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Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities
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Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from Modern Ruins, Decay and Urban Exploration
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How Rust Became the New Urban Luxury Item

How Rust Became the New Urban Luxury Item | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

Ok, I love rusted, storied pieces of history, and I love the hue of rust, but here's the piece worth perusing. " Everyone knows that the ghost of urban decay is as crucial to the High Line’s appeal as fancy design, if not more so. (click though for more...)


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MAPS: What Your State Is Good At, And What It's Lame At

MAPS: What Your State Is Good At, And What It's Lame At | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
Who could ever have guessed that about Delaware?!

 

Just when you thought you knew everything about a red state or a blue state, these cool maps show that each state is No. 1 in some kind of environmental or public health initiative. (Btdubs, can someone from Michigan explain what an Asian carp is?!)


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Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
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Five Keys to Finding Success on Kickstarter for Sustainable Food Entrepreneurs

Five Keys to Finding Success on Kickstarter for Sustainable Food Entrepreneurs | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
Over its three year life span, Kickstarter, a crowdfunded donation site, has become quite the boon for sustainable agriculture entrepreneurs, raising $9.1 million in funding for 846 food projects[1].

http://seedstock.com/2012/09/17/five-keys-to-finding-success-on-kickstarter-for-sustainable-food-entrepreneurs/


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Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from World Environment Nature News
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Blue and green honey makes French beekeepers see red

Blue and green honey makes French beekeepers see red | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
Bees at a cluster of apiaries in France have been producing honey in mysterious shades of blue and green, alarming their keepers who now blame residue from containers of M&M's candy.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from Trends in Sustainability
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In a climate-crazed world, how can we plan for the future?

In a climate-crazed world, how can we plan for the future? | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

Making decisions about how and where to invest limited resources is always difficult, especially with a group of diverse stakeholders. It’s more difficult when, as in the case of infrastructure like bridges, sea walls, and sewer systems, the effects of the decisions can extend out for decades, even centuries. And it’s more difficult still when future conditions are subject to what I discussed in a previous post as “deep uncertainty."

 

Deep uncertainty involves two basic conditions. First, the models we use to anticipate future conditions produce a wide range of scenarios of equal (or indeterminate) likelihood. There are, to quote my current favorite World Bank white paper, “multiple possible future worlds without known relative probabilities.” And second, stakeholders have divergent worldviews and irreconcilable differences about what counts as success, or an appropriate level of risk.


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'Frozen air' could heat up renewable energy

'Frozen air' could heat up renewable energy | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

"The journey to a cooler, greener planet may start with a breath of fresh air, suggests a battery technology under development that could rap...


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A second, clean energy revolution in the North Sea"

A second, clean energy revolution in the North Sea" | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
Over forty organisations have joined forces to set out a long-term vision for the deployment of offshore wind in the northern seas and the economic opportunities this presents. These include world-leading manufacturers, cutting-edge developers, supply-chain firms, researchers and industry-bodies.

 

The new network – called norstec – was first announced by the Prime Minister in April and brought together around 20 companies. Today, with its ranks more than doubled and numbers continuing to grow, the network has held its first full meeting in London centred around this vision and the role that norstec can play in maximising the potential of the northern seas’ abundant resources.


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DailyGood: Guerilla Gardener Plants Joy in Potholes

DailyGood: Guerilla Gardener Plants Joy in Potholes | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
They're the bane of cyclists and motorists alike, but one urban gardener has grown a fondness for potholes after deciding to spruce up cities around Europe by filling them up with miniature flower arrangements.

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Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from YOUR FOOD, YOUR ENVIRONMENT, YOUR HEALTH: #Biotech #GMOs #Pesticides #Chemicals #FactoryFarms #CAFOs #BigFood
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Agriculture causes 80% of tropical deforestation - The Terrible Price We Pay

Agriculture causes 80% of tropical deforestation - The Terrible Price We Pay | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

Agriculture is the direct driver of roughly 80 percent of tropical deforestation, while logging is the biggest single driver of forest degradation, says a new report funded by the British and Norwegian governments.

September 27, 2012 - Mongabay http://news.mongabay.com/2012/0927-drivers-of-deforestation.html

 

SEE: Fast-Tracking Our Own Extinction THE DEFORESTATION HOLOCAUST AND PALM OIL ECOCIDE http://www.scoop.it/t/biodiversity-is-life/p/1510545458/fast-tracking-our-own-extinction-the-deforestation-holocaust-and-palm-oil-ecocide

 

VIDEO: USA Majestic Forests in Oregon, at Risk from Timber Industry and Chemical Spraying http://www.scoop.it/t/biodiversity-is-life/p/2674358899/video-usa-majestic-forests-in-oregon-at-risk-from-timber-industry-and-chemical-spraying

 

SEE: GMO Trees - Eradicating Real Forests to plant Monoculture BioEngineered Trees http://www.scoop.it/t/biodiversity-is-life/p/2568524705/gmo-trees-eradicating-real-forests-to-plant-monoculture-bioengineered-treesAgriculture

 

WATCH: "MOTHER TREE" - How Trees Communicate http://www.scoop.it/t/biodiversity-is-life/p/2827188209/mother-tree-video-how-do-trees-communicate


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Virtual Water: Motion Graphics

Virtual Water: Motion Graphics | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

Most of the water we use - 92 % of it - is used in food production. Most of this water is managed by the world’s farmers. With the help of science and technology they have performed greater and greater miracles in improving water productivity – in getting more crops per drop.

The good news is that each one of us can also make the world a little more water secure, ready to face the needs of our peak population future.

The answer lies in our shopping baskets...


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Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from "Environmental, Climate, Global warming, Oil, Trash, recycling, Green, Energy"
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Our iPhones Are Depleting the Earth's Resources [INFOGRAPHIC]

Our iPhones Are Depleting the Earth's Resources [INFOGRAPHIC] | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
This infographic takes a look at this troubling technology trend, which is depleting the planet's supply of Rare Earth Elements.

Via Efraim Silver, ABroaderView
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How Green Was My Lawn

How Green Was My Lawn | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
Environmentalism, which became a prominent issue after the publication of “Silent Spring” in 1962, has lost its once enthusiastic backing.
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Cleantech News Roundup for September 22-23, 2012

One of the highlights in my week: the arrival of "Clean tech news roundup -- from around the web for your weekend reading pleasure" by Jaymi Heimbuch of @treehugger. Clik on header to reach all stories TGIF

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Blue and green honey makes French beekeepers see red

Blue and green honey makes French beekeepers see red | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
Bees at a cluster of apiaries in France have been producing honey in mysterious shades of blue and green, alarming their keepers who now blame residue from containers of M&M's candy.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from GMO GM Articles Research Links
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Monsanto fails at attempt to explain away tumors caused by GM corn

Monsanto fails at attempt to explain away tumors caused by GM corn | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
Monsanto's efforts to dismiss new evidence linking its genetically modified (GM) corn to tumors has been thoroughly debunked in a public briefing by the food sustainability nonprofit Earth Open Source.

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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon, Laura Stevenson-Wood
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from Sustainable ⊜ Smart Path
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Map of the Day: Where Americans Use the Most Oil

Map of the Day: Where Americans Use the Most Oil | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
3.5 percent of U.S. counties consume more than 10 percent of the nation's oil.

 

America consumes a lot of energy. Counties play a large role in this overall consumption — and many of them contain large cities like Los Angeles and Chicago.

 

Deron Lovaas, the federal transportation policy director for the Natural Resources Defense Council, posted a map charting oil consumption by county on the NRDC staff blog Thursday.

The map is the product of a joint research effort of the NRDC, the Sierra Club, and the League of Conservation Voters to identify the most oil dependent locations across the United States.

 

As shown in the map (and accompanying list of national averages), oil consumption is geographically uneven and highly concentrated. Lovaas notes that "just 108 counties out of the nation's 3,144, or about 3.5 percent of the total consume more than 10 percent of the nation's oil." Not surprisingly, Los Angeles county had the most annual oil consumption, at nearly 1.9 billion gallons in 2010. Harris county, Texas, follows with 1.7 billion gallons, and Cook county, Illinois, takes third with 1.6 billion.


Via Lauren Moss, Paul Aneja - eTrends
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Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies

Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
Two things never seem to change about crude oil: the constant warnings that our thirst for it is unsustainable, and the fact that we continue to use it...

 

These two troubling trends are issues which should be dealt with, and quickly, as this intriguing motion graphic from The Post Carbon Institute points out.
They make the case that in recent years the political rhetoric has increased, pointing to so-called “new” technologies as solutions to the un-sustainability of fossil fuels. One such technology, fracking, aims high pressure water and chemicals into our soils, releasing both oil and natural gasses. In fact an old technology, a multitude of problems arise from its use, not least of which is the pollution of ground waters and the destabilization of soils resulting in earthquakes in previously stable areas. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the technology is expensive to use and only begins to makes sense financially in a world with high enough fuel prices – the world of today.


Isn’t it time we start getting realistic about our true fuel situation? Watch the video at the link for more information, then check out The Post Carbon Institute to show your support...


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Brad Wells's curator insight, October 21, 2014 12:43 PM

This is info-packed...

Alex

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Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from YOUR FOOD, YOUR ENVIRONMENT, YOUR HEALTH: #Biotech #GMOs #Pesticides #Chemicals #FactoryFarms #CAFOs #BigFood
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When Governments Work For the Corporation: #GMOs, pesticides, and the new scientific deadlock

When Governments Work For the Corporation: #GMOs, pesticides, and the new scientific deadlock | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

A new study says GMO crops have led farmers to use 400 million more pounds of pesticide than they would have otherwise. Here's how to interpret the science -- and the critique. http://grist.org/food/superweeds-story/


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Cleantech News Roundup for October 6-7, 2012

Morning coffee-worthy tech news from around the web for your weekend reading pleasure. By Jaymi Heimbuch

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Deaths fails to stem widespread pesticide use in UAE

Deaths fails to stem widespread pesticide use in UAE | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

Residents in the UAE are still using pesticides despite the increasing number of deaths and poisonings across the country...

http://www.thenational.ae/news/uae-news/death-fails-to-stem-use-of-pesticides-in-uae?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=Daily%2BNewsletter%2B29-09-2012


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Renewable Energy Realities: US Energy Transparency Infographic

Renewable Energy Realities: US Energy Transparency Infographic | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

Renewable energy enjoys broad support in the US where people expect the government to support emerging clean power technologies- Americans more concerned about the state of the economy than the threat of climate change: 41% of respondents ranked climate change in the lowest category as a threat facing the world and 51% ranked the economic recession in the highest category in the recent 2012 Global Consumer Wind Study.

When asked to what extent does the electric utility industry cause human-action induced climate changes, 32% of GCWS respondents answered to a certain degree and 39% answered to a high or very high degree.

The overwhelming majority (67%) of respondents said that they would prefer to have their electricity sources supplied by renewables, versus 9% for fossil fuels and 8% for nuclear.

78% of respondents said that they would prefer to see renewables such as wind, solar, hydro, biomass and geothermal developed over the next five years.

To see this information and learn more, view the infographic, as well as visit links shared at the complete article...


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Change the World Without Losing Yourself

Change the World Without Losing Yourself | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

A hundred years ago, people didn't talk about changing the world — not in the way we speak of it today. In 1912, there weren't movements for the eradication of poverty or disease, or even an understanding of their scale. Then came Woodrow Wilson's dream of the League of Nations, Eleanor Roosevelt, and the formation of the United Nations. From there, Gandhi, the civil rights movement, and speeches by President and Robert Kennedy that declared, "We need men who dream of things that never were," and that spoke of "a new world society." There was Martin Luther King's "I have a dream" speech, delivered at the age of 34, and Neil Armstrong walking on the surface of the moon at the age of 38. Their youth brought a feeling of youthfulness to humanity itself, and gave people the sense that nothing is impossible.


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Coral Reefs: Under Threat & Why We Need Them. {Video}

Coral Reefs: Under Threat & Why We Need Them. {Video} | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
More than 60 percent of the world’s reefs are currently threatened by local human activities.
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How ‘Silent Spring’ Ignited the Environmental Movement

How ‘Silent Spring’ Ignited the Environmental Movement | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

History of the  Enviromental movement: A must read!


What was it that allowed Rachel Carson to capture the public imagination and to forge America’s environmental consciousness?

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