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The Cost of Food Wastage (Infographic)

The Cost of Food Wastage (Infographic) | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Food isn’t something you should have to worry about; however, even in developed countries like the UK, we’re still seeing around 6% of adults in the UK having to pay for food on credit (in July 2013), causing families to have an increased level of debt.

The UKDebt Advisory Centre has created this infographic to highlight how much could be saved with less waste; this could go some way to reducing debt levels for families – and cutting food wastage too.


Via Lauren Moss
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How a New Grocery Store Concept Reduces Waste and Increases Profits

How a New Grocery Store Concept Reduces Waste and Increases Profits | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Think of your average supermarket -- it's a place of plenty, with piles of fresh vegetables bursting off the shelves, yard after yard of meats, cheeses, breads and every wholesome and unwholesome thing you could ever want to stuff in your face. But that illusion of abundance comes with an enormous cost.

 

The Natural Resources Defense Council estimates that grocery stores toss out $15 billion worth of fruits and vegetables each year, and that the average supermarket dumps $2,300 worth of out-of-date products each day. (In fact, the entire U.S. food system wastes 40 percent of the goods it produces.) Then there are the hundreds of boxes the food is shipped in; the tons of plastic bags, pasteboard and cellophane the food is wrapped in; plus the paper and plastic bags customers use to carry it home.

 

When you take a good, hard look, a grocery store starts to seem less like a modern cornucopia and more like a national shame. At least, that's what Christian and Joseph Lane see when they look at a conventional supermarket. The brothers from Austin, who run a software-consulting firm, were kicking around ideas for a second business when they were struck by the concept of a zero-waste, packaging-free grocery store.

 

Read more: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/226852#ixzz2Y5ei8bOS


Via Olive Ventures
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Alois Clemens's curator insight, July 5, 2013 4:12 AM

That's the spirit

 

 

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, August 25, 2013 2:26 PM

Why blame the "US food system" for the 40 some percent waste that's caused by us, not the "system?"

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The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food

The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Inside the hyperengineered, savagely marketed, addiction-creating battle for American "stomach share."

 

[Adapted from “Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us,” by Michael Moss, an investigative reporter for The Times.]

 

The public and the food companies have known for decades now that sugary, salty, fatty foods are not good for us in the quantities that we consume them. So why are the diabetes and obesity and hypertension numbers still spiraling out of control? It’s not just a matter of poor willpower on the part of the consumer and a give-the-people-what-they-want attitude on the part of the food manufacturers. What I found, over four years of research and reporting, was a conscious effort — taking place in labs and marketing meetings and grocery-store aisles — to get people hooked on foods that are convenient and inexpensive.

 

I talked to more than 300 people in or formerly employed by the processed-food industry, from scientists to marketers to C.E.O.’s. Some were willing whistle-blowers, while others spoke reluctantly when presented with some of the thousands of pages of secret memos that I obtained from inside the food industry’s operations.

 

What follows is a series of small case studies of a handful of characters whose work then, and perspective now, sheds light on how the foods are created and sold to people who, while not powerless, are extremely vulnerable to the intensity of these companies’ industrial formulations and selling campaigns.


Via Pamir Kiciman, The DoctorsPlace
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Pamir Kiciman's curator insight, February 24, 2013 12:47 PM

This is a long and thorough excerpt from the book on newyorktimes.com and is a MUST-READ.

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Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont

Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Lawmakers in Vermont are looking to regulate food labels so customers can know which products are made from genetically modified crops, but agricultural giants Monsanto say they will sue if the state follows through.

Via Seth Dixon
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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 6:40 PM

I don’t think that there is a specific reason on why  Vermont is the first state to make some headway in producing this type of legislation, Vermont used to pride themselves on being one of the states with a large numbers of organic farms. And with a company like Monsanto whom use GMO on their product, it doesn’t go well with Vermont image. I do think that other states will follow suit because using Genetically Modified Organisms(GMO) and Genetically Engineered (GE) affect our help and Vermont cannot fight this big corporation by themselves. I feel that even though requiring labels on products that contain GMO is a good thing for us the consumers to know Exactly  what we are giving to ur family. I do think that is going to be a bad impact. because this big corporations like Monsanto is a good source of employment for the states. If they feel that the can make their product, they are going to take their business else where.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:30 AM

If monsanto can win a course a battle saying they don't have to represent their GMO's on products, then they will be able to win in other places which will further murk up the waters of GMO presentation.

Obed Hernandez's curator insight, February 18, 5:34 PM

Figures!

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Food, fuel and the global land grab - The Income Divide Food Wars

Food, fuel and the global land grab - The Income Divide Food Wars | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Jan 3, 2012 - As land and water become scarce, as the earth’s temperature rises, and as world food security deteriorates, a dangerous geopolitics of food scarcity is emerging, writes Lester Brown

Growing demand for food and fuel has put pressure on the world’s agricultural lands to produce more. Now, a trend in “land grabbing” has emerged, as wealthy countries lease or buy farms and agribusiness in poorer countries to ensure their own future supplies. The result may be further economic disparities and even “food wars.”


Via pdjmoo, Hans De Keulenaer
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How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land? | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Tags: infographic, food, agriculture, sustainability, urban, urban ecology, locavore, land use, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities.


Via Seth Dixon, PIRatE Lab
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Crissy Borton's comment, September 11, 2012 8:36 PM
Looking at purchasing a house in the next year or so and this is one thing we have been looking at. Although we don't want to raise our own meat we would like to grow everything else we eat.
Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:44 PM

Good visual representation of what it would take to be self sufficient.

Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:51 AM

If you need a backyard that is about 2 acres to live off the land imagine how big of a backyard you would need if you had a family of 8.

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The world is closer to a food crisis than most people realise

The world is closer to a food crisis than most people realise | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Lester R.Brown: Unless we move quickly to adopt new population, energy, and water policies, the goal of eradicating hunger will remain just that...

 

Another warning but no one is listening until it is too late and then we will get the "free" rock concerts again.


Via Willy De Backer
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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 11, 2014 1:29 PM

This should be truly terrifying to thsoe who hold political and social power at our present juncture.

 

Yet what are they doing to mitigate the problems of these impending crises, other than to prepare civilization for marshal law?  How are they actually helping others (and themselves) through the constant resorting to the jack-boot?

 

Not very enlightened.

 

Not every inspired.


Not very original.

 

Think abouti it.

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Rethinking Agriculture

"Growing Power is a national nonprofit organization and land trust supporting people from diverse backgrounds, and the environments in which they live, by helping to provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities."


Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:56 AM

with the increasing numbers of urban citizens in years to come the key to success in the city will be its ability to adapted to its growing enviroment. It would be nearly impossible for cities to exsit in the future with the current ways of agriculuture, there needs to be a change in the way things are done. Thats why this next gen way of agriculuture is going to take off in urban areas. with the ability to have full farms on rooftops the city will be able to self sustain itself more properly than it does in current times.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:40 PM

For the past three years I have had the luxury of having a garden in my backyard, it is a lot of work but there is nothing better than knowing where my food is coming from. I enjoy going in my backyard and being able to grab vegetables whenever I need them. I also go to farmers markets for vegetables that I don't grow in my own garden.  I would defeniately support local people to get good quality food. 

Lauren Shigemasa's curator insight, January 23, 2014 1:28 AM

a powerful way to increase access to healthy foods! this organization called Growing Power is using urban gardening not only to create a sustainable food source for its neighbors, but also provides a system so we can donate and send a week's worth of fresh fruit/vegetables to any surrounding community in need. so amazing!

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From Farm to Fork: Our Toxic Food System - infographic

From Farm to Fork: Our Toxic Food System - infographic | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Food is the fuel we use to get our bodies into motion. 

However, with the way our current food system works, processed foods such as chips, soda, french fries, hamburgers and candy are making up a significant portion of our daily food intake. They’re readily available at every food store, and an ice cold Coca-Cola is very difficult to pass up in favor of sparkling water. The problem, though, is that it’s not even about choosing healthy options. Today, 80% of food in the U.S. is supplied by massive factory farms associated with a myriad of environmental and health risks.


Do you know where your food comes from? Or what’s in it? How is a hotdog made? Today’s conventional food system depends heavily on the use of toxic chemicals and synthetic inputs that pose threats to our health — especially children’s.


Via Lauren Moss
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FarmRoof®'s curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:51 PM

What a great infographic!

sTreet's comment, July 5, 2013 4:03 AM
fantastic
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Food Fraud: 10 Counterfeit Products We Commonly Consume

Food Fraud: 10 Counterfeit Products We Commonly Consume | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Coffee, olive oil and fish are just some of the adulterated and intentionally mislabeled foods regularly passed off as something they’re not.

 

In a country where we have relatively strict labeling regulations, many food manufacturers still manage to swindle shoppers by adding fillers or diluting the real deal with less expensive ingredients, without the knowledge of the consumer. And in fact, it’s become so prevalent that the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention, a nonprofit that sets standards used by the FDA, set up a database to track the infractions. Called the Food Fraud Database (FFD), it describes food fraud as the "deliberate substitution, addition, tampering or misrepresentation of food, food ingredients or food packaging, or false or misleading statements made about a product for economic gain." It has a shocking number of entries.


Via Pamir Kiciman, The DoctorsPlace
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Kirk Fontaine's curator insight, April 7, 2013 11:02 AM

This seems to be happening quite frequently in order to cut production and manufacturing costs and the consumer is the one that loses out

Sandi Cornez's curator insight, April 7, 2013 1:13 PM

Good catches. Best advice: be discerning when you shop. Read labels carefully. Buy organic. Do research on brands you're not familiar with. Purchase fresh foods as often as possible. You can make your own orange juice.

nancercize's comment, April 8, 2013 11:55 AM
Natural foods + natural exercise = health.
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Infographic: Feeding 7 Billion People And Counting

Infographic: Feeding 7 Billion People And Counting | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Inspired by a recent Wall Street Journal article, Sustainable America has created the following infographic to show how food is wasted and lost around the world, and what can be done about it.

 

Food waste and food security are serious problems, but there are current solutions and ways you can help. Read on to learn more, and stay tuned for our next blog post, which will delve deeper into some of the points made by Lappe and Nierenberg in the Wall Street Journal piece.


Via Lauren Moss, Electric Car, Olive Ventures
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Creativity Angel's comment, February 4, 2013 2:30 AM
Insects are the solution, more than 1,000,000,000 people on the planet eat insects every day.
Creativity Angel's curator insight, February 4, 2013 2:31 AM

Insects are the solution. Western people has to use to know that more than 1,000,000,000 people on the planet eat insects every day and they are the most effective food.

Mercor's curator insight, February 4, 2013 5:45 AM

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Seattle builds nation’s largest food forest | SmartPlanet

Seattle builds nation’s largest food forest | SmartPlanet | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

In Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood, plans are in place to turn an empty seven acre lot that didn’t receive much attention (expect from the occasional lawn mower) into a “food forest” for everyone to use. And when it’s complete, the Beacon Food Forest will be the largest public food forest in the United States, according to the Seattle news website Crosscut. It will look something like this:

[A]n entire acre will feature large chestnuts and walnuts in the overstory, full-sized fruit trees like big apples and mulberries in the understory, and berry shrubs, climbing vines, herbaceous plants, and vegetables closer to the ground.

Further down the path an edible arboretum full of exotic looking persimmons, mulberries, Asian pears, and Chinese haws will surround a sheltered classroom for community workshops. Looking over the whole seven acres, you’ll see playgrounds and kid space full of thornless mini edibles adjacent to community gardening plots, native plant areas, a big timber-frame gazebo and gathering space with people barbecuing, a recreational field, and food as far as you can see.

[...]

In a food forest, everything from the tree canopy to the roots is edible or useful in some way.


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Jeremy Grantham: ‘Welcome to Dystopia’: We Are ‘Entering A Long-Term And Politically Dangerous Food Crisis’

Jeremy Grantham: ‘Welcome to Dystopia’: We Are ‘Entering A Long-Term And Politically Dangerous Food Crisis’ | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

"We are five years into a severe global food crisis that is very unlikely to go away. It will threaten poor countries with increased malnutrition and starvation and even collapse. Resource squabbles and waves of food-induced migration will threaten global stability and global growth. This threat is badly underestimated by almost everybody and all institutions with the possible exception of some military establishments."

 

Joe Romm summarises the latest article by guru investor Jeremy Grantham in his Quarterly Newsletter. "The global economy is a Ponzi scheme".


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How Urban Farming can Transform our Cities & our Agricultural System

How Urban Farming can Transform our Cities & our Agricultural System | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

As concerns mount over the accessibility and quality of meals in cities, urban agriculture is becoming a practical solution to give communities more choice—all while helping address greenhouse gas emissions from centralized agriculture.
With more than 80 percent of the American population living in metropolitan centers, urban farming has the ability to dramatically enhance economic growth, increase food quality and build healthier communities.


Via Lauren Moss, Digital Sustainability
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