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Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
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Time Warner Cable Suddenly Forced To Compete In Kansas City; Complains Google Has 'Unfair Advantage' | Techdirt

Time Warner Cable Suddenly Forced To Compete In Kansas City; Complains Google Has 'Unfair Advantage' | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

That didn't take long. Google's move into the fiber business has already irritated the incumbents (Time Warner Cable and AT&T). Faced with a faster, cheaper rival, the two companies (at this point, mainly Time Warner) are complaining that the incentives provided to Google are "unfair."

 

'In order to create the infrastructure for the cable and gigabit internet service, Google was given everything from free fiber, government employees, buildings, and discounted services; an agreement that a Time Warner Cable spokesman feels puts them "at a competitive advantage compared with not just us but also the other competitors in the field."'

 

Time Warner's spokesman seems to misunderstand what the word "incentive" means. When cities attempt to lure businesses they want, they offer concessions, grants, tax breaks, etc. It's assumed that the incumbent businesses have grabbed substantial marketshare and, therefore, don't need to be given incentives to do anything more than stay. If Time Warner is upset that its new competition was given this in exchange for selecting Kansas City, it can't blame anyone else for its failure to offer better services. It certainly was in the position to do so, but it never occurred to the incumbent(s) to make any great leaps in service and speed until it was "unfairly" forced to do so.

 

This complaining about being forced to offer a competitive service is nauseating enough. But this sentence tops it:

 

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The Next Big Battle in Internet Policy | Slate Magazine

The Next Big Battle in Internet Policy | Slate Magazine | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

For two years, network neutrality, the nation’s most high-profile and contentious Internet policy conflict has taken a backseat to other debates—privacy investigations by the Federal Trade Commission, cybersecurity orders from the White House, proposed copyright legislation like SOPA and PIPA, software patents in courts, and censorship abroad. After nearly a decade of (rarely productive) debate, net neutrality—restrictions on Internet service providers to ensure consumers experience freedom online—has rarely been in the news since early 2011.

 

But that quiet won’t last much longer. We have merely been in an extended intermission, and soon we will watch the third act in this play unfold. At stake is access to the mobile Internet on the handhelds and tablets in our pockets—as well as access by the chips increasingly embedded in our clothes, toasters, and heart monitors.

 

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EU set to give UK’s rural broadband plan its blessing? | TeleGeography

Following reports in July 2012 that the UK’s rural broadband rollout strategy had been placed on hold while European regulators examine it, the Financial Times is today reporting that the European competition watchdog has given its approval to the plans. The news source claims that Joaquin Almunia, the European Commissioner for Competition, has suggested he is happy for state funds to be used to support the initiative, on the proviso that some small changes are made to the design of the government scheme.

 

As previously reported by CommsUpdate, the scheme was paused after confirmation that just two companies – fixed line incumbent BT and Japanese technology firm Fujitsu – had been selected to receive funding from Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK), a team within the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) set up to deliver the government’s broadband strategy.

 

BDUK’s main role is to allocate and distribute GBP530 million (USD829 million) in funding with a view to bringing superfast broadband to the third of UK homes and businesses which are not expected to be provided for by commercial rollouts.

 

The state had originally aimed for an open process in which community groups and private firms would be commissioned to build Europe’s ‘best superfast broadband network’, with BDUK having published a framework covering 35 local authority areas, under which contractors competed to win equipment supply deals.

 

However, with claims that the selection criteria had proved insurmountable, a number of companies, including Geo and Cable & Wireless withdrew from the process last year.

 

It had been suggested that one of the main concerns with the setup was that BT was unprepared to offer access on a sufficiently open basis to the infrastructure it will roll out, with Brussels thought to want the incumbent to allow rival operators to be able to rent its dark fibre.

 

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Chicago extends response deadline for broadband expansion RFI | MuniWireless

Chicago has extended the deadline for responding to the RFI for broadband infrastructure expansion. The new deadline is 31 October 2012. It has also released an Addendum to the RFI, which you should download if you wish to respond.

 

As I mentioned before, Chicago has 3 goals:


- create an open access gigabit fiber network;


- provide free or cheap high speed wired or wireless Internet broadband service;


- free wireless networks in parks and other public spaces.

 

I have posted the two RFI documents (main document and addendum) on Scribd (see below).

 

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FCC Chairman, Experts, Discuss Driving Broadband Adoption and Effects on Economy at Joint Center

FCC Chairman, Experts, Discuss Driving Broadband Adoption and Effects on Economy at Joint Center | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Although it had only been in its new office location for less than three weeks, the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies continued with old business recently with its “Broadband, the Economy, and Driving Adoption” panel discussion.

 

In collaboration with Comcast, the Joint Center gathered a panel of broadband data experts and pragmatists to identify the factors impeding high broadband adoption rates in low adopting communities, share real-world examples of the effects of broadband in low-income and minority communities, and discuss lessons learned in convincing the aforementioned communities to adopt broadband.

 

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Julius Genachowski delivered remarks prior to the main discussion and emphasized the increase in prevalence of broadband across the country.

 

“Four years ago, these issues were issues that technology folks talked about,” he began. “It’s changed dramatically in the last few years, and I’m seeing people all over the country outside of these circles understand the benefits of it.”

 

While technology enthusiasts and people beyond the Beltway recognize and experience the benefits of broadband, Genachowski mentioned that nearly one-third of the United States’ population has not realized the many advantages broadband offers.

 

Bruce Leichtman, president and principal analyst at Leichtman Research Group, and Madura Wijewardena, director of research and policy at the National Urban League Policy Institute, pinpointed the divides within home broadband adoption rates.

 

Leichtman suggested that income and age were significant divides in relation to broadband adoption, noting that nearly all households with incomes above $50,000 subscribe to broadband (91 percent) and have a computer at home (97 percent), while households that earn under $30,000 have lower broadband subscription rates (47 percent) and are not likely to have a home computer (59 percent). He also said that based on his firm’s research, low adoption rates could be attributed to lack of “hardware” and “knowledge,” rather than prior leading reasons such as cost and accessibility.

 

Wijewardena indicated that race and education were also dividers and offered a couple of “optimistic points” regarding the narrowing adoption gap between blacks and whites.

 

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Keyboard College | American RadioWorks

Keyboard College | American RadioWorks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Digital technologies and the Internet are changing how many Americans go to college. From online learning to simulation programs to smart-machine mentors, the 21st-century student will be taught in fundamentally new ways. In this documentary, Stephen Smith asks whether these innovations can help more people get access to higher education and bring down the cost of college without sacrificing learning.

 

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Internet Freedon: Free to choose | The Economist

Internet Freedon: Free to choose | The Economist | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The arrest of a senior executive rarely brings helpful headlines. But when Brazilian authorities briefly detained Google’s country boss on September 26th—for refusing to remove videos from its YouTube subsidiary that appeared to breach electoral laws—they helped the firm repair its image as a defender of free speech.

 

Two weeks earlier those credentials looked tarnished. Google blocked net users in eight countries from viewing a film trailer that had incensed Muslims. In six states, including India and Saudi Arabia, local courts banned the footage. In Egypt and Libya, where protesters attacked American embassies and killed several people, Google took the video down of its own accord.

 

The row sparked concern about how internet firms manage public debate and how companies based in countries that cherish free speech should respond to states that want to constrain it. (Freedom House, a campaigning think-tank, reckons that restrictions on the internet are increasing in 20 of the 47 states it surveys.)

 

In June Google revealed that 45 countries had asked it to block content in the last six months of 2011, up from only four in 2002. Some requests were easily rejected. Officials in the Canadian passport office asked it to block a video advocating independence for Quebec, in which a citizen urinated on his passport and flushed it down the toilet.

 

Most firms do accept that they must follow the laws of countries in which they operate (Nazi content is banned in Germany, for example). Big internet firms can prevent users accessing content their governments consider illegal, while leaving it available to visitors from countries where no prohibition applies. Some pledge to be transparent about their actions—Twitter, like Google, releases six-monthly reports of government requests to block information. It also alerts citizens when it has censored content in their country.

 

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VZ's FiOS expansion's not going to happen, CFO tells investors | FierceIPTV

VZ's FiOS expansion's not going to happen, CFO tells investors | FierceIPTV | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Verizon CFO Fran Shammo has slammed the door on any individuals or communities still hoping Verizon might resume its rollout of FiOS services beyond its current franchise obligations.

 

Speaking at the Goldman Sachs Communacopia Conference in New York City, Shammo said FiOS will wind down as soon as its contractual commitments are met.

 

"At this point we won't build beyond that, because at this point we have to capitalize on what we have invested," Shammo said, according to a report in Stop the Cap!.

 

Shammo's comments really aren't new, since Verizon has for several years said it won't be pushing FiOS beyond its current limits. The statement just provides another indication that Verizon is serious in its desire to decrease capital investments in its wired networks while shifting money towards Verizon Wireless. That means, as of 2014, FiOS gets a whole lot less than it's been getting since it launched in 2006 as the only direct wireline opposition to many cable operators.

 

Even with deep pockets, Verizon said it found it hard to keep coming up with about $700 to reach each home--even though that is only half the cost originally estimated when the FTTH project began.

 

"The fact of the matter is wireline capital--and I won't give the number but it's pretty substantial--is being spent on the wireline side of the house to support wireless growth," Shammo reportedly said. "So the IP backbone, the data transmission, fiber-to-the-cell, that is all on the wireline books but it's all being built for the wireless company."

 

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Memphis, TN: DeSoto broadband survey in high gear for high-tech coverage | The Commercial Appeal

Memphis, TN: DeSoto broadband survey in high gear for high-tech coverage | The Commercial Appeal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

With an ambitious goal of filling all gaps in broadband coverage, a DeSoto County survey of high-speed Internet needs is aiming at every residential "doorstep" as the October-long high-tech campaign gets into high gear.

 

"This survey will help us to plot not only the areas where service is not provided but also who the nearest service providers are," said Supervisor Lee Caldwell of Nesbit. "And we're tying to find from those who do have service if they're satisfied and what further needs they have."

 

Said County Administrator Vanessa Lynchard: "We have 57,748 occupied households in DeSoto County, and we want 57,748 completed surveys back. There is no doubt that a broadband gap exists, and it can be cleared if we can get valid information." By Thursday, just a few days into the canvass, "we had more than 2,000 surveys returned, so we're excited about the response."

 

The Board of Supervisors' five members — each of whom heard constituent complaints about broadband during last year's election — last month authorized the survey. Then Caldwell and Supervisor Mark Gardner of Southaven, a fellow member of the Broadband Internet Access Committee, and Lynchard lined up major help.

 

"All the schools are putting the survey on their websites, and children will take surveys home with them," said Caldwell, an instructional coach with DeSoto County Schools who knows the need for the Internet. Floyd Graham, media technology specialist for DCS, is plugged into the schools' effort.

 

"This is something we've wanted to do for some time in the school system," said Caldwell. "We want to make sure our students whose parents want it are served with Internet at home, and these children aren't at a scholastic or competitive disadvantage."

 

Also enlisted with online portals and survey forms are the First Regional Library system and its five DeSoto branches, the various Chambers of Commerce, radio stations and other media, said Caldwell.

 

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Comcast to deliver 305 Mbps speed tier over Ethernet-based FTTH | FierceTelecom

Comcast to deliver 305 Mbps speed tier over Ethernet-based FTTH | FierceTelecom | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Comcast (Nasdaq: CMCSA) on Thursday revealed plans that it will soon offer a 305 Mbps/65 Mbps speed tier over a point-to-point Ethernet-based Fiber to the Home (FTTH) network.

 

Comcast's fiber-based $300 service tier is, not surprisingly, being used to target markets where Verizon is offering its 300/65 Mbps Quantum speed tiers, according to Broadband Reports.

 

Not long after Verizon launched its 300 Mbps service in June, another Broadband Reports article said Comcast was also developing a 305 Mbps offering, but did not reveal any of the technical details of the offering.

 

The markets where Comcast will deliver the fiber-based service include parts of Boston, Hartford, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Harrisburg, Wilmington, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Richmond, and New Jersey.

 

According to anonymous sources in Broadband Reports' user forum, Comcast will be delivering a service that looks and smells like the Metro Ethernet service it delivers to its business clients. To deliver the service, the MSO will use Ciena's 3931 Service Delivery Switch in the last mile network and a NETGEAR R6300 gateway inside the home.

 

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Chinese telecom firms brace for accusations of spying in new report | The Hill's Hillicon Valley

Chinese telecom firms brace for accusations of spying in new report | The Hill's Hillicon Valley | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Chinese telecom companies are bracing for a new congressional report that is likely to accuse them of posing a security threat to the United States.

 

On Monday, the House Intelligence Committee will release the findings of its yearlong investigation into the Chinese companies Huawei and ZTE. The chairman of the panel, Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.), hinted last week that the report wouldn’t be favorable to the telecom giants. "The report will explain why there may be reasons for concern," Rogers said at an event in Washington.

 

Some officials worry that the Chinese government could use the companies to spy on Americans or sabotage communications networks.

 

Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.), the Intelligence Committee's top Democrat, said at a hearing last month that he is concerned about the companies because China is "known to aggressively conduct cyber espionage." He wondered whether China is subsidizing Huawei and ZTE so that the companies can offer "bargain basement prices to unsuspecting consumers."

"These consumers may have no idea about the national security implications of their purchase," he said.

 

Huawei and ZTE insist the concerns raised by lawmakers are baseless.

 

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T-Mobile USA/MetroPCS merger poses content integration headaches | Fiercemobilecontent

T-Mobile USA/MetroPCS merger poses content integration headaches | Fiercemobilecontent | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The merger of Deutsche Telekom's T-Mobile USA subsidiary and MetroPCS Communications (NASDAQ:PCS) not only brings together their respective customer bases and spectrum licenses but also their mobile content efforts, calling into question which services the combined company will continue to offer moving forward.

 

The Deutsche Telekom and MetroPCS boards on Wednesday approved an agreement to combine the nation's fourth and fifth-largest carriers. The transaction is structured as a recapitalization, in which MetroPCS will declare a 1 for 2 reverse stock split, make a cash payment of $1.5 billion to its shareholders and acquire all of T-Mobile's capital stock by issuing to Deutsche Telekom 74 percent of MetroPCS' common stock on a pro forma basis. DT also will roll its existing intercompany debt into new $15 billion senior unsecured notes of the combined company, thereby providing the combined company with a $500 million unsecured revolving credit facility and a $5.5 billion backstop commitment. The post-merger company will operate under the T-Mobile brand under the leadership of current T-Mobile CEO John Legere and serve 42.5 million U.S. subscribers and projects 2012 pro forma revenues of $24.8 billion.

 

"The T-Mobile and MetroPCS brands are a great strategic fit--both operationally and culturally," Deutsche Telekom CEO Rene Obermann said. "The new company will be the value leader in wireless with the scale, spectrum and financial and other resources to expand its geographic coverage, broaden choice among all types of customers and continue to innovate, especially around the next-generation LTE network."

 

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A bird's eye view of a combined T-Mobile-MetroPCS | GigaOM Mobile News

A bird's eye view of a combined T-Mobile-MetroPCS | GigaOM Mobile News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

What would a combined T-Mobile and MetroPCS look like? The good people at Moasik Solutions, a network coverage mapper formerly known as American Roamer, have provided us with some handy visuals showing exactly where Metro’s networks and spectrum would add to T-Mobile’s network.

 

As you can see from the first map, MetroPCS owns some big swathes of spectrum, but like most carriers it hasn’t deployed networks throughout its license territory. Instead its focused on the bigger markets and populated regions of its footprint.

 

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We Can't All Be in Google's Kansas: A Plan for Winning the Bandwidth Race | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

We Can't All Be in Google's Kansas: A Plan for Winning the Bandwidth Race | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Even though America is in a “global bandwidth race” and our “nation’s future economic security is tied to frictionless and speedy access to information,” according to FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski’s latest speech – we don’t have a plan for winning that race.

 

And our current incumbent providers are not going to help. They’re not going to be the ones rolling out the fiber-to-the-home networks that could provide this speedy access to information. Why? They have no incentive to do so. Because they never enter one another’s territories, they don’t face the competition that might spur such expansion.

 

Instead, incumbent internet access providers such as Comcast and Time Warner (for wired access) and AT&T and Verizon (for complementary wireless access) are in “harvesting” mode. They’re raising average revenue per user through special pricing for planned “specialized services” and usage-based billing, which allows the incumbents to constrain demand. The ecosystem these companies have built is never under stress, because consumers do their best to avoid heavy charges for using more data than they’re supposed to. Where users have no expectation of abundance, there’s no need to build fiber on the wired side of the business or build small cells fed by fiber on the wireless side.

 

If the current internet access providers that dominate the American telecommunications landscape could get away with it, they’d sell nothing but specialized services and turn internet access into a dirt road.

 

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MN: Public-Private Broadband Partnerships lead to cost reduction and application development | Blandin on Broadband

Every now and again I catch up with David Asp, Fiber Administrator and Network Engineer at Dakota County. Last time was in Mary, 2012, when he shared documents such as templates for broadband partner agreements, which other communities could use for their own broadband projects.

 

It’s always inspiring and overwhelming to talk to David. Inspiring because David is steadfast in his goal to use broadband infrastructure to make life better for folks in Dakota County – and beyond – his methods are outlined in the Guiding Principles for Dakota County Broadband Projects. Overwhelming because he is doing so much and I need two of me to keep track.

 

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Chicago resurrects muni Wi-Fi plans, issues RFI | MuniWireless

The city of Chicago has launched an initiative that could revive the city’s moribund muni Wi-Fi plans. According to the Chicago Broadband Challenge website, the city wants residents to send ideas on how it can make best use of its existing broadband infrastructure to deliver truly high-speed Internet access to every home and wireless broadband in parks and public spaces. It has also issued an RFI for vendors seeking their input in the creation of a municipal broadband network (for wired and wireless access).

 

Note that this is nothing like the Wi-Fi everywhere plan that Chicago had a few years ago when it issued an RFP and solicited bids from companies like EarthLink. Chicago (under Mayor Daley) backed down from the muni Wi-Fi plans in August 2007 (here is an excerpt from the city’s press release, posted on MuniWireless under “Chicago Backs Away From Muni Wi-Fi”):

 

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Genachowski: FCC is on track to free up 300MHz of frequencies by 2015 | TeleGeography

Julius Genachowski, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), has promised that the watchdog is on track to exceed its goal of freeing up 300MHz of spectrum for wireless use by 2015, Fierce Wireless reports.

 

Citing a speech made by Genachowski at the University of Pennsylvania last week, the website reports that the agency is on track to auction 75MHz of licensed Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) spectrum by 2015, including the sale of shared rights to the 1755MHz-1780MHz band, which could potentially be paired with the 2155MHz-2180MHz band.

 

Further, he said that in 2013 the FCC will auction the AWS-2 ‘H Block’ spectrum in the 1900MHz PCS band, as targeted by Sprint Nextel among others.

 

Going forward, by the end of this year, Genachowski expected that the FCC ‘will finish removing outdated rules and restrictions’ on 70MHz of spectrum, including 40MHz of 2GHz Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) S-band spectrum that satellite TV operator DISH Network holds, as well as 30MHz of 2.3GHz Wireless Communiction Services (WCS), as desired by AT&T Mobility.

 

The freeing up of the frequencies is a key element of the FCC’s national broadband plan.

 

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MN: How would you use a computer if it were new to you? | Blandin on Broadband

Insight News ran an article this weekend that highlights some of the folks who have been taking advantage of public computer centers and training offering through the Broadband Access Project, which finances 12 new or enhanced community based public computer centers in four federally designated poverty zones in Minneapolis and St. Paul.

 

Here are some of the stories they told:

 

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WI: Funding uncertainty puts rural Internet plans in jeopardy | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

WI: Funding uncertainty puts rural Internet plans in jeopardy | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Efforts to expand high-speed Internet access in rural Wisconsin could be slowed or stopped as broadband providers say they're frustrated over uncertainty in federal funding.

 

The Wisconsin State Telecommunications Association, a group that represents mostly rural telecom providers, says half of its member companies are delaying or canceling projects because of changes at the Federal Communications Commission aimed at bringing an $8 billion Universal Service Fund into the digital age.

 

The FCC's goal is to make high-speed Internet access available in all of rural America by 2020, with some of the funding coming from a fee that's added to consumers' and businesses' monthly telephone bills.

 

But telecom providers say recent changes in the Universal Service Fund and Intercarrier Compensation program mean they can't predict how much of the money will be available to subsidize rural broadband projects. That makes them hesitant to invest in expansions that cost millions of dollars.

 

In some cases, about half of the cost of an expansion project has been covered by the Universal Service Fund, but that's less certain going forward.

 

It puts projects at a "huge risk," said Shirley Bloomfield, chief executive officer of the National Telecommunications Cooperative Association, based in Washington, D.C.

 

Without the federal support, private lenders could back away from these projects, according to Bloomfield.

 

The Obama administration has identified universal broadband as critical to driving economic development, producing jobs and expanding the reach of cutting-edge medicine and educational opportunities.

 

Often, rural areas lack high-speed Internet access because the cost of extending the service in thinly-populated communities is too expensive for telecom providers to justify the expense without subsidies.

 

The FCC says reforms implemented last November were necessary because the Universal Service Fund had become inefficient and wasteful.

 

The agency "imposed long-overdue fiscal responsibility and accountability measures" limiting use of the fund, said Sharon Gillett, who earlier this year stepped down as chief of the FCC Wireline Competition Bureau.

 

The timing of the telecom industry's complaints is questionable given the upcoming elections, said Barry Orton, a telecommunications professor at University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 

"Nobody can say they don't have any chutzpah," Orton said, adding that telecom providers were against the University of Wisconsin-Extension getting federal money for broadband expansion but are now upset because some of their projects could be at risk.

 

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GA: High-speed Internet hub coming online | Rome News Tribune

GA: High-speed Internet hub coming online | Rome News Tribune | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A small building on Broad Street in Rome is home to a fiber optic Internet hub that is linking Northwest Georgia and eastern Alabama to the rest of the world with previously unavailable speed and reliability.

 

Appalachian Valley Fiber Network has added more than 180 miles of high-capacity fiber optic cable and electronics to a network that, upon completion, will include more than 500 miles of infrastructure connected to major international hubs in Atlanta and Chattanooga.

 

“This is essentially a concrete bunker. The roof could blow off and this building within a building will still be standing,” said David Parker of Parker Fibernet. “Literally thousands of fiber connections leave this building and connect to other communities.”

 

Parker is the founder of AVFN, a public-private partnership that relied on a $21 million federal stimulus package grant and a $6 million local match in the form of his existing network. AFVN is carrier-neutral network open for interconnection by any provider.

 

The network being built includes connections to so-called community anchor institutions — schools, health care facilities, governments and major industries — and with companies that provide service to homes and small businesses.

 

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CA: EDA opens new source for broadband funding with $2 million for San Leandro conduit | Steve Blum's Blog

CA: EDA opens new source for broadband funding with $2 million for San Leandro conduit | Steve Blum's Blog | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The City of San Leandro will fill in key gaps in broadband availability in industrial and commercial areas, thanks to a $2.1 million grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration. The press release is here.

 

As far as we can tell, this award is the first ever given by EDA for a community broadband project, with credit largely due to the City's economic and business development staff. They worked closely with the EDA to develop the innovative framework required and to meet the stringent requirements of the program. Tellus Venture Associates assisted staff during the process.

 

The money comes from EDA’s Public Works Economic Development Assistance program. It will pay for 7.5 miles of conduit, which will be connected to the City's existing infrastructure. The new conduit will make it possible for Lit San Leandro, a privately funded fiber optic system, to extend the reach of its 11 mile network to more than 18 miles. The work is expected to be completed within a year.

 

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Internet T1 vs. DSL for High Speed Internet Connections | T1Everywhere Blog

Internet T1 vs. DSL for High Speed Internet Connections | T1Everywhere Blog | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Not long ago, high-speed Internet connections were not only expensive, but difficult to come by. Thankfully that is no longer the case, as there are a number of broadband access options for even the most remote businesses.

 

The traditional high-speed Internet connection for businesses is the Internet T1 line. An Internet T1 line is an always-on, dedicated connection that offers symmetrical speeds (same upload and download) of 1.5Mb. T1 lines are typically purchased for a 1, 2 or 3 year lease and come with Service Level Agreements (SLAs) that guarantee bandwidth, service uptime, and additional parameters such as latency and jitter.

 

DSL, on the other hand, is a shared bandwidth service that is most often used by small or at-home offices. Unlike a T1 line, DSL offers asymmetrical speeds – with download speeds higher than upload speeds – that vary depending upon the provider you choose. While DSL does not offer SLAs, its biggest selling point is its relatively inexpensive price.

 

One of the largest differences between an Internet T1 line and DSL service is their classification. A T1 connection is a dedicated service, meaning the bandwidth you purchase is dedicated solely to you and your business. Today, T1 connections are virtually ubiquitous, even the most remote locations. DSL, conversely, is considered an information service. Due to the fact that information services are regulated differently than telecommunications services, DSL is offered on an as-available basis.

 

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Time Warner, AT&T cutting Google-style deals in KC | KansasCity.com

Time Warner, AT&T cutting Google-style deals in KC | KansasCity.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Google Inc. came to Kansas City promising breakneck Internet speeds and asking for a way to cut through local red tape and its pesky costs.


Local competitors noted that the California tech titan got some enviable goodies from local government — promises of office space with electricity paid, expedited construction permits, waived fees and help in marketing what is known as Google Fiber.

Now, as Google is finally set to launch the much-coveted service — 1,100-plus communities had lobbied for the project — Time Warner Cable has secured much the same treatment from Kansas City as its new-to-town competition.

“We understood that when we entered the deal with Google,” said Rick Usher, Kansas City’s assistant city manager. “When we make concessions to one company, then everybody else gets that same benefit.”


That means City Hall is refunding permit fees it has charged Time Warner since Kansas City cut the deal that landed Google.

By gaining the same footing as Google, the cable company has saved about $27,000 in fees in Kansas City. Google, by comparison, has avoided about $100,000 in permit and other costs. That reflects the difference between ongoing work to an existing system and the building of an entirely new network.

Both companies have direct access to city staff on technical issues. They avoid future permit and excavation fees, get access to rights-of-way and will receive free traffic control during construction.


Google has also been allowed to build what it calls “fiber huts” — garden shed-sized buildings housing equipment that connect neighborhoods to the Internet. Usher said the city would consider requests from Time Warner or AT&T to get the same free access to mostly unused city land.


The city and Time Warner reached their agreement in August, largely out of public view because it did not require approval by the City Council. Usher said AT&T, the other large provider of Internet and subscription television through its U-verse brand, is in talks now with the city on a similar deal.

 

 

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Fiber gets faster with better signal switching – developed at UMN | Blandin on Broadband

Good news for folks looking to increase broadband speeds is brought to us today from the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering. They have recently announced…

 

'A team of scientists and engineers at the University of Minnesota has invented a unique microscale optical device that could greatly increase the speed of downloading information online and reduce the cost of Internet transmission.'

 

They go on to report…

 

'The new study is based on a previous discovery by Li and collaborators in 2008 where they found that nanoscale light conduits can be used to generate a strong enough optical force with light to mechanically move the optical waveguide (channel of information that carries light). In the new device, the researchers found that this force of light is so strong that the mechanical property of the device can be dominated completely by the optical effect rather than its own mechanical structure. The effect is amplified to control additional colored light signals at a much higher power level.'

 

“This is the first time that this novel optomechanical effect is used to amplify optical signals without converting them into electrical ones,” Li said.'

 

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What T-Mobile gains from a MetroPCS merger: Surgical spectrum | GigaOM Mobile News

What T-Mobile gains from a MetroPCS merger: Surgical spectrum | GigaOM Mobile News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Within hours of making their merger plans official on Wednesday, T-Mobile and MetroPCS started selling their grand plan to investors, customers, the media and the world. On a conference call with analysts and press, T-Mobile’s new CEO John Legere painted a picture of a new hyper-competitive carrier that would dominate the prepaid and budget mobile markets and offer the country’s most powerful 4G network in the biggest metro markets.

 

In short, the new carrier – which the companies are referring to as NewCo while waiting for regulatory approval – would be much greater than the sum of its parts, according to Legere, who would take over the helm of the new carrier. “When you add MetroPCS to an already aggressive challenger strategy, it acts as an accelerant,” he said.

 

From a consumer’s perspective, there’s a lot to like in combined T-Mobile and MetroPCS assuming they can pull their complex transition plan off. Its 42 million subscribers would still leave it the No. 4 carrier in the U.S. rankings, but it will have closed considerable distance with No. 3 Sprint. What’s more, those two subscriber bases would match up almost perfectly, Legere said.

 

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