Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities
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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon, Laura Stevenson-Wood
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies

Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
Two things never seem to change about crude oil: the constant warnings that our thirst for it is unsustainable, and the fact that we continue to use it...

 

These two troubling trends are issues which should be dealt with, and quickly, as this intriguing motion graphic from The Post Carbon Institute points out.
They make the case that in recent years the political rhetoric has increased, pointing to so-called “new” technologies as solutions to the un-sustainability of fossil fuels. One such technology, fracking, aims high pressure water and chemicals into our soils, releasing both oil and natural gasses. In fact an old technology, a multitude of problems arise from its use, not least of which is the pollution of ground waters and the destabilization of soils resulting in earthquakes in previously stable areas. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the technology is expensive to use and only begins to makes sense financially in a world with high enough fuel prices – the world of today.


Isn’t it time we start getting realistic about our true fuel situation? Watch the video at the link for more information, then check out The Post Carbon Institute to show your support...


Via Lauren Moss
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Brad Wells's curator insight, October 21, 2014 12:43 PM

This is info-packed...

Alex

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