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Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
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Apps that Nana and Grandpa could love | Crain's Chicago Business

Apps that Nana and Grandpa could love | Crain's Chicago Business | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Seniors aren't the sexiest demographic for mobile developers. Only 8 percent of Americans over age 65 own a tablet, according to Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project, compared with 26 percent of those ages 30 to 49. Less than 5 percent say they download apps. Yet older Americans still constitute an important demographic because of their purchasing power, and companies in industries such as financial services and health care are building apps with these audiences in mind.

 

Chicago-based Solstice Mobile has built apps for clients such as Discover, Northern Trust, Redbox and Sprint. Gregg Wheeler, Solstice's director of client engagement, tells Crain's contributor Steve Hendershot how developers can build senior-friendly apps.

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CA: Ventura seniors get tech help with gadgets | Ventura County Star

CA: Ventura seniors get tech help with gadgets | Ventura County Star | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

After two trips to Best Buy and two hours on the phone with technical support, Ventura resident Louise Piche still couldn’t figure out how to transfer photos from her camera to her computer tablet.

 

But she spent 15 minutes with Foothill Technology High School student Richie Mangun Friday afternoon and her problem was solved.

 

Piche, 67, was one of 15 seniors who figured out their gadgets at the Senior Recreation Center thanks to the help of a half-dozen tech-savvy teens.

 

Doug Reed, director of the center, held the first workshop five years ago when he noticed more and more seniors were getting gadgets from their children and grandchildren and did not know how to use them.

 

Seniors sought help with tablets, smart phones, GPS devices, digital music players and digital cameras. Reed said 25 seniors signed up but the turnout was smaller because of the rainy weather.

 

“It’s important for seniors to have this knowledge because we’re living in the digital age, and these gadgets are a way for them to stay connected with friends and family,” he said. “I also think this is a nice way to bring different generations together.”


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Smart grid consumers say educate me, engage me (and make it easy on me!) | Smart Grid News

Smart grid consumers say educate me, engage me (and make it easy on me!) | Smart Grid News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Smart Grid Consumer Collaborative just issued its latest 'State of the Consumer Report. Bottom line:  Most consumers like smart technology and would be willing to participate in energy-saving programs. But there's still a lot of work to be done.

 

Based on research studies conducted in 2012, SGCC found that about 75 percent of consumers either have never heard the term smart grid or don’t know what it means. In addition to the awareness problem, SGCC points to the following highlights from its 2013 report:

 

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Juniper: Banking is now mobile and branchless | Fiercemobilecontent

Juniper: Banking is now mobile and branchless | Fiercemobilecontent | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Mobile banking forms an essential component of the overall mobile commerce industry, wherein the two are closely interrelated. Empowering users to make account transactions whilst on the move, mobile banking enables supplementary mobile commerce actions to be undertaken as a function of a mobile wallet.

 

Equally, a consumer adopting the mobile phone to make payments reinforces a mutual mentality in which individuals increasingly consider the device as a comprehensive financial tool, and subsequently naturalizes its use for ancillary payment actions such as banking. For example, although making a contactless NFC payment for a train or metro ticket is not mobile banking, the recurrent act of paying with a mobile device allows the customer to become more comfortable, and to then find related and additional transactions a more efficient undertaking via their mobile.


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The Web-Deprived Study at McDonald's | Yahoo! Finance

Joshua Edwards's eighth-grade paper about the Black Plague came with a McDouble and fries.

 

Joshua sometimes does his homework at a McDonald's restaurant—not because he is drawn by the burgers, but because the fast-food chain is one of the few places in this southern Alabama city of 4,000 where he can get online access free once the public library closes.

 

Cheap smartphones and tablets have put Web-ready technology into more hands than ever. But the price of Internet connectivity hasn't come down nearly as quickly. And in many rural areas, high-speed Internet through traditional phone lines simply isn't available at any price. The result is a divide between families that have broadband constantly available on their home computers and phones, and those that have to plan their days around visits to free sources of Internet access.

 

That divide is becoming a bigger problem now that a fast Internet connection has evolved into an essential tool for completing many assignments at public schools. Federal regulators identified the gap in home Internet access as a key challenge for education in a report in 2010. Access to the Web has expanded since then, but roughly a third of households with income of less than $30,000 a year and teens living at home still don't have broadband access there, according to the Pew Research Center.

 

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NC: Triangle universities, cities aim to create ultra-fast broadband network | WRAL Tech Wire

NC: Triangle universities, cities aim to create ultra-fast broadband network | WRAL Tech Wire | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A consortium of universities and municipalities representing the Triangle and Winston-Salem will publish a request for proposals on Friday that could lead to a project similar to Google Fiber to North Carolina.

 

Blair Levin, a former FCC chief of staff who was a lawyer for a decade in North Carolina, and the national organization he leads, Gig.U., is supporting the effort.

 

The North Carolina Next Generation Network, chaired by Duke University Chief Information Officer Tracy Futhey, spelled outs its plans and strategy around a visit by Levin to the Triangle on Monday. The two briefed reporters about the project at the headquarters for MCNC, which operates the growing North Carolina Education and Research Network.

 

The RFP will be published through the Triangle J Council of Governments. It is being written under the direction of former Raleigh Mayor Charles Meeker, who has returned to private law practice Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein in Raleigh.

 

The group includes Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill, N.C. State and Wake Forest University as well as six municipalities: Raleigh, Durham. Chapel Hill, Cary, Carrboro and Winston-Salem.

 

Its members are hoping to find broadband providers who would be interested in working with the region to deploy an ultra-fast broadband network capable of delivering 1 gigabit speeds to businesses as well as consumers similar to the project search giant Google has launched in Kansas City called Google Fiber.

 

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Australia: Elderly brought out of digital dark ages | SBS World News

Australia: Elderly brought out of digital dark ages | SBS World News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

More than 1.3 million seniors, including those in regional NSW, will get help to become familiar with computer and internet technology.

 

NSW Ageing Minister Andrew Constance says the Tech Savvy Seniors program - a partnership with Telstra - provides low cost or free training in community colleges and libraries covering computers, tablets, smartphones and the basics of social media.

 

"We have a digital divide and it's something we must close the gap on," Mr Constance told AAP on Wednesday.

 

"We do not want to see seniors in our state left in the technology dark ages."

 

Gordon Ballantyne, Telstra's Chief Customer Officer, said the ease with which smartphones and computers can access online shopping, paying bills and connecting to family, friends and the broader community would be of great benefit to older people.

 

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Smart video: Putting the emphasis on the user | Washington Business Journal

Smart video: Putting the emphasis on the user | Washington Business Journal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

What makes smartphones so smart? Ultimately, we call them "smartphones" because they improve the user experience across a whole range of functions, so they seem smart to us. When smartphones first arrived on the scene, they instantly eclipsed "feature phones" like the Motorola Razr because they put the emphasis where it should have been all along – on the user experience.

 

What the video conferencing industry needs is that same kind of paradigm shift – a move away from features that are still too hard to launch intuitively. To be fully embraced by businesses and individuals, the industry as a whole has to get to "smart video." (And for those of you already racing to set up a "smart video" Wiki, remember: You heard it here first.)

 

First, a brief history lesson. The combination of telephony and computing was the phone industry’s Holy Grail for decades, arguably dating back to the 1970s, with some early versions offered for sale as early as 1994. By most accounts, though, it was 1997 when the term “smartphone” was coined by Ericsson to describe its GS 88 “Penelope.”

 

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Canada: Bell Reintroduces Unlimited Internet: $10-30 Add-On Eliminates Usage Caps for Good | Stop the Cap!

Canada: Bell Reintroduces Unlimited Internet: $10-30 Add-On Eliminates Usage Caps for Good | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Despite years of arguments that Bell Canada (BCE) could not sustain offering unlimited Internet access, the company suddenly managed an about-face Monday, announcing the launch of a $10 unlimited Internet add-on option for broadband customers who do not want to worry about their online usage.

 

Bell customers in Québec and Ontario who choose at least three Bell services (broadband, television, phone, satellite, or wireless service) can qualify for the add-on. Broadband-only customers and those with two qualifying Bell services can also buy unlimited access for an additional $30 a month.

 

“Canadians are the heaviest Internet users in the world and our time spent online is growing every day,” said Wade Oosterman, president of Bell Mobility and Residential Services. “Thanks to Bell’s massive network investments and the success of the new Fibe network, Bell is taking the lead in maximizing the online experience with affordable unlimited usage options.”

 

Another factor may be a forthcoming ruling regarding wholesale access to Bell’s network from Canada’s chief telecom regulator, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), rumored to be beneficial to the growing number of independent providers that already offer unlimited access.

 

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U.S. government warns of hack threat to network gear | Reuters.com

U.S. government warns of hack threat to network gear | Reuters.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The U.S. government's Computer Emergency Readiness Team, on its website, advised consumers and businesses to disable a feature known as Universal Plug and Play or UPnP, and some other related features that make devices from computers to printers accessible over the open Internet.

 

UPnP, a communications protocol, is designed to let networks identify and communicate with equipment, reducing the amount of work it takes to set up networks. Dave Marcus, chief architect of advanced research and threat intelligence with Intel's McAfee unit, said hackers would have a "field day" once the vulnerability in network devices is exposed.

 

"Historically, these are amongst the last to be updated and protected properly which makes them a gold mine for potential abuse and exploitation," said Marcus, who advises government agencies and corporations on protections against sophisticated attacks.

 

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Testing by NTIA’s ITS Paves the Way for First Responder Broadband Interoperability | NTIA

Testing by NTIA’s ITS Paves the Way for First Responder Broadband Interoperability | NTIA | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

NTIA’s Institute for Telecommunication Sciences (ITS) is hard at work in our Boulder, Colorado labs testing next-generation technology that will be used in a new nationwide public safety broadband network to be built by the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet).


Congress directed that the new FirstNet public safety network utilize Long Term Evolution (LTE) radio technology, a developing commercial network standard for broadband transmission. The public safety community identified LTE as the most promising technology to satisfy its growing need for advanced communications capabilities. As a result, voice communications for first responders will migrate to LTE networks using Voice over LTE (VoLTE), a digital protocol under which the network handles voice as just another form of data. ITS is working with the public safety community to ensure that mission-critical voice transmission using this new technology is at least as clear to practitioners in field conditions as current technologies.

 

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Verizon Likes Spectrum Ownership Caps...For Sprint - Urges FCC to Apply Spectrum Screen to Sprint Deals | DSLReports.com

Both AT&T and Verizon have historically fought against capping the amount of spectrum any one company can own, both companies trotting out the spectrum capacity crisis myth when it's convenient.

 

But with Sprint potentially acquiring a spectrum treasure trove with their acquisition of Clearwire, Verizon is busy nudging the FCC to act. Verizon wants the FCC to apply its "spectrum screen" to the deal, potentially limiting how much spectrum Sprint could acquire.

 

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The next Apple TV is still a box, just smaller | GigaOM Tech News

The next Apple TV is still a box, just smaller | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Apple is getting ready to launch the next generation Apple TV — and it’s still just a box. An FCC filing first spotted by Engadget reveals that Apple has been working on an updated Apple TV device with a slightly smaller casing. 5 millimeters smaller (0.2”) on each side, to be precise.

 

The FCC filing is heavily redacted, so we don’t have any actual photos, and don’t know what else is different about the new Apple TV — but it doesn’t look like much will change.

 

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MI: Merit Network, Charlevoix, Schools Partner to Improve Broadband | CBS Detroit

MI: Merit Network, Charlevoix, Schools Partner to Improve Broadband | CBS Detroit | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A new fiber-optic infrastructure agreement will have major benefits for the Charlevoix area.

 

Ann Arbor-based Merit Network Inc. is leasing strands of fiber within the community from Charlevoix Public Schools and the City of Charlevoix. The fiber will connect to Merit’s statewide fiber-optic network and will be used to serve Charlevoix-area organizations.

 

As part of its REACH-3MC project, Merit has been building over 2,200 miles of fiber infrastructure across the Lower and Upper Peninsulas of Michigan. Two routes to Charlevoix are in the process of being constructed and will connect to the 3.4 miles of leased fiber, which will provide redundancy for network traffic going in and out of the Charlevoix area. With the leased fiber, Merit will be able to serve any community anchor organizations within the city.

 

Elwood Downing, vice president of member relations, communications, services and product development for Merit Network, called the cooperation of the city and the school district “a win-win for not only the Charlevoix community, but for all three organizations and the federal government. Due to their collaboration we were able to expedite our REACH-3MC Round 1 fiber construction project, leverage current resources, and connect anchor institutions without having to build fiber within the city. It is community collaborations like this that will help expedite high-speed broadband expansion throughout Michigan and into rural Michigan.”

 

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Tough year for expensive broadband fixes, says key lawmaker | Minnesota Public Radio

Tough year for expensive broadband fixes, says key lawmaker | Minnesota Public Radio | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A legislator key to the broadband issue in Minnesota said he's open to discussing bigger ideas than Gov. Mark Dayton proposed this month but isn't sure there's much appetite for it among lawmakers.

 

Rep. Sheldon Johnson, DFL-St. Paul, chairman of the House Labor, Workplace and Regulated Industries Committee, appeared before the governor's broadband task force this morning to talk about how much of what the task force says is needed will actually get anywhere.

 

Johnson said he was ready to propose legislation creating a broadband development staff position within the Commerce Department, paying to develop a database of fiber projects and instigating a dig-once policy to simplify infrastructure developments. These are included in Dayton's budget proposal and have a total two-year price tag of $500,000.

 

Not included in that proposal were task force recommendations to provide a tax credit or grant to Internet providers as an incentive to increase broadband access and sales tax exemptions for some telecommunications equipment directly related to fiber installation. The task force didn't estimate the cost of the credit but did say the sales tax exemption would cost about $10 million over two years.

 

"Things that cost a lot of money are less likely to move forward," Johnson said.

 

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Telecom Policy Reform Dominates the Discussion at State of Net, Free State Events | Broadband for America

Reform the Universal Service Fund. Clear the regulatory underbrush by eliminating outdated rules.  Resist applying old regulations to new technologies. The list of policy reform suggestions was nearly as long as the roster of esteemed experts in attendance at two communications-centric policy events held in Washington, DC this week, the State of the Net Conference and a Free State Foundation (FSF) luncheon that previewed FSF’s new book, “Communications Law and Policy in the Digital Age: The Next Five Years.”

 

The annual State of the Net Conference is described as the “largest information technology policy conference in the U.S. and the only one with over 50 percent Congressional staff and government policymakers in attendance.” Regulatory reform was center stage at the 2013 Conference. Panel discussions looked at not only what legacy regulations should be removed in the Digital Age, but how crafting sound Internet policy could restore the U.S. to economic greatness.

 

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Broadband Bringing Middle America Back from the Brink | Epoch Times

Broadband Bringing Middle America Back from the Brink | Epoch Times | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Six years ago, the tiny rural town of Dawsonville, Ga., some 60 miles north of Atlanta, was facing a dire future, but through the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program, a cutting-edge, fiber-optic broadband network opened doors and offered solutions.

 

Like many regional communities, Dawsonville’s local industries were struggling, and with the national economy contracting, civic leaders wondered how the town would survive. At that time, Bruce Abraham and colleagues on the board of directors at the telecommunications agency North Georgia Network (NGN) did not know “[optic] fiber from muffins.” 

 

That all changed, however, when a government grant helped the company roll out its “big honking network.” The digital age had arrived in the tiny town, and prospects for the future suddenly looked bright. 

 

“We have raised expectations by bringing this infrastructure into the region,” Abraham said at a forum at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., in early January. Initially, it was a challenge to bring the community on board—it took a “push affect” to get it going— but “now everybody’s pulling us … and it’s a great phenomenon,” he said.

 

The forum focused on the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP), a national awards program designed to encourage access to high-speed Internet in regions across the United States.

 

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The Rise and History of MOOCs - Infographic and Prezi Presentation | eLearning Industry

The Rise and History of MOOCs - Infographic and Prezi Presentation | eLearning Industry | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In 2008, the MOOC term was coined.


In 2011, Stanford Univeristy's Fall Al class attracts over 150,000 online enrollees.


In 2012... If you are interested in the Rise of the MOOCs I highly encourage you to see the following infographic!

At the end you will find a excellent presentation of The History of MOOCs by Alyssa Martin

 

You may also find the following articles useful:

 

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Gina Anderson CEO Mopi16 's curator insight, February 1, 2013 8:43 AM

Provides some background and history for those wanting a historical perspective. 

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MA: 2012 Recap and Plans for 2013 | WiredWest

2012 was a busy year for WiredWest that included the addition of 16 new towns to the Cooperative, bringing the current membership to 42 towns eager to work together to create a long-term, comprehensive solution to the problem of inadequate broadband access.

 

Regular meetings of WiredWest’s organizational bodies were conducted throughout the year, with Board of Directors meeting monthly, Executive Committee meeting weekly and sub-committees meeting as needed.

 

WiredWest launched our new website in 2012, and has continued with a social media presence on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

 

Significant work was undertaken in 2012 to enable financing and buildout of the network. That work was made possible by grants from the Massachusetts Broadband Institute, Berkshire Regional Planning Commission and the Central Berkshire Fund, in addition to support from donations, Cooperative membership fees, and thousands of volunteer hours.

 

In the spring of 2012, WiredWest conducted a comprehensive market survey in our member towns. The survey provided detailed information on residents’ satisfaction and usage of existing services, and demand for new services. The results indicated strong demand for the network across the region, and they are being used to develop service offerings and support our pro-forma financial statements.

 

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Phone unlocking ban could hit you in the wallet | TechHive

Phone unlocking ban could hit you in the wallet | TechHive | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As of Saturday, your options for owning an unlocked phone become far more limited. You can ask your carrier to unlock it—and good luck with that—or you can pay a premium to manufacturers like Apple or Google for a new unlocked phone. You just can’t unlock your phone yourself—at least, not legally.

 

That decision was made not by voters, the courts, or even Congress. It was made by one man, 83-year-old Congressional Librarian James Hadley Billington, who is responsible for interpreting the meaning of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Billington decided last October that unlocking your phone yourself is a violation of the Act, which was originally written to prevent digital piracy.


When Billington made his decision, he also granted a 90-day exemption period in which people could still buy phones that they could later unlock, but only after asking their carrier to do it and getting “no” for an answer. That period ends Saturday. After that, the question of whether or not the smartphone you buy is truly your own gets a little fuzzy.

 

The idea that a decision that will affect so many, and involves so much money, could rest on a single unelected person is bizarre at best and absurd at worst.

 

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Cisco to Buy AT&T's Favorite SON Startup | Light Reading

Cisco to Buy AT&T's Favorite SON Startup | Light Reading | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Cisco Systems Inc. plans to spend US$475 million on 4G technology startup Intucell, which already has a network-wide deal with AT&T Inc.under its belt.


Intucell, based in Ra'anana, Israel, produces self-optimization network (SON) technology to improve 4G network performance. SON technology performs multiple tasks, such as automatically detecting when a site is down and routing users to the next-best cell, or enabling cells to share bandwidth when network capacity is limited.

 

Intucell has been working with AT&T on SON since April 2011. The operator announced in February 2012 that it would deploy the optimization techniques on its network during the year ahead.

 

John Donovan, senior EVP of AT&T technology and network operations, said of Intucell's technology in February 2012 that it had shown "as much as a 10 percent improvement in call retainability, 10 percent improvement in throughput speeds and 15 percent reduction in overloading."

 

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Time Warner Cable Hiking Rates: Basic Cable Up 8.2% – $72.50/Month in Southern California | Stop the Cap!

Time Warner Cable Hiking Rates: Basic Cable Up 8.2% – $72.50/Month in Southern California | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Time Warner Cable customers in southern California are bracing themselves for a rate increase that will raise prices by 8.2 percent — almost four times the rate of inflation.

 

The price for digital basic cable, the most popular cable television package, will rise from $67 to $72.50 per month. The price charged to record shows from that package is also going up. “DVR service,” which does not include the DVR equipment itself, is rising 18.6% — from $10.95 to $12.99 a month.

 

Stop the Cap! reader Steve in Carlsbad adds his rate increase notification also mentions price increases for bundled packages:

 

"All Standard and Basic packages and bundles will increase by $5.00 and all digital video packages and bundles will increase by $3.00."

 

The rate increases are by no means over. As Time Warner mails its price change notifications for 2013 to customers, it also signed a 25-year deal with the Los Angeles Dodgers for yet another regional sports channel showcasing the baseball team. Industry insiders estimate the deal is worth between $7-8 billion and could eventually cost cable subscribers an additional $5 a month, whether they watch the channel or not.

 

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U.S. kids need computer-science education | USA Today

U.S. kids need computer-science education | USA Today | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Estonia is a small country in the Baltic region with a population of 1.3 million. It's probably best known in the tech world as the home of the engineers that developed Skype, but it's soon to be known for far more than that.

 

Why? Because Estonia recently announced that it is teaching all first graders how to code, and one of the best ways to seed innovation is to spread computer-science education.

 

The future of the U.S. economy depends upon technological progress, and learning basic skills like computational thinking and programming are great ways to expose students at an early age to its importance. If the U.S. doesn't follow suit, we will lose out in the global economy.

 

By 2018, there will be nearly three times as many job openings requiring computer science knowledge than qualified applicants. This goes well beyond just becoming a professional programmer -- learning computer science can teach problem solving skills, new ways of breaking down complex scenarios, and a means to build something tangible in our software-driven age.

 

Equipped with this mindset, Ben Gleitzman, an MIT alum with a computer science (CS) degree, started a program to teach high school kids several years ago. When pitching it to a principal at a top New York City school, he was informed "our students need to be learning Latin, not computer science." Sure, Latin has its uses, but to bluntly say students should not be given the opportunity to learn computer science is irresponsible and short-sighted. And this was not an isolated incident -- he repeatedly received pushback from school administrators on teaching CS.

 

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Bobby Lewis's comment, June 29, 2013 7:23 AM
To the Students of Mr. Lewis, write a response to the article. Your response must be four sentences. Turn in assignment to Edmodo to receive the badge ( I have an opinion)
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FCC Announces Details For January 31, 2013 Telemedicine Demonstration | Benton Foundation

FCC Announces Details For January 31, 2013 Telemedicine Demonstration | Benton Foundation | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Federal Communications Commission announced details for a January 31, 2013 telemedicine demonstration by Georgia Telehealth Partnership, in conjunction with an FCC staff presentation at the Open Commission meeting earlier that day regarding the FCC’s ongoing work to expand broadband access and spectrum availability for health care uses.

 

Telemedicine and telehealth applications can improve the quality of health care delivered to patients in rural areas, generate savings in the cost of providing health care, and reduce the time and expense associated with travel to distant locations to receive or provide care. The demonstration will include a simulated patient examination with the Coffee Regional Medical Center in Bacon County, Georgia, a participant in the Rural Health Care Pilot Program. The demonstration will be followed by audience questions and comments.

 

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Fatima Zunara's curator insight, October 19, 2014 11:54 AM

how can we define e-health ?

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Tech companies cheer for Senate proposal to increase immigration | Ars Technica

Tech companies cheer for Senate proposal to increase immigration | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Comprehensive immigration reform is generally considered an issue that is very likely to come up in the 2013 Congressional session. Striking a deal that will satisfy all sides, though, will be a complex negotiation.

 

However, a small group of Senators from both parties aren't waiting on a grand bargain over immigration to move ahead with a particular slice of immigration reform that's important to the tech industry: increasing the number of highly skilled workers that are allowed to come to the US.

 

The Immigration Innovation Act of 2013 was introduced today in the Senate and is already sponsored by five senators from each party. The bill's particulars are laid out at the website of one of its sponsors, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT). The bill would:

 

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