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The House Commerce Committee’s Communications and Technology Subcommittee Hearing Recap: Is the Broadband Stimulus Working? | Benton Foundation

The House Commerce Committee’s Communications and Technology Subcommittee Hearing Recap: Is the Broadband Stimulus Working? | Benton Foundation | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The House Commerce Committee’s Communications and Technology Subcommittee held a hearing examining whether taxpayers are getting their money’s worth four years after the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) allocated $7 billion for broadband grants and loans.

 

A background memo for the Subcommittee’s majority staff highlighted that approximately $611 million of the funding covering 42 projects has been revoked, relinquished, or suspended. Republican members of the Subcommittee claimed throughout the hearing that the program is rife with wasteful spending. "Promoting broadband is a laudable goal. But there are many laudable goals," said Subcommittee Chairman Greg Walden (R-OR). "From what we know now, the government has spent millions on equipment it did not need and on stringing fiber to areas that already had it." Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX) questioned the necessity of the broadband stimulus and suggested that the $2.5 billion in unused funds should be given back to the Treasury.

 

Subcommittee Democrats, however, defended the spending, which is made up of the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) and the Broadband Initiatives Program (BIP). They argued that while there will always be problems with large government programs, the broadband stimulus has been worthwhile. "The investments made in broadband infrastructure are having a profound impact in local communities around the country," said Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-CA), the ranking member of the subcommittee. "I don't really understand how any of my colleagues can argue that providing better, faster Internet and more digital literacy training to underserved and unserved areas of this country is something we should criticize," Rep. Mike Doyle (R-PA) said.

 

Larry Strickling, the head of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), which oversees BTOP, pushed back against the Republican criticism in several testy exchanges with lawmakers.

 

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Helping Communities Achieve True Self-Determination | community broadband networks

Helping Communities Achieve True Self-Determination | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Chattanooga continues to receive attention because of the incredible community owned network they built for themselves. We recently came across an article from Tom Baxter of the Atlanta SaportaReport. In his article, Chattanooga: Eating our lunch in liveability, Baxter expresses the envy he feels as an Atlantan as he considers the way Chattanooga has transformed itself. From the article:

 

"Yes, Chattanooga. Seldom do we think of our neighbor across the Tennessee line as much of a competitor. When they built an aquarium, we just built a bigger one. But for nearly three decades, since a group of civic leaders got together in 1984 and committed themselves to doing something about Chattanooga’s image as the dirtiest city in America, and in the view of some the dullest, they have been eating our lunch on the playing field of liveability."

 

Baxter mentions Georgia's HB 282, a bill we are following closely, and notes how its passage would drive more distance between livability in Georgia and the increasing quality of life in Chattanooga:

 

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Is Home Automation the Next UX Frontier? | Mashable

Is Home Automation the Next UX Frontier? | Mashable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If there is one thing that UX and UI designers should take away from this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, it is that the next big thing is home automation, and we better be ready for it.

 

From dishwashers with digital interfaces to smartphone apps that can manage an entire home heating and cooling system, this shift in home appliances means that these new digital interfaces will need just as much TLC as a new web app.

 

These transitions present some incredible opportunities but also plenty of challenges. The team at ÄKTA sat down to discuss the matter. Here are both the opportunities and the challenges that will come with home automation.

 

We imagine that this shift will create a breakdown of silos. We will no longer see "product design" and "digital UX” as two different pieces of the building process. Rather, we will start to focus on a more holistic user experience that covers everything from the physical product to the digital interface.

 

Because of this breakdown, cross-system and cross-platform areas of expertise will become invaluable. Take for example a smart washer by LG that we spotted at CES 2013. A repairperson brought in to fix this machine will now need to know how to fix network systems in addition to plumbing systems.

 

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FCC Collects Reply Comments on IP Transition | Broadcasting & Cable

Reply comments were being filed Monday on the transition to all-IP networks, including AT&T's request that it be allowed to test regulation-lite, all-IP zones and USTelecom's request that given the competition from those IP services, incumbent LECs should no longer be considered dominant as providers of switched-access service.

In both cases the idea is to reduce deregulation in the face of a changing technology.

The Internet Innovation Alliance, which comprises tech companies building and deploying broadband networks -- Corning, AT&T, Alcatel-Lucent -- not surprisingly said in its filing that AT&T should be permitted to beta test all-IP service. "To continue expanding the array of social and economic benefits for American business and consumers, the Commission should ignore the call of entities seeking to expand legacy regulations in an all-IP world," IIA says.

Public Knowledge does not join the call for light touch regulation. "[T]he FCC should remember that even though the technology is changing the needs of the American people do not," said senior VP Harold Feld. "A framework that serves the interests of consumers is the best way to evaluate proposals for the future of our communications infrastructure."

Public Knowledge also points out that while most commenters on both sides have suggested there be some regulatory backstop to an all-IP network, Comcast does not. Comcast warned about "regulatory slippage into oversight of IP interconnection....[R]equests for regulatory intervention into IP-to-IP interconnection agreements for voice services are premature and likely would prove harmful."

Even the National Cable and Telecommunications Association, of which Comcast is the largest member, does not go as far. "The Commission generally should maintain a light regulatory approach for IP-based retail voice service," NCTA said in its initial filing [it is not filing reply comments] but it should oversee interconnection for the exchange of voice traffic to ensure there is no harmful disruption to competitive providers and their customers as a result of the incumbent LECs' technological transition."

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How Netflix and the Internet Might Impact This Year's Emmy Race | Star Courier

How Netflix and the Internet Might Impact This Year's Emmy Race | Star Courier | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Broadcast network execs have long grumbled about their shows having to compete against edgy, star-driven and sometimes bigger budgeted cable fare at the Emmy Awards. But now broadcast and cable foes may find themselves united against a new rival: digital programmers like Netflix and Amazon.

Thanks to a 2008 rule change, the Academy of TV Arts and Sciences allows shows like Netflix's House of Cards and Arrested Development to be nominated for Emmys in the same categories as broadcast and cable contenders; that means a show that isn't regularly scheduled on a linear TV channel might wind up competing against broadcast and cable shows for one of Emmy's top series awards.

"Our rules are silent on what screens a program is received," says John Leverence, the senior vice president in charge of awards at the TV Academy. "I suspect that 2008 will join 1988 - when the Academy introduced cable into eligibility - as a landmark year in the history of the Primetime Emmys."

Leverence notes that it took six years for a cable network to win its first major program award (HBO's Stalin and Barbarians at the Gate, which tied for outstanding made-for-television movie in 1993). Five years after the new digital rule, no series has been nominated in a major category, but that could change this year with the buzzy House of Cards, its stars Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright and producer-director David Fincher..

 

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A startup quietly delivers smart wires to big power players | GigaOM Tech News

A startup quietly delivers smart wires to big power players | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Out of the hundreds of energy innovations on display this week at the annual ARPA-E Summit just outside of Washington D.C., it’s been rare to find a group actually selling and shipping products. But a startup out of Oakland, Calif. called Smart Wire Grid has quietly begun delivering devices that clamp onto transmission lines and control the flow of power, and it has scored some of the bigger names in the power company business. In a few weeks Smart Wire Grid plans to install its devices on the lines of power giant Southern Company, following a pilot installation of 99 of its devices on the lines of the federally-owned Tennessee Valley Authority.

 

Smart Wire Grid’s devices — called Distributed Series Reactors or DSRs — can be hooked onto transmission lines and signal to the electrons coming down the line to go elsewhere. It’s a similar concept to how internet infrastructure can allocate more bandwidth when needed or can smartly route around problem areas in the network.

 

For utilities, such technology can be a low cost way to push power to underutilized lines and to avoid over usage of certain lines that can lead to costly outages. The DSRs can also be networked with wireless technology to create a smart network of power flow and monitoring devices.

 

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Set-Top Box Energy Conservation Agreement Update | Cable Tech Talk

Set-Top Box Energy Conservation Agreement Update | Cable Tech Talk | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The unprecedented, voluntary Set-Top Box Energy Conservation Agreement that NCTA and CEA announced last December was just the first step in the multichannel video industry’s effort to implement significant commitments that will lead to annual savings of $1.5 billion for American consumers. One outcome of the agreement was the creation of a steering committee to ensure that the commitments are being met and provide a forum to discuss additional options for energy savings.

 

The companies that signed the agreement were Comcast, DIRECTV, DISH Network, Time Warner Cable, Cox, Verizon, Charter, AT&T, Cablevision, Bright House Networks and CenturyLink, and manufacturers Cisco, Motorola, EchoStar Technologies and ARRIS. Last Friday, companies implementing the agreement participated in the first steering committee meeting where officers were elected and progress reports were given. 

 

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Unemployment Insurance: Adding Online Education in Return to Work Programs | Heritage.org

Millions of Americans have remained stuck on unemployment insurance (UI) during the weak recovery. Congressional debate has largely focused on the amount and duration of UI benefits—currently almost one and a half years. Yet policymakers have done little to reform the UI system to help the long-term unemployed acquire the skills that they need to return to work more quickly.

The typical unemployed worker spends about 40 minutes per day on job hunting. This leaves most UI recipients with considerable time available to improve their chances of getting a job.

 

Regrettably, traditional job training programs are both expensive and ineffective. However, the technological revolution that is changing higher education is potentially great news for job seekers. In particular, the rise of online education offers a new and better option. Anyone can now learn online for free from some of the best instructors in the world. Congress should require workers collecting federally extended UI benefits to enroll in classes to improve their skills, and taking courses online should count toward this requirement.

 

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New Copyright Alert System Launches | Cable Tech Talk

New Copyright Alert System Launches | Cable Tech Talk | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

When I sit in front of my computer, it’s a wonder I get anything accomplished.  There are seemingly millions of hours of TV shows, movies, music, and cat videos, all of them staggeringly easy to find, download, and share.

 

But where did all of this content come from? Sure, some of it was home made, but what about the professional stuff? When I stream an episode of “The Americans” online, is it coming directly from FX or is it a pirated copy? Or what about when I download a song? Is the band getting paid? Am I using it in an authorized manner?

 

In an effort to answer these questions and educate Internet users about their digital media options, the Center for Copyright Information launched the Copyright Alert System yesterday. This system is designed to alert users to possible infringing activities, help users figure out where to find legal content, and advise them how to avoid accidentally downloading unauthorized copies of copyrighted works.

 

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Big Brother? US linked to new wave of censorship, surveillance on web | Fox News

Even the most open, democratic governments have sought laws and new forms of surveillance that many see as a new wave of censorship -- and that includes the United States.

 

The U.S. government asked Google for data on its users more than 31,000 times in 2012 alone, for example. And the government rarely obtained a search warrant first, Google recently revealed; in nearly all cases, the company ended up turning over at least some data.

 

Some argue that heightened surveillance, restrictions on Internet freedom and even censorship are necessary to protect intellectual property rights, prevent cyberespionage, fight child pornography, and protect national interests such as nuclear power plants from hackers. And here the U.S. is far from alone.

 

"A number of democratic states have considered or implemented various restrictions in response to the potential legal, economic, and security challenges raised by new media," notes the Freedom House report "Freedom on the Net 2012."

 

Anxiety over online theft and cyberattacks is not unwarranted. Virtually every major U.S. company and media outlet has been a victim. Google was attacked back in 2009. Facebook, Apple and Microsoft revealed this month that hackers had breeched their defenses. And The New York Times and Wall Street Journal have fought off Chinese hackers for months. Indeed, dozens of countries have their own online hacking groups -- so-called cyber or asymmetrical warfare divisions.

 

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Obama cybersecurity chief warns further regulations may be required | The Hill's Hillicon Valley

Obama cybersecurity chief warns further regulations may be required | The Hill's Hillicon Valley | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

President Obama’s executive order on national cybersecurity could result in new regulations for companies that operate key infrastructure, according to Michael Daniel, the White House’s cybersecurity coordinator.

 

Daniel said new regulations could be needed to create a “backstop” to address security gaps in the computer systems and networks of the nation’s water systems, electric grid and other critical infrastructure. 

 

Some observers have said the administration’s order, issued earlier this month, lacks teeth because the bulk of its measures are voluntary.

 

The order creates a program led by the Homeland Security Department where critical infrastructure operators would join on a voluntary basis and agree to follow a set of cybersecurity best practices and standards crafted jointly by the Commerce Department and the industry.


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Sascha Meinrath, OTI Director, a Keynote Speaker at F2C Conference | NewAmerica.net

Sascha Meinrath, New America Foundation vice president and director of the Open Technology Institute, will be a keynote speaker at the F2C: Freedom to Connect conference March 4-5. His address,“Causing a Commotion: The Rise of the Intranet Revolution," will focus on the increasing use of commotion wireless technology.

“Over the years, F2C has done an outstanding job of interconnecting those fighting on the frontlines of the Internet freedom movement with those pushing the policy reform and technological R&D envelopes," Meinrath said. "I am truly honored to have the opportunity to address this extraordinary group of activists, technologists, journalists, and visionaries. F2C has a tradition of fostering innovative ideas that aim to ensure that civil liberties and human rights are protected online.”

Freedom to Connect brings under-represented people and issues to inside-the-Beltway policy discussions. Other scheduled speakers include: Vint Cerf, Glenn Greenwald, Darcy Burner, Peter Cochrane and Taren Stinebrickner-Kauffman, Graves, Ed Bender and Catharine Rice.

 

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Internet piracy rehab: The latest push to curb illegal downloads | Marketplace.org

Internet piracy rehab: The latest push to curb illegal downloads | Marketplace.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Downloading stuff illegally online? Say hello to Internet piracy rehab. Instead of 12 steps, users get six warnings. That's part of a program that begins this week dubbed "Six Strikes". Under Six Strikes, Internet Service Providers send out warnings to users suspected of pirating online content.

 

Some of the participating ISP's include Comcast, Time Warner and AT&T. Jill Lesser, executive director for the Center for Copyright Information, the group leading the program, says a lot of those who share illegal content don't realize it's wrong.

 

"We are hopeful that the vast majority of people engaging in this behavior will change their behavior when they're informed in a way that's useful," she says.

So part of the new copyright alert system includes tips like how to secure your wireless connection and where to find legal downloads. If users keep pirating content online, ISP's can slow their Internet connection dramatically. Or users might have to watch a five-minute video on copyright infringement.

 

Benjamin Lennett, policy director for the Open Technology Institute, warns that content owners can ultimately use the program to cut off users' Internet connections.

 

"There's no cost for the content industry to submit as many requests to ISP's as they want," he says. "And this will all happen with very little transparency for the public."

 

Lennett says the new program offers no checks and balances for the content industry, so even if it seems weak on the surface, the copyright program can easily spiral out of control against users.

 

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Jake Christian's curator insight, May 13, 2013 11:51 AM

I think while personally wrong is a subjective term and not a concrete idea, the author makes points that people may not realize its wrong. There is a fallacy in this in terms of how the Legal System in the US works, although saying that, it does not mean I agree or disagree with how they approach it. In the US it does not matter if you percieve to be right in a situation, it has to do with what in fact occurred. I would say that this would kill off ISPs who do this, or severely curb them from new generations who are used to having a free internet where you do not feel as though you are being watched by your ISP to make sure you are not doing anything wrong. While in theory everybody would be okay with this, reality and theory are sometimes parallels and not a convergence.

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Internet sales tax bill advances in Senate committee | Deseret News

Internet sales tax bill advances in Senate committee | Deseret News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A bill designed to force online retailers to collect sales tax for the products they sell was approved Tuesday by a Senate committee.

 

SB226 modifies the circumstances under which a person may be required to collect and remit sales and use taxes to the State Tax Commission.

 

Supporters of the measure say it would "level the playing field" for all retailers, whether online or "brick and mortar," and help the state collect an estimated $180 million in sales taxes that are currently being missed out on. Critics have argued that, if approved, the bill would hurt small businesses that operate primarily online.

 

By a unanimous vote, the bill was given a favorable recommendation by the Senate Revenue and Taxation Committee and advanced to the full Senate.

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Music Industry Data: Sales Up, Piracy Down... But It's Not Because Of Any 'Anti-Piracy' Efforts | Techdirt

Music Industry Data: Sales Up, Piracy Down... But It's Not Because Of Any 'Anti-Piracy' Efforts | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A few folks have sent over variations on two different reports concerning the music industry, with some suggesting that this is "proof" that the recording industry's "war on piracy" has been effective on two fronts: increasing sales and reducing piracy. Of course, for many years, we've questioned whether or not reducing piracy actually increases sales, so we looked closely at the numbers and they don't seem to say what some people think they're saying. The Hollywood Reporter has a good summary of both reports. One comes from IFPI, celebrating that "global recorded music revenue" rose 0.3% in 2012. That is, obviously, a tiny increase, but it is an increase. Of course, as we've noted, "recorded" music revenue is merely one piece of the wider music industry ecosystem -- and that entire ecosystem has been growing for quite some time.

The second report comes from one of the industry's favorite researchers, NPD, claiming a massive decline in music file sharing (based on consumer surveys). I've found NPD's data to be suspect in the past, but let's just assume this is true. Then, can we reach the conclusion that the industry's anti-piracy efforts both worked and that it led to increased sales?

Actually... no. Not even close. We can see this pretty clearly just by looking beyond the recorded music market, to the wider file sharing space. Various reports have made it clear that widespread file sharing (mostly of infringing content) has continued to grow quite rapidly during the same time period. Sandvine reports (pdf) that BitTorrent traffic increased 40% over the same basic time frame. Or, zero in on a different market beyond music. How about software? The BSA's annual report continues to show increases in "piracy."

 

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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.'s curator insight, April 5, 2013 3:50 PM

*"Anti-Piracy Efforts" are no more than Culture Censorship and Pe@ple Control Tools.
- Don't Confuse (Pe@ple Nor 'Yourself')

Albert Lochard's curator insight, December 7, 6:55 PM

This article is present you two examples on how music piracy is slowly decreasing. They mentioned  that global recorded music revenue rose 0.3% in 2012. In my opinion this is a very small percentage but at least it's going up, slowly but surely. I'm glad to see that the war against music piracy is actually working. 

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For the First Time, Women Could Head FTC, FCC | AdWeek.com

For the First Time, Women Could Head FTC, FCC | AdWeek.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

President Obama has the chance to make history again, this time by naming the first woman chair of the Federal Communications Commission as well as one to head the Federal Trade Commission.

 

A woman in either post could go a long way to squelch critiques that Obama's administration looks like a boy’s club. Over the last few weeks, groups like the Women’s Media Center (co-founded by Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan and Gloria Steinem) have turned up the heat on the president, reminding him it was the women’s vote that sent him back to the White House.

 

At the FCC, one front-runner is commissioner Mignon Clyburn, who was sworn in for a second term last year. Other contenders include commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, who joined the FCC last year, and Karen Kornbluh, the ambassador to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

 

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Clearwire to take $80 million in financing from Sprint, hampering odds of Dish buyout | The Verge

Clearwire to take $80 million in financing from Sprint, hampering odds of Dish buyout | The Verge | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Clearwire plans to take $80 million in financing from Sprint, the first time the company has pulled from an $800 million arrangement between the two. The announcement confirms a report from The Wall Street Journal yesterday, with the money coming in the form of notes that convert into stock, a tactic that could eventually increase Sprint's stake in Clearwire — even as the carrier attempts to buy the company's remaining shares outright. That plan has been delayed some thanks to Dish Network, which made a surprise bid to the tune of $5.15 billion last month, effectively doubling Sprint's $2.2 billion offer.

 

However, Dish has publicly stated that it would withdraw its bid should Clearwire dip into the Sprint financing agreement. The satellite provider hasn't hidden its ambitions to break into the mobile industry, so we wouldn't consider the deal dead until Dish declares it to be so. We've reached out to the company for comment. For its part, Clearwire insists that it "will pursue the course of action that it believes is in the best interests of Clearwire’s non-Sprint Class A stockholders." At the same time, the company is maintaining its recommendation that shareholders approve the proposed Sprint transaction.

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IN: AT&T's wireless investment here lauded by Chamber | South Bend Tribune

“Late last year, we rolled out our 4G LTE network, which is available throughout much of the area,” said George Fleetwood, president of AT&T Indiana, at a news conference Friday at Innovation Park in South Bend.

The 4G LTE network is the latest generation of fast wireless network technology and it improves performance on mobile smartphones and tablets.

“This is the fastest data network in the country,” Fleetwood said, explaining that speeds are nearly 10 times faster than AT&T’s earlier third generation product and the network provides “somewhere in the neighborhood of 25 megabits per second download speed.”

South Bend and Mishawaka are among the first areas in Indiana to have access to the 4G LTE network, he said. Other areas include Gary, Bloomington, Lafayette, Muncie and Indianapolis. And the company plans to continue to expand that network.

AT&T recently launched Project Velocity IP, a three-year investment initiative to expand and enhance its wireless and wired IP broadband networks. The company hopes to cover about 75 percent of its customer locations in its wired service and reach one million additional business locations by the end of 2015.

 

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Supreme Court Effectively Says There's No Way To Challenge Warrantless Wiretapping | Techdirt

Supreme Court Effectively Says There's No Way To Challenge Warrantless Wiretapping | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

This probably won't come as a surprise to anyone, but the Supreme Court has completely shot down the ACLU (and some activists and journalists') attempt to invalidate the part of the FISA Amendments Act that "legalized" warrantless wiretapping. As we guessed at the time of the oral hearings, it seemed like it was going to be difficult to convince a majority of the court that the plaintiffs had any standing to complain, since they couldn't show that they had been directly impacted. And, indeed the court ruled 5 to 4 that there was no standing here. So, basically, there is simply no way to challenge the constitutionality of warrantless wiretaps.

Doesn't that seem like a serious constitutional problem? The government can pass laws that it can spy on people in private, and there's no way to then challenge that law. Oh, and if you happen to discover (by accident!) that you've been spied upon the government can just claim sovereign immunity, and that's it. Case closed.

The full ruling is pretty depressing. The court basically says any harm is "speculative," and thus there can't be any standing at all.

 

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Australia: NBN rolls out | Surf Coast Times

Ocean Grove is a front-runner as the National Broadband Network (NBN) reaches out across the Bellarine Peninsula, the Surf Coast and Geelong, with 37 new development sites either with high-speed broadband services now available or under construction around the region.

 

There are six different broadband sites in Ocean Grove now under construction, including the Goandra, Oakdene and Kingston estates, with some homes ready to be switched on to the network. Other parts of the region are not far behind, with the NBN underway in two sites in Torquay at Surf View, four sites at Point Lonsdale’s Point Estate, two sites around Portarlington, in Secret by the Bay and Arlington Rise, and 12 sites across the large Warralily development.

 

These estates will be among the first in Australia to see the benefits of high-speed NBN optic fibre connections.

 

In addition, there are a range of additional broadband sites being developed by private sector companies, such as Opticomm, including Villawood’s Armstrong Mount Duneed development in Armstrong Creek, Curlewis in Drysdale and potentially in the Zeally Sands in Torquay.

 

Curlewis Estate is the first fibre-connected community to be up and running.

 

It is claimed the early fitting of broadband to greenfield sites is fuelling homebuyer take-up in these areas, boosting building activity and jobs, and attracting many small home-based businesses. The local Curlewis Parks estate manager in Drysdale, Brett Thompson, said the estate is now attracting families from Point Cook and Werribee due to broadband speeds.

 

“The speed of the web is a big reason they choose Curlewis Parks.”

Ocean Grove will also be one of the first so-called “brownfield” sites – established townships – to get the NBN broadband services, along with Queenscliff, and Torquay, Bellbrae and Jan Juc on the Surf Coast.

 

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SES New York Keynote Speaker Says Internet is TV's Best Friend | Search Engine Watch

SES New York Keynote Speaker Says Internet is TV's Best Friend | Search Engine Watch | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Internet didn’t kill TV! According to Mike Proulx, the Internet has become TV’s best friend. Proulx will be the opening keynote speaker at SES New York 2013. The leading event for experienced marketing and advertising professionals will take place March 25-28, 2013, at the New York Marriott Marquis.

 

Proulx is a Senior Vice President and the Director of Social Media at Hill Holliday, a renowned advertising agency based in Boston, where he leads a team with a focus on cross-channel integration, emerging and social media. He has spent the last 17 years working at various interactive, high-tech, and new media companies on the agency-side, client-side, and as an entrepreneur. He has spoken at dozens of events and has been widely featured in the press including The New York Times, Fast Company, TV Guide, Forbes, BusinessWeek, Mashable, BuzzFeed, and NPR.

 

Proulx conceived, produced, directed, and co-host the TVnext summit, which took place in early 2011 and 2012. He is the co-author of Social TV, a best-selling book from Wiley publishing that launched in February of 2012. He is also the host of the social TV web series, “The Pulse on Lost Remote”. He holds a Master’s degree in Computer Information Systems from Bentley University and in 2012 was named the Ad Club’s Media All Star.

 

His opening keynote is titled, “Social TV: How Marketers Can Reach and Engage Audiences by Connecting Television to the Web, Social Media, and Mobile.”

 

Search Engine Watch (SEW) asked Mike Proulx (MP) five questions about his upcoming keynote. Here are his answers:

 

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Document shows how much data cops suck up from suspects’ cell phones | Ars Technica

Document shows how much data cops suck up from suspects’ cell phones | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The courts have traditionally allowed the police to inspect any items a suspect is carrying when they arrest him or her. But in the past, the information the police could obtain in this fashion was fairly limited. The advent of the smartphone has changed all that.

 

A new document uncovered by the ACLU provides insight into just how aggressive law enforcement agencies have become about obtaining the contents of seized cell phones. Last fall, writes the ACLU's Chris Soghoian, "officers from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) seized an iPhone from the bedroom of a suspect in a drug investigation."

 

A document filed in court shows that police extracted a wealth of personal information from the device, including call records, contacts, stored text messages, photos, videos, and passwords. They also obtained "659 geolocation points, including 227 cell towers and 403 Wi-Fi networks with which the cell phone had previously connected"—a detailed record of where the device had been in previous weeks. Soghoian says law enforcement agencies can buy portable devices that extract this kind of information from smartphones in a matter of minutes.

 

While acquiring such a massive volume of data without a warrant may fit the letter of the law, it certainly seems to violate the spirit of the Fourth Amendment. Until recently, no one would have had that much personal information in their pockets. Such records, if they existed at all, would have been in the suspect's home, where the police couldn't seize it without a warrant.

 

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Company With Former Ties To Libya, Warrentless Wiretapping, Woos Pentagon With New Product | Huff Post

Company With Former Ties To Libya, Warrentless Wiretapping, Woos Pentagon With New Product | Huff Post | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A company that created a device at the heart of the debate over warrantless wiretapping has launched a new network analytics product for the defense market.

 

Narus, a wholly owned subsidiary of Boeing, announced on Monday that it is unveiling the nSystem, which "can scan millions of pieces of data and metadata; aggregate data about users, communities, devices and applications; and then delve into the traffic as well as the content behind network behavior," according to a statement.

 

Now Narus, which said in a statement that it "counts governments, carriers and enterprises around the world among its growing customer base," seems to be targeting the Pentagon. The company said the nSystem is "built on the principles of Cyber 3.0," referring to a Department of Defense standard for cyberspace operations announced at the annual cryptography and security RSA Conference two years ago.

 

The nSystem's launch comes at the same time as this year's RSA Conference, and just weeks after the company named a new president, John Trobough.

 

"Securing and managing our current networked world requires the visibility, control and context that can only come with the application of machine learning to cyber security and surveillance," Trobough said in the statement.

 

Narus first came into the public eye in 2006, when whistleblower Mark Klein provided evidence that AT&T had installed one of the company's devices in a switching room to enable a US government warrantless wiretapping program.

 

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Eerie Silence on Cybersecurity | NYTimes.com

Eerie Silence on Cybersecurity | NYTimes.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Apart from a few companies like Google, which revealed that Chinese hackers had tried to read its users’ e-mail messages, American companies have been disturbingly silent about cyberattacks on their computer systems — apparently in fear that this disclosure will unnerve customers and shareholders and invite lawsuits and unwanted scrutiny from the government.

 

In some cases, such silence might violate the legal obligations of publicly traded companies to share material information about their businesses. Most companies would tell investors if an important factory burned to the ground or thieves made off with hundreds of millions of dollars in cash. So why do they feel that the theft of trade secrets that are often much more valuable do not deserve to be discussed? Companies might argue that it’s hard to quantify the losses from cyberattacks, but that does not mean that they are costless.

 

By keeping quiet, companies also make it more difficult for other businesses and the government to protect against similar attacks. Recent evidence suggests that cyberassaults against corporate and government systems are becoming more frequent and more sophisticated. Bringing these assaults into the open can make everybody more secure. President Obama’s recent executive order encouraging voluntary sharing of information is a welcome step in that direction.

 

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Wireless connections creep into everyday things | SFGate.com

Wireless connections creep into everyday things | SFGate.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A car that tells your insurance company how you're driving. A bathroom scale that lets you chart your weight on the Web. And a meter that warns your air conditioner when electricity gets more expensive.

 

Welcome to the next phase of the wireless revolution.

 

The first wave of wireless was all about getting people to talk to each other on cellphones. The second will be getting things to talk to each other, with no humans in between. So-called machine-to-machine communication is getting a lot of buzz at this year's wireless trade show. Some experts believe these connections will outgrow the traditional phone business in less than a decade.

 

"I see a whole set of industries, from energy to cars to health to logistics and transportation, being totally redesigned," said Vittorio Colao, the CEO of Vodafone Group PLC, in a keynote speech at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. The British cellphone company has vast international interests, including its 45 percent ownership stake in Verizon Wireless.

 

Companies are promising that machine-to-machine, or M2M, technology will deliver all manner of services, from the prosaic to the world-changing. At U.S. chipmaker Qualcomm Inc.'s booth here at the show, there's a coffeepot that can be ordered to start brewing from a tablet computer, or an Internet-connected alarm clock. A former president of Costa Rica is also at the show, talking about how M2M can save massive amounts of greenhouse gases by making energy use more efficient — enough to bring mankind halfway to the goal of halting global warming.


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