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An Economical Modular Prefab in Oregon

An Economical Modular Prefab in Oregon | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

The brief was basic: a simple guesthouse for a familyto live while Bohlin Cywinski Jackson designed their main residence. The architect's design for the is instantly legible with a repetition of trusses, windows, and lumber creating a strong linear profile.

A standard, repeatable, four-foot-wide bay makes use of economical, available materials, such as open-web steel trusses, plywood, laminated veneer lumber, and an insulated aluminum window system. The resulting residence is linear, with an open-plan kitchen and living space, 3 bedrooms, and an office with views over the Cascade Range.


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Absolutely Prefabulous: 10 Modular Homes

Absolutely Prefabulous: 10 Modular Homes | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

The benefits of using prefabrication are many, and can result in beautiful homes that function just as well or better than custom ones built on site.

Using modular techniques for construction allows for stronger purchasing power. The process of building on site is also much quicker—and cheaper. Prefabrication is also greener since it uses computer technology to manufacture the modules, which creates 50% to 75% less material waste. The one limitation of prefabrication is that the pieces of the home need to be able to be shipped from the factory to the site of assembly.

But the benefits of prefabrication are many, and can result in beautiful homes that function just as well or better than custom ones built on site.

 

Check out these 10 examples of prefab architecture at the link.


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ParadigmGallery's comment, September 1, 2013 1:11 PM
That was a wonderful prefab 101 for a novice like me! Thanks so much,,,
Jorge Forero's curator insight, September 4, 2013 1:45 PM

10 ejemplos de arquitectura modular, los invitamos a visitar http://inatechservices.com para conocer un poco más de arquitectura modular.

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DOM(E): Sustainable Geodesic Prefab for Any Location

DOM(E): Sustainable Geodesic Prefab for Any Location | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

No Rules Just Architecture has created DOM(E), an prefabricated off-grid home that is an eco-friendly and portable shelter. DOM(E) provides optimal living conditions no matter where it is located and is less expensive than traditional construction, while making the best use of natural energy resources.

 

DOM(E) can be folded for transport and assembled on-site. Its shape provides for natural ventilation while utilizing an underground duct system for heating and cooling. Solar panels connect to a hot water tank and rainwater collection systems can be made part of the drainage system that surrounds the enclosure.

Find more details and images at the article link.


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Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, July 30, 2013 4:35 AM
we love this! ty Lauren!
Maryline Khan's comment, July 30, 2013 6:50 AM
very impressive!
Conrado C. Guzmán's curator insight, July 31, 2013 11:09 PM

Design

 

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Cargotecture – the Rise of Recycling Shipping Containers

Cargotecture – the Rise of Recycling Shipping Containers | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

One man’s trash is said to be another man’s treasure, and now old cargo shipping containers are rapidly becoming sought-after treasure in the architecture industry.

 

The term cargotecture, coined in 2005 by HyBrid Architecture, is used to describe any building partially or entirely built from recycled ISO shipping containers. It may seem strange that such a simple, aesthetically-unappealing box could be so loved by modern architects, but the increased use of reclaimed materials in architecture is starting to show no bounds.

In a world dominated by mass production, architects are being forced to find alternative ways of designing buildings that will make the smallest impact on the earth. Extending the life of discarded materials and saving salvageable items from landfill is a completely viable approach.

Shipping containers are resistant to fire, termites, hurricanes and earthquakes, proving themselves to be extremely resilient.

 

Somewhat like stacking blocks of Lego, steel or aluminum shipping containers are a perfectly strong building block...


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Pierre R Chantelois's comment, January 12, 2013 9:56 PM
Quelle excellente idée. Si les gouvernements pouvaient en réquisitionner quelques milliers, ils pourraient en faire don à Haïti pour accéler la mise à niveau de la qualité de vie de la population. Un 12 décembre, il y a trois ans...
oliviersc's comment, January 13, 2013 10:35 AM
Hélas, les bonnes idées ne sont pas rentables...
Natalie Curtis's curator insight, March 8, 2013 9:27 AM

I love that I've finally found the neologism for this type of architecture finally! Cargotecture is an upcoming trend in the architect's world and this article is actually one of the most brief and yet informative blogs I may have found in my short search, so far of these shipping container homes and buildings. The containers prove to be a very useful and easily moveable. They are in great abundance, which is fantastic since they are so often used for their resilience to fire, termites, hurricanes and earthquakes. So there's my answer finally to why these containers are becoming so popular amongst architects.

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Haus W in Germany by Kraus Schonberg Architects

Haus W in Germany by Kraus Schonberg Architects | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
A pre-fabricated, low energy house by Kraus Schonberg Architects. One big connected space, separated by an upper and a lower part.

 

The volume of the space is created by rooms of various heights, corresponding to their individual function. The lower part rest below ground level creating a direct view into the garden while standing up and a privacy feel while sitting down.

 


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A Look at the First Shipping Container Home in New Orleans

A Look at the First Shipping Container Home in New Orleans | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

This home was designed by the Toronto-based maker of prefab homes, MekaWorld, and is the first container home in New Orleans. It is made up of two shipping containers and has a net living area of 640 square feet.

The compact design has large windows installed on each side, letting plenty of natural light into the house. The windows and sliding doors are double glazed and thermally broken; the house is also designed to withstand winds of up to 130 mph.


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Julia LeMense's curator insight, November 16, 2013 1:59 PM

A much better use of containers than stacking them up around economically depressed and environmentally degraded neighborhoods to the point that those in the neighborhood cannot see anything other than containers....

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Passion House prefab: 400 square feet of Nordic design

Passion House prefab: 400 square feet of Nordic design | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
This series will enter into fierce and competitive prefab market. It is designed to fulfill the energy consuption requirements in nordic countries, even snow load requirements up to 3 kN. Houses are equipped with high standard ventilation systems, full automation and management systems, they are designed to utilize a solar heating during spring and autumn, have shelter from sun during summer months, thus not requiring a cooling system. Used building materials are in most parts wood, walls are vapour permeable and facades are ventilated. Structural frame is made of glulam, walls have rockwool insulation, internal walls are made of cross-laminated-timber panels, windows are wood-aluminium and furniture is either painted or laminated MDF boards.

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Frédéric Liégeois's curator insight, August 28, 2013 5:39 PM

Un faux air du nouveau projet présenté par Starck récemment...

Alysyn Curd's curator insight, August 28, 2013 8:10 PM

This is what I call, "Innovation realized," which is what design/engineering is all about. I'm inspired. What design inspires you?

 

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'Tind' Prefab Houses by Stockholm-based Design Studio Claesson Koivisto Rune

'Tind' Prefab Houses by Stockholm-based Design Studio Claesson Koivisto Rune | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Stockholm-based studio claesson koivisto rune have has created 3 sleek typologies for prefabricated homes that draw from the distinctly scandinavian landscape and approach to efficient living.


The 'Tind' residences draw their name from the norwegian word for 'mountain peak', a concept informed by the remarkable lack of sharp pointed peaks in scandinavian mountain systems. The softened edges of the range lend the landscape a particular beauty that finds its way into the architecture in the form of a truncated, single pitch roof. Floor-grazing windows are relegated to major walls and all apertures lie flush with light-drenched interiors. Rather than a perforated volume, the home is a rhythmic composition of built material and void, and despite the various models of kit houses, every interior is organized by a central entrance way or staircase and seeks to blur notions of interior and exterior.

While prefabricated homes have many historical iterations, the architectural integrity of the 'Tind' series is preserved through culturally relevant approaches to living...


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Villa Asserbo: A Sustainable, Printed House That Snaps Together ...

Villa Asserbo: A Sustainable, Printed House That Snaps Together ... | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it
We’ve covered 3D Printing a lot here at ArchDaily, but most of our coverage has been speculative and, frankly, futuristic – could we, one day, print out Gaudi-esque stone structures? Or even print a biologically-inspired, living house?

But today we heard a story about an alternative to 3D Printing‘s capabilities in the here and now - and its implications are pretty exciting.In a small town outside of Copenhagen, Danish architects Eentileen joined forces with London-based digital fabrication and architecture specialists, Facit Homes, to create Villa Asserbo: a 1,250 square foot, sustainable home made from Nordic plywood fabricated via CNC miller and easily “snapped” together.No heavy machinery, no cranes, no large labor force. Just a couple of guys, a few easily printed pieces, and six weeks.

The architects are looking to make the houses open to the public soon. If their easy, sustainable, well-designed model is the immediate future of alternative to 3D Printing (and considering it’s such a “snap,” it very well might be), then we’re all aboard...


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Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, November 3, 2012 3:24 AM
we love this house! I am a fan of Facit ..we have pinned this in Pinterest ty :)
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New Sustainable Modular Homes by Connect:Homes

New Sustainable Modular Homes by Connect:Homes | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Connect:Homes, a Los Angeles-based prefab innovator, has just launched a new line of affordable, exportable, and sustainable modular homes, all of which come from its single California-based factory. The company’s patent-pending modular system ships like shipping containers, but are most definitely not shipping container homes.

Affordable because Connect:Homes has a patent-pending technology that allows them to build modules to 90% complete at the factory, surpassing industry standards that are typically closer to 50%. This reduces finish time and reducing construction costs considerably...


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