomes part of the outside.

It's considered a "'super-normal" house that is both modern and traditional at the same time.


Visit the link for more photos of this beautiful and contextual project...

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The Rock House in Norway Adjusts to the Terrain...

The Rock House in Norway Adjusts to the Terrain... | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Rock House replaces an older building at the site and had to be well adjusted to the terrain, both in terms of shape, scale, material and color. The house and terraces are partly built upon existing stone walls, the parts of the walls which are new are made of stones from the blasting at the site. The low elongated volume is cut into to allow for wind shielded outdoor areas, embraced by the house itself. These cuts also bring down the scale of the building, and together with the local variations of the section, make the building relate to the surrounding cliff formations.

On the outer perimeter of terraces and pool, a glass fence also protects against wind, but allows for maximum view. The house is clad with Kebony wood, a sustainable process of treating the wood to allow for good durability towards the exposure to salt water...

 

View the link for more great images of the Rock House...

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Stripe House: A beautiful, efficient live/work townhouse in the Netherlands

Stripe House: A beautiful, efficient live/work townhouse in the Netherlands | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Stripe House is an energy efficient and naturally daylit home in Leiden, The Netherlands and was designed by local firm, GAAGA. Encased in a handmade plaster facade and brightly daylit from a host of windows, the compact home doubles as an office and is very energy efficient by design.


Sited on a corner lot near a park, the home does its best to make the best of the compact plot. Three stories tall, the home creates space with vertical floor area, but still retains a small garden space from which to enjoy the exterior and the neighborhood, also providing a soft transition from public to private space as well as distance from the neighboring houses.

The ground floor is used as an office, while the first and second floors are for the family. The first floor living space has an open living/kitchen floor plan, and two bedrooms and a bath are located on the top floor. A void between the living space and the bedrooms creates a connection via operable shutters.

Large windows on the the three open sides of the home are oriented towards interesting views and fill the bright white interior with natural daylight. The exterior is very tactile with a beautiful handcrafted plaster facade created with linear molds.

Beyond daylighting, the Stripe house is also a very sustainable house that scores well in several energy performance and environmental index calculations and labels- making it an efficient and beautiful example of innovative green design.


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Eco-Friendly + Energy Conscious Architecture on the Cliffs of Scotland

Eco-Friendly + Energy Conscious Architecture on the Cliffs of Scotland | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

There are no boundaries when it comes to developing extensive architectural projects that focus on alternative energy sources and environmentally friendly materials. Scotland’s climate had a lot to do with completing the project, named The Houl. The team of architects stated that their work is so impressive because it’s based on “an energy conscious design”.

The house was built by taking into account the benefits of Scotland’s windy weather. The roof is sloping at different angles and the main reason for choosing such an unusual shape for it, is the summer sun. The house makes use of natural materials, such as hardwood for the inside floors and bricks for the side façade. The Houl keeps a cozy appearance, the inside walls are painted in a luminous white, making the place more spacious and relaxing. With a stunning panoramic view, this house is simply delightful. Utterly immersed into an isolated spot, The Houl makes its inhabitants feel the sweet scent of freedom. A breezy, ventilated place for those who prefer the solitary landscapes...

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