Sustainability Science
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Sustainability Science
How might we keep the lights on, water flowing, and natural world vaguely intact? It starts with grabbing innovative ideas/examples to help kick down our limits and inspire a more sustainable world. We implement with rigorous science backed by hard data.
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China to end one-child policy

China to end one-child policy | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it

"All couples will now be allowed to have two children, the state-run news agency said, citing a statement from the Communist Party. The controversial policy was introduced nationally in 1979, to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate. However, concerns at China's aging population led to pressure for change."


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 24, 2015 6:58 AM

Chinas change in policy can be directly attributed to the need of unskilled labor. China has become an economic superpower, by exploiting its vast resources of labor. For decades, China has had a vast reservoir of cheap labor to rely on. In recent years, that vast reservoir has begun to run dry. This new phenomenon can be traced to the governments one child policy.  The lack of multiple new births has lead to an older population. An older population can provide the type of manual labor, that China needs to compete in the global market. The government  hopes to revesre the aging trend by ending this policy. If successful, China would likely see another era of great growth within its economy.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:37 PM

Lets not forget the expansion of china also with its economic strength and its military strength which is a threat to other countries in the area because china can take control and with Chinese moving into Africa and United states as residents china is going to need to populate its own country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:55 PM

First implemented in 1979 and diminished in 2013 It is good to hear something like this has finally come to an end. Although it deemed successful by stopping the birth of an estimated 400 million babies, there were some places that allowed two children in rural areas if the first was a girl. It is assumed though that even though this is no longer a required policy, many couples may only have one child since it is accepted as a social norm. 

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Tsunami in Japan 2011

This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami n Kesennuma, Japan. The arthquake and subsequent tsunami caused catastrophic damage, although many were able to survive on the high-rise rooftop (like the videographer).  Much like a tsunami, the video starts out slow with only alarm bells, but at around the 2:20 minute mark the first sign of the small wave makes its way up the river, with onlookers unsure of the magnitude of the impending damage.  The riverbanks are breached at 7:43.  By 14 minutes, the debris and wreckage is massive, and the quantity of water flooding in is still growing.  The last 6 minutes shows the waters receding, but the impact of the tsunami still spreads as fires spread through town. For a full documentary on the tsunami, click here.  I surely hope that no one reading ever gets a closer look at what a tsunami looks like in person.  This time lapse is an audiovisual representation of global seismic activityputs the Japanese tsunami into it proper context (wait for the dramatic event at the 1:45 mark).


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 1:52 PM

So, I will never forget this morning because my brother was living in Japan at the time and I remember getting a text from him saying "we are ok."  My brother is a bit of a jokester so I figured he had something up his sleeve, however, when I woke up and heard of the destruction, I was so relieved to know he and his family were safe.  For the next month my brother flew rescue missions and brought water and food to the survivors.  He had taken hundred of pictures, and I was able to witness first hand how devastating the tsunami had been.  My heart still goes out to those people, and I am forever grateful that my brother is alive and well.