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News that effects the sustainability of life on Earth
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Solar Ambitions: 6 Projects Powered By The Sun

Solar Ambitions: 6 Projects Powered By The Sun | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

The city of London has covered the roof of its Blackfriar's Bridge (part of the Blackfriar's Railway Station) with 4,400 photovoltaic solar panels. The new solar array will have the capacity to convert enough solar energy to make 80,000 cups of tea a day. Since the energy created is entirely carbon free, the photovoltaic cells will reduce the station's carbon footprint by 511 tons, or an average of 89,000 car trips per year.

Solar arrays usually appear on the rooftops of buildings, or as part of large solar farms outside of cities–which makes the Blackfriar's Bridge all the more impressive. The project marks an ambitious effort to convert rail infrastructure—which itself consumes a sizable about of energy each year—to help solve the complex climate puzzle.


Via Lauren Moss
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Arianna Smith's curator insight, February 11, 2:40 PM

Solar energy being used to dazzle the people. Not only does it look awesome but it's heading the world in the right direction. It's carbon free, which means it helps the environment. I'm  not entirely sure if it can generate a lot of energy, but it's defiantly a path I'm willing to follow. The buildings they created look like something out of a science fiction film! It's crazy. Not everyone nor every country has solar energy accessible to them(whether it's climate or price). But the people that can, should use it. I think this is a great way to showcase Solar Energy to the world.

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Infrastructure for the sake of jobs?

Infrastructure for the sake of jobs? | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

"Jobs and economic growth are the results of productive systems, not the other way around. Until we reconfigure our towns and change our growth patterns, our communities are likely to continue to be starved for jobs and growth. Building pieces of infrastructure with the primary purpose of creating jobs with little consideration to context is a recipe for disaster."


Via Willy De Backer
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Tour the Country’s Energy Infrastructure Through A New Interactive Map

Tour the Country’s Energy Infrastructure Through A New Interactive Map | Sustain Our Earth | Scoop.it

Examining the network of power plants, transmission wires, and pipelines gives new insights into the inner workings of the electrical grid.


Every time you switch on a light, charge your electronics or heat your home in the winter, you’re relying upon a tremendous network of energy infrastructure that literally stretches across the country: power plants, pipelines, transmission wires and storage facilities.

It can be hard to visualize all this infrastructure and understand how it makes abundant energy available throughout the country. To help see a bigger picture, a new map, just released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, combines a range of data (locations of power plants, electricity lines, natural gas pipelines, refineries, storage facilities and more) into an elegant, interactive interface that helps to piece how it all fits together. You can also zoom in on your own city to see the types of power plants generating electricity nearby.

The map also includes layers of real-time information on storm movement and risks, allowing energy analysts to better understand the potential impact of storms.


Via Lauren Moss
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Norm Miller's curator insight, July 30, 2013 1:32 PM

Understanding the grid in real time is somewhat facilitated by this new interactive map.

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Our current infrastructure was built for a different planet

"Past attempts to forecast the possible costs of climate change have been largely inadequate. They failed because of unanticipated effects on and complex interconnections among various parts of critical infrastructure."

 

Kurt Cobb on the unexpected effects of climate change on our global infrastructure (roads, railways, bridges, power plants).


Via Willy De Backer
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