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Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
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Should Google Fiber be in every home? | Android Authority

Should Google Fiber be in every home? | Android Authority | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If you like how Google Fiber’s fast and speedy service is being implemented in test cities across the U.S., you might envy the Chinese, which are requiring homes within the vicinity of fiber facilities to have access to the infrastructure.

 

China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology recently released a new government policy requiring new homes constructed within a mile of fiber optic channel networks to be equipped and fiber ready. This will give a boost to the “Fiber to the Home” initiative in the country, meant to expand domestic fiber broadband service networks. Chinese telecommunications companies are also expected to benefit from this potential growth worth in the trillions of yuan.

 

In 2012, the second largest telecommunications company, China Unicom (Hong Kong) Ltd. Added 10 million Chinese households to the their FTTH projects, and the Economic Information Daily also reported that these fiber network projects are expected to reach an additional 40 million families by 2015.

 

The policy implementation is set to start on April 1, 2013. Affected home construction guidelines also require that connections should include services from various telecommunications companies within the area. This would allow residents a choice in broadband service providers. The report, however, does not state any parameters for projected internet speeds for the fiber network, but rather just the implementation of access facilities itself.

 

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Redefining Cloud Computing: Cloud Calling and Smartphones | Cloud Computing Journal

With more smartphones being utilized everywhere, should we be redefining cloud computing? If not redefining it, at least recalibrating it to encompass and fit new edge technology that is becoming the device of choice.

 

Many organizations that are looking at implementing cloud computing should also be looking at BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) concepts that focus on smartphones and tablets.

 

Why? More people are using smartphones and tablets than PCs today. They don't want to be burdened with "computing," that sounds too technical. All they want to do is make a call and get things done.

 

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We're Falling In Love With Our Phones | Huff Post Blog

We're Falling In Love With Our Phones | Huff Post Blog | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Siri: humble assistant -- and close friend?

 

A survey of 1,000 cell phone owners commissioned by Nuance, a provider of voice recognition software, suggests that people are developing closer relationships with the virtual assistants on their smartphones. In the past decade, we've embraced software as a service. Will software as soulmate be next?

 

Fifty-seven percent of people surveyed said they felt a "personal connection" with their mobile assistant and wanted a virtual assistant that was not only helpful, but personable. Nearly half of respondents sought an assistant with a sense of humor, and almost a third desired "sassy" assistants. That's good news for Siri, whose sarcastic answers turned her into a celebrity and continue to differentiate her from new virtual assistants, like Google Now, which haven't replicated her personality. More than half of all users -- 71 percent of women and 66 percent of men -- have actually named their virtual assistants.

 

In addition to peppering virtual assistants with predictable questions about driving directions, the weather forecast and where to go for dinner, people are doing some soul-searching with their assistants as well, the survey found.

 

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UnitedHealth Tech Innovation Contest: Prize $60,000 | Blandin on Broadband

Thanks to John Schultz for the heads up on an opportunity for enterprising innovators to create tech solutions to health issues…

 

"The “Breakthrough Health Tech Challenge” aims to tap the creativity of innovators worldwide, both within and beyond the health care industry, to bring concepts and solutions that help address some of the greatest challenges facing the health system. This “crowdsourcing” challenge seeks ideas on how common consumer technologies or devices, including video game systems and mobile phones, can be used in new ways to serve people by helping them address their chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity." 

 

Details of the challenge and a submission form can be found here. Ideas are being accepted through April 8, with the winning submission earning a $60,000 prize.

 

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Space Satellite Connects Rural Health Clinics to Broadband | Government Technology

Space Satellite Connects Rural Health Clinics to Broadband | Government Technology | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

To connect mobile health units in the hills of rural New England with broadband access, policymakers are looking up -- all the way to space. In the next few months, roaming trailers that serve rural communities and ships that double as health clinics for Maine’s outer islands will be equipped with the gear necessary to draw broadband Internet from a satellite powered by Hughes Network Systems.

 

The initiative is being led by the New England Telehealth Consortium, a federally funded group of health care providers dedicated in part to improving rural health care access. The consortium’s efforts also focus on building new broadband infrastructure, but the mobile units that serve many of the hard-to-reach communities in the area would never be able to plug into the grid. Instead, they’ll transmit data through the Hughes Spaceway 3 broadband satellite, floating 22,300 miles above the Earth. It will allow those providers to use remote monitoring, electronic health records and more in a way that they never could with their current technology.

 

“People will sometimes say: ‘Well, those are just going to be unserved areas,” says Tony Bardo, vice president for government solutions at Hughes. “With satellites, there are no unserved areas. We can serve wherever you can see the southern sky.”

 

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Telerehabilitation system allows people to do physiotherapy at home | Gizmag.com

Telerehabilitation system allows people to do physiotherapy at home | Gizmag.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Generally speaking, people tend to dislike doing the exercises that are part of physiotherapy. Not helping matters is the fact that in many cases, patients must travel to a clinic to perform those exercises under the supervision of a trained professional. Now, researchers from Germany’s Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems FOKUS are developing a “telerehabilitation” system that allows patients to perform exercises at home or when out and about, while still receiving feedback from a physiotherapist.

 

The system consists of a mini-PC-like internet-connected “physio box,” a mobile sensor unit, and “exercise editor” software.

 

To begin, the physiotherapist uses the exercise editor to create an exercise program that is suited to a specific patient’s needs, and which involves an increase in the intensity of the exercises over the course of several weeks. Once it’s ready to go, the program is loaded onto the patient’s physio box.

 

Once at home, the patient hooks that box up to their TV. The first time they use it, the physio box utilizes its Kinect camera and built-in software to map the patient’s bodily parameters in 3D, and create a biomechanical computer model of that person. Subsequently, the patient will be guided through their exercises by an on-screen animated avatar.

 

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Facebook and Open Compute just blew up the server and disrupted a $55B market | GigaOM Tech News

Facebook and Open Compute just blew up the server and disrupted a $55B market | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The launch of two new features into the Open Compute hardware specifications on Wednesday has managed to do what Facebook has been threatening to do since it began building its vanity-free hardware back in 2010. The company has blown up the server — reducing it to interchangeable components.

 

With this step it has disrupted the hardware business from the chips all the way up to the switches. It has also killed the server business, which IDC estimates will bring in $55 billion in revenue for 2012.

 

It’s something I said would happen the day Facebook launched the Open Compute project back in April 2011, and which we covered again at our Structure event last June when we talked to Frank Frankovsky, VP of hardware and design at Facebook. What Facebook and others have managed to do — in a relatively short amount of time by hardware standards — is create a platform for innovation in hardware and for the data center that will allow companies to scale to the need sof the internet, but also to do so in something closer to web-time. It will do this in a way that creates less waste, more efficient computing and more opportunity for innovation.

 

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MN: Discussion of the Governor’s Task Force report | Blandin on Broadband

MN: Discussion of the Governor’s Task Force report | Blandin on Broadband | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Today I attended the Discussion of the Governor’s Task Force report hosted by the Minnesota High Tech Association. The theme of the morning – we need to do more to reach the 2015 broadband goals. I thought there were some good questions too.

 

Bill Hoffman from Connected Nation began by reminding us that 61 percent of Minnesota homes have access to broadband as defined by the Minnesota 2015 standards (10 Mbps down and 5 Mbps up). So there’s room for progress with deployment. Also 73 percent of homes subscribe to some level of broadband. Duane Ring pointed out that 96 percent of Minnesota homes have access to some level of broadband. So there’s also progress to be had in adoption.

 

Public-private partnership came up a lot. It always does. I feel like a couple of things were said that aren’t always said.

 

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Jay Rockefeller retirement shakes up privacy battle - Alex Byers | POLITICO.com

Jay Rockefeller retirement shakes up privacy battle - Alex Byers | POLITICO.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sen. Jay Rockefeller’s announcement that he’ll retire in 2015 is the latest personnel move in a month that has thrown the legislative end of the online consumer privacy world into flux.

 

The West Virginia Democrat, who’s been the upper chamber’s most vocal proponent of strengthening online privacy laws, is the third privacy hawk in three weeks to make news for potentially being on the move. Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.), who co-introduced a privacy bill of rights in April 2011, has been tapped by President Barack Obama for secretary of state. That opens a Senate seat in Massachusetts that longtime privacy hawk and Democratic Rep. Ed Markey wants and is likely to be focused on this session.


Those three aren’t the only lawmakers interested in a growing technological issue — Democratic Sens. Al Franken of Minnesota, Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut and Mark Pryor of Arkansas have all made waves on consumer privacy and Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) has been alongside Markey in the House. But the trio has been a standard-bearer, and the moves throw an issue, which was in many ways on target for a breakout year in 2013, somewhat up in the air.

 

Rockefeller, who has served more than 25 years in the Senate and has been a privacy leader from his perch as chairman of the powerful Senate commerce committee, still has a full two years left in the upper chamber. And his announcement Friday raises the question: Does the two-year time frame fuel the fire among him and his colleagues to pass an online privacy bill — or does it give opponents more resolve to run out the clock?

 

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Limits on consumers’ Internet use fuel calls for federal investigation | The Hill's Hillicon Valley

Limits on consumers’ Internet use fuel calls for federal investigation | The Hill's Hillicon Valley | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Liberals and consumer advocates are pushing the Obama administration to investigate Internet providers for limiting the amount of online material that customers can consume each month.

 

Critics of data caps say they are unnecessary and are unfairly used by monopolists to squeeze more profits out of consumers.

 

Advocacy groups including Public Knowledge and Free Press are urging the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to review the practice and are lobbying Congress to hold hearings.

 

“Data caps can create an artificial scarcity in the broadband market that limits consumer choice and hinders the creation of new competitive content online,” Christopher Lewis, Public Knowledge’s top lobbyist, said in a statement last month.

 

Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) introduced legislation last month to regulate data caps.

 

Internet providers defend the caps and say customers who use the Internet the most should pay more.

 

The issue could flare into a major regulatory battle in the new Congress.


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“Six strikes” program could affect businesses too, even if infringer is unknown | Ars Technica

“Six strikes” program could affect businesses too, even if infringer is unknown | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

For one-and-a-half years now, we’ve been following the play-by-play of the "six strikes" plan set to hit the majority of American Internet users sometime this year.

 

The Copyright Alert System (CAS), as it's formally known, is now set to come online this year. It's been orchestrated by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), and major American ISPs, which are collected under an umbrella organization called the Center for Copyright Information (CCI).

 

Once in place, the CAS monitors Internet usage looking for traffic of unauthorized downloads. Then, users will be "educated" about legal alternatives. These individuals will have to acknowledge those warnings, and over time, they may have their Internet access throttled or may have legal charges brought.

 

But a new report and leaked document published last week by TorrentFreak suggests Verizon’s six strikes plan will also affect its business customers, beyond its regular residential customers. According to the Verizon document, once an accused infringer reaches the fifth and sixth warning stage, the Internet connection would be reduced to 256kbps for two to three days.

 

If true, that could potentially put a huge burden on small businesses—particularly cafés with open Wi-Fi hotspots. Any business with more than a few employees, therefore, could be unduly, collectively punished via their ISP simply because of the accused actions of one person. That’s far different from a small, contained home network, where there is only a small number of users at any given time—and likely, the one paying the bill knows all of them.

 

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Electronic Records Systems Have Not Reduced Health Costs, Report Says | NYTimes.com

Electronic Records Systems Have Not Reduced Health Costs, Report Says | NYTimes.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Optimistic predictions by RAND in 2005 helped drive explosive growth in the electronic records industry and encouraged the federal government to give billions of dollars in financial incentives to hospitals and doctors that put the systems in place.

 

“We’ve not achieved the productivity and quality benefits that are unquestionably there for the taking,” said Dr. Arthur L. Kellermann, one of the authors of a reassessment by RAND that was published in this month’s edition of Health Affairs, an academic journal.

 

RAND’s 2005 report was paid for by a group of companies, including General Electric and Cerner Corporation, that have profited by developing and selling electronic records systems to hospitals and physician practices. Cerner’s revenue has nearly tripled since the report was released, to a projected $3 billion in 2013, from $1 billion in 2005.

 

The report predicted that widespread use of electronic records could save the United States health care system at least $81 billion a year, a figure RAND now says was overstated. The study was widely praised within the technology industry and helped persuade Congress and the Obama administration to authorize billions of dollars in federal stimulus money in 2009 to help hospitals and doctors pay for the installation of electronic records systems.

 

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New Baltimore CTO Focuses on Engagement | Public CIO

New Baltimore CTO Focuses on Engagement | Public CIO | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Baltimore is refocusing its IT efforts after the hire of Chief Technology Officer Chris Tonjes. Tonjes was named as a replacement to Rico Singleton, who resigned in Feb. 2012 amid accusations of ethics violations. Among Tonjes' focus areas are upgrades to broadband availability and increased civic engagement.

Tonjes joined Baltimore following his service as CIO for the District of Columbia Public Library, where he oversaw the creation of the library's first mobile application, broadband expansion for library branches, and an initiative to offer computer education classes to low-income residents. Bridging the digital divide is also a key priority in Tonjes' new role, he said, and his office will eventually announce concrete plans focused on making progress toward that goal.

But for now, Tonjes has spent the last few months getting oriented with the city and focusing on infrastructure. “I've been doing due diligence to understand the capability and maturity level of the city's IT agency and the city's IT portfolio as a whole. We're organizing around what I consider to be very important focus areas,” Tonjes said. The city is also looking to cut waste by eliminating unneeded programs and technology spending, such as custom software development that could simply be purchased instead.

 

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NC: Despite legal concerns, Gig.U initiative approved to provide Internet | The Daily Tar Heel

The Chapel Hill Town Council moved forward Monday with an initiative to provide Internet to communities, despite concerns about its legality.

 

The Gig.U initiative is a nationwide effort to provide high-speed Internet access to universities and their surrounding communities that has been successful in states like Florida and Maine.

 

North Carolina began its own initiative under the North Carolina Next Generation Network group — made up of six municipalities, including Chapel Hill and Carrboro, and universities like UNC and Duke.

 

The group hopes to release a request for proposal Feb. 1. This allows potential network service providers to submit proposals for the job.

 

In November, Cynthia Pols, a telecommunications attorney, contacted the group about major problems with its request.

 

One of the problems is the legality of some of the objectives — specifically one that would require low-cost Internet in low-income neighborhoods.

 

Under state and federal laws, North Carolina municipalities can neither franchise nor regulate broadband systems, Pols said.

 

“North Carolina is a unique beast in terms of the restraints in municipalities,” she said. “The North Carolina legislature has essentially prohibited municipal involvement in the broadband arena.”

 

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iPhone 5S, low-cost iPhone 5 to debut this summer, analyst says | CNET Apple News

iPhone 5S, low-cost iPhone 5 to debut this summer, analyst says | CNET Apple News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Apple could have a busy summer if the latest iPhone forecast from one analyst comes to fruition.

 

The company will launch an iPhone 5S and a revamped version of the iPhone 5 in June or July, predicts KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.

 

In an investors note received by MacRumors, Kuo said the iPhone 5S would be similar to the current model but offer a few improvements, including an A7 chip for faster performance and a fingerprint sensor. The camera specs would bump up to an f2.0 aperture and a smart LED flash.

 

The revamped iPhone 5 would be a lower-cost version of the current model in a somewhat thicker case made of plastic and offer a choice of six colors. The analyst estimates the phone would sell for an off-contract, or unlocked, price of $350 to $450.

 

Rumors of a low-cost iPhone have heated up this month with claims from The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg and forecasts from other analysts. But most of the reports have cited a launch time of later in the year.

 

On Monday, Taiwan-based DigiTimes also said the new low-cost iPhone would be outfitted with a plastic chassis in order to cut costs. However, it's difficult to envision Apple going too cheap on the exterior as that's not the company's usual style, even when trying to lower costs.

 

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Why I'm thinking of ditching my precious iPhone for an Android | GigaOM Tech News

Why I'm thinking of ditching my precious iPhone for an Android | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If you don’t like personal stories about infidelity, please read no further. After being in love with my iPhone for several years now, my attentions are increasingly being pulled elsewhere — and I’m not fighting it. I’ve been an iPhone fan ever since I first got my hands on one: it instantly made my BlackBerry feel like an ugly brick that was designed by orangutans. All I wanted to do was hold it forever, and that’s almost exactly what I’ve done since I first got one — until, that is, I switched to using an Android phone over the holidays.

 

I didn’t decide to try an Android phone because I was dissatisfied with Apple or the iPhone — in fact, I still think the iPhone is one of the best-designed and most appealing products of any kind that I’ve ever used. I have a MacBook Air and an iPad that I also love using, and I recommend them whenever I get the chance. But I will confess that I have been looking enviously at Android phones for a little while, after seeing friends like my GigaOM colleague Kevin Tofel using them and then borrowing one last fall for a trip to Amsterdam for our Structure: Europe conference.

 

Part of what I was interested by was the larger screens on the Nexus and other phones — I like to read webpages and other documents and look at photos on my phone, so more screen real estate was appealing. But I was also interested in the openness of the Android ecosystem, and whether that would be a benefit compared to the walled garden that Apple runs for iOS.

 

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Eshoo to reintroduce wireless bill in coming weeks | The Hill's Hillicon Valley

Eshoo to reintroduce wireless bill in coming weeks | The Hill's Hillicon Valley | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-Calif.) said Tuesday that she intends to reintroduce legislation in the coming weeks that's aimed at ensuring consumers have complete information about pricing and service conditions before they sign up for for a mobile wireless contract.

Eshoo said it's imperative that mobile providers "accurately disclose terms and the conditions of services, including a clear and concise explanation of pricing," as well as explain whether they have a "network management policy that could impact a user's experience."

The goal of the forthcoming bill is to ensure "consumers know what they're getting for their money before committing to a two-year wireless service contract," Eshoo said during an event about Congress's broadband agenda for 2013 that was held by the Broadband Breakfast Club. 

 

The California lawmaker first introduced the bill, called the Next Generation Wireless Disclosure Act, during the last congressional session.

 

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Congresswoman Introduces Draft Amendment to U.S. Hacking Law | Fast Company

Congresswoman Introduces Draft Amendment to U.S. Hacking Law | Fast Company | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) has introduced a draft amendment to an existing computer hacking law in honor of Aaron Swartz. Lofgren posted a copy of the draft amendment, which she said she hopes to call Aaron's Law, on the Reddit website. Swartz was one of the creators of the social media site.

 

According to Lofgren, who is no stranger to the Reddit community, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act is so vague that it is easily violated. "Using the law in this way [violation of an online service's user agreement or terms of service] is a violation of the CFAA and the wire fraud statute," she said.

 

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CAF. Is This the USF Reform We Were Hoping For? | Gigabit Nation on BlogTalk Radio

CAF. Is This the USF Reform We Were Hoping For? | Gigabit Nation on BlogTalk Radio | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The FCCs Connect America Fund is the current end product of reforming the Universal Service Fund. If the number and variety of people complaining about a particular government program is a measure of success, then the FCC has been wildly successful with USF reform.


Today's interview with telecom attorney Fred Goldstein (partner with Interisle Consulting Group) attempts to sort out some of the wailing and gnashing of teeth.


--whats wrong with CAF, whats right with CAF


--who benefitted from this phase I of the CAF program (some argue it wont be rural communities)


--should we be surprised carriers refused to play in the CAF game


--does anyone really understand how this program works


If were having this much angst and agony over CAF phase I and II with only $300 million, whats going to happen when reform of the remaining $4 billion in former USF money comes on line?


Anyone whos involved with, working for or cares about broadband in the U.S. needs to listen to this show.

 

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Survey: 35 Percent of Smartphone Owners Use Them While Driving | AllThingsD.com

Survey: 35 Percent of Smartphone Owners Use Them While Driving | AllThingsD.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Thirty-five percent of smartphone owners use their devices while driving, according to a McKinsey study released today on “Mobility of the Future.”

 

The rest, I’d venture to say, are lying about it! But then, I didn’t conduct an online survey of 4,000 people in the U.S.

 

Of respondents who said they use their smartphones while driving, 89 percent said it was for calls, 68 percent for navigation, 39 percent for SMS and 31 percent for using the Internet.

 

The McKinsey report — which was released at the Detroit Auto Show — did not get into the various voice, visual and touch interfaces people use to try to be safe while driving.

 

But it’s worth saying, because it’s always worth saying, that smartphones tend to distract us from other things we probably should be paying attention to when operating a motor vehicle.

 

McKinsey also found some interesting results around more sustainable transportation. For instance, 45 percent of young people — age 18 to 39 — said they expected to use car sharing more in the next 10 years.

 

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County and State Partner For Local Connectivity in Iowa | community broadband networks

In 2010, the Iowa Communications Network received a $16.2 million Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP). The project will connect all 99 counties in the state by upgrading an existing 3,000 mile network (PDF of the project summary). The state plans to bring 10 Gbps capacity points of presence to each county and to provide 1 Gbps service to about 1,000 anchor institutions. The project will be managed by the state's Department of Transportation, which will be using fiber primarily for traffic management.

 

A recent Ames Tribune article reports that the local community will be partnering with the state to capitalize on the existence of the fiber for connectivity. Story County, located in the very center of the state, will soon be using several strands in the Ames area to create a loop between city and county offices. The 20-year arrangement will cost the county $15,000 and provides ample capacity to support the county's work and support future uses.

 

From the article:

 

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Why data-caps SUCK | Boing Boing

Why data-caps SUCK | Boing Boing | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Brian sez, "I made an animated presentation about broadband and mobile data caps - specifically, how they discourage innovation, how the excuses used to justify data caps don't hold water, and the real reasons that ISPs and mobile providers are moving towards caps."

 

This is really good stuff. It might need an edit for time, but if you've got 11 minutes, this is what you should spend 'em on.

 

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The Next FCC Chair: Decisive Protector of the Public Interest | Public Knowledge

The Next FCC Chair: Decisive Protector of the Public Interest | Public Knowledge | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Even though current FCC Chair Julius Genachowski has not announced that he is leaving, there is still much talk about who is being considered to be his successor.  In its never-ending fascination with the horse race of politics, the trade press has been throwing out names of the supposed frontrunners every few weeks or so.   

 

But this focus on names is premature.  Before we talk about who will be the next FCC Chair, there needs to be a conversation on the qualities the ideal candidate should possess.  Because the issues and controversies that will come before the Commission over the next four years will be no less contentious than in the previous four. 

 

The next Chair will preside over matters such as the transition to all IP networks, finalizing the incentive auction and spectrum screen proceedings, figuring out how to promote broadband competition, and of course, how to reinstate the agency’s authority (and indeed its relevance) should it lose the legal challenge to the open Internet rules.  This is in addition to whatever transactions the Commission may be asked to decide by industry.

 

So what qualities should the next FCC Chair possess?

 

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AT&T Hints at Fixed Residential LTE - Still Likely a Few Years Out After Massive Spectrum Deals | DSLReports.com

As we've noted, AT&T's recently announced U-Verse upgrades are less significant than the company's recent announcement made it appear, given the "expansion" involves simply pushing U-Verse out to an additional 3 million or so users they'd already intended to upgrade (the majority in San Francisco, where debates over VRAD cabinets stalled upgrades). Last week AT&T stated that some of their U-Verse expansion will also use LTE as a delivery mechanism, though the company's just not quite done working out how to do it yet:

 

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Vermont to get broadband boost through federal grant | NECN

Vermont to get broadband boost through federal grant | NECN | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Twenty-five Vermont communities are about to get a high-tech boost.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. and representatives of the other members of the state's Congressional delegation announced a $1.8-million federal grant Friday. The money will go to the Vt. Council on Rural Development.

The council will use the money for several economic development initiatives involving enhancements to high-speed internet infrastructure, including developing downtown wi-fi zones, VCRD executive director Paul Costello said. The group will also grow online message boards to better connect communities, and host training seminars to teach businesses and municipalities how to move their records onto "the cloud."

Having digital records stored in cyberspace could help if another disaster like 2011's Tropical Storm Irene hits. In several rural communities where access to broadband is limited, paper documents were lost to floodwaters and no digital backups were easily accessible.

"Money is one thing. We Vermonters, though, know that part of our soul of a state was damaged by what happened," Sen. Leahy said. "But virtual infrastructure is going to help some of these communities recover more quickly."

 

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