Sustainability in Higher Ed
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The Solution under Our Feet: How Regenerative Organic Agriculture Can Save the Planet

The Solution under Our Feet: How Regenerative Organic Agriculture Can Save the Planet | Sustainability in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Many of us are now choosing to eat holistically grown foods. We want:• more nutrition from our food.• to avoid toxic pesticides and GMOs.• to create safer conditions for farmers and rur

Via Wes Thomas
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The Department of Change: 2013: Resilience vs. campus sustainability?

The Department of Change: 2013: Resilience vs. campus sustainability? | Sustainability in Higher Ed | Scoop.it

Has “sustainability” run its course? Is it time for the Next Big Thing? 

So now what? Is it time for the Next Big Thing?  Has “sustainability” run its course? Before we think about that, what has sustainability accomplished? Well, on campuses at least, there are more courses, majors, schools, colleges and certificates in sustainability than ever; fairly rapid growth because many students want to learn about it. More campuses are offering sustainability curricula. More students are signing up for these classes. This is no small feat and a very hopeful sign. Likewise, campus carbon emissions are moderating or even going down. Green buildings are going up. Zero waste efforts are also on the rise. Local food programs/campus gardens are taking root. Renewable energy is up. And we are getting better at measuring all these impacts (STARS!). Great environmental improvements. Yet missing from the list of sustainability’s accomplishments are two important categories: fiscal equity and social justice.

 


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Sustainability in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


Via Seth Dixon
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone