Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities
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Charting Anticipated Solar Power Prices through 2025

Charting Anticipated Solar Power Prices through 2025 | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
A new survey of experts shows solar power will become much cheaper through 2025, while expanding greatly, but for these trends to continue for the long term will require a commitment to funding research.
Prices for solar modules—the part of solar panels that produce electricity—will continue to fall, in line with the long-term trend since 1980, according to a survey of experts by Near Zero, a nonprofit energy research organization.
To get a sense of what future prices for solar power are likely to be, as well as other challenges and bottlenecks that the industry faces, Near Zero conducted a formal, quantitative survey from leaders in the industry, universities, and national labs, as a means of formally collecting expert judgments on a topic. By aggregating forecasts made independently by a variety of experts, these results reflect the collective wisdom of the group about how the solar power industry is most likely to develop, and also help to characterize the range of uncertainty about the future...
Via Lauren Moss
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Renewable Energy Realities: US Energy Transparency Infographic

Renewable Energy Realities: US Energy Transparency Infographic | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

Renewable energy enjoys broad support in the US where people expect the government to support emerging clean power technologies- Americans more concerned about the state of the economy than the threat of climate change: 41% of respondents ranked climate change in the lowest category as a threat facing the world and 51% ranked the economic recession in the highest category in the recent 2012 Global Consumer Wind Study.

When asked to what extent does the electric utility industry cause human-action induced climate changes, 32% of GCWS respondents answered to a certain degree and 39% answered to a high or very high degree.

The overwhelming majority (67%) of respondents said that they would prefer to have their electricity sources supplied by renewables, versus 9% for fossil fuels and 8% for nuclear.

78% of respondents said that they would prefer to see renewables such as wind, solar, hydro, biomass and geothermal developed over the next five years.

To see this information and learn more, view the infographic, as well as visit links shared at the complete article...


Via Lauren Moss
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