Towards A Sustain...
Follow
Find tag "oil"
4.3K views | +0 today
Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Susan Davis Cushing
Scoop.it!

Shell sought to influence direction of Science Museum climate programme

Shell sought to influence direction of Science Museum climate programme | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it

Sunday 31 May 2015 15.17 EDT

by Terry Macalister


"Shell tried to influence the presentation of a climate change program(me) it was sponsoring at the Science Museum in London, internal documents seen by the Guardian show...


.....A recent book argued that fossil fuel companies were sponsoring the arts around the world on an “epidemic” scale as a cynical PR strategy to improve their reputation."


Click on image for full story and links.


Susan Davis Cushing's insight:

Energy is money. As sponsorship information and caveats begin to leak out publicly, can anyone really say they didn't see the environment funding conundrum unfolding? We, as artists, scientists and fundraisers, have used and depended on the fossil fuel corporations for decades.


How now do create bridges and solutions in positive and proactive manner to save our punctured planet?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies

Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
Two things never seem to change about crude oil: the constant warnings that our thirst for it is unsustainable, and the fact that we continue to use it...

 

These two troubling trends are issues which should be dealt with, and quickly, as this intriguing motion graphic from The Post Carbon Institute points out.
They make the case that in recent years the political rhetoric has increased, pointing to so-called “new” technologies as solutions to the un-sustainability of fossil fuels. One such technology, fracking, aims high pressure water and chemicals into our soils, releasing both oil and natural gasses. In fact an old technology, a multitude of problems arise from its use, not least of which is the pollution of ground waters and the destabilization of soils resulting in earthquakes in previously stable areas. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the technology is expensive to use and only begins to makes sense financially in a world with high enough fuel prices – the world of today.


Isn’t it time we start getting realistic about our true fuel situation? Watch the video at the link for more information, then check out The Post Carbon Institute to show your support...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Brad Wells's curator insight, October 21, 2014 12:43 PM

This is info-packed...

Alex

a

Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from Sustainable ⊜ Smart Path
Scoop.it!

Map of the Day: Where Americans Use the Most Oil

Map of the Day: Where Americans Use the Most Oil | Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities | Scoop.it
3.5 percent of U.S. counties consume more than 10 percent of the nation's oil.

 

America consumes a lot of energy. Counties play a large role in this overall consumption — and many of them contain large cities like Los Angeles and Chicago.

 

Deron Lovaas, the federal transportation policy director for the Natural Resources Defense Council, posted a map charting oil consumption by county on the NRDC staff blog Thursday.

The map is the product of a joint research effort of the NRDC, the Sierra Club, and the League of Conservation Voters to identify the most oil dependent locations across the United States.

 

As shown in the map (and accompanying list of national averages), oil consumption is geographically uneven and highly concentrated. Lovaas notes that "just 108 counties out of the nation's 3,144, or about 3.5 percent of the total consume more than 10 percent of the nation's oil." Not surprisingly, Los Angeles county had the most annual oil consumption, at nearly 1.9 billion gallons in 2010. Harris county, Texas, follows with 1.7 billion gallons, and Cook county, Illinois, takes third with 1.6 billion.


Via Lauren Moss, Paul Aneja - eTrends
more...
No comment yet.