Sustainability Science
7.8K views | +38 today
Follow
Sustainability Science
How might we keep the lights on, water flowing, and natural world vaguely intact? It starts with grabbing innovative ideas/examples to help kick down our limits and inspire a more sustainable world. We implement with rigorous science backed by hard data.
Curated by PIRatE Lab
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by PIRatE Lab from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped

Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it

"Data viz extraordinaire Max Galka created this map using NASA’s gridded population data, which counts the global population within each nine-square-mile patch of Earth, instead of within each each district, state, or country border. Out of the 28 million total cells, the ones with a population over 8,000 are colored in yellow."

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brian Weekley's curator insight, July 27, 2016 10:47 AM
Great simple map of world population.  Scroll down and look at the U.S.  It reflects the global trend.  This also has political implications, as evidenced by voting patterns in the 2012 presidential election.  Elections are dependent upon votes, which come from people, which are primarily clustered in cities.  Election campaigns would use this data to plan their schedules as to where to focus their campaigning efforts.  For the folks in Wyoming, they rarely see candidates other than during the primaries.  And these world populationclusters have been relatively consistent historically, particularly in south and east Asia.  Northern India has serious carrying capacity challenges. Notice the clusters along the Nile- evidence of arable land.
Francisco Restivo's curator insight, August 8, 2016 5:49 PM
Fantastic visualization!
David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 8, 2016 5:55 PM

Geeky-cool stuff! Thanks to Jim Lerman.

Scooped by PIRatE Lab
Scoop.it!

The future of agriculture

The future of agriculture | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
The Economist offers authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
PIRatE Lab's insight:
This well-researched article totally ignores issues of nutrition, soil health, water supply, food justice, etc.  This is an interesting read to be sure, but at times most closely tracks with big Pharma and the Monsanto-esque approach to food production that is firmly in the driver seat of our food policy these days.  Biotech approaches are truly impressive and are clearly part of the mix now and in the future.  But there are many more layers of the onion here than "simple" technofixes and whiz-bang things that appear to "solve" the hard choices and difficult decisions that are necessitated by a world of perhaps 9 billion very hungry humans.

Thanks to Rachel Langley for flagging this piece.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PIRatE Lab
Scoop.it!

After Texas stopped funding Planned Parenthood, low-income women had more babies

After Texas stopped funding Planned Parenthood, low-income women had more babies | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
The state of Texas’ sustained campaign against Planned Parenthood and other family planning clinics affiliated with abortion providers appears to have led to an increase in births among low-income women who lost access to affordable and effective birth control, a new study says.The analysis, published...
PIRatE Lab's insight:

A valuable data point in the debate about access to women's health providers.  Often we have shown reduced mortality, greater reproductive space, etc. when women are provided access to family planning resources.  We have far fewer examples showing the consequences of removing such resources once they have been established.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by PIRatE Lab from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China to end one-child policy

China to end one-child policy | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it

"All couples will now be allowed to have two children, the state-run news agency said, citing a statement from the Communist Party. The controversial policy was introduced nationally in 1979, to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate. However, concerns at China's aging population led to pressure for change."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 24, 2015 6:58 AM

Chinas change in policy can be directly attributed to the need of unskilled labor. China has become an economic superpower, by exploiting its vast resources of labor. For decades, China has had a vast reservoir of cheap labor to rely on. In recent years, that vast reservoir has begun to run dry. This new phenomenon can be traced to the governments one child policy.  The lack of multiple new births has lead to an older population. An older population can provide the type of manual labor, that China needs to compete in the global market. The government  hopes to revesre the aging trend by ending this policy. If successful, China would likely see another era of great growth within its economy.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:37 PM

Lets not forget the expansion of china also with its economic strength and its military strength which is a threat to other countries in the area because china can take control and with Chinese moving into Africa and United states as residents china is going to need to populate its own country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:55 PM

First implemented in 1979 and diminished in 2013 It is good to hear something like this has finally come to an end. Although it deemed successful by stopping the birth of an estimated 400 million babies, there were some places that allowed two children in rural areas if the first was a girl. It is assumed though that even though this is no longer a required policy, many couples may only have one child since it is accepted as a social norm. 

Scooped by PIRatE Lab
Scoop.it!

School For Husbands Gets Men To Talk About Family Size

School For Husbands Gets Men To Talk About Family Size | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
The average woman in Niger bears seven children — the world's highest birth rate. And the country can barely feed its current population. How do you convince people that smaller families are better?
PIRatE Lab's insight:

We need to pull down birth rates faster than before.  Local approaches such as this are a key part of the solution.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by PIRatE Lab from sustainability and resilience
Scoop.it!

Birth Control Enters Mainstream Concern

Birth Control Enters Mainstream Concern | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it

This week, a group of researchers promoted a different kind of global approach to addressing climate change: voluntary family planning.

Though their proposal may raise eyebrows, researchers at the Population Reference Bureau and Worldwatch Institute say what they are advocating will both empower women and preserve the environment. They recently formed a joint working group of health, climate and population experts from around the world. They are drafting a report on how family planning could be incorporated into governments' environmental policy.


Via Garry Rogers, Anita Woodruff
more...
Garry Rogers's curator insight, October 31, 2014 7:59 PM

Good.  This is long overdue.  Reducing the human population by encouraging birth control will take generations.  In the short term (like in the next five years), we must drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and we must gain control over land use practices.  

Scooped by PIRatE Lab
Scoop.it!

Family Planning Worldwide 2013 Data Sheet

PRB's Family Planning Worldwide 2013 Data Sheet provides the latest estimates of births per woman and other indicators for 150 countries, including the percentage of women using modern and traditional family planning methods, unmet need for family planning, and use of modern contraception by wealth group.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PIRatE Lab
Scoop.it!

▶ 220 years of US population changes in one map

Every ten years, the U.S. Census Bureau calculates the exact center of the American population. Vox's Danielle Kurtzleben explains what that one statistic sh...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PIRatE Lab
Scoop.it!

Field Notes: Quarry Bay, Hong Kong — Pacific Standard

Field Notes: Quarry Bay, Hong Kong — Pacific Standard | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
As part of an architectural series called Look Up, photographer Andy Yeung reveals the artistry of vertical human development and…
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by PIRatE Lab from GarryRogers Biosphere News
Scoop.it!

Meanwhile, In India: Family Planning Beyond Sterilization

Meanwhile, In India: Family Planning Beyond Sterilization | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Population Control in India GR:  Beginning in the 1950's, India has had the most proactive population control program in the world.  From quotas, and often-forced sterilization to meet them, to paid sterilization, the country has tried--and failed to control population growth.  The article below discusses some of the reasons and some of the alternative approaches. …

Via Garry Rogers
PIRatE Lab's insight:
Managing Human Population and family sizes in India in the 21st Century.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by PIRatE Lab from GarryRogers Biosphere News
Scoop.it!

Address the Cause, Not the Symptoms

Address the Cause, Not the Symptoms | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it

"We must recognize that we shot past the opportunity to stabilize our population at a sustainable level of 2 billion about 80 years ago. We must now focus on humanely reducing population on the planet. Some recognize this harsh truth, but most are focused on symptoms. The issue of overpopulation is feared, ignored, misunderstood, falsely represented and demonized by people from all political and religious persuasions. The concept of too many people using up the earth’s limited resources lies outside the parameters of the typical activist’s world. It flies in the face of current norms and doesn’t fit into society’s dominant anthropocentric worldview.

"Bindi [the photograph] is the precocious animal-loving daughter of the late Australian “crocodile hunter,” conservationist and personality Steve Irwin. Bindi was invited to submit an essay on wildlife conservation to Hillary Clinton’s e-journal. She chose to focus on the threat human overpopulation poses to wildlife. “How is it possible that our fragile planet can sustain these masses of people?” Bindi wrote. She used the analogy of too many people showing up for a party and not having enough food to go around.

"Clinton or her lackeys heavily edited the piece before publication, censoring the overpopulation angle, but the feisty Bindi would have none of it. She refused to allow the gutted essay to appear in Clinton’s journal, and instead went about publicizing how Clinton had tried to silence her."


Via Garry Rogers
more...
Garry Rogers's curator insight, December 19, 2015 6:58 PM

GR:  This is a well-written review of an excellent book on population. For Earth:  We need to act now to stop greenhouse-gas emissions, and we need to act now to begin reversing our population.

Rescooped by PIRatE Lab from sustainability and resilience
Scoop.it!

Human population growth's effects on global warming

Human population growth's effects on global warming | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Earlier this month, Pope Francis made news when he said that not only was climate change real, but it was mostly man-made. Then, last week, he said that couples do not need to breed “like rabbits” but rather should plan their families responsibly — albeit without the use of modern contraception.

Via Garry Rogers, Anita Woodruff
more...
Garry Rogers's curator insight, January 25, 2015 2:25 PM

Good.  We need more like this.  We need to delete the third-rail image from population and bring public pressure to bear on our politicians. 

V. C. Bestor's curator insight, January 26, 2015 11:25 AM

Ladies devoted to Creation can save species from humans: the Garden of Eden has elbow room for all God's critters. 

Scooped by PIRatE Lab
Scoop.it!

For Babies, Preterm Birth Is Now The No. 1 Cause Of Death

For Babies, Preterm Birth Is Now The No. 1 Cause Of Death | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
For the first time, the single greatest threat to a newborn's life is not a specific disease. Rather, it's the fact of being born prematurely.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PIRatE Lab
Scoop.it!

▶ Gains and Gaps: No Ceilings Data Visualization - YouTube

At the 10th Annual Meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative, No Ceilings: The Full Participation Project previewed a data visualization video that highlighte...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PIRatE Lab
Scoop.it!

How Ethiopia solved its abortion problem

How Ethiopia solved its abortion problem | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
A generation ago, botched abortions were the single biggest contributor to Ethiopia’s sky-high maternal mortality rate. Then, the country liberalized its abortion law.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

We see time and time again, clear benefits to open and cheap access to modern family planning.

 

This is true despite the best efforts of those who would for political or other reasons prefer it to be otherwise.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by PIRatE Lab from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.

 

Why do commentators, like Chicken Little, treat this worldwide trend as a disaster, even collective suicide? It could be because declines in fertility rates stir anxieties about power: national, military and economic, as well as sexual. In reality, slower population growth creates enormous possibilities for human flourishing. In an era of irreversible climate change and the lingering threat from nuclear weapons, it is simply not the case that population equals power, as so many leaders have believed throughout history. Lower fertility isn’t entirely a function of rising prosperity and secularism; it is nearly universal.


Via Seth Dixon
PIRatE Lab's insight:

This op-ed from the New York Times provides excellent material for discussing demographic issues, especially regarding declining populations.  Many countries do fear the demographic uncertainty and are actively encouraging pro-natalist policies (with salacious ads such as Singapore's National Night and a Travel agency's 'Do it for Denmark' campaign).  The author of this article though, seeks to quell those fears.  

more...
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:18 PM

The dwindling birth rates may be seen as negative to some in a sense of power insecurities, but the reality is that it is great for economic growth and prevents population issues. With high birth rates, movement tends to be higher towards immigration while low birth rates mainly have movement towards urban spaces.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:35 PM

Unit 2

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, October 12, 2016 8:51 AM
After reading this article, do you agree or disagree?  Remember, be specific with your arguments.