Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities
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Charting Anticipated Solar Power Prices through 2025

Charting Anticipated Solar Power Prices through 2025 | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
A new survey of experts shows solar power will become much cheaper through 2025, while expanding greatly, but for these trends to continue for the long term will require a commitment to funding research.
Prices for solar modules—the part of solar panels that produce electricity—will continue to fall, in line with the long-term trend since 1980, according to a survey of experts by Near Zero, a nonprofit energy research organization.
To get a sense of what future prices for solar power are likely to be, as well as other challenges and bottlenecks that the industry faces, Near Zero conducted a formal, quantitative survey from leaders in the industry, universities, and national labs, as a means of formally collecting expert judgments on a topic. By aggregating forecasts made independently by a variety of experts, these results reflect the collective wisdom of the group about how the solar power industry is most likely to develop, and also help to characterize the range of uncertainty about the future...
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Infographic: How Much Money Will Solar Panels Save?

Infographic: How Much Money Will Solar Panels Save? | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

Even as more affordable photovoltaics and government incentives for adopting renewable energy sources have made solar a financially attractive alternative in some areas, it can still be hard to find accurate, easy-to-understand information to help make the leap. The Solar Tool, developed by the Sustainable Design Lab at MIT and Boston-based design workshop MoDe Studio, aims to solve that problem for the city of Cambridge. Simply enter your address, and a comprehensive satellite map of Cambridge shows you how efficient your own

rooftop is for soaking up the sun’s rays, from excellent to poor, down to the square meter.


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Center for Solar Energy & Hydrogen Research in Stuttgart

Center for Solar Energy & Hydrogen Research in Stuttgart | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

The new research building in Stuttgart is designed on a grid for a highly flexible workplace that serves as a dynamic framework for ongoing research activities. The Center for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research comprises offices, laboratories, meeting and conference facilities.

“The grid structure of the research centre ensures a high degree of mobility and freedom to change and expand the building”, explains Design Director Louis Becker, Henning Larsen Architects. “The building has a rational design and is organised in modules. 

Carefully integrated into the surrounding context, the building features various heights that relate to the city and adjacent buildings. The building will create a new, distinctive entrance to Stuttgarter Engineering Park and provide an insight into the ongoing research.


Read the complete article for details on the sustainable strategies and technologies utilzied in the design of this flexible, adaptable and green research building...


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Renewable Energy Realities: US Energy Transparency Infographic

Renewable Energy Realities: US Energy Transparency Infographic | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

Renewable energy enjoys broad support in the US where people expect the government to support emerging clean power technologies- Americans more concerned about the state of the economy than the threat of climate change: 41% of respondents ranked climate change in the lowest category as a threat facing the world and 51% ranked the economic recession in the highest category in the recent 2012 Global Consumer Wind Study.

When asked to what extent does the electric utility industry cause human-action induced climate changes, 32% of GCWS respondents answered to a certain degree and 39% answered to a high or very high degree.

The overwhelming majority (67%) of respondents said that they would prefer to have their electricity sources supplied by renewables, versus 9% for fossil fuels and 8% for nuclear.

78% of respondents said that they would prefer to see renewables such as wind, solar, hydro, biomass and geothermal developed over the next five years.

To see this information and learn more, view the infographic, as well as visit links shared at the complete article...


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