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Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
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On YouTube, Amateur Is the New Pro | NYTimes.com

On YouTube, Amateur Is the New Pro | NYTimes.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A kid from Nebraska shows up in New York City to make it big. This kid was Bryan Odell, a 21-year-old college dropout who lived with his parents. Gangly, with curly blond hair, he looked and talked­ as if he arrived straight from central casting. (“I was just a kid from Nebraska,” he says.) But central casting had nothing to do with it. As an aspiring YouTuber, he cast himself.

 

Odell’s destination was the Manhattan office of Google Inc., YouTube’s corporate parent. He was among the 25 winners of a competition called Next Up, which is aimed at “accelerating the growth of the next big YouTube stars,” as an official YouTube blog explained. The prize included four days of tips and training from “YouTube experts” in New York. It also included a $35,000 check, no strings attached.

 

Founded in 2005 and owned by Google since 2007, YouTube today contains multitudes: 72 hours of video are uploaded onto the service every minute. For some, it is an infinite museum of moving images: Patti Smith singing “You Light Up My Life” on a 1970s kids’ show; Mike Wallace puffing Luckys through an interview with Salvador Dalí; forgotten teenage dance shows. For others, this is the medium of the one-off “viral” video — the often accidentally funny home movie or blooper that is e-mailed, linked and tweeted into collective consciousness. There is also an endless variety of produced material: “supercut” mash-ups, TED Talks, book trailers, brand campaigns.

 

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GA: Broadband network taking shape - Rome News Tribune

GA: Broadband network taking shape - Rome News Tribune | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sections of a new high-speed broadband network in Northwest Georgia will start coming online in the next few months, and work is slated to start in Alabama this fall.

 

“We’ll be testing different segments in July and August,” said Ken Carlton of Appalachian Valley Fiber Network. “When we turn one on ... we’ll have a kind of ribbon-cutting and explain the advantages to the whole community.”

 

The Rome-based AVFN is a spinoff of Parker FiberNet in Summerville, which put up its existing fiber optic network as the local match for a $21 million federal stimulus package grant.

 

It’s a public-private partnership, so any Internet provider may connect to the middle-mile fiber being installed in 12 counties. The network is designed to provide service to schools, libraries, community and technical colleges, government, health care and public safety organizations.

 

“The level of service the AVFN network will provide enables our region to match or exceed the broadband speed and capacity of virtually any metropolitan area in the country,” said Parker owner David Parker.

 

Carlton said there are no signed contracts with last-mile providers yet — the utilities that serve private homes and businesses — but there are tentative agreements with at least three he’s not ready to officially announce.

 

Parker will be one, of course. The AFVN website also lists Cal-Net in Calhoun, Fibercom in Cartersville, Trenton Telephone Co. in Trenton and Chickamauga Telephone as “private partners” and network supporters.

 

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Opposition Growing to SB 1161 - The Worst Telecom Bill Ever in California | California Progress Report

Why has a seemingly innocuous bill, SB 1161(Padilla) attracted the support of some of the biggest corporations on the planet, as well as vociferous opposition from consumer, labor and economic justice organizations? According to supporters, SB 1161 doesn’t really do anything new; it just “affirms” existing laws.

 

Fortunately, that’s the kind of deception that withers in the light of day.

SB 1161 is actually the most anti-consumer bill ever introduced in California because it permits the telecom industry to dictate the terms of its own regulation, or as the case would have it, deregulation.

 

The impact of SB 1161 goes far beyond its stated goal of protecting the Internet and fostering innovation and job creation in California’s high tech industry. In fact, the bill has nothing to do with the internet. What the bill does is eliminate minimum standards for all telephone services that utilize VOIP (voice over internet protocol) or IP-enabled networks (internet protocol) - which have nothing to do with the Internet.

 

Its real impact will be in tying regulators’ hands. In a few years, when the telecom industry completes its transition to VOIP phone service, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) will lose authority over all telecom, and consumers like you and me will lose all our rights.

 

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ACTAfacts? ACTAfiction? Or Just Unsourced Pro-ACTA Propaganda Purporting To Be Objective? | Techdirt

ACTAfacts? ACTAfiction? Or Just Unsourced Pro-ACTA Propaganda Purporting To Be Objective? | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

actafacts.com, a new pro-ACTA website, made the rounds earlier this month, along with a new report claiming ACTA would create billions of euros in growth and hundreds of thousands of new jobs.

 

Glyn Moody was quick to pull the facts apart. FSF called it "3rd-rate astroturfing" and EDRI suspected "parody."

 

This week actafacts.com resurfaced on fliers at the European Parliament and on the entrance door to the EU Trade committee, prior to an important vote on whether to recommend the European Parliament to reject or accept ACTA on July 4th.

 

The flyer, displaying a majestic container ship plowing through a quiet sea, was as clear in its advocacy -- "A vote against ACTA would be a vote against Europe's economy. Get the facts at actafacts.com" -- as it was unclear about its origins (potentially violating EU rules). Oh, and the container ship image? Yeah, it's infringing according to Jeremie Zimmermann.

 

This, and other last-minute-lobbying-attempts, seem to have had little impact. The trade committee voted down ACTA. However, it's interesting to analyze who's actually behind this now that the monster has reared it's head.

 

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Severe storms cause Amazon Web Services outage | GigaOM Cloud Computing News

Severe storms cause Amazon Web Services outage | GigaOM Cloud Computing News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

For the second time in less than a month, Amazon’s Northern Virginia data center has suffered an outage and is impacting many popular services. Amazon’s status dashboard shows that the Elastic Compute, Elastic Cache, Elastic MapReduce and Relational Database Services have been out for over an hour. Amazon is blaming the outage on what it describes as “a power event.”

 

Dominion Virginia Power, which is an electricity provider to many data centers in the Virginia region says that severe storms in the region have disrupted power supplies.

 

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Telcos succeed in killing off muni broadband in South Carolina | CivSource

Telcos succeed in killing off muni broadband in South Carolina | CivSource | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Following a playbook that first succeeded in neighboring North Carolina, telecom lobbyists led by AT&T have been successful in passing a bill in the South Carolina legislature that makes it nearly impossible for cities to build their own broadband networks. The bill passed on Wednesday and is expected to be signed by the Governor.

 

As CivSource has reported, municipal broadband networks across the nation have been under attack by private broadband and telecommunications services providers who say that municipally backed networks are unfair competition.

 

Existing municipal networks in states like Minnesota are typically created through a local public bond issue and provide affordable broadband access to local residents. These networks are especially important in lower population areas, where private providers have explicitly said that there is no business case to build there.

 

Despite having no intention to build, these private companies want to make sure no one else does either, effectively cutting off much of rural America from broadband and capping the economic development potential of many areas of the country.

 

“We’ve all been trying to find a broadband solution that was economically viable to get out to rural America, and we’re not finding one to be quite candid. The best opportunity we have is LTE,” AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson, said on an earnings conference call where he discussed the company’s view of expansion.

 

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Nearly 50,000 People Ask Why The Government Is Seizing Their Digital Files | Techdirt

Nearly 50,000 People Ask Why The Government Is Seizing Their Digital Files | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The folks at Demand Progress today filed a brief in one part of the ongoing Megaupload case: the fight over users being able to get their files back. The DOJ is trying to block this, while also wanting the evidence destroyed.

 

The MPAA says it is okay with data being returned... if there is a 100% guarantee that no infringing works are accessed (an impossibly high standard). The Demand Progress filing points out that this whole thing flies in the face of being innocent until proven guilty, and argues that users who are non-parties to the lawsuit should have access to their files.

 

Related to this, Demand Progress has also put together a petition, asking people to sign on to support a user's right to his or her own files -- and against the government just magically taking files out of the cloud:

 

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Judge appears skeptical towards government position on Megaupload data | Ars Technica

Judge appears skeptical towards government position on Megaupload data | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Today US District Judge Liam O'Grady deferred a decision on whether Megaupload users would get their data back, saying he would schedule an evidentiary hearing at a later date.

 

A date for this later hearing was not specified, but it will likely determine whether the Department of Justice committed a search-and-seizure that would require the DOJ to make users' files accessible to them again, or whether "the court should treat Goodwin and other Megaupload users as unsecured creditors who can ask for their data back when the DOJ's case against Megaupload is finished," as PCWorld reported Assistant US Attorney Andrew Peterson as saying earlier today.

 

Still, Judge O'Grady appeared skeptical of the government's position that Megaupload was merely a service provider rather than a holder of property.

 

"Goodwin isn’t 'asking that service be restored,'" O’Grady said, according to Bloomberg. "He’s asking for his data back, and that’s property, right?"

 

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From the printed page to bits: new tools for mass digitisation | EU Info Society News

From the printed page to bits: new tools for mass digitisation | EU Info Society News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

EU-funded research has developed a suite of automated text recognition and processing tools that improve the fidelity and searchability of digitised texts from museum and library archives.

 

'These days anything that is not digital is not visible,' states Hildelies Balk, head of European Projects at Koninklijke Bibliotheek in The Hague, Netherlands. 'For libraries and national archives this problem is even more pronounced today than before because most people only look at the internet now. If something is not online then they presume it is not available. So national libraries, archives and museums now have an obligation to make everything available electronically. We need to scan and digitise books, documents and printed materials en masse as quickly and as accurately as we can.'

 

The digitisation process is relatively straightforward. First you scan a document to create an image of the page - and this is where the process stopped in the earliest days of digitisation. Today, however, the scanned image is then processed, typically using 'Optical character recognition' (OCR) software to extract the text into a digital format. Once the text is digitised this way it makes the entire document available for indexing and accessible to search engines.

 

The searchability of historical texts suddenly transforms collections into a powerful cultural resource. Previously you had to go to a specific institution and look for a particular document. Today a quick keyword search, for example, can pull back thousands of documents; you can identify a huge volume of important sources with no prior knowledge at all.

 

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South Carolina passes bill against municipal broadband | Ars Technica

South Carolina passes bill against municipal broadband | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

South Carolina has become the latest state in the union to pass a state-level bill that effectively makes it difficult, if not impossible, for municipalities to create their own publicly owned Internet service provider that could compete with private corporations. The bill passed the South Carolina General Assembly and Senate on Wednesday and awaits the signature of the state’s governor.

 

"It’s not an absolute ban, but it makes it pretty tough," Matt Wood, policy director at Free Press, a digital advocacy group, told Ars on Thursday.

 

Oddly, the bill also defines broadband as being "not less than one hundred ninety kilobits per second," which is pretty laughable by any measure. Municipal broadband watchers like Phillip Dampier also say that the bill’s passage shows the effective lobbying of AT&T, the state’s largest telco, who has contributed thousands of dollars in campaign contributions.

 

Dampier and others also allege that the bill was crafted by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), a conservative think-tank that lobbies local, state, and federal representatives to push for bills and craft ideal draft legislation that are conducive to its values. On its website, ALEC says that cities should not be allowed to create broadband utilities in competition with private corporations.

 

"If municipalities are inclined to pursue broadband initiatives then certain safeguards must be put in place in order to ensure that private providers, with whom the municipality will compete with, are not disadvantaged by the municipality in the exercise of its bonding and taxing authority, management of rights of way, assessment of fees or taxes, or in any other way," the organization writes.

 

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Can IBM eggheads slay Boston’s traffic woes? | GigaOM CleanTech

Can IBM eggheads slay Boston’s traffic woes? | GigaOM CleanTech | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

I’m betting no, but then again I’m from Boston where negativity is a way of life.

 

Boston won the opportunity to pick the brains of six IBM engineers — including one from Tokyo — who flew in to check out its traffic situation and figure out a way to consolidate, analyze and use existing traffic data feeds as well as new data sources including (of course) Twitter feeds, to ease the city’s notorious traffic jams. The effort was reported in Friday’s Boston Globe.

 

The Internet of things links data flowing from traffic lights, CO2 sensors, even cars themselves, in a way that could automate traffic re-routing in what could be a time- and gas-saving assist for commuters.

 

“There are literally millions of data points per second — from GPS and cellphone technology — that can be analyzed and made intelligent,” Steve Wysmuller, an IBM Global Services exec, told the Globe.

 

The IBM experts, along with techies from Boston University and the Boston’s Office of New Urban Mechanics, were to come up with a plan to better manage traffic — by spotting problems faster — and to minimize carbon emissions with better bicycling, parking and traffic management policies, according to the City’s web site.

 

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Seven Point Game Plan for a Winning Broadband Co-op Strategy | GigaBit Nation on BlogTalk Radio

Seven Point Game Plan for a Winning Broadband Co-op Strategy | GigaBit Nation on BlogTalk Radio | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

How does your community get out from under the thumb of large incumbents responsible only to Wall Street and win better broadband? By becoming independent of these anti-market forces and building a true community network.

 

Frank Ohrtman, former manager in the Colorado Office of Information Technology, explains how his regional co-op unites the efforts of 40 of the states 64 counties. They are achieving independence by planning, funding, building and operating local broadband networks.

 

Gigabit Nation host Craig Settles recent report on alternative funding strategies for broadband strongly advocates for broadband co-ops. Ohrtman lays out a seven-point game plan for making this strategy work and creating a financially sustainable network. Tell your colleagues, community stakeholders and everyone else who wants better broadband to listen, learn and do.

 

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Boxee and Comcast Kiss and Make Up - Strike Agreement Over Basic Tier Encryption | DSLReports.com

Back in February you might recall that Boxee warned about a cable industry effort to encrypt basic tiers of cable programming. That would have killed services like Boxee's Live TV dongle, which for $50 (on top of the $200 Boxee box) allows users to watch over-the-air and ClearQAM cable channels.

 

Apparently Boxee and Comcast have been hashing out their differences and this week proposed a potential solution to the FCC: the creation of a new class of set top, the Ethernet – Digital Transport Adapter (or E-DTA). The E-DTA would deliver cable signals over a local network using the DLNA protocol, essentially being the most streamlined TV gateway server possible, allowing Boxee services to continue working even if the cable industry's encryption push is successful.

 

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CA: State bill threatens universal access to open internet | Access Humboldt

Consumer groups, public interest advocates and local government jurisdictions across the nation are raising concerns about industry backed legislation to prohibit States from overseeing, regulating or implementing public policies that will ensure universal access to the open internet.

 

Free Press is organizing actions http://act2.freepress.net/sign/defeat_sb1161/

 and a recent report by Cheryl Leanza describes the situation, "States Fight ALEC-Inspired Deregulation of Internet Services." http://www.progressivestates.org/news/dispatch/states-fight-alec-inspire...

 

On Monday June 18th, national attention will focus on Sacramento, California as the State Assembly Committee on Utilities and Commerce will hear SB 1161, an industry sponsored measure that would prohibit the Public Utilities Commission and all local government jurisdictions in the State from implementing broadband policies.

 

California Broadband Policy Network provides analysis in "Padilla's AT&T backed bill places Californians in jeopardy," here http://californiabroadband.org/blogs/Xavier/padillas-att-backed-bill-pla... . The Senate Committee hearing convened by co-author Committee chair Senator Alex Padilla is featured video here: http://californiabroadband.org/

 

Access Humboldt (AH) has consistently expressed concerns about the Bill - http://accesshumboldt.net/site/state-legislation-threatens-local-access-....

 

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Telemedicine market to reach $2.5B by 2018 | Healthcare IT News

Telemedicine market to reach $2.5B by 2018 | Healthcare IT News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The thriving telemedicine market hasn't shown signs of abating any time soon, according to a new report by Companies & Markets. The report shows that in 2011, the global telemedicine monitoring market reached a value of $736 million and, according to officials, is poised to increase to $2.5 billion by 2018.

 

This significant growth in the global market can be attributed to numerous factors as telemedicine monitoring provides ways to improve clinical care delivery to patients while also reducing the need for hospitalizations and visits to the emergency room.

 

Telemedicine is the use of telecommunication and information technologies in order to provide clinical healthcare at a distance. It helps to eliminate barriers and improve access to medical services that would often not be readily available in rural communities. The technology can also be utilized in critical care and emergency environments.

 

Having the ability to accurately access patient condition via a combination of advanced testing and telemonitoring creates the opportunity to intervene during a clinical emergency and permits education provisions regarding healthy living in a way that is likely to create compliance with clinician recommendations.

 

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Mapping the tubes | The Economist

Mapping the tubes | The Economist | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

“GOVERNMENTS of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind.” So begins John Perry Barlow, once a lyricist for the Grateful Dead and now a cyber-libertarian, in a tract he penned in 1996, entitled, “A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace”. It is a poetic summation of the common image of the internet as an ethereal, non-physical thing—an immanent Cloud that is at once everywhere and for ever on the far side of a screen.

 

For Andrew Blum, a writer for Wired, that illusion was shattered on the day a squirrel chewed through the wire connecting his house to the internet. That rude reminder of the net’s physicality sparked an interest in the infrastructure that makes the internet possible—the globe-spanning tangle of wires, cables, routers and data centres that most users take entirely for granted. His book is an engaging reminder that, cyber-Utopianism aside, the internet is as much a thing of flesh and steel as any industrial-age lumber mill or factory.

 

It is also an excellent introduction to the nuts and bolts of how exactly it all works. The term “internet” is a collective noun for thousands of smaller networks, run by corporations, governments, universities and private business, all stitched together to form one (mostly) seamless, global, “internetworked” whole. In theory, the internet is meant to be widely distributed and heavily resilient, with many possible routes between any two destinations. In practice, a combination of economics and geography means that much of its infrastructure is concentrated in a comparatively small number of places.

 

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NYC Housing Authority Puts Broadband on Wheels | GovTech

NYC Housing Authority Puts Broadband on Wheels | GovTech | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Much like the lovable ice cream trucks that drive around neighborhoods and sell delicious treats, the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) is driving a van equipped with laptops, Wi-Fi and printers to communities in need of computer access.

 

The pilot project, called Digital Vans, began in February. The NYCHA started the program to help community members search for jobs online, print resumes and other general Internet use. The program currently uses one van, with another one purchased and slated to be put in service later this year. Each week the vehicle is parked at various locations in the Bronx, Manhattan and Brooklyn that have limited or no access to broadband or high-speed Internet, according to the NYCHA.

 

The van is outfitted with eight laptops equipped with Microsoft Office software, printers and broadband access. Those interested can use the van’s resources for as long as the van is open. (Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) If people are waiting, users are limited to a 30-minute session, said D'Andra Van Heusen-Thomas, NYCHA’s manager of educational services in the Department of Community Operations.

 

She said users working on resumes and cover letters are given a free 1 GB flash drive to keep for storing their documents.

 

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Seattle's Short History of and Bleak Future for Community Broadband | community broadband networks

Seattle's Short History of and Bleak Future for Community Broadband | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

We have followed Seattle's on-again, off-again consideration of a community broadband network for years and have occasionally noted the successful cable network in nearby Tacoma.

 

Seattle Met's Matthew Halverson has penned a short, impressive article explaining the trials and tribulations of Tacoma while also exploring why Seattle's Mayor has abandoned his goal of a broadband public option.

 

Before the massive cable consolidation that has left us with a handful of monopolists, we had a larger number of smaller monopolists that abused their market power to limit competition. One of the worst was TCI, which refused to upgrade its awful services in Tacoma, which pushed Tacoma to build its own network. TCI suddenly decided it did care about Tacoma.

 

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Supreme Court Won't Hear Challenge To Media Rules | National Journal

Supreme Court Won't Hear Challenge To Media Rules | National Journal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Federal Communications Commission rules that put limits on the cross-ownership of broadcast stations and newspapers in a single market will stand for the time being, Reuters reports.

 

The Supreme Court denied a bid to hear appeals by Media General in a case dating back to 2008 that challenged the FCC's authority to modify its rules.

 

Since 2008, the FCC has required waivers for broadcasters operating in a top 20 market to acquire a newspaper in that market. Broadcast companies, including Media General, Tribune Company and others challenged the rule on First Amendment grounds.

 

"We're disappointed the Supreme Court declined to review rules that limit local broadcasters' ability to compete with our national and multinational pay programming competitors. NAB will continue to advocate for modernizing ownership rules that stem from an era of 'I Love Lucy'," said Dennis Wharton, spokesman for the National Association of Broadcasters.

 

The FCC didn't have a perfect day at the Court, however. Justices declined to hear an appeal by the FCC to reinstate a $550,00 fine against CBS Corp. stemming from the infamous "wardrobe malfunction" in the 2004 Super Bowl broadcast, in which the bare breast of singer Janet Jackson was aired on live TV.

 

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What if FiberNet Monticello Had Been Canned in 2008? | community broadband network

What if FiberNet Monticello Had Been Canned in 2008? | community broadband network | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Monticello faced a number of key decision moments throughout the history of its FiberNet. Given the recent changes in management and decision not to make up the different between debt service and revenues, some may be wondering if proceeding with FiberNet was the smart decision.

 

It was 2008 and the economy hadn't entered its death spiral. Monticello had overwhelmingly voted by a 3:1 margin for the local government to bond for and build the network.

 

When Monticello was beginning to sell its bonds, the incumbent telephone company (TDS) filed a lawsuit against the City, with the extremely dubious claim that Monticello did not have the authority to do what other cities in Minnesota had done. Courts later tossed it, finding that the TDS suit had no merit and making TDS reimburse Monticello for some of its costs due to the frivolous suit.

 

But the goal was never to win the lawsuit, it was to delay and harass. Monticello had to wait a year to begin building its network. Though TDS had previously maintained that its DSL was just fine for the needs of residents and busineses, it began pulling permits to significantly upgrade its DSL to a FTTH product. (TDS has steadfastly maintained, while investing more in Monticello than any other Minnesota community, that community networks result in less investment from incumbents.)

 

At any rate, Monticello had a decision. It faced an expensive court case and the City's action was apparently driving TDS to improve its poor network. Monticello could have backed down in the face of TDS' bullying.

 

And if it had? From what we have seen elsewhere, this is our best guess:

 

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USTR Rejects Rep. Issa's Request To Observe TPP Negotiations | Techdirt

USTR Rejects Rep. Issa's Request To Observe TPP Negotiations | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

So much for "transparency." While the USTR continues to talk up its faux transparency as if it's real transparency, the truth is always going to come out. Earlier this week, we wrote about how Rep. Darrell Issa had asked the USTR if he could come and observe the next round of TPP negotiations, taking place next week in San Diego.

 

The USTR took all of two days to reject such a request, showing that it's not at all interested in any sort of actual transparency with the Congress who is supposed to oversee issues of international commerce. The USTR told Issa he could only attend the "public" portions, like anyone else.

 

In response, Issa put out the following statement:

 

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Senator Rockefeller Says He Doesn't Trust Industry to Regulate Itself on Privacy | National Journal

Senator Rockefeller Says He Doesn't Trust Industry to Regulate Itself on Privacy | National Journal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va. said Thursday that he doesn't trust that companies can self-regulate themselves when it comes to protecting consumer privacy online and will continue to press for legislation.

 

"No I don't trust companies to do what's right when it runs against their bottom lines in absolute terms," Rockefeller said following a hearing on consumer privacy. Much of the hearing focused on the issue of whether to pass legislation to give consumers the choice of whether they want to be tracked when they surf the Internet. The issue has become a concern as companies increasingly track consumers as they visit websites or engage in other activities online in order to target ads based on consumer preferences.

 

Last year, Rockefeller introduced legislation that would require the Federal Trade Commission to develop rules giving consumers a do-not-track option when they surf the Web and would require companies to honor consumer tracking requests. Rockefeller acknowledged the issue will likely slip to next year, but said he would continue to pursue the issue in the next Congress. "Probably it's a next year thing," he said.

 

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South Carolina Erects New Barrier to Community Broadband - Another Big Political Win for AT&T | DSLReports.com

South Carolina Erects New Barrier to Community Broadband - Another Big Political Win for AT&T | DSLReports.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

South Carolina has effectively passed H. 3508, a bill backed by regional incumbent AT&T (see our previous report), intended to make it more difficult for towns and cities to wire themselves for broadband -- even when nobody else will.

 

The move comes on the heels of a similar effort in North Carolina last year, where regional incumbents Time Warner Cable and CenturyLink passed a similar bill after four previous failed attempts.

 

The bills are being pushed by companies who, in many of these markets, have failed to adequately meet broadband demand -- and in AT&T's case have frozen next-gen expansion plans.

 

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The Tale of Southwest Minnesota Broadband Services | Blandin on Broadband

We’ve been following the fiber project in Southwest Minnesota for a while – definitely since they were awarded the ARRA funding. They have been on time deploying fiber and great about sending updates.

 

Broadband Properties just ran an article that really outlines their project and progress. I won’t recap the whole article because as I said we’ve bee following their progress – but I wanted to share the highlights on why they think they have been successful. I think their notes will be helpful to others:

 

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Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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AOL reorganizes, creates three new groups | CNET News

AOL reorganizes, creates three new groups | CNET News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AOL announced two substantial changes to its business this morning.

 

First up, the company says it has promoted CFO Artie Minson Jr. to chief operating officer. In his new role, Minson will be in charge of three new units AOL that has established as part of a reorganization focused on "driving growth and improved profitability."

 

According to AOL, it's business will now be aligned in three distinct operating groups -- AOL Membership, Content Brands, and Advertising.com. All three operating units will report directly to Minson.

 

A fourth group, made up of sales, technology, communications, brand marketing, and other support areas, will report to CEO Tim Armstrong.

 

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