sustainable architecture
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sustainable architecture
design strategies + innovative technologies that promote a sustainable built environment
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Massive Green-Roofed StreetDome Skate Park Pops Up in Denmark

Massive Green-Roofed StreetDome Skate Park Pops Up in Denmark | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

Danish architecture firm CEBRA teamed up with Glifberg+Lykke to design a multi-use park that boasts a 4,500-square-meter area for skating, parkour, boulder climbing, canoe polo and other recreational activities.

The project is part of an initiative to create a new urban space for recreation. The 1,500-square-meter dome is based on CEBRA’s igloo hall concept. Spanning over 40 meters, the design uses similar technology of previous projects, including low-cost and lightweight sports halls. It uses cheaper, off-the-shelf components often used in industrial buildings and warehouses.

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UN City by 3XN Architecture in Copenhagen

UN City by 3XN Architecture in Copenhagen | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The new regional head office of the United Nations is designed with clear references to the UN’s identity and values: It is a building that physically reaches out to all parts the world, while the sculptural staircase in its core reflects the UN’s work to create global dialogue.

Located on an artificial island the building is naturally separated from its immediate surroundings, while still being highly visible from both the city and the water.


Learn more at the article link...

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Sushma Sharma's curator insight, July 24, 2013 7:37 AM

Interesting to capture values in architecture 

Istvan Kalapacs's curator insight, July 27, 2013 3:48 AM

Modern építészet

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Sustainable Housing in Denmark by Lendager Architects

Sustainable Housing in Denmark by Lendager Architects | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Lendager Architects announced their first prize win in the competition to build the first DGNB-certified housing project in Denmark in Næstved.

DGNB is a new green building certification system expected to become the scale for sustainability in Europe. DGNB-Certification focuses on three equally weighted parameters: Environmental-, Social- and economical sustainability, for a holistic evaluation of built projects.

In total, the project will have 24 single family homes, built around a shared courtyard to encourage community and shared resources. Passive solar design with optimized window and shade placement allows for passive cooling and heating. Energy efficient design, including a tight thermal envelope with energy saving systems reduces power consumption, while rooftop photovoltaics produce electricity. Green roofs protect the home and provide further insulation. A close connection with nature and gardens encourages residents to live off the land.

As Lendager Architects told us about the project, “We wanted to answer the questions of how we can build without affecting the environment, how we can build without using new materials, how we can build houses that produce more energy than they use, and how sharing becomes a natural part of the daily life.”
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Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design

Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The house on the shore with a view of the Wadden Sea is an energy-plus house, which means that it produces more electricity and heat than it uses.


This was achieved without compromising on the exclusive qualities of a large home, including panoramic sea-views. The architecture uses clear and simple expression, open and transparent to the sea and more closed and private towards the neighbors. The unusual geometry of the volume is combined with a calm and unpretentious detailing, and a restrained material palette.

Designed with ‘passive house’ principles, the home is compact in form, with large windows facing the view to the south-west, to make optimal passive use of the sun’s heat. The angle also respects the shoreline protection zone, creating a triangular floor plan. The sloping roof is angled to optimize the performance of the solar heating cells. Passive solar heat gain is absorbed and accumulated in the interior concrete walls and floor slabs, while the south-west facing balcony and overhangs shade the facades and control the amount of seasonal solar energy. The balcony is a free-standing concrete slab completely eliminating any cold-bridging to the interior...


Read more about this contemporary and contextual green design at the article link...

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BIG's zoo makeover to offer "freest possible environment" for animals

BIG's zoo makeover to offer "freest possible environment" for animals | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
BIG presents a vision for the future of Denmark's Givskud Zoo where animals and humans "co-exist", and all the architecture is hidden within the topography.

Named Zootopia, the proposal reimagines the 1960s zoo and safari park in central Jutland as a continuous landscape of forests, savannahs and rivers that centre around a sunken courtyard of visitors' facilities. 

"It is our dream – with Givskud – to create the best possible and freest possible environment for the animals' lives and relationships with each other and visitors," said BIG, the office led by architect Bjarke Ingels.

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Catherine Devin's curator insight, August 4, 2014 3:02 AM

Comme évoqué avec l'exemple de la bicyclette, c'est aussi en créant l'occasion d'expériences plaisantes que chacun peut s'ouvrir à de nouvelles pratiques plus durables ... et partant, être prêt à écouter aussi des informations relatives à la nécessité de sobriété dans les consommations et les déchets, puis modifier son  comportement ?

Antonios Bouris's curator insight, August 7, 2014 11:13 AM

keyword: Co-existance!!!! 

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A Coastal Summer Home in Denmark

A Coastal Summer Home in Denmark | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
For his family’s summerhouse in North Zealand, Denmark, a resourceful architect goes full tilt with native wood and playful geometries.


Danish architect Jesper Brask took his time— three years, to be exact—studying the site before pounding even one nail into the summer home he built for his family. After buying an acre of densely wooded coastal land in Hald Strand—an hour’s drive from the family’s main house in North Zealand, north of Copenhagen—in 2003, he felled 150 Austrian pine trees to make way for what would become the house, to be constructed partly from the lumber. He set up a mobile sawmill and had the trees cut into planks. While the wood was curing, so too was the design scheme. “It took three years to get into the real spirit of the place— to feel the atmosphere and get the right ideas for the house,” says Brask. During that time, on their visits, the family squeezed into a 100-square-foot trailer Brask brought to the land.

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Henning Larsen Architects: Low-energy office building in Denmark

Henning Larsen Architects: Low-energy office building in Denmark | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it

The new office building of Energinet.dk in Ballerup has achieved the lowest energy class possible by means of optimizing the design and geometry. The building has an annual energy consumption of only 47,7 kWh/m2. Incorporating solar panels, ground water cooling and heat pumps in the project would further reduce the annual energy consumption.

A flexible and easily comprehensible layout consists of three elements: meeting facilities on the ground floor, a uniting atrium and workstations on the top floor, which floats above the sloping landscape.

The atrium is identity-creating, open and active. A significant part of the environmental objective has been to ensure a high degree of flexibility. The open design as well as the light walls and simple, reusable elements will make it easy to change the interior layout in the future.


Visit the link to view more images of this low-energy design in Denmark...

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The House That Wind Built

The House That Wind Built | sustainable architecture | Scoop.it
Renewable energy reigns at House of Vestas, a new LEED Platinum office building for a global wind-turbine manufacturer in Aarhus, Denmark.

It seems appropriate that renewable energy abounds at the House of Vestas, a 30,500-square-meter office building that is the anchor of the wind-turbine manufacturer Vestas Wind System’s campus in Aarhus, Denmark. A geothermal system snakes a total of 36 kilometers under a 10,000-square-meter triangular park—which links the new building to an existing building next door. The system is producing nearly 1,000 megawatts of power annually. A total of 850 square meters of photovoltaics is spread out between 350 square meters of solar hot-water heaters on the ground level, a separate installation on the roof of a southern office wing, and thin-film PVs in the skylight glass that tops the building’s central atrium. Missing from the renewable mix, however, is the backbone of Vestas’s business: wind...

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