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Jeb Bush slams Norquist’s tax pledge: Don’t ‘outsource your principles’ | The Raw Story

Jeb Bush slams Norquist’s tax pledge: Don’t ‘outsource your principles’ | The Raw Story | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R) on Friday suggested that Republicans were outsourcing their “principles and convictions” by signing Grover Norquist’s pledge to never raise taxes.

During a House Budget Committee hearing, Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) asked the former governor if he agreed with the Americans for Tax Reform pledge.

“No,” Bush said, shaking his head. “OK, so I ran for office three times. The pledge was presented to me three times. I never signed the pledge. I cut taxes every year I was governor.”

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Stupidity Is Not A Valid Defense For Us - The Automatic Earth

Stupidity Is Not A Valid Defense For Us - The Automatic Earth | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

If we can't plead stupidity, what else is there? How do we live with ourselves? Is it all the stuff we buy that manages to numb our brains and consciences?

 

When I see a headline like this one at Bloomberg today, World Needs Record Saudi Oil Supply as OPEC Convenes, there’s just one thought that pops into my head: what the world needs is for us to stop doing this thing we’re doing. Even apart from peak oil concerns, it’s obvious we’re going to run out at some point or another, and it doesn’t matter whether that’s tomorrow or at some other point in the future, though we do know it’s not going to take another 100 years, or even 50.

 

And nothing will ever take the place of oil; once those unique carbons are gone, that’s it, we’ll have to find a completely different way of running our societies, and if we’re not smart enough to prepare for that beforehand, we’ll be cats fighting in a sack and use the last scraps to kill off each other. And our legacy won’t be the Greek thinkers and Picasso and Dostoyevsky and Walt Whitman and Maria Callas, since there won’t be the means for our children anymore to share what makes man great between them. Our main legacy will instead be bloodshed, we will have gone the exact same path that any non-thinking or even primitive organism would have taken, who don’t have opera or philosophy or poetry to their name.

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David Collet's curator insight, August 2, 5:26 PM

A thoughtfull read.

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Addressing economic inequality at root

Addressing economic inequality at root | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Spiralling economic inequality is undermining our economy, society and democracy. Now seen by many as one of the world’s most pressing challenges – the time has come for action.

Is it any surprise that four out of five British citizens want the government to act on inequality? The richest 1% of the UK population are now wealthier than the poorest 50% put together – a disparity that has been growing steadily since the 1970s, and on current trends is set to get even worse.

But this isn’t about the politics of envy; nor is it purely about what is morally right or wrong. We have convincing evidence that extreme economic inequality is contributing decisively to financial instability, wasted human capital, lower well-being and mental health, domination of politics by an elite few and low voter turn out.


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This is how we solve economic inequality

This is how we solve economic inequality | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

I’ve blogged before about the most insidious aspect of economic inequality: its ability to hijack the democratic process, as the wealthy elite move seamlessly from Oxbridge into positions of power from where they have the clout to out-lobby, out-publicise and out-finance anything that challenges the status quo.

 

Setting a binding national target for reducing economic inequality, much like the recent target for reducing child poverty, would be a vital first step in defusing this effect. It would solidify government commitment to act, serve as a barometer of success and, most importantly, provide an important means for the public to hold them to account. Download the report to read more about how an economic inequality reduction target could work and the indicators we could use to measure it.

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Mapping the LA Neighborhoods Most at Risk From Global Warming

Mapping the LA Neighborhoods Most at Risk From Global Warming | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

The UCLA Luskin Center and Environmental Defense Fund have just released a new report looking at Los Angeles's opportunities for using more solar power (which are still 98% untapped, they say) and it includes these fascinating maps of which areas of LA County are most vulnerable to global warming.

According to the report, it's the "first study to provide specific climate-change projections for the greater Los Angeles area [in the years 2041 to 2060], with unique projections down to the neighborhood level." By mid-century, SoCal can look forward to "slightly warmer winters and springs but much warmer summers and falls, with more frequent heat waves," but the burden won't be spread around evenly: "The study predicts a likely tripling in the number of extremely hot days in the downtown area and quadrupling the number in the valleys and at high elevations." But of course higher temps aren't the only threat.


Via Lauren Moss
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Towards a New Co-Existence: On Reframing Our Ecological Crises

Towards a New Co-Existence: On Reframing Our Ecological Crises | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
How we think about and talk about ecological crises and our role in them form the structures of our responses.

Via Flora Moon
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À Chittagong, "le réchauffement climatique c'est du concret"

À Chittagong, "le réchauffement climatique c'est du concret" | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Chaque année, les zones inondées sont plus nombreuses autour de la ville côtière de Chittatong, au sud du Bangladesh. Un phénomène...

Via Hubert MESSMER @Zehub on Twitter, François GARREAU, Stephane Bilodeau, Frédéric Liégeois
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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, Today, 5:26 AM

Le Bangladesh est considéré comme l'un des pays les plus vulnérables au réchauffement climatique. Dans une étude de 2013, la Banque mondiale a estimé que le pays était de plus en plus sujet à "des débordements extrêmes de rivières, des cyclones tropicaux plus intenses, la hausse du niveau de la mer et des températures très élevées".

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Réchauffement climatique : quelles évolutions possibles ?

Réchauffement climatique : quelles évolutions possibles ? | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Où on s'interroge sur les rapports de force entre pays et diplomaties pour parvenir à un accord sur le climat à l'heure du réchauffement climatique ; analyse et point de vue

Via Hubert MESSMER @Zehub on Twitter
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Worse than the 1930s: Europe’s recession is really a depression

Worse than the 1930s: Europe’s recession is really a depression | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Europe's self-inflicted wounds are making its recession worse than the worst of the 1930s.

Via Willy De Backer
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Willy De Backer's curator insight, Today, 11:20 AM

Good analysis of the never-ending Eurozone crisis. A few nice quotes: "how is Europe making the Great Depression look like the good old days of growth? Easy: by ignoring everything we learned from it." and

"They have made a desert, and called it the eurozone."

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Wall Street Warned About $91 Billion of High-Risk Oil Megaprojects | InsideClimate News

Wall Street Warned About $91 Billion of High-Risk Oil Megaprojects | InsideClimate News | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Critics of environmentally risky oil projects proposed for deep undersea and Canada's tar sands got new ammunition last week when a report labeled those ventures and others as the industry's most financially questionable pursuits.

Via Anita Woodruff
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NASA's Tom Wagner on Siberian Holes and Methane

NASA's Tom Wagner on Siberian Holes and Methane | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Description from PBS Newshour: When holes opened up in the earth recently in Siberia, a wave of speculation was set off as to their cause. Scientists are now pinpointing a dramatic increase in arct...
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'If we don't change now we will lose the reefs' | Environment

'If we don't change now we will lose the reefs' | Environment | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
A major study has found Caribbean coral reefs could disappear in 20 years. DW spoke to Carl Gustaf Lundin, director of the global marine and polar programme at the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
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Why ignoring global warming is like driving across a rickety bridge

Why ignoring global warming is like driving across a rickety bridge | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
A viral tweet perfectly captures just how irresponsible climate denial is.
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UK's warmest period record sparks call for greater climate action

UK's warmest period record sparks call for greater climate action | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Policy expert says figures showing January-July was the warmest since records began should increase urgency of efforts
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CHINA'S FUTURE / WHAT CHINA WANTS

CHINA'S FUTURE / WHAT CHINA WANTS | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

As China becomes, again, the world's largest economy, it wants the respect it enjoyed in centuries past. But it does not know how to achieve or deserve it.

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7 reasons we need a Sustainable Development Goal on reducing economic inequality

7 reasons we need a Sustainable Development Goal on reducing economic inequality | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Ignoring inequality will undermine global efforts to fight poverty and climate change
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Zero Waste World

Zero Waste World | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
When the economy goes in circles, everybody wins.

 

Welcome to the emerging world of the circular economy. Faced with rising prices for energy and raw materials, along with pressures from environmentalists and regulators who have passed “extended producer responsibility laws” in Europe and some U.S. states, forward-thinking companies are finding ways to take back, reuse, refurbish or recycle all kinds of things that would otherwise be thrown away. In contrast to the traditional “take-make-dispose” linear economy, which depletes resources, a circular economy is an industrial system that is restorative or regenerative by intention and design.

 

Inspired by nature, a circular economy aspires not merely to limit waste but to eliminate the very idea of waste: Everything, at the end of its life, should be made into something else, just as in the natural world, one species’ waste is another’s food.

 

The transition to a circular economy could generate savings of more than $1 trillion in materials alone by 2025, according to an analysis by the U.K.-based Ellen MacArthur Foundation, McKinsey & Company and the World Economic Forum, which are collaborating to promote circular thinking.

 

So are we moving closer to the circular economy — or further away? Accurate data is hard to come by, but the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates indicate that recycling rates grew rapidly from 1980 through 2000, and only gradually since then. Disposal of waste to landfill declined from 89 percent of the amount generated in 1980 to 54 percent — about 135 million tons — in 2012.

 

Clearly there’s lots of work ahead for advocates of the circular economy. But the vision they are pursuing is a bold one: In a truly circular economy, where waste becomes nutrients and energy is renewable, economic growth would be decoupled from environmental restraints. Companies could sell more stuff without generating pollution. Consumers could buy more stuff, without guilt. What’s not to like?


Via Daniel LaLiberte
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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, Today, 5:22 AM

So paying the full cost for products, including the cost to recycle them completely at the end of their life, could end up costing LESS, not more, since we will design products to be reused longer and eventually recycled.

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Changement climatique : les météorologues anticipent l’avenir et se préparent au pire

Changement climatique : les météorologues anticipent l’avenir et se préparent au pire | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Turbulences aériennes accrues, épisodes polaires et caniculaires toujours plus extrêmes, vagues géantes dans les océans: les spécialistes mondiaux du climat ont brossé un tableau apocalyptique de la météo des prochaines décennies.

Via Hubert MESSMER @Zehub on Twitter, François GARREAU, Stephane Bilodeau
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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, Today, 5:32 AM

À l’initiative de l’Organisation météorologique mondiale, agence des Nations unies, un millier de scientifiques ont débattu autour du thème, «la météo, quel avenir?» à l’occasion d’une première conférence mondiale sur la météorologie, qui s’est conclue jeudi à Montréal.

 

Près de 10 ans après l’entrée en vigueur du Protocole de Kyoto qui visait à réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, la question n’est plus d’établir si le réchauffement de la Terre va avoir lieu.

 

«C’est irréversible et la population mondiale continue d’augmenter, il faut que l’on s’adapte», observe Jennifer Vanos, de l’Université Texas Tech.

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The Changing Face of the Global City

The Changing Face of the Global City | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
I want to highlight a couple of recent studies by Joel Kotkin for which I provided some research support. The first is a report on global cities from the Singapore Civil Service College called "Siz...

Via Flora Moon
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Utilisation de produits phytosanitaires : la réglementation dans le viseur des agriculteurs - Le Figaro

Utilisation de produits phytosanitaires : la réglementation dans le viseur des agriculteurs - Le Figaro | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
La France est un des pays où la réglementation est la plus stricte en ce qui concerne l'utilisation de produits phytopharmaceutiques. Ces efforts pèsent sur les revenus des producteurs de fruits et légumes, qui dénoncent la concurrence déloyale des produits venus de pays beaucoup moins exigeants.

Via Doc IAMM, Isabelle Pélissié, Sylvain Rotillon
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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, Today, 10:09 AM

La France qualifiée de "bon élève", même en période estivale, c'est un peu fort. Selon les chiffres clés du ministère de l'écologie, la France est le premier consommateur européen, ce qui est logique ayant la plus grande surface agricole de l'UE, et le 4ème mondial. Si l'on rapporte la consommation à la production, on est au quatrième rang européen derrière le Portugal, les Pays-Bas et la Belgique. Rapporté à la surface, on est dans la moyenne, mais devant l'Espagne.

L'environnement ça commence à bien faire disait quelqu'un, mais on oublie que le coût des traitements est aussi un élément non négligeable dans le prix de revient des produits agricoles. 

Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, Today, 10:23 AM

La France qualifiée de "bon élève", même en période estivale, c'est un peu fort. Selon les chiffres clés du ministère de l'écologie, la France est le premier consommateur européen, ce qui est logique ayant la plus grande surface agricole de l'UE, et le 4ème mondial. Si l'on rapporte la consommation à la production, on est au quatrième rang européen derrière le Portugal, les Pays-Bas et la Belgique. Rapporté à la surface, on est dans la moyenne, mais devant l'Espagne.

L'environnement ça commence à bien faire disait quelqu'un, mais on oublie que le coût des traitements est aussi un élément non négligeable dans le prix de revient des produits agricoles. 

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La nouvelle société du coût marginal zéro de Jeremy Rifkin - CDURABLE.info

La nouvelle société du coût marginal zéro de Jeremy Rifkin - CDURABLE.info | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Les règles du grand jeu de l’économie mondiale sont en train de changer. Le capitalisme se meurt et un nouveau paradigme qui va tout bousculer est en train de s’installer : les communaux collaboratifs. 

C’est une nouvelle économie collaborative qui se développe où la valeur d’usage prime sur la propriété – déjà très implantés avec l’auto-partage, le crowfunding, les A.M.A.P., le couchsurfing, les producteurs contributifs, d’énergie verte ou même d’objets avec les imprimantes 3D – offrent un espace où des milliards de personnes s’engagent dans les aspects profondément sociaux de la vie. Un espace fait de millions (au sens littéral du terme) d’organisations autogérées qui créent le capital social de la société. Ce qui les rend plus pertinents aujourd’hui qu’à tout autre époque, c’est que le développement de l’internet des objets optimise comme jamais les valeurs et les principes qui animent cette forme d’autogestion institutionnalisée.



Via Hubert MESSMER @Zehub on Twitter
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Landslides After Heavy Rain Kill at Least 36 in Japan | NYTimes.com

Landslides After Heavy Rain Kill at Least 36 in Japan | NYTimes.com | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

At least 36 people were killed and seven missing in the western Japanese city of Hiroshima on Wednesday after heavy rain caused flash floods and landslides that buried victims alive as they slept in their homes, the police said. Hundreds of soldiers have been sent to the scene to dig for survivors.

 

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who had been on summer vacation, cut short a game of golf to rush back to Tokyo to lead the response to the disaster, government officials said. While deadly landslides are common in this densely populated, mountainous nation, death tolls rarely reach this high.

 

According to the police, the dead included two brothers, ages 2 and 11, who were buried when a wall of mud engulfed their home in a neighborhood that sits at the foot of a steep mountainside. A firefighter also died during rescue operations, the police said.

 

The landslides took place around 3:30 a.m. local time, after rainfall of up to four inches per hour was recorded by the national weather agency. Many of the victims appeared to have been asleep when entire hillsides, heavy with the weight of rainwater, suddenly gave way.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Climate clues: Sunlight controls the fate of carbon released from thawing Arctic permafrost

Climate clues: Sunlight controls the fate of carbon released from thawing Arctic permafrost | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Just how much Arctic permafrost will thaw in the future and how fast heat-trapping carbon dioxide will be released from those warming soils is a topic of lively debate among climate scientists. ANN AR

Via Anita Woodruff
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Yale Climate Connections Launches New Climate Series on NPR Stations

Yale Climate Connections Launches New Climate Series on NPR Stations | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Here’s an example of the first week’s offerings, above, and the web story associated with it. They decided to lead with a “solutions” story, which I think was a good choice.

Yale Climate Connections:


Environmentalists and Tea Partiers are frequently at odds with each other, but in Georgia, they sometimes dance to the same tune. For example, the Sierra Club and the Atlanta Tea Party recently joined forces to fight for the right of homeowners with rooftop solar to sell their homegrown electricity to the Georgia Power Company. The Sierra Club supports solar energy because it’s good for the environment. For Debbie Dooley, co-founder of the Atlanta Tea Party, it’s about the free market and consumer choice.

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Rapidly Warming Arctic Leading to Deadly Extreme Weather Events

Rapidly Warming Arctic Leading to Deadly Extreme Weather Events | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Global warming is driving rapid changes in the Arctic, which may be shifting the jet stream to favor deadly extreme weather events in the U.S. and Europe.
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10 health benefits of lemons

10 health benefits of lemons | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
When life gives you lemons, eat them! From taming inflammation and hindering kidney stones to boosting antioxidants and fighting disease, the potential health benefits of lemon are many.
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Wind Turbine Syndrome? Courts Aren’t Buying It | Climate Central

Wind Turbine Syndrome? Courts Aren’t Buying It | Climate Central | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
Do wind turbines make people sick? Courts and scientists say they don't.
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