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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Moveable Timber Shutters Modulate Light at Mantois Technology Centre, near Paris

Moveable Timber Shutters Modulate Light at Mantois Technology Centre, near Paris | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Moveable timber fins cover the top five storeys of this university technology centre by French architects Badia Berger to modulate light and shade inside.

The timber fins that cover the exterior can rotate to alter shade and light inside, and are made from heat-treated pine.The thermo-treatment improves the timber's durability and the process requires no chemicals – only heat, steam and oil," said the architects.

Mantois Technology Centre is a new centre for the science and technology departments at the Université Versailles de St Quentin en Yvelines, near Paris.

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Libeskind's Vibrant Proposal for a New Architectural Icon in Paris: the Tour Signal La Defense

Libeskind's Vibrant Proposal for a New Architectural Icon in Paris: the Tour Signal La Defense | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Every building tells a unique story reflecting both the programmatic content and the singularity of the site, and the Tour Signal La Defense proposal for Paris by In Studio Daniel Libeskind radiates a new spirit with a vibrant, sustainable, mixed-use development.

The powerful, unique icon is expressed in a dynamic volume- a reflection of the aim to create a building before its time. Two intertwined ribbons spiral together formally and programmatically, creating a tower, and open space between, with south-facing vertical gardens to act as biotopes for workers, visitors and residents.

Find more images and project details at the article link...

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Norm Miller's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:32 AM

Libesiind does it again. 

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A Parisian Restaurant Design with a Pixelated Green Facade

A Parisian Restaurant Design with a Pixelated Green Facade | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Architect Stephane Malka’s striking facade proposal for a Parisian restaurant creates an unusual site, sure to stand out in the urban setting of the city. Amidst a city of man-made concrete and glass structures could rise a building essentially comprised of an organically growing “forest.

Malka, who has experience in urban landscaping, created a green facade that wraps around a glass enclosure and is composed of raw wooden blocks arranged in a patchy, pixelating pattern. The uneven surface creates spaces for plant life to grow, spilling flourishing green plants and foliage down the building.

The textured wooden facade, which seems to actively move inward to completely engulf the glass skin, stops to reveal an expansive view of the restaurant’s interior.

Malka’s work presents passersby and restaurant customer with with the interesting paradox of nature abundantly flourishing in an urban environment...

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Rebecca Ashley Martinez's curator insight, June 8, 2013 2:29 PM

Architect Stephane Malka's work of art an urban forest....

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Preservation & Environmentally Responsive Architecture: Villa Solaire by JKA and FUGA

Preservation & Environmentally Responsive Architecture: Villa Solaire by JKA and FUGA | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Revisiting traditional construction techniques, French architecture studios JKA and FUGA have converted an 1826 farmhouse into a luxury villa. Conceived as a sundial and exposed in its four façades to the path of the sun, Villa Solaire responds to its environment while maintaining historic integrity.


Located in the district of Pied de La Plagne, Morzine, France, the volume was singled out by the municipality as a landmark for traditional architecture.  Seeking to preserve its appearance while allowing light to enter the building, the architects used a traditional technique of decorative cut-outs within the uniform wooden cladding in a simple and contemporary pattern.


"Throughout the year, the surrounding roofs and buildings cast their shadows on the façades," state the architects. "The pattern within the cladding is designed to respond to the path described by these shadows". JKA and FUGA further explain that the house was conceived as a sundial, exposed in its four façades to the path of the sun: thus the name Villa Solaire...

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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, December 29, 2012 6:12 AM

Arquitectura & Design Sustentáveis, sem fundamentalismos : Gosto!

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

Fabián Salazar Bazúa's curator insight, March 11, 2013 7:07 PM

Ejemplo de la efectividad de las nuevas técnicas de construcción. Utilizando las energias renovables y alterando construcciones ya hechas.

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École Maternelle by Eva Samuel Architects and Associates

École Maternelle by Eva Samuel Architects and Associates | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Eva Samuel Architects and Associates designed this school in Paris, France.

The building’s envelope is a response to several environmental aims: visual protection, increased natural light to counteract the surrounding solar screens, no thermal bridges, natural ventilation and double flux in winter. This school is the first to comply with the City of Paris’s climate plan. The result is a thick façade with varied reliefs – bay, alcove, and concave windows – used horizontally on the roof as skylights and to house air treatment machinery and ventilation chimneys. These multi-form elements enliven and dematerialise the façades.

The atmosphere inside the school is gentle and serene. The only colours are those of the materials themselves, such as the wood of the false ceilings and the bay windows. The façade’s thickness creates a strong sense of protection and minimises outlook from neighbouring towers. The children enjoy taking over the micro-spaces generated by the façade’s thickness, using them as mini-living rooms, for reading, tea parties, hiding, etc...

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Steel Blades Envelope Media Library by Opus 5 Architectes

Steel Blades Envelope Media Library by Opus 5 Architectes | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Paris-based office Opus 5 architectes has completed a ‘media library’ located in western France. The building is oriented in three directions, presenting different views of the structure to the surrounding area. forming a retreat away from the city, the center offers a peaceful and tranquil environment where guests can read privately or engage in collaborative work...

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Catherine Devin's curator insight, April 25, 2014 10:01 AM

Une organisation des espaces et des équipements  qui, à l'écart des rayons et archives, invite les usagers à s'installer confortablement pour lire ou à se regrouper et  travailler à plusieurs.

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Allianz Riviera Stadium by Wilmotte & Associés

Allianz Riviera Stadium by Wilmotte & Associés | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The newly-built Allianz Riviera Stadium in Nice, France, located 15-km away from Nice’s historical centre, and sitting in the heart of the Éco-Vallée of Plaine du Var, is actually comprised of three projects – a 35,000-seat multi-purpose stadium, a sports museum and an extensive, mixed real-estate development plan – all designed to meet specific environmental and urban integration requirements.

This large-scale intervention works in a coherent and intelligible manner so as to encourage urban synergy.


Largely inspired by a flying bird, the stadium’s overall shape essentially reflects the aim to reinforce the surrounding urban fabric. Likewise, shifting services like parking, underground allows for generous green spaces connecting the building to the rest of the neighborhood.

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Organic Architecture at the University of Versailles Science Library, France

Organic Architecture at the University of Versailles Science Library, France | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Paris-based architects Badia-Berger Architectes have recently completed the University of Versailles Science Library, in France- an efficient building composed of three juxtaposed volumes intersected by a series of voids.

The building acts as a connector inside the university campus, uniting the eastern sloped park and the western sporting grounds, which determines that it doesn't have a main façade, rather, a central position from which its multidirectional nature stems.

The library is comprised of three juxtaposing volumes intersected by a series of voids, which allow for abundant daylight to pour into the building, as well as creating a series of transparencies between the two connected terrains — the park and the sporting grounds. The three separate volumes harbour respectively the entry hall, the reading rooms and internal spaces. "The shape is an expression of our perception of the program and our response to the requirements of a low energy building," state architects Marie-Hélène Badia and Didier Berger, "fully acknowledging lighting and thermal comfort as well as highlighting the site's contrasts."

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Trompetista De Jazz's curator insight, March 15, 2013 12:16 PM

Organic Architecture at the University of Versailles Science Library, France

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Passive Progressive: a bamboo-clad modern farmhouse in France

Passive Progressive: a bamboo-clad modern farmhouse in France | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Among the first Passive Houses in France, this bamboo-clad farmhouse by the Parisian firm Karawitz Architecture brings a bit of green to tiny Bessancourt.

When architects Milena Karanesheva and Mischa Witzmann—the couple behind Paris-based Karawitz Architecture—decided it was time for more space, they knew that they’d have to move their private lives outside of the French capital. After much research they settled on the small town of Bessancourt, about 17 miles northwest of Paris, because it offered an easy train ride into the city and a five-minute walk to the Montmorency Forest, ideal for their two young kids. But as for the house they’d live in, as Karanesheva puts it, “We wanted to use the opportunity to experiment.”

They commenced building in 2008, with German Passive House standards as their sustainability polestar. By construction’s end they had created a 1,733-square-foot home that uses only 4,200 kilowatt-hours per year—about a tenth of what a conventionally constructed house in France might use. With no other means of heating or cooling than those generated by the structure—a tenet of Passive House design—the new home is modeled on the French country dwellings of the area. Regional aesthetic codes also made their presence felt—out went any plans for a terraced roof, in came the barnhouse slope—but the resulting bamboo-clad abstraction of a farmhouse makes a strikingly modern addition to the rural landscape...

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