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How might we keep the lights on, water flowing, and natural world vaguely intact? It starts with grabbing innovative ideas/examples to help kick down our limits and inspire a more sustainable world. We implement with rigorous science backed by hard data.
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A fungal virus threatens 80% of the global banana production—far more than a previous strain in the early 1900s

A fungal virus threatens 80% of the global banana production—far more than a previous strain in the early 1900s | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it

During harvest last year, banana farmers in Jordan and Mozambique made a chilling discovery. Their plants were no longer bearing the soft, creamy fruits they'd been growing for decades. When they cut open the roots of their banana plants, they saw something that was turning banana plants into a rotting mass. 

 

Scientists first discovered the fungus that is turning banana plants into this rotting mass in Southeast Asia in the 1990s. Since then the pathogen, known as the Tropical Race 4 strain of Panama disease, has slowly but steadily ravaged export crops throughout Asia. The fact that this vicious soil-borne fungus has now made the leap to Mozambique and Jordan is frightening. One reason is that it’s getting closer to Latin America, where at least 70% of the world’s $8.9-billion-a-year worth of exported bananas is grown.

 

 

Chiquita, the $548-million fruit giant with the world’s largest banana market share, is downplaying the risk. ”It’s certainly not an immediate threat to banana production in Latin America [where Chiquita's crops are],” Ed Lloyd, spokesman for Chiquita, told the Charlotte Business Journal in late December, explaining that the company is using a “risk-mitigation program” to approach the potential spread.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
PIRatE Lab's insight:

For more about banana's see Dan Koeppel's Blog: http://www.bananabook.org

 

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Christian Allié's curator insight, March 8, 2014 4:01 AM

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......  And at $8.9 billion, bananas grown for export are only a fraction of the $44.1 billion in annual banana and plantain production—in fact, bananas are the fourth-most valuable global crop after rice, wheat, and milk. Where are the rest of those bananas sold? Nearly nine-tenths of the world’s bananas are eaten in poor countries, where at least 400 million people rely on them for 15-27% of their daily calories. And that’s the really scary part. Since the first Panama disease outbreak, bananas have evolved from snacks into vital sustenance. And this time there’s no back-up banana variety to feed the world with instead. .

 

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Agriculture and economy's comment, March 8, 2014 5:57 AM
Commentaire très instructif. . Après les problèmes du café, du cacao... Risques pour la sécurité alimentaire de nombreux pays et risques sociaux en vue ?
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Bangladesh Tragedy Reinforces Need for Corporate Action to Ensure Health and Safety in Supply Chains

Bangladesh Tragedy Reinforces Need for Corporate Action to Ensure Health and Safety in Supply Chains | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it

Today, on International Workers’ Day, an international celebration of the labour movement, the UN Global Compact is urging companies to step up efforts and engage in the fight to improve occupational health and safety standards.


Via EcoVadis
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EcoVadis's curator insight, May 8, 2013 10:25 AM

An interesting move from the United Global Compact to focus on down-to-earth CSR issues and advocate for the adoption of better health safety standards in the supply chain. This is a little reactive after major incidents such as the one at the Tazreen factory fire and Rana Plaza factory collapse that led to a 800+ death toll (not 400 as mentioned), but welcome.