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Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
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Confused Irish Newspaper Editorial Argues That Search Engines Need To Pay Newspapers | Techdirt

Confused Irish Newspaper Editorial Argues That Search Engines Need To Pay Newspapers | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As a few folks sent in, recently the Irish Examiner newspaper had an editorial arguing that copyright law needs to be expanded because, of course, newspapers are suffering. Though, as you look at the details, whoever wrote the article appears to be quite confused:

 

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Google opens up on seven years of its data center history | GigaOM Cloud Computing News

Google opens up on seven years of its data center history | GigaOM Cloud Computing News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Google’s head of data center operations provided a seven-year look at how the search giant’s data center strategy has evolved during the 7×24 Exchange conference on Tuesday in Phoenix, Ariz., providing a new look at the secretive search giant’s operations.

 

From the company that pioneered the idea that the data center is no longer a place to keep servers, but rather a computer in and of itself, this evolution is eye-opening.

 

Joe Kava, the VP of data centers for Google, kicked off his presentation with seven years of data center history at Google. So first, the timeline:

 

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FL: Fear of smart meters has little or no basis in reality | News-JournalOnline.com

Smart meters were wagging tongues again, and just in time for Halloween and Election Day.

 

This is unwelcome news, if not totally surprising. Smart meters are digital meters used to measure electricity usage in homes and businesses.

 

Florida Power & Light Co. plans to install 200,000 smart meters in Flagler and Volusia counties. In some areas, many of those new meters have already been installed.

 

In South Daytona, though, one citizen informed The News-Journal via a letter to the editor that he heard some trash talk about smart meters from city proponents of the municipal takeover.

 

Regardless of who provides electricity service, smart meters are a logical improvement. Yet some saw a political opportunity and disparaged the meters, which are somewhat controversial.

 

In Port Orange, city leaders pressure FPL to not install the meters if customers requested no change. But the statement by the city was puzzling. The Volusia County Council also weighed in on the issue earlier this year, although their resolution about opting out has no legal teeth.

 

That people are afraid of the meters so much that they are asking city and county officials to weigh in is a sign that both FPL and the Public Service Commission need to educate the public on the issue.

 

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Google inaugurates its super-high-speed Internet service | CNET News

Google inaugurates its super-high-speed Internet service | CNET News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

After years in the making, Google announced today that it has started connecting people in Kansas City, Kan., to its ultra high-speed fiber-to-the-home Internet service. Acting as guinea pigs of sorts, these locals will be the first people in the world who get to test out Google's new service and decide whether it lives up to the hype.

 

When Google first announced its nationwide Google Fiber project in 2010, around 1,100 U.S. towns and cities applied to get in on the deal. When Kansas City won out, Google Access General Manager Kevin Lo said, "new high-speed infrastructure will ultimately be carrying Kansas Citians' data at speeds more than 100 times faster than what most Americans have today."

 

Now, as the service officially kicks off, Google is making sure that its customers know what to expect. The company's representatives are going door-to-door letting people know their service is on the way and how the installation will work.

 

Here's more from a blog post by Google Fiber's service delivery director Alana Karen:

 

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Connect MN Broadband Availability Figures: 62% MN Households meet state goal | Blandin on Broadband

Connect Minnesota just released their latest report on availability. It looks as if there’s been improvement in availability of speeds – but results show that 61.57 percent of Minnesota households can access broadband at speeds of at least 10 Mbps download/6 Mbps upload – the goal is to have 100 percent coverage by 2015.

 

Here’s their press release…

 

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Fox and Google Make Amends With Fiber TV Agreement; AMC, HBO Still Missing | Stop the Cap!

Fox and Google Make Amends With Fiber TV Agreement; AMC, HBO Still Missing | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Google recognizes that television lineups still matter. The Kansas City gigabit fiber broadband project is not just about faster Internet access, and some KCMO and KCK residents have made it clear if Google Fiber lacks the television channels they want to see, they won’t switch providers.Since late summer, Google has been quickly signing deals with the remaining holdout programmers to present a television lineup nearly equivalent to what its competitors Time Warner Cable and AT&T U-verse offer.

 

In early September, Google announced an important deal with Disney which brought ABC Family, ABC News Now, Disney Channel, Disney Junior, Disney XD, ESPN, ESPN Buzzer Beater, ESPN Classic, ESPN Deportes, ESPN Goal Line, ESPN2, ESPNews, and ESPNU to the lineup. The company also signed deals for the important regional sports channel The Longhorn Network, and niche channels Ovation, SOAPnet, TBN, TBN Enlace, and Velocity.

 

In mid-September, additional deals with Time Warner (Entertainment) and its Turner division netted Google Fiber TV: Boomerang, Cartoon Network, CNN, CNN en Español, CNN International, HLN, hTV, infinito, MLB Network Strike Zone (as part of an add-on package),TBS, TCM: Turner Classic Movies, TNT and truTV.

 

On Monday, Google landed a deal with News Corp., parent company of Fox, for a bunch of additional sports, news, and general entertainment channels.

 

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Libya, Ethiopia, Rwanda, and Mauritania Have Faster Broadband Than You (Along With Dozens More) | Stop the Cap!

The United States scores 44th (Canada is 67th) in the global upload speed race. North Americans can take a moment (or two… or three… or four) and ponder the meaningfulness of statisticsgathered by Net Index that explains why uploading that home movie to grandma last month seemed to take forever. Because it did.

 

The average upload speed in the United States is an embarrassing 4.05Mbps (and it stings even worse to realize your cable or phone company provider has probably locked you in even slower at 1-2Mbps for uploading content.) Canadian broadband advocates can’t even be seen in public. The country’s comfortable telco-cable duopoly gives consumers in the north just 2.35Mbps for upstream connectivity.

 

So who among the league of broadband nations has us beat? Countries that have barely survived civil conflicts bordering on all-out war, others plagued with bouts of starvation, and a handful whose currency can be counted into the thousands and it still wouldn’t be enough to buy you breakfast. But they can upload pictures of the restaurant you are not eating at far faster than you can.

 

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Sprint, Verizon, others argue for role in building FirstNet 700 MHz LTE network | FierceBroadbandWireless

Sprint, Verizon, others argue for role in building FirstNet 700 MHz LTE network | FierceBroadbandWireless | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As of Friday, dozens of companies, individuals, associations, government bodies and public-safety groups had filed more than 70 sets of comments with the National Telecommunications Information Administration regarding plans to build an LTE-based, public-safety broadband network in the 700 MHz spectrum band.

 

The deadline for filing comments on the project, headed by the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet), had been extended from Nov. 1 to Friday, Nov. 9, due to Hurricane Sandy. A sampling of the comments shows mobile carriers like Verizon Wireless and Sprint Nextel in favor of commercial carrier involvement in the creation of the network, but with some concerns about how network reliability and other issues will be managed. In their comments, public-safety agencies apear much more concerned about ensuring first responders can override the network to gain priority over other network users.

 

Also last week, FirstNet board chairman Sam Ginn announced the appointment of longtime public-safety telecom advocate Harlin McEwen as chairman of FirstNet's Public Safety Advisory Committee (PSAC). McEwen most recently was chairman of the Public Safety Spectrum Trust Corp., but also had long been the chairman of the International Association of Chiefs of Police Communications Committee and at one time was deputy assistant director of the FBI.

 

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Survey: Charlotte, NC has highest Internet prices in the nation | CharlotteObserver.com

Survey: Charlotte, NC has highest Internet prices in the nation | CharlotteObserver.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Feel like you're paying a lot to get online?

 

You're on to something.

 

According to WhiteFence, the average Charlottean paid $51.18 for high-speed internet services in October. That's the highest price in the nation, higher than New York City, Philadelphia and Washington D.C.

 

The WhiteFence Index showed the price of internet service rising steadily since May, when it was below $40/month.

 

WhiteFence helps people compare prices on utilities, then sign up for service online. It used data from its own website to create its index. The price of Internet compares Internet-only products, not products sold as part of a bundle, WhiteFence says.

 

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Commissioner Rosenworcel at “Looking Back to Look Forward: The Next Ten Years of Spectrum Policy” | Benton Foundation

Commissioner Rosenworcel at “Looking Back to Look Forward: The Next Ten Years of Spectrum Policy” | Benton Foundation | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In remarks delivered at a policy conference in Washington (DC), Federal Communications Commission member Jessica Rosenworcel set out her perspectives on several of today’s top spectrum debates, including guiding principles for incentive auctions, a new approach for federal spectrum, a way forward using model rules for facility siting, and the need for a comprehensive look at network reliability.

 

1) Her guiding principles for incentive auctions are: Simplicity, Fairness, Balance, Public safety and Expedition.


2) Concerning federal spectrum she said traditional clearing as well as sharing proposals can maximize access to the spectrum in the long run. Commissioner Rosenworcel added that federal users need incentives such as proceeds from spectrum auctions, especially in light of upcoming budget cuts.


3) She addresses network reliability in the “wireless and digital age” saying it is a time for honest conversation that includes ways to keep consumer equipment powered up during a disaster as well as access to fuel, priority under the Stafford Act, maintaining backhaul, and harmonization of laws at all levels of government.

 

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Rural Broadband Programs are Not 'Rational' Economically, Just 'Politically' | TechZone360.com

Rural Broadband Programs are Not 'Rational' Economically, Just 'Politically' | TechZone360.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

There is a difference between "economic rationality" and "political rationality." In other words, it sometimes is entirely politically rational to do something that might be deemed economically irrational.

 

And it almost always is the case that national communications policy has some elements of economic or financial rationality, and a heavy, perhaps controlling dose of political rationality.

 

That necessarily applies to programs intended to bring broadband access to under-served areas of the United States.

 

For example, George L. Fendler, owner of Central Coast Internet in Hollister, Calif., has a problem. He wants to illustrate the “cost differences between fixed wireless and fiber installations in a rural environment.”

 

In large part, the reason for his question is that wireless Internet service providers, such as Central Coast Internet, believe they can deliver Internet access in rural and isolated areas at far lower prices than telcos or cable companies can accomplish.

 

But most funding goes to local telcos that operate higher-cost networks. Not logical? Yes and no.

 

Politically, it makes sense. In many rural areas, telcos are significant employers. Beyond that, what legislator wants to be on the wrong side of the "communications for rural America" argument?

 

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Prepaid or postpaid?: The fight for your cell phone dollars | CNET Blog

Prepaid or postpaid?: The fight for your cell phone dollars | CNET Blog | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

By definition, the no-contract carrier model is designed to save you money over the two-year contract agreement that reigns supreme here in the U.S.

 

The question is: How much do you really gain by going prepaid, and what do you lose from the subscriber experience? Without a doubt, no-contract carriers like MetroPCS, Virgin Mobile, Boost Mobile, and Cricket Wireless can dramatically cut your monthly cell phone bill, but there are trade-offs.

 

I'm not going to dive into every carrier's pricing structure and phone offerings, so for the sake of comparison, I'm going to break down the cost of ownership over a two-year span for two carriers: Verizon, which has the most U.S. subscribers, and MetroPCS, the country's largest prepaid network.

 

Samsung's Galaxy S3 makes a good model device thanks to its ubiquity across seven carriers; the 16GB version has a $199.99 base price for most contract providers.

 

That's a cost that Verizon and others subsidize so you can get your phone for less than the $500 that MetroPCS will charge. The trade-off for a "cheaper" phone is committing to two years of data fees no matter what, and getting slapped with a multiple-hundred-dollar termination fee if you try to leave early.

 

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EarthLink Completes Final Phase of Eastern Tennessee Broadband Project | Sacramento Bee

EarthLink Completes Final Phase of Eastern Tennessee Broadband Project | Sacramento Bee | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

EarthLink, Inc., a leading IT services and communications provider, today announced the conclusion of its Eastern Tennessee Middle Mile Fiber Broadband Project and the completion of a more than 500 mile fiber optic broadband networkconnecting previously underserved communities across the eastern part of the state. In all, EarthLink deployed 15 Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM)-capable Points of Presence (POPs) in the state, from which it can provide long-haul DWDM service up to 10 Gigabits, plus metro service in Nashville and Memphis.

 

EarthLink's Tennessee Broadband project was funded by $9.4 million in federal stimulus by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) through the Broadband Technology Opportunity Program (BTOP) to reach communities designated as underserved by Connected Tennessee, an independent non-profit organization that develops and implements effective strategies for technology deployment, use and literacy in Tennessee.

 

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Minnesota Broadband Conference 2012: Task Force Presentation | Blandin on Broadband

Mayor Ness Official Opens the Conference

 

'Discouraging to have almost no discussion of broadband during elections. Need to make investment in rural area – need to make the point that broadband *is* essential in rural area. We need to put action behind ideas. Duluth’s broadband infrastructure allows us to compete with the rest of the world. Without that investment we would not be able to compete.'

 

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Australia: New website to support seniors online | CFCA Connect

Older Australians now have greater access to training resources and information to help them get online with the Australian Government’s new Broadband for Seniors website.

 

Senator Doug Cameron, launched the new website at the 2012 Australian Computer Conference for Seniors in Sydney.

 

The Acting Minister for Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, Brendan O’Connor, said the revamped web resource will provide seniors with more online learning tools to help them use the internet, as well as providing kiosk hosts and volunteer tutors with additional resources.

 

“The Government’s Broadband for Seniors program has been a huge success, with about 250,000 older Australians accessing the internet in about 2,000 internet kiosks across the country,” Mr O’Connor said.

 

“These kiosks are located in community hubs like senior citizens centres and bowls clubs, and provide seniors with free access to computers with broadband internet, as well as training in basic computing, internet browsing and email skills from teams of dedicated volunteers.”

 

Senator Cameron said the Australian Government was investing $25 million in the program, which is being delivered by NEC Australia, in partnership with Adult Learning Australia, Australian Seniors Computer Clubs Association and University of the Third Age Online.

 

“The Government is proud to be part of such a successful partnership that has helped thousands of senior Australians gain the skills and confidence to get online and be involved in the digital economy,” Senator Cameron said.

 

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CA: TECHNOLOGY: A report card for I-15 Inland Innovation Corridor | Press-Enterprise

CA: TECHNOLOGY: A report card for I-15 Inland Innovation Corridor | Press-Enterprise | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A grass-roots effort to make Inland Southern California’s Interstate 15 corridor a magnet for technology-based companies entered into a challenging arena when it was created less than a year ago.

 

On Tuesday, Nov. 13, a group of about 75 business, civic and education leaders learned that there are many more steps to be taken to make the area a destination for high-tech companies. InSoCal Connect, a nonprofit Riverside County coalition formed to facilitate new development in these sectors, met at Murrieta City Hall to discuss the group’s first annual report.

 

The Inland area’s innovation corridor is in part an outgrowth of San Diego’s economic cluster, one of Southern California’s strongest. Advocates say the twin cities of Temecula and Murrieta have a much higher level of academic achievement than the overall Inland area. About 37 percent of people 16 years old or older in those two cities have at least a two-year degree, according to the report.

 

Also, Riverside has one of the top research universities in Southern California in UCR and two other four-year schools, and UCR is in the process of building a medical school. Both Riverside and Corona have long-established technology companies.

 

Stephen Austin, chairman of the InSoCal Connect executive committee, said he moved to Temecula to work as an accountant a quarter-century ago and said it wasn’t uncommon to see sheep roaming the streets.

 

“This would have been a two-minute report 25 years ago,” said Austin, managing partner of Swenson Advisors, a financial services firm with offices in Murrieta and San Diego.

 

Today the I-15 corridor has about 80 new start-up companies every year, only a few less than the 96 in Seattle, which ranks 10 th in that category, according to SmartPlanet, a magazine that caters to the clean technology industry.

 

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Will Brazil's 'Anti-ACTA' Marco Civil Be Subverted By Copyright Lobbyists At The Last Moment? | Techdirt

Will Brazil's 'Anti-ACTA' Marco Civil Be Subverted By Copyright Lobbyists At The Last Moment? | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Just over a year ago Techdirt wrote about Brazil's Marco Civil -- essentially a civil-rights based framework for the Internet. At the time, we dubbed it an "anti-ACTA", since it seemed to protect many of the things that ACTA sought to attack. It all seemed a little too good to be true, and the post concluded by questioning whether it would survive in its present form.

 

Most of it has, remarkably, but a recent addition to one clause basically guts protection for ISPs and other online intermediaries. The EFF has a good explanation of the situation:

 

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Australian Court: Google Must Pay Guy $200k Due To Image Search Turning Up Gangsters | Techdirt

Australian Court: Google Must Pay Guy $200k Due To Image Search Turning Up Gangsters | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

With Google still holding the search engine crown, they're obviously going to be the target of a myriad of lawsuits. Defamation has played a role in the legal life of the search giant for some time now, even though the entire basis for technology behind the search results is in what the internet community at large does, rather than any active role by Google. That's what makes this kind of thing so silly.

 

We previously wrote about autocomplete defamation cases, for instance, in which autocompletes are generated based on common searches, but people still want to hold the search engine accountable. We also had the story about the minority owner of the Miami Heat who didn't like the fact that a picture of him doing his best dog-with-peanut-butter-in-its-mouth impression showed up in search results. But, hey, at least he was suing over a picture that actually was him.

 

Not so for Milorad Trkulga, an elderly man from Melbourne, Australia, who has been awarded $200,000 from Google because the search engine's image results also conjured up pictures of Tony Mokbel, an apparent "Australian gangland figure."

 

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In Ruling Over DISH's Autohopper, Details Show Fox Lost On Nearly All Important Issues | Techdirt

In Ruling Over DISH's Autohopper, Details Show Fox Lost On Nearly All Important Issues | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Last week, we wrote about the ruling in the lawsuit Fox filed against DISH over its Autohopper feature -- which automatically skips commercials on TV shows it records as part of its "Prime Time Any Time" feature (recording all prime time TV from the four major networks to the local DVR hard drive). As we noted, the judge refused to issue an injunction, but both sides claimed victory. Reading between the lines we said it appeared that Fox mostly lost, and its only wins were pretty small. The (slightly redacted) ruling has now been released and it confirms that prediction.

 

Fox is definitely the loser here. In fact, it looks like our original statements about the case, when it was first filed, turned out to be accurate. Fox's claims that recording the entire prime time lineup is a "bootleg" copy was a direct challenge to the ruling in the Betamax case, and the judge here relied heavily on that ruling in rejecting Fox's arguments. Furthermore, in our original analysis, we pointed out that the ruling about Cablevision's remote DVR should apply here as well, since the key issue there was who pressed the button -- and with "Prime Time Any Time" (PTAT) and the Autohopper technology, it's still the consumer doing it. The court is having none of that:

 

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Smart Grid Came to Rescue in Hurricane Sandy | SustainableBusiness.com

About 8 million people lost their power when Hurricane Sandy swept through and most of them had to call their utility to report the outage.

 

That's because the US has a centralized grid that's far from "smart," but investments in the US smart grid under President Obama's Recovery Act helped.

 

Utility Pepco, which serves Washington DC and parts of Maryland, was able to restore power for 130,000 homes in just two days after the hurricane hit.

 

Thanks to smart meters (two-way meters) installed in 425,000 homes, Pepco was notified by the meters' "no power" signal that allowed it to quickly pinpoint where outages were in the network. The signals arrived at their central monitoring post, allowing them to respond to customers quickly and effectively.

 

Then Pepco used advanced switches to automatically reroute power to where it's needed rather than having to fix the entire transmission line.

 

After power was restored, Pepco could "ping" meters to verify service - no need to send a crew or make a phone call.

 

There are now 400 centralized monitoring posts across the US and 1000 more are planned by the end of next year.

 

Another hallmark of the smart grid are microgrids, which are just getting off the ground. These smaller, distributed systems, which could run on renewable energy, would operate independently from the grid, allowing energy to be generated even if the broader network is down.

 

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4G Kills the Copper Plant | Light Reading Mobile News

4G Kills the Copper Plant | Light Reading Mobile News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It's been a big week in storms, elections, events and awards here at Light Reading Mobile and maybe for you, too.

 

But we can't ignore that the two largest phone companies in the U.S. are moving more quickly to kill off fixed phone lines, DSL and rid themselves of expensive copper infrastructure and the legal requirements that surround it. These technologies are to be replaced with either 4G Long Term Evolution (LTE), IP broadband fiber or some combination of both.

 

Verizon Communications Inc. CFO Fran Shammo hammered the newest nail into copper's coffin this Thursday at a Wells Fargo Securities LLC conference. (See Verizon CFO: Spectrum Sale to 'Play Out' in Q1.)

 

"I think we're on a good path to execute on what we've talked about on the copper-to-fiber migration," he told the crowd. "We have already gotten relief from a number of states on carrier of last resort, we're no longer called the carrier of last resort in a number of states we deal in," he said.

 

Carrier of last resort -- or COLR to its friends -- refers to the legal requirement that every American household should have access to a phone. Shammo said that Verizon is taking the local route to free itself of pesky COLR requirements. Traditionally, the states -- rather than the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) -- have handled the COLR rules for carriers.

 

Nonetheless, AT&T Inc. revealed Wednesday that it has petitioned the regulator over ways to update its rules so that wired or wireless IP systems can be considered as a replacement for the traditional copper phone-line system as part of a $14 billion investment plan in 4G and IP Broadband. (See AT&T Puts Up $14B to Boost Broadband.)

 

"AT&T has also filed a petition with the FCC today suggesting issues to consider in our ongoing work to modernize our rules for the evolving communications market," stated FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski about Wednesday's petition.

 

For consumers, these developments clearly throw up a couple of questions:

 

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Pandora founder rejects criticism of Internet royalty bill | The Hill's Hillicon Valley

Pandora founder rejects criticism of Internet royalty bill | The Hill's Hillicon Valley | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Pandora founder Tim Westergren on Tuesday pushed back against claims that an Internet royalty bill pending in Congress would take money away from musicians and recording artists.

 

Westergren is a vocal proponent of the Internet Radio Fairness Act, which proposes to put Internet radio services on the same royalty-setting standard as satellite and cable radio stations. The Pandora founder has argued that Internet radio stations unfairly pay higher royalty fees than other digital radio services because they're placed under a different standard.

 

Critics of the bill, such as musicFIRST, have said that Pandora is more interested in its bottom line than fairly compensating artists. Speaking at the Future of Music Summit on Tuesday, Westergren said those charges are false and emphasized that the bill does not set royalty rates for Internet radio services.

 

"That's a huge misnomer. It's really important for artists to try to parse the rhetoric around this. That is not true," Westergren said.

 

"What this legislation proposes to do is to provide us with the same rate-setting standards so when the Copyright Royalty Board considers our situation, they get to consider that evidence under the same sort of rubric," he said. "It doesn't set a rate. It's been unpredictable in the past. It wouldn't even bet on what the outcome would be. It allows us to operate on a level playing field."

 

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Community Broadband Bits 21 - Benoit Felten on Stokab | community broadband networks

Community Broadband Bits 21 - Benoit Felten on Stokab | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

For this week's Community Broadband Bits, we venture outside the U.S. to interview Benoit Felten of Diffraction Analysis about the Stokab muni fiber network in Stockholm, Sweden. Stokab appears to be the most successful open access fiber network in the world.

 

Benoit has just published a case study of Stokab and is an expert on broadband networks around the planet. Our discussion covers how Stokab was built and what lessons it has for other cities. Because Stokab was started so long ago, other local governments will find they cannot simply duplicate it -- times have changed.

 

Benoit also writes regularly at Fibre Evolution and can be found on twitter @fiberguy. Benoit and I last appeared together in a roundtable discussion about bandwidth caps.

 

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Information Literacy is an essential skill in the workplace | Florida Institute of Technology

Information Literacy is an essential skill in the workplace | Florida Institute of Technology | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Employers today are looking for college graduates who are information savvy. According to an October 16 report from Project Information Literacy(PIL), a project concerned with the research habits of college students, employers want to hire graduates who can search online and in databases, but also seek information in print or from their colleagues if needed (8). Searching for and finding information is only half the equation. Employers also expect their employees to be able to extrapolate information and evaluate their findings.

 

Employers’ perceptions of recent college graduates are mostly positive. For example, one employer interviewed in PIL’s research said, “The contrast is so evident between us on one side and them on the other. They are connected in a way my generation wasn’t, which gives them all this solid background. There’s this whole vocabulary they come speaking, you say something to them, and they say, ‘Oh, yeah. I can do that.’ Information? They find it, they take it, and they blend it, they mash it, they repurpose it” (10). However, there are some skills that employers find new college graduates often lack:

 

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Government Requests for Users’ Google Data Spikes | Truthdig

Government Requests for Users’ Google Data Spikes | Truthdig | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Were you a target of any of the nearly 21,000 requests made by governments worldwide in the first half of 2012 for access to search results, Gmail accounts and other data Google holds for its users? The number of appeals is almost twice that of the 12,539 made in the last six months of 2009, when Google first published its Transparency Report.

 

Authorities issued 1,791 requests for Google to remove 17,746 pieces of content in the first six months of 2012, almost double the 949 requests made in the same interval last year. In the last half of 2011, 1,048 appeals were made.

 

The United States issued more requests than any other nation because many Google users reside in the country. U.S. authorities are also more familiar with Google than officials in some other nations, and foreign governments sometimes seek information through U.S. channels. In those instances, the countries from which the requests originate remain unknown.

 

Defamation, privacy and security were the top three reasons cited by governments in their removal appeals. Google also reports numerous instances of having received fake court documents asking it to remove content.

 

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