sustainable archi...
Follow
Find tag "durability"
124.2K views | +20 today
sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Tasmanian Beach House: Sustainable shipping container-style architecture

Tasmanian Beach House: Sustainable shipping container-style architecture | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The Dutch owners of this beach house in Tasmania asked their architect Daniel Haskell of Haskell Architects to design a functional, efficient and inexpensive shack that was sustainable and maximised the views and environment. It also needed to be durable for extended periods while the owners were back at their base in the Netherlands. Ideally the building would appear as thought it could be picked up and removed without a trace.
In the words of architect Daniel Haskell, "The building is elevated above the sloping ground by slender steel posts and touches the ground lightly at the entrance. Externally, the building is a simple rectangular form, reminiscent of a shipping container, and clad with a simple palette of inexpensive & durable materials. The main exterior cladding was Zincalume corrugated steel primarily for economy, durability and low maintenance, with patches of cedar cladding to help visually break up the facades. The windows facing the sea are made of aluminium to provide maximum weather protection."

Internally, large windows provide expansive views to the “Bay of Fires” and the bushland behind the house. The remote location influenced the materials to those readily available locally or otherwise easily transported to site. European fixtures and fittings add some luxury touches. When the owners pack up and return home, they do so safe in the knowledge that the beach house will look after itself until their return...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Glenbrook Residence by David Jameson Architect

Glenbrook Residence by David Jameson Architect | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The concept for the Glenbrook residence was to create three distinct structures: one for the most public programs (entry space, garage and guest bedrooms), one for the most private living programs and one where “public” and private can co-exist. Each space has an outdoor terrace or some special connection to the site while the roof of the glass pavilion folds beyond one’s cone of vision to create the feeling of being outside.

The building is made of all natural materials with a 100-year lifespan and features an underground spring-fed water furnace HVAC system.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Teti Konstantinidou
Scoop.it!

Not Just For Farms: Corrugated Steel Is the Standard in Iceland For New & Old Buildings

Not Just For Farms: Corrugated Steel Is the Standard in Iceland For New & Old Buildings | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Most of Iceland's buildings appear to be clad in this basic industrial material, and it is amazing what they have done with it.

Corrugated iron and steel are the most prosaic of building materials, used in North America mostly for industrial purposes, although a few modernist architects have played with the stuff. Invented in 1828, it was used in the earliest prefabs, shipped from Britain around the world, but fell out of fashion as local building industries developed.

In Iceland, corrugated galvanized iron arrived in the 1860s; architect Pall Bjarnason says that it is a wonderful material for such a harsh climate, and that with very little maintenance it can last forever...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Sustainable Getaway in East Hampton: Northwest Peach Farm

Sustainable Getaway in East Hampton: Northwest Peach Farm | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Northwest Peach Farm is another impressive contemporary residence designed by Bates Masi Architects, this time located in East Hampton, New York, USA.

“The clients wanted this to be a gathering place for their family, full of memories for generations to come. Thus the materials were chosen not only for durability but also for their gradual changes over many years. The copper siding and roofing will slowly turn green as the weathering limestone becomes darker. However, the window system will stand the test of time unchanged. A geothermal heating and cooling system, green roofs, organic finishes, and triple glazed windows will minimize the structure’s environmental impact over the generations”.

more...
No comment yet.