Sustainability and Gardens
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Sustainability and Gardens
Greening and gardening, hand in hand
Curated by David Andersen
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Experimental Landscapes: Alexander Felson on Ecology and Design

Experimental Landscapes: Alexander Felson on Ecology and Design | Sustainability and Gardens | Scoop.it
Urban ecologist Alexander Felson proposes a new kind of ecological practice, one that moves from analyzing nature to shaping it and embeds scientific experiments into the design process.

Via Donovan Gillman
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Donovan Gillman's curator insight, April 16, 2013 3:48 AM

Ecological Urbanism at work - actual experiment are needed to find out what the future possibilites of the urban field are - Design as Research rather than a previsualised result.

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The Green Pine Garden / Scenic Architecture | ArchDaily

The Green Pine Garden / Scenic Architecture | ArchDaily | Sustainability and Gardens | Scoop.it
Courtesy of Scenic Architecture Architects: Scenic Architecture Location: Qingpu, Shanghai Architect In Charge: Scenic Architecture Design Team: Zhu.
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Water sensitive design: integrating water with urban planning

Water sensitive design: integrating water with urban planning | Sustainability and Gardens | Scoop.it

Water has become a risk rather than an opportunity in our cities and that must change.


At Ecobuild, Professor Tony Wong, chief executive of the Cooperative Research Centre for Water Sensitive Cities, spoke about the steady progression up the agenda of water sensitive urban design (WSUD) in Australia. Successive years of flooding and some of the worst droughts in history have threatened the health and wellbeing of the population and nearly brought industry grinding to a halt, prompting the government to think differently about water.

A new report published in March reinterprets the WSUD concept and its concludes: for too long, we have been designing water out of our cities when we should have been designing it in.


For example, sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) – the creation of ponds, wetlands, swales and basins that mimic natural drainage – can be a cost-effective way to prevent surface flooding while creating valuable public amenities. But we need to go further and join the dots between flood risk management and water resource management, and put water at the heart of discussions about what makes places great to live...


Via Lauren Moss
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Noor Fatima's curator insight, April 20, 2013 10:10 AM

impotant 

Keith Thorogood's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:31 PM

Water resource management.

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9 Essential Green Elements For Cities Wanting To Be Sustainable | EarthTechling

9 Essential Green Elements For Cities Wanting To Be Sustainable | EarthTechling | Sustainability and Gardens | Scoop.it
What really makes for a green or sustainable city? And how can sometimes highly diverse urban areas attain it?

Via Donovan Gillman
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Donovan Gillman's curator insight, April 16, 2013 8:26 AM

The reality of what it means for an urban district or an entrire city to be sustainable goes beyond "Green Buildings" or even green neighborhoods and encompassss many more concepts and relationships to SUSTAIN them over time. Here a take on this problem and what is required. _ I prefer not to use the "G" word as it is as loaded and ambiguous as the "S" word - still we have to use words that we sort of know what we are talkiing about to each other.

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Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability?

Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability? | Sustainability and Gardens | Scoop.it

A new breed of high-rise architecture is in the process of being born, thanks to the collaborative efforts of modern design pioneers. Envisioned as the best sustainable option for meeting world housing demands and decreasing global carbon emissions, wooden mega-structures are now one step closer to becoming a reality.


“Big Wood,” a conceptual project to the eVolo 2013 Skyscraper Competition, builds on the premise that wood, when harvested responsibly, is one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and creating healthy communities. Aspiring to become one of the greenest skyscrapers in the world, Big Wood challenges the way we build our cities and promotes timber as a reliable platform to support tomorrow’s office and residential towers...


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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 20, 2013 11:38 AM

The Case For Tall Wood                               Michael Green Architecture

I find this hard to truly picture, but the story is solid...."the last century there has been no reason to challenge steel and concrete as the essential structural materials of large buildings. Climate change now demands that we do.....Wood is the most significant building material we use today that is grown by the sun. When harvested responsibly, wood is arguably one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and storing carbon in our buildings."

 

“I’d put my money on solar energy…I hope we don’t have to wait till oil and coal run out before we tackle that.”
~Thomas Edison, In conversation with Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone March 1931

 

http://mg-architecture.ca/portfolio/tallwood/

 

 

“Known as the birthplace of the skyscraper, Chicago is an optimal location for a prototype in mass timber construction,” writes Carlos Arzate

Geovanni's curator insight, May 8, 2013 9:32 AM

Fascinating place. Must of been a lot of wood to be created.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, May 13, 2013 11:44 AM
It takes around 30 years for a seedling to grow into the kind of wood that can be used in construction. A little maintenance is required during that period. Meanwhile it's soaking up CO2 and making oxygen. The only industrial processes required are to cut it down and cut it into boards and 2 x 4s. If you stagger your planting you have an endless supply.