Sustain Our Earth
56.3K views | +1 today
Follow
Sustain Our Earth
News that effects the sustainability of life on Earth
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from Sustainable Energy
Scoop.it!

Shhhh! New Low Noise Wind Turbine Blades Designed By GE

Shhhh! New Low Noise Wind Turbine Blades Designed By GE | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Forget about building a better mousetrap, if you could build a noise-free wind turbine the world will beat a path to your door.

Via Hans De Keulenaer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from Sustainability Pragmatika
Scoop.it!

Can the U.S. Create Its Own German-Style Energy Revolution?

Can the U.S. Create Its Own German-Style Energy Revolution? | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
A generation of Germans picked up the renewable torch that President Reagan tossed aside. The renewable energy revolution didn't end; it moved overseas.

 

"Can the American renewable energy revolution be restarted? William Reilly, the director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the George H.W. Bush administration, thinks so. "We're going to get there, one way or another," he told me during a 2009 interview about his solar-powered home.

Indeed, optimists look at recent energy figures and see evidence that a seismic shift has already begun. Since Reilly and I talked, 3,700 megawatts of solar power have been installed in the United States—nearly twice the amount that existed in 2009. More wind power (4,728 megawatts) was added to the U.S. electrical grid in the first three quarters of 2012 than the total generating capacity from wind just a decade ago (4687 megawatts). All told, over the last four years the percentage of our electricity generated by renewables (not including hydroelectric) has doubled.

Still, energy expert John Farrell warns that it's too early to celebrate an America renewable energy renaissance along the lines of Germany's Energiewende."The U.S. electric grid is poised for a transformation," Farrell, a senior researcher with the Minnesota-based Institute for Local Self-Reliance, told me, "but we're not there yet."

 

 


Via Arno Neumann
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from Sustainability Pragmatika
Scoop.it!

Renewables: Australia's a land of plenty

Renewables: Australia's a land of plenty | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Renewables: Australia's a land of plenty...

 

" “There has never been a scientific question as to whether renewable energy could provide 100 per cent of Australia's energy needs,” said Mr Want, who is also chief executive of energy developer Vast Solar.

 

“The question is whether we as a society and as a nation see value in harnessing that resource — for domestic use and for export — and whether we are prepared to demand of our leaders that they design policies to achieve those ends.” "

 

 


Via Arno Neumann
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from Sustainable Energy
Scoop.it!

First Saudi Arabia Utility-Scale Clean Energy Plant to be Built in Mecca

First Saudi Arabia Utility-Scale Clean Energy Plant to be Built in Mecca | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Mecca, which hosts millions of pilgrims a year visiting Islam's most holy shrine, is working toward becoming the first city in Saudi Arabia to operate a utility-scale plant generating electricity from renewables.

Via Roberto Bogge, Hans De Keulenaer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from The Great Transition
Scoop.it!

King Natural Gas

King Natural Gas | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Will cheap natural gas give us an opportunity to reduce ­emissions while inventing new technologies? Or will we simply become addicted to another fossil fuel?

 

This MIT Technology Review article on the American natural gas revolution might be a bit too optimistic about the future of gas and a bit too negative on the future of renewables, but it has some very valid arguments.


Via Willy De Backer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from The Great Transition
Scoop.it!

How renewables will change electricity markets in the next five years

How renewables will change electricity markets in the next five years | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Photovoltaic (PV) cells, onshore wind turbines, internet technologies, and storage technologies have the potential to fundamentally change electricity markets in the years ahead. Photovoltaic cells are the most disruptive energy technology as they allow consumers of all sizes to produce power by themselves—new actors in the power market can begin operating with a new bottom-up control logic. Unsubsidised PV markets may start to take off in 2013, fuelling substantial growth where PV power is getting cheaper than grid or diesel backup electricity for commercial consumers.

 

Good overview of the potential of renewables in the science magazine Energy.


Via Willy De Backer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from The Great Transition
Scoop.it!

Big Oil's Big Lies About Alternative Energy

Big Oil's Big Lies About Alternative Energy | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
As President Obama calls for greater investments in alternatives, the biggest energy companies are doubling down on riskier, more destructive oil sources

Via Willy De Backer
more...
Willy De Backer's curator insight, June 27, 2013 9:46 AM

That they lie is not the biggest problem - that political and business leaders believe them, that is the real tragedy. In the end, Big Oil will help kill Big Capitalism. And that's the irony.

Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from Sustainability Pragmatika
Scoop.it!

High-Voltage DC Breakers Could Enable a Renewable Energy Supergrid | MIT Technology Review

High-Voltage DC Breakers Could Enable a Renewable Energy Supergrid | MIT Technology Review | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
A high-power circuit breaker makes it possible to create highly efficient DC power grids.

"ABB's circuit breaker changes that. Within five milliseconds it can stop the flow of a huge amount of power—equal to the entire output of a nuclear power plant, ABB says. The breakers could be used to nearly instantaneously reroute power in a DC grid around a problem, allowing the grid to keep functioning. “Ordinarily, if something goes wrong anywhere, all the power goes off,” says Claes Rytoft, ABB’s chief technology officer. “The breaker can cut out the faulty line and keep the rest healthy.”

 

Researchers have been trying to develop high-voltage DC circuit breakers for a century (see “Edison’s Revenge: The Rise of DC Power”). Mechanical switches alone didn't work—they shut off power too slowly. Power electronics made of transistors that can switch on and off large amounts of power offered a possible solution, but they proved far too inefficient. ABB's solution combines power electronics with a mechanical switch to create a hybrid system that's both fast and efficient. The new circuit breaker could also be far less expensive than systems that use only transistors.

 

http://goo.gl/koDHZ

 


Via Arno Neumann
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from Sustainable Energy
Scoop.it!

New Method of Turning Sewage Sludge into Biodiesel is Low-Cost, High-Yield

New Method of Turning Sewage Sludge into Biodiesel is Low-Cost, High-Yield | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

I have a love/hate affair with biofuels and biodiesel, because while they may be cleaner than petro-fuels, and considered a renewable resource, growing the feedstock usually entails a lot of land and a lot of water, both of which are limited resources. But if a new process for making biodiesel from sewage sludge gets commercialized, every flush of the toilet could be helping to fuel some of our energy needs.


Via Hans De Keulenaer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from Energy Efficiency in Industry
Scoop.it!

km-tech: Forecasting tool for energy efficiency

km-tech: Forecasting tool for energy efficiency | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Balijepalli believes that an efficient power forecasting tool is extremely essential in today’s scenario when our country is facing a power crisis of the worst kind. And with the gap between demand and supply of power continuing to widen, the situation looks bleak. What it requires are drastic steps. Till the time that happens, an innovation like km-tech can be relied upon to ease the situation, as it will help the players in the power sector better manage their power needs and also save them some money in the process. Explaining the issues with the existing forecasting tools, he says, “The existing forecasting technologies face the drawback of using a large historian data before being able to predict to standard practical accuracy levels. Moreover...


Via Hans De Keulenaer, Diedert Debusscher
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by SustainOurEarth from Digital Sustainability
Scoop.it!

Scotland's renewable energy output increased by 45% in the first quarter of this year, compared with the same period last year.

Scotland's renewable energy output increased by 45% in the first quarter of this year, compared with the same period last year. | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Scotland's renewable energy output increased by 45% in the first quarter of this year, compared with the same period last year.

 

UK government figures showed Scotland generated 4,590 gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy in the first three months of 2012.

 

This was an increase of 1,435 GWh on the first quarter of 2011.

 

Scotland is aiming to generate the equivalent of 100% of its electricity needs from renewables by 2020.

 

The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change also issued revised statistics for 2011 which showed that renewable electricity generation in Scotland was 13,735 GWh in 2011, an increase of 44.3% from 2010 and up 97.3% from 2006.

The Scottish government said that, assuming gross consumption in 2011 was similar to 2010, about 35% of Scotland's electricity needs came from renewables in 2011, beating its interim target of 31%.

 

'World leader'Scottish Energy Minister Fergus Ewing said the figures showed the country was making good progress towards the 2020 target.

He added: "The increase of 45.5% in renewable output in quarter one 2012 compared to quarter one 2011 is particularly encouraging when you consider that 2011 saw the highest output from renewable energy to date.


Via Digital Sustainability
more...
No comment yet.