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Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
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G.O.P. Balks at Plan to Add Airwaves for Mobile Internet and Wi-Fi | NYTimes.com

G.O.P. Balks at Plan to Add Airwaves for Mobile Internet and Wi-Fi | NYTimes.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
House Republicans warned the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday against “giving away” scarce airwaves that they said could produce up to $19 billion in proceeds if they were instead auctioned to telecommunications companies for use in mobile broadband networks.

The remarks, which came at a House communications subcommittee hearing, took aim at one of the top priorities of Julius Genachowski, the F.C.C. chairman: to make available more unlicensed airwaves, or spectrum, to open congested mobile broadband networks and to use in Wi-Fi hot spots.

In September, the F.C.C. proposed freeing 12 to 20 megahertz of spectrum for those unlicensed uses. The unlicensed space on the electromagnetic spectrum would also be used as “guard bands.” Those are areas that border segments of airwaves that are used by cellphone companies, broadcasters and other communications entities; their purpose is to limit interference from transmissions on nearby airwaves.

Mr. Genachowski defended the commission’s plans. “Unlicensed spectrum has a powerful record of driving innovation, investment and economic growth — hundreds of billions of dollars of value creation for our economy and consumers,” he told the committee on Wednesday.

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Google Starts Reporting False DMCA Takedown Requests | TorrentFreak

Google Starts Reporting False DMCA Takedown Requests | TorrentFreak | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
Google has quietly rolled out a new feature to its copyright transparency report, allowing the public to see when DMCA takedown notices sent by copyright holders are false. The search giant is currently processing more than a dozen million “infringing” links per month, but points out that not all requests sent by rightsholders are legitimate. As an example, Google cites a request where a major U.S. motion picture studio asked them to censor their IMDb page and official trailer.

Ever since Google started publishing a transparency report for the DMCA requests it receives, the number of notices being sent have shot through the roof.

During the past month copyright holders asked Google to remove 12,045,130 webpages from its search. Unfortunately, however, not all of these requests are legitimate.

In some cases the notices are flagged as false because the content has already been removed from the original site. But the automated systems used by copyright holders also include perfectly legitimate content as we’ve highlighted in the past.

This hasn’t gone unnoticed by Google either.

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TV-on-the-go service Aereo adds Bloomberg TV as first cable channel | GigaOM Tech News

TV-on-the-go service Aereo adds Bloomberg TV as first cable channel | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
If you’re unfamiliar with Aereo, the company uses dime-size antennas to stream live television to your phone or tablet and lets you record shows on a remote DVR. The service, available for $1 a day or $8/month, is only available in New York while the company battles copyright claims from NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox.

On Thursday, the Wall Street Journal reported that Aereo has added its first cable channel, Bloomberg TV. The channel covers financial issues and is owned by Bloomberg LP, the large data and media company owned by the mayor of New York City. The Journal says Aereo is reportedly paying Bloomberg to transmit the channel.

The significance of the cable deal is two-fold. First, it adds more content to Aereo’s offerings which for now consist of only over-the-air TV. Bloomberg TV is not exactly ESPN but it does show potential Aereo customers the company is serious about expanding.

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Dish Network considering 'strategic options' after winning FCC approval to build wireless network | FierceCable

Dish Network considering 'strategic options' after winning FCC approval to build wireless network | FierceCable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
Dish Network stock jumped more than 2 percent Wednesday, after the FCC announced late Tuesday that Dish could use wireless broadband spectrum it acquired from TerreStar and DBSD North America to launch a wireless phone and high-speed Internet service.

While Dish chairman Charlie Ergen said in July that the company would create "tens of thousands of new jobs" if it got the green light to use the AWS-4 spectrum to challenge Comcast, Verizon and other broadband providers, the company said it is still reviewing the FCC decision.

"Following a more thorough review of the order and its technical details, Dish will consider its strategic options and the optimal approach to put this spectrum to use for the benefit of consumers," Jeff Blum, Dish SVP and deputy general counsel, said in a prepared statement.

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The Fiscal Cliff Could Kill Super-WiFi | TMCnet.com

The Fiscal Cliff Could Kill Super-WiFi | TMCnet.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
One of the most amazing turning points in technology advancement has been the US Government’s decision to allow unlicensed spectrum to be used in the form of WiFi. Instead of taking the short-term gain of revenue via spectrum auction, it was released for free for everyone to use. As a result, cable companies can compete wirelessly with 4G providers and they need no private spectrum to do so.

The point is, unlicensed spectrum has truly revolutionized technology and productivity. Think this through – even the companies who sell “competitive to WiFi” 4G service are benefiting from WiFi. Consider carriers often wheel in large-scale WiFi equipment to sporting events and other venues because of cellular capacity issues. AT&T has over 30,000 WiFi hotspots thanks in-part to acquisitions like Wayport who added 20,000 hotspots and Superclick Networks.

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KS: High-speed broadband a lifeline for rural America | Morning Sun

KS: High-speed broadband a lifeline for rural America | Morning Sun | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
Most of the people I know who choose to live in rural America happily do without the conveniences of the cities and suburbs in order to enjoy the benefits of rural life.

In today’s world, though, high-speed broadband networks are far more than a convenience for rural America. They deliver greater opportunity for improved healthcare, education and economic development through advanced communications.

Modern broadband connections allow patients in small towns to be examined and even treated from afar by medical experts in distant cities.

Kids in rural schools too small to offer advanced courses could take those courses online.
Broadband networks could help stem the population decline in some rural areas by attracting new businesses that create new jobs.

To forego the benefits that state-of-the-art broadband networks bring would limit the potential of small towns and rural counties that deserve to be equal beneficiaries of the technology revolution that’s being made possible by the transition away from legacy analog copper wire-based networks and to high-speed next generation Internet Protocol (IP)-based networks.

Despite the explosive growth in broadband Internet services and capacity over the past decade, there’s an undeniable gap separating rural America from the rest of the country. This summer the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) reported that broadband access is still not
available to 19 million Americans, and 14.5 million of those Americans live in rural areas.

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FTC orders data brokers to reveal business practices | The Hill's Hillicon Valley

FTC orders data brokers to reveal business practices | The Hill's Hillicon Valley | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
The Federal Trade Commission opened an investigation on Tuesday into the business and privacy practices of data brokers—companies that compile and sell consumers' personal information.

The FTC ordered nine data brokers to explain how they collect and use personal data. The agency also asked whether consumers are able to access or correct the information collected about them.

The FTC noted that consumers do not interact directly with data brokers. Instead, the companies compile information from public records or buy the information from other companies.

"As a result, consumers are often unaware of the existence of data brokers as well as the purposes for which they collect and use consumers’ data," the FTC said. "This lack of transparency also means that even when data brokers offer consumers the ability to access their data, or provide other tools, many consumers do not know how to exercise this right."

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The Evolving Internet: Patterns in Usage and Pricing | CableTechTalk.com

The Evolving Internet: Patterns in Usage and Pricing | CableTechTalk.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
For those who missed last Friday’s NCTA Connects, here’s a full video of the event.

The discussion, titled The Evolving Internet: Patterns in Usage and Pricing, was a deep dive into how consumer broadband usage is changing and how Internet Service Providers must evolve with the needs of their customers.

Through the lens of an economist, Professor Steven Wildman debunks some of the myths surrounding Usage Based Pricing and how a more flexible pricing model promotes the spread of broadband access.

Also joining Professor Wildman was Professor Daniel M. Lyons of Boston College Law School – who recently published “The Impact of Data Caps and Other Forms of Usage-Based Pricing for Broadband Access” – and Sandvine President and CEO Dave Caputo who highlighted the findings of his company’s recent Internet research.

The event surrounded the release of Professor Wildman’s paper, titled “The Economics of Usage-Based Pricing in Local Broadband Markets”.

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Utah's Spanish Fork City Network an Incredible Success | community broadband networks

Utah's Spanish Fork City Network an Incredible Success | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
Back in 2010, we reported on the municipal network in Spanish Fork, Utah. Back then, the utility innaugurated its telephone service, which completed its triple play offering. With recent discussion around Utah's UTOPIA, Spanish Fork is getting a second look.

A Cimaron Neugebauer, Salt Lake Tribune article, highlights the success of the Spanish Fork Communications Network (SFCN). When we last reported on SFCN, 60% of residents subscribed to its cable television and high-speed Internet service. Two years later, the numbers are even higher:

Spanish Fork runs its own municipal network to deliver telephone, cable TV and Internet services. The network has deep ties with the community and is popular with residents, nearly 80 percent of whom are customers.

"It’s exciting to live in community that invests in this kind of thing," resident Bret Bills said.

A combination of bonding and borrowing paid for the $7.5 million network including a municipal electric utility substation. Construction began in 2001. The investment continues to pay off:

Today, the city currently makes about $1 million a year profit from the service and its bonds of $600,000 annually will be paid off in 2015.

The network is a combination of fiber and coax cable. As is often the case, the community acted to fill the gap left by the failure of the private sector, involving the community along the way. From the SFCN website:

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National Broadband Plan relies on communities to drive innovation | Editor's Blog at WRAL Tech Wire

National Broadband Plan relies on communities to drive innovation | Editor's Blog at WRAL Tech Wire | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
Communities have to take steps to remove bandwidth as a constraint on innovation, according to Blair Levin.

Levin is one of the premier communications strategists in the United States who lead in the creation of the National Broadband Plan released in March 2010. He now serves as executive director of Gig.U.

The University Community Next Generation Innovation Project, or Gig.U, is a broad-based group of more than 30 leading research universities from across the country with a mission to accelerate the deployment of ultra-high-speed networks to leading U.S. universities and their surrounding communities. These improvements to these networks, according to Gig.U’s mission statement, will drive economic growth and stimulate a new generation of innovations addressing critical needs, such as health care and education.

Levin talked here locally about the implementation of the National Broadband Plan, Gig.U, US UCAN, and what's to come in addressing big data / big broadband needs in North Carolina and nationwide:

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Capping the Nation’s Broadband Future? | NewAmerica.net

Capping the Nation’s Broadband Future? | NewAmerica.net | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
The past few years have been marked by unprecedented innovation and growth on the Internet. New digital platforms and rich content from voice-over-IP and video conferencing connect family and friends around the world at little or no cost, high quality video streams facilitate online learning and digital education along with new ways to view movies and TV shows, and a host of platforms and applications allow for the creation and sharing of original content and ideas through cloud based computing.

These examples are just a few of many innovations made possible by a relatively uncapped and unmetered Internet environment. Unfortunately that is rapidly changing. Even as new applications and content require increasing amounts of data, Internet service providers (ISPs) are clamping down on Internet use through putting in place more stringent and costly data limits on their subscribers. ISPs claim that these measures are necessary to manage the growth of Internet traffic on their networks and maintain quality of service.Yet, the technical or engineering rational for relying on monthly data caps to address network congestion is questionable, when congestion is often limited to certain peak hours and locations.

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Smart Grid Trends to Watch: ICT Innovations and New Entrants | Energy Collective

Smart Grid Trends to Watch: ICT Innovations and New Entrants | Energy Collective | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
The convergence of information and communications technologies (ICT) with the traditional operations technologies (OT) is an ongoing Smart Grid trend. Within the USA and its 3000+ electric utilities, Smart Grid investments focused on optimization of transmission and distribution grid operations through machine to machine (M2M) communications and forays into data analytics for applications ranging from revenue assurance to voltage conservation.

This ICT/OT convergence trend is encouraging new entrants into the vendor ecosystem that supports electric, gas, and water utilities. One of the latest entrants is Dell Computers. Dell made two announcements in the past two months that illustrate how ICT companies are exploring Smart Grid market opportunities. 2013 will be the year to watch their strategies and progress.

Dell recently unveiled their Smart Grid Data Management Solution which combines high-performance computing, networking and storage to manage data for review and action in utility operations.

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Expected Google Settlement on Standard-Essential Patents (SEPs) | Marvin Ammori Blog

Expected Google Settlement on Standard-Essential Patents (SEPs) | Marvin Ammori Blog | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
As noted in our last post, several news reports suggest that the FTC’s wide-ranging 19-month investigation of Google’s business practices is coming to an end.

The FTC and Google are also settling a (somewhat different) matter regarding whether Google can seek injunctions when it asserts “standard-essential” patents, also known as SEPs.

This post is more for explanation than advocacy. The competitive issues regarding these patents are complex, and it remains unclear what the ultimate settlement will say.

CNET has a nice description of the reported agreement:

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Do Copper Rules Belong in an All-IP World? | Light Reading

Do Copper Rules Belong in an All-IP World? | Light Reading | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) commissioners this week dropped some of the strongest hints yet that they will back plans by AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) and Verizon Wireless to move away from supporting copper lines.

On Tuesday, the FCC created a new task force to examine AT&T's Nov. 7 request for the agency to "facilitate the transition" from the "TDM-based, circuit-switch network" to a wired and wireless IP future. (See AT&T Puts Up $14B to Boost Broadband.)

Incumbent carriers are subject to a 1913 Carrier Of Last Resort (COLR) rule that requires them to provide every American household with access to a landline. Verizon says it has gotten deals from some states to drop those requirements; AT&T, meanwhile, has urged regulators to update the rules. (See 4G Kills the Copper Plant.)

At a broadband-focused Senate hearing on Wednesday, U.S. Rep. John Shimkus (R, Ill.) asked FCC commissioners about the "end of the copper era" and how the agency plans to deal with it.

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Senate panel approves Franken's location privacy bill | The Hill's Hillicon Valley

Senate panel approves Franken's location privacy bill | The Hill's Hillicon Valley | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
The Senate Judiciary Committee voted in favor of Sen. Al Franken's (D-Minn.) Location Privacy Protection Act on Thursday.

The bill would require companies to get a customer's consent before collecting or sharing mobile location data. It would also ban mobile applications that secretly monitor the user's location — a feature that Franken said allows for stalking and enables domestic violence.

Franken noted that many apps already ask for users' permission before tracking them, but he said his bill is necessary to ensure that the practice is mandatory.

"I believe that Americans have the fundamental right to control who can track their location, and whether or not that information can be given to third parties," Franken said. "But right now, companies – some legitimate, some sleazy – are collecting your or your child’s location and selling it to ad companies or who knows who else."

GOP Sens. Mike Lee (Utah), Jeff Sessions (Ala.) and Tom Coburn (Okla.) did not attend the markup, but registered dissenting votes. Sen. Chuck Grassley (Iowa), the panel's ranking Republican, said he still has concerns with the bill, but he agreed to move it forward.

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DirecTV Starts Charging $3 Extra Sports Fee - First Step Toward Breaking Out Sports Costs? | DSLReports.com

DirecTV has taken the unique step of charging some new TV subscribers a sports content surcharge if they subscribe to more than one sports channels. According to the Los Angeles Times, DirecTV has started charging the $3 fee to customers who live in markets where there's more than one regional sports network. While DirecTV estimates that only around 20% of markets have more than one local sports channel, that number is rising quickly.

Here's the explanation of the new fee from the DirecTV website:

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Here's why Sprint offered $2.1B to buy the rest of Clearwire | GigaOM Mobile Tech News

Here's why Sprint offered $2.1B  to buy the rest of Clearwire | GigaOM Mobile Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
One of the most amazing turning points in technology advancement has been the US Government’s decision to allow unlicensed spectrum to be used in the form of WiFi. Instead of taking the short-term gain of revenue via spectrum auction, it was released for free for everyone to use. As a result, cable companies can compete wirelessly with 4G providers and they need no private spectrum to do so.

The point is, unlicensed spectrum has truly revolutionized technology and productivity. Think this through – even the companies who sell “competitive to WiFi” 4G service are benefiting from WiFi. Consider carriers often wheel in large-scale WiFi equipment to sporting events and other venues because of cellular capacity issues. AT&T has over 30,000 WiFi hotspots thanks in-part to acquisitions like Wayport who added 20,000 hotspots and Superclick Networks.

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AT&T, Verizon, others debate liability, funding for Next-Generation 911 service | FierceWireless

AT&T, Verizon, others debate liability, funding for Next-Generation 911 service | FierceWireless | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
As the nation's wireless carriers and messaging providers gear up to support text-to-911 service, they are also already staking out positions on a Next-Generation 911 service that could support a range of communication mechanisms including pictures, video and other IP-based communications.

The FCC this week announced proposed rules that will allow wireless users to send text messages to 911. The rules will require wireless carriers and over-the-top messaging providers like Facebook Messenger and Apple's iMessage to support text messages to 911 and to provide bounce-back messages if the service is unavailable. As part of that effort, the nation's four largest carriers agreed to deploy a nationwide text-to-911 service by May 15, 2014.

However, the FCC is also seeking comment on a Next-Generation 911 system, dubbed NG911. That system, the details of which are still being hashed out, will support a wide range of functions beyond just text messages.

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Sandy’s Impact: Lower Manhattan Phone Service Not Back to Normal Until May 2013 | Stop the Cap!

Sandy’s Impact: Lower Manhattan Phone Service Not Back to Normal Until May 2013 | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has called Verizon’s notification that phone service in lower Manhattan will not be back to normal until late next spring “unacceptable.”

Hurricane Sandy’s storm surge ruined at least 95 percent of Verizon Communications’ landline network in the lower half of Manhattan leaving numerous businesses without phone service with little hope service will be restored this year.

“Their schedule right now says that lower Manhattan is not going to be back up until May,” Bloomberg said in a recent speech.

The mayor is upset with Verizon’s timetable because a number of major buildings in the area cannot be reoccupied by business tenants until telephone service is restored, and Verizon is facing questions about why it will take a half-year to get phone service back up and running to everyone that wants it.

When local cable news channel NY1 asked Verizon how many customers were still without service, a spokesman told the reporter it did not know, adding some customers have priorities more pressing than phone service.

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Broadband's Financial Impact? Local Government, Heal Thyself | Gigabit Nation on BlogTalk Radio

Broadband's Financial Impact? Local Government, Heal Thyself | Gigabit Nation on BlogTalk Radio | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
Local governments use of broadband to improve communication and operations is one of the two main pillars in the financial sustainability model of community broadband networks, wrote host Craig Settles in his first book on the subject. Stakeholders need to pay more attention to this pillar.

The Institute for Local Self Reliance (ILSR) recently released a Public Savings Fact Sheet that spells out in dollars and sense how specific local governments in Florida, Ohio, Virginia and several other states used broadband to significantly cut costs. Christopher Mitchell, a Director with ILSR, joins us to discuss some of these projects.

Mitchell provides assessments of how these various communities identified operational areas broadband could impact. He also offers pointers for listeners who want to replicate some of these successes.

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OH: Knight Foundation commits nearly $8 million to revitalize University Park in Akron |Sacramento Bee

OH: Knight Foundation commits nearly $8 million to revitalize University Park in Akron |Sacramento Bee | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation today announced a nearly $8 million commitment to help residents strengthen and reshape University Park in Akron.

The University Park Alliance will use the funds to revitalize a 50-block area at Akron's urban core. The bulk of the Knight funding, a $6 million grant, will go to engage neighborhood residents, local businesses and city institutions to ensure they are directly involved in the direction and evolution of the University Park revitalization. The rest, a $1.8 million low-interest loan, will support the redevelopment of University Square, a linchpin of the alliance's master plan that will provide housing and shopping for both students and residents.

"The work at hand will help build a vibrant, engaged community in Akron where people aspire to live, work, learn and play," Eric Anthony Johnson, the alliance's executive director, said. "The alliance is building on the tremendous groundwork of visionary local leaders such as Mayor Don Plusquellic and University of Akron President Luis Proenza. The pieces are in place for the transformative work ahead."

The investment recognizes the alliance's success over the past two years in engaging the community in crafting the master plan for Downtown Akron, said Jennifer Thomas, Akron program director for Knight Foundation.

"This new support builds on the momentum of the last two years in creating partnerships and reengaging the community," Thomas said. "The alliance's efforts are galvanizing residents around a larger vision for the city, and engaging the next generation of neighborhood leaders who want to drive the city's future."

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Clinton: businesses need Korean broadband speeds | Broadband | News | PC Pro

Clinton: businesses need Korean broadband speeds | Broadband | News | PC Pro | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
President Bill Clinton says businesses need broadband speeds comparable to those in parts of Asia to compete in the global market.

In an echo of the broadband argument rumbling in the UK, Clinton believes the US needs to invest in fast, universal broadband throughout the country.

Delivering the opening keynote at Dell World in Texas, the former president said: "You want to help small businesses, you want to help your entrepreneurs, you want to make it possible for people living in remote towns and upstate New York and West Texas to be part of the global economy? Then stop pretending we can do it with South Korea having average download speeds of four times ours."

President Clinton said he was a great believer in the disruptive power of the internet, although admitted he sent only two emails during his entire eight-year term in office: one to US troops serving in the Balkans and one to a 77-year-old astronaut.

"When I became president [in 1993] the average cell phone weighed five pounds, there were a grand total of 50 websites on the entire internet. That was it," he quipped.

Nevertheless, Clinton has grown to appreciate the benefits of e-commerce. "I love the way the internet enables people to make unusual partnerships and to do things differently and to try, and not be afraid to fail and go on and do something else," he told the thousand-strong audience.

"I think the availability of technology to short circuit the otherwise very lengthy process of building effective systems can make a difference."

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Detroit is the testing ground for a new open source wireless network technology | GigaOM Tech News

Detroit is the testing ground for a new open source wireless network technology | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
A section of Detroit will be the proving ground for a new open source wireless networking technology called Commotion. Commotion is a mesh networking technology that creates a wireless local area network for devices. The network can connect users to each other and with an Internet connection and can connect them to the greater web.

The network is being built by the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute (OTI), which has completed the first phase of construction of this network in the Cass Corridor section of Detroit. It plans to publicly release Commotion in early 2013 so other places can experiment with the technology. We’ve covered Commotion and the OIT’s efforts before in our story detailing the technology stack for an open wireless network. The stack contains technologies such as Serval, which would enable the handsets to recognize the Commotion network, Tor, a program that can hide where a user is coming from and OpenBTS, an open source base station that runs software that can interface between VoIP networks and GSM radios.

The idea of an open source wireless network, free from ISP and government meddling has been a dream of the Open Technology Institute for a while. In 2011 the nonprofit applied for a grant from the state department grant to make it happen using a cluster of technologies that have also been tested in unlikely places — such as this year’s Defcon security event. The State Department is keen to use such technology to ensure places like Egypt or Syria could still connect to each other and maybe the outside world, even if the government cuts off access to the web.

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Vector-based video could mean no more pixels | Gizmag.com

Vector-based video could mean no more pixels | Gizmag.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
Unlike traditional bitmap graphics, which are made up of an array of pixels, vector graphics consist of lines, curves and shapes that are based on geometric formulas. Not only do they take up far less memory than bitmaps, but sections of them can also be enlarged without any loss of resolution. Currently, however, vector graphics aren’t well-suited to photorealistic applications, such as video. That may be about to change, though, as researchers from the UK’s University of Bath have developed a new program that is said to overcome such limitations – the scientists believe that the technology could make pixels obsolete within five years.

The main problem with vector graphics is that they tend to be made up of sharply-defined areas of solid color, lacking the subtle transitions between those areas that are seen in bitmaps. As a result, the graphics are good for things like posters and animation, but tend to look a little cartoon-like.

The new codec (a program that encodes or decodes a digital video stream) is reportedly capable of filling in the boundaries between the elements in vector images. No details have been released regarding how the process works. The result, however, is moving vector-based video that is said to be equal in quality to bitmap video.

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VA: Town center planned near technology park - RichmondBizSense

VA: Town center planned near technology park - RichmondBizSense | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
A longtime Chesterfield developer is laying the groundwork for a major mixed-use project next to the new Amazon distribution center.

George Emerson, head of Emerson Builders, is in the early stages of planning the 68-acre Meadowville Town Center project that would include up to 400 apartments and about 200,000 square feet of retail, he said.

“We’re going to go in and do a nice town center project that will be commensurate with what Meadowville Technology Park is becoming,” he said. “This is going to be one of the nicest projects we’ve worked on to date.”

Emerson is working with Chesterfield County to obtain zoning that would allow for apartments. Getting the right permits and the financing will likely take all of next year, he said, adding that he hopes to begin the project in 2014.

The parcel, a wooded lot, is near the intersection of Enon Church and Meadowville roads, near the access road to the technology park.

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