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Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
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Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Verizon's wireless glows, broadband hits wall | WSJ.com

Verizon's wireless glows, broadband hits wall | WSJ.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Verizon Communications Inc., parent of the country's largest cellphone carrier, on Thursday said its net income rose 13 percent in the second quarter as its wireless arm pulled in record profits.

 

Verizon has one foot in the wireless world and one in the traditional, wired phone-company world. In the latter, results were notably weaker. Like other phone companies, Verizon is losing landlines, but has been compensating to some extent by signing up broadband customers. In the second quarter, that trend faltered, as it gained a net of just 2,000 broadband customers — the worst result in four years.

 

Chief Financial Officer Fran Shammo said the weak showing was in part due to Verizon ending the sale of DSL connections to people who don't have a landline phone account. The effort is part of an attempt to improve profitability. The wired-connection side of Verizon, which still employs nearly half of its workers, is running just above break-even.

 

Verizon has upgraded part of its phone network with optical fiber, a service it sells as "FiOS." In locales where it hasn't done that, it's losing out to cable companies, who can offer much higher speeds than Verizon can with DSL.

 

The poor showing comes after Verizon Wireless struck a deal to market cable broadband from Comcast and Time Warner Cable in its stores, a move consumer advocates see as a capitulation by Verizon that will leave many areas with just one viable choice for home broadband: cable.

 

Shammo said putting profits over growth also means raising FiOS prices, resulting in fewer new FiOS subscribers.

 

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How fast is your ISP? A new report tells all. | GigaOM Tech News

How fast is your ISP? A new report tells all. | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Cablevision and Verizon FiOS are the mostly likely to deliver better than advertised download speeds, while any provider offering DSL — AT&T, Frontier, Windstream and CenturyLink– struggle to deliver on their promises. Such information is hard to come by from ISPs, which aren’t exactly forthcoming about their actual versus advertised speed, but it’s vitally important to consumers who may not be getting the service they are paying for or are wondering why their Netflix streams stutter all the time.

 

Thankfully, the Federal Communication Commission started collecting data to help consumers (and the agency) see if consumers get what they pay for when it comes to broadband. And for the most part, they do. The accuracy of an ISP’s advertised speeds are just one measurement of broadband quality offered in the FCC’s latest report. So check out the charts below to see how your ISP fares.

 

The FCC uses a variety of tests to get this information, including sending out routers to households that report back speed and packet quality information (I’m one of the test homes). It first reported this data last August as part of an effort to improve the type and quality of data it had about U.S. broadband providers. The most recent report, released Thursday, involves a lot of FCC chest-thumping about how its measurements have improved service to consumers over the last year.

 

But here’s what really matters to consumers. How good is your provider? In general, fiber-to-the-home services such as Verizon FiOS performed closest to or above advertised speeds and had the lowest latency, followed by cable and then DSL providers. Latency is a measure of how long a packet takes to traverse the network, and it matters for services such as voice calling over IP lines, gaming and video streaming.

 

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Google’s Kansas City Fiber Service to Launch on July 26? | Telecompetitor

Google’s Kansas City Fiber Service to Launch on July 26? | Telecompetitor | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It’s been close to 2 ½ years since Google announced their intentions to build a FTTP network and roughly 16 months since they selected Kansas City as the location of the fiber experiment. Google now informs us that July 26 is the official launch date of Google Fiber in Kansas City. At least we think so – details as to exactly what is happening on July 26th are few and far between. Kansas City was selected from over 1,100 community submissions to Google for the fiber network.

 

Google targeted ‘sometime in 2012’ as the launch date of Google Fiber, so it appears they will meet that timeline. As is the case with most FTTP builds, I suspect it will be a phased approach, with select neighborhoods individually gaining access to the service over time. Google has been giving steady updates on its progress, including construction and engineering milestones.

 

There are still many important questions that have yet to be answered about this Google ‘experiment,’ with an open access approach chief among them. Google originally discussed the idea of this 1 Gbps FTTP network being open access, giving independent ISPs access to it for delivery of services to end customers. They have since cooled to that idea, but have not outright denied that they will take that approach.

 

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20% of U.S.: Satellite or Leave | Fast Net News

20% of U.S.: Satellite or Leave | Fast Net News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Buffalo Commons" as people leave? Lowell McAdam of Verizon is echoing AT&T’s plan to shut down millions of rural lines, many where wireless service isn’t available. “Areas that are more rural and more sparsely populated, we have got LTE built that will handle all of those services and so we are going to cut the copper off there.... It is not sustainable to keep having copper plant out there.” What Lowell didn’t say, but is almost certainly true, is that they will also shut down the phone lines where neither they nor anyone else offers local service.

Anyone who’s ever used a satellite phone knows it’s awful for primary communication. Satellite broadband speeds now are 5-10 megabits down, but satellite still has painful latency, is much more expensive, and doesn’t have the capacity for much video. As far as I know, this will be the first large area anywhere in the developed world without terrestrial service.


AT&T’s $100M/year lobbying machine has succeeded in eliminating “carrier of last resort” in Florida, North Carolina, Texas, and Wisconsin. McAdam's equally well-funded lobbyists supported the Florida and Texas moves and now are focused on New Jersey and New York. Verizon has been trying to sell 10,000’s of square miles of upper New York since at least 2004 without finding a buyer, as well as much of Virginia, Pennsylvania and Western Massachusetts. Meanwhile, they’ve treated these regions like the Romans treated the Sabine women, with some of the lowest DSL coverage in the developed world. No surprise they’ve lost customers, therefore.


Somewhere between 10% and 30% of the land area of the U.S. is not planned for LTE or other wireless coverage. The "satellite or leave" area is huge but secret. Unless the FCC requires V & T to reveal their future plans, there's no accurate way to know the size of the area likely abandoned.

 

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Is This the Ultimate Map of the Internet? | Mashable Tech

Is This the Ultimate Map of the Internet? | Mashable Tech | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

No, the Internet doesn’t travel through the air. Nor does it live in one big, epic cloud. In fact, chances are it’s traveling under your feet right now.

 

To demonstrate the trajectory of the Internet, Fortune magazine writer Andrew Blum and graphic designer Nicolas Rapp teamed up with telecom data and infrastructure company GeoTel Communications. The company maps fiber optic cables and geographic information systems (GIS) that connect people all over the world.

 

The result was a Fortune article called “Mapping the Internet.” The piece contains stunning visuals that literally display where said fiber optic cables run: for the most part underwater, across the worlds’s largest oceans.

 

These cables transfer data in the form of light to and from power repeaters in major cities — such as Hong Kong and New York — in a matter of milliseconds.

 

From there, the cables become part of an interconnected metro communications grid, whereupon carriers like AT&T and local government create lateral hubs by pulling cable conduits into darkened buildings on the street. One of the largest in Manhattan is 60 Hudson.

 

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eBay’s John Donahoe Seeing a “Staggering Surge” in Mobile Shopping | All Things D

eBay’s John Donahoe Seeing a “Staggering Surge” in Mobile Shopping | All Things D | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

EBay has revised its mobile revenue figures, once again.

In what is becoming a routine move, the company said today during its second-quarter earnings release that it is now expecting eBay and PayPal mobile to each transact $10 billion in volume this year.

 

“That’s more than double 2011,” said eBay’s CEO John Donahoe, who called it “a staggering surge” in mobile commerce that did not exist just a few years ago.

 

As recently as January, eBay was predicting that mobile shopping — either through its apps or the browser on either a phone or tablet — would hit $8 billion in mobile gross merchandise volume in 2012. Likewise, PayPal was expected to hit another $7 billion in mobile total payment volume.

 

Last year’s numbers were similarly revised multiple times before the end of the year, when eBay’s final mobile tally stood at $5 billion and PayPal’s totaled $4 billion.

“The line is blurring between online and offline, and that behavior is happening because of the investments we have made in mobile,” he said.

 

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Did George Stoney Invent YouTube? | FromDC2Iowa: July 2012

Did George Stoney Invent YouTube? | FromDC2Iowa: July 2012 | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A great man has died. His contributions deserve to be recognized.

 

If you think it an exaggeration to compare George Stoney's contributions to American democracy with those of Jefferson and Madison, just read on.

 

So what's the big deal about "public access" channels on cable? (The cable television franchise for Iowa City's cable system has six channels set aside for the people and institutions of Iowa City: City of Iowa City, Public Library, Kirkwood Community College, University of Iowa, and Iowa City Community School District.) The sixth channel is Iowa City's "Public Access TV" channel 18 -- literally available for essentially uncensored cablecasting by any citizen or organization in the community.

 

The "big deal" is the radical and innovative nature of this concept.

 

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Lessons From Last Week's Power Outages | IEEE Spectrum

Lessons From Last Week's Power Outages | IEEE Spectrum | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A friend in Northern Virginia reports that there were two particularly bad things about the outage that left him and some 750,000 other people without power last week. “The temperature hovered around 100 degrees with high humidity all six days; and for the first couple of days, all of the nearby stores, bars/restaurants, gas stations, etc. were powerless and therefore closed.“

 

What and how did he eat? For the first couple of days, he “carefully grazed off of the food in the fridge, hoping that the undisturbed freezer would retain its low temperature until the power came back on. But by the end of the weekend, we declared the food a total loss.” His wife having had the good fortune to be out of town, he sought refuge in his D.C. office much of the time.

 

On a larger scale, one of Amazon’s major server facilities went down, leaving cloud customers like Netflix, Instagram, Perest, and Heroku without access to their databases.

 

How can we do better in the future?

 

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US Cellular lines up new 700MHz spectrum deal with Actel | TeleGeography

Chicago-based mobile operator US Cellular has filed a petition with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for permission to buy several 700MHz spectrum licences from Actel.

 

The projected deal includes seven concessions in the Lower A Block of the 700MHz band, and covers 35 Cellular Market Areas (CMAs) in Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin. ‘The additional spectrum will allow [US Cellular] to offer innovative services and improve its voice and data offerings to the public’, the company stated in its regulatory filing.

 

According to TeleGeography’s GlobalComms Database, US Cellular has already utilised its A Block spectrum holdings to support the initial rollout of LTE services across selected markets; through a partnership with King Street Wireless, the cellco picked up more than 150 A and B Block licences during the auction, which concluded in March 2008.

 

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What are rural folks doing online? | Blandin on Broadband

What are rural folks doing online? | Blandin on Broadband | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Calix just released an interesting report that looks at “Internet traffic and applications utilization based upon data aggregated from a subset of Compass Flow Analyze deployments at different sized wireline communications service providers serving rural America.”

 

They get info from 50 broadband providers representing more than 100,000 users. Given the audience it represents, that seems like a sample but I suspect the results are reflective of general use. This latest report is from Q1 2012.

 

Here are the couple of the high level stats:

 

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Here's The Proposal The FCC Says Doesn't Exist To Move Network Diagnostics To Proprietary Servers | Techdirt

Here's The Proposal The FCC Says Doesn't Exist To Move Network Diagnostics To Proprietary Servers | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

We recently wrote about some concerns by Vint Cerf and others that the FCC was considering a proposal to move some of their network diagnostics efforts -- which are a really good thing -- from the open M-Labs solution to proprietary servers run by the telcos. As we noted, the telcos denied that this was happening -- and Henning Schulzrinne, the CTO of the FCC, showed up in our comments to strongly deny that such a proposal existed.

 

"Yesterday, Vint Cerf distributed an open letter regarding concerns about the Measuring Broadband America measurement infrastructure. We share the objectives of the letter writers that “Open data and an independent, transparent measurement framework must be the cornerstones of any scientifically credible broadband Internet access measurement program.” Unfortunately, the letter claims: “Specifically, that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is considering a proposal to replace the Measurement Lab server infrastructure with closed infrastructure, run by the participating Internet service providers (ISPs) whose own speeds are being measured.” This is false."

 

It turns out his claim that "this is false" is... well... false. Attached below, we have the proposal that supposedly doesn't exist.

 

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Labor Job Centers to Become Broadband Learning Center | Multichannel News

The Department of Labor said that its almost 2,800 American Job Centers will start providing digital literacy outreach as part of the Federal Communications Commission/Obama Administration/broadband industry Connect2Compete initiative.

 

That came in an announcement Monday at an employment center in Arlington, Va.

 

FCC chairman Julius Genachowski joined Labor secretary Hilda Solis and others to unveil that new effort, as well as an early 2014 public service campaign through the Ad Council, which puts together pro bono creative with donated ad space and time from TV and radio stations.

 

The campaign will promote a new database and training locator tool to help identify computing centers and training, which will be released this fall.

 

As part of Monday's announcement, Connect2Compete released preliminary results from its San Diego pilot program offering $9.95-per-month standalone broadband and $150 laptops to households with school kids eligible for school lunch programs, where more families bought the service from Cox -- the participating cable provider -- during the two-month test than had been projected, according to the FCC.

 

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The Cost of Connectivity | OTI | NewAmerica.net

The Cost of Connectivity | OTI | NewAmerica.net | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In this study, we compare high-speed Internet offerings in 22 cities around the world by price, download and upload speed, and bundled services. We have included some of the most relevant findings from our research in the report that follows, as well as a discussion of policy recommendations for the U.S. The report includes:

 

--A comparison of "triple play" offerings that bundle Internet, phone, and television services;

 

--A survey of the best available Internet plan for approximately $35 USD in each city;

 

--A comparison of the fastest Internet available in each city.

 

The results indicate that U.S. consumers in major cities tend to pay higher prices for slower speeds compared to consumers abroad. For example, when comparing triple play packages in the 22 cities surveyed, consumers in Paris can purchase a 100 Mbps bundle of television, telephone, and high-speed Internet service for the equivalent of approximately $35 (adjusted for PPP).

 

By contrast, in Lafayette, LA, the top American city, the cheapest available package costs around $65 and includes just a 6 Mbps Internet connection. A comparison of Internet plans available for around $35 shows similar results.

 

Residents of Hong Kong have access to Internet service with symmetrical download and upload speeds of 500 Mbps while residents of New York City and Washington, D.C. will pay the equivalent price for Internet service with maximum download speeds that are 20 times slower (up to 25 Mbps and upload speeds of up to 2 Mbps).

 

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Wired broadband adoption dips as wireless flies | The Register

Wired broadband adoption dips as wireless flies | The Register | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The developed world has lost its appetite for terrestrial internet connections, but is hungry for vast increases in wireless connectivity, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's (OECD's) latest data on broadband adoption among its 34 members.

 

The new data asserts that residents of OECD members collectively use 314,857,679 wired broadband connections and 667,400,934 wireless services, as of December 2011. But growth in wired connections has slowed to just 1.8% across the OECD bloc, for the six months to December 2011 measured in this study. Wireless connections, by contrast, leapt by 13%.

 

Wired connection penetration into business and homes has also flatlined across the OECD. The table below showing the The Reg's top three four reader-infested nations is repeated throughout the bloc.

 

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Testimony by Assistant Secretary Strickling, “Digital Divide: Expanding Broadband Access to Small Businesses” | NTIA

Testimony by Assistant Secretary Strickling, “Digital Divide: Expanding Broadband Access to Small Businesses” | NTIA | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A key element of building the innovation economy of the future – one that supports new and better jobs, and enhances America’s global competitiveness – is expanding the availability and adoption of broadband access in America. In the near-term, investments in broadband infrastructure help create jobs and business growth by supporting the installation and upgrade of fiber-optic networks, wireless towers, and other high-tech components.

 

Public computer centers provide much-needed training and broadband for those without access to this empowering technology in their homes. Sustainable broadband adoption efforts help to educate vulnerable populations about the benefits of broadband and enable them to become proficient in computer-related skills. In the longer-term, expanding broadband access and adoption facilitates economic growth and innovation, especially for small businesses; enhances health care delivery; improves public safety; and lays a foundation for long-term economic development in communities throughout the United States.

 

Small businesses benefit from the Internet economy in a number of important ways. Broadband reduces geographic barriers and the costs of doing business. The Internet offers the opportunity for anyone with a connection and an innovative idea to create and grow a business. Indeed, online retail sales in the United States totaled an estimated $169 billion in 2010 alone.[1] Just a decade ago, the companies that are now household names – Google, Facebook, Twitter, and many more – were small businesses. These innovators and countless others have used their creativity, determination, and the power of broadband to grow the Internet economy.

 

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Vermont FiberConnect completes construction of first 100 miles of fiber optic | vtdigger.org

Sovernet Fiber Corp. and the Vermont Telecommunications Authority (VTA) announced today that the Vermont FiberConnect (VFC) project has recently completed constructing the first 100 miles of fiber optic network. This important milestone comes as the project heads into its final year, with completion of the 821 mile network scheduled for June 30, 2013.

 

The project will connect over 340 community anchor institutions, including State owned buildings, public safety towers, public and private K-12 schools, public libraries and colleges. Currently Sovernet has over half of the anchors under contract, including 41 libraries and 51 K-12 public schools.

 

Governor Shumlin praised the milestone noting the State’s financial role in the project, “The investment of $2 million of state capital played a part in leveraging this federally funded collaborative project between Sovernet and the VTA. Connecting Vermont communities with high bandwidth – our schools, libraries, businesses and neighbors – is our highest priority and this is how we get it done. We’re celebrating this milestone and look forward to mile 821.”

 

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McAdam of Verizon: We Will Turn Off Almost All Copper | Fast Net News

New York, Washington and 20M+ Lines “Killed”.

 

LTE at $60 minimum rural, FiOS at $70 urban.

 

“Every place we have FiOS, we are going to kill the copper. We are going to just take it out of service,” CEO McAdam is completely clear. “Areas that are more rural and more sparsely populated, we have got LTE built that will handle all of those services and so we are going to cut the copper off there.”

Verizon is going to shut down the copper phone network for 18M homes with FiOS and millions more in rural areas they serve with LTE. I believe they also intend to shut down the copper network where neither they nor anyone else offers a wireless alternative.

 

“It is not sustainable to keep having copper plant out there,” says CEO McAdams. “We have got parallel networks in way too many places now, so that is a pot of gold in my view. So margins can improve.”


Lowell is right it's illogical to continue the copper network where fiber is available but under present rules it would be a disaster for many. DSL prices have been from $15-35 for most people, although Verizon has recently raised their minimum to about $50 by requiring a voice line. FiOS prices now begin at $70. This makes a mockery of "affordable broadband," especially when Verizon and AT&T are boycotting the plan for discounts for poor schoolchildren.

 

The detente between telcos and cablecos means the prices of modest Internet speeds (3-15 megabits down) are typically going up from $30-45 to $55-70.

 

In addition, competitors who now share the copper network will typically be totally $@$#$@. Nationwide, alternatives to the telco/cablecos have less than 5% of the residential market but in some areas they remain important.

 

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Comparison of Twin Cities--Minneapolis & St. Paul-- Broadband Plans | Blandin on Broadband

The Line asks a great question…

 

'If you wanted to use your garage for a high-tech startup, one that was going to require a gig of connectivity, where would be the best possible place for that garage to be located?'

 

The answer provided by Institute for Local Self Reliance’s Christopher Mitchell is Chattanooga, Tennessee. Chris is a proponent of community-owned networks and makes the point that an investment in fiber does more than allow local teens to download videos faster – it provides a platform for better job creation.

 

From a local perspective the article also does a nice compare and contrast with Twin Cities communities. (And remember that in the big picture – none of the Twin Cities communities were the best place to start a garage start-up!)

 

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OpEdNews Article: George Stoney: A Life in Film

Documentary filmmaker George Stoney died on July 12th at age 96. I did not know George well. I met him just five years ago at a meeting of the New York Film and Video Council (NYFVC) where we were both members. That's where I learned about his fifty groundbreaking documentary films, which spanned more than half a century.

 

You could not help but instantly like George. He greeted you with a warm engaging smile and direct eye contact. Despite his ninety-plus years, his halting steps had upbeat energy that everyone noticed when he entered the room. "Doesn't George look great," admirers would say---and then surround him, as if drawn by magnetic force.

 

I got to know George a bit better in 2009 when I had the privilege of co-producing (and narrating), along with former WNBC-TV producer Rita Satz, a short documentary about George and his film career. We interviewed George at an award ceremony at New York City's Donnell Library, where he was honored and several of his classic documentaries were screened. Then Rita followed with a more intensive interview at the Manhattan Neighborhood Network public access television studio, which George was instrumental in founding--indeed, George is often called the "father of public access television."

 

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Hennepin, Dakota and Anoka all Top Digital MN Counties | Blandin on Broadband

Thanks for the heads up from Ann Higgins on the Top Digital County Awards. Here’s a brief description of the award:

 

"Ten winners were named in each of four population-based categories. The winning counties carried out strategies with measurable benefits that aligned with county priorities. Successful programs also showed progress over the previous year, utilized innovative solutions, and revealed a commitment to collaboration within and outside of their organization. The self-reported survey is judged by a panel of experts."

 

“This year, counties are focused on saving money where they can by simplifying their information technology infrastructure and sharing systems with other governments,” Center for Digital Government Executive Director Todd Sander said. “Many of them have found ways to provide better information security, transparency and citizen engagement with innovative uses of social media and advanced decision support tools.”

 

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Internet Defense League Forms To Fight Next SOPA And PIPA | TPM Idea Lab

Internet Defense League Forms To Fight Next SOPA And PIPA | TPM Idea Lab | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

They may be the Super Friends of the Internet: A group of prominent web companies including Mozilla, maker of the Firefox Web browser, the social news website Reddit and the blogging service WordPress have teamed up with advocacy groups and lawmakers to form the Internet Defense League (IDL), a coalition dedicated to rallying Web users against government attempts to take over or destroy the world — the world wide web, that is. And they want your help, too.

 

“The League is about its members fighting for the interests of the Internet,” said Tiffiniy Cheng, a co-founder of nonprofit Web freedom advocacy group Fight For the Future, which is coordinating the formation of the Internet Defense League, in a phone interview with TPM.

 

“This is a new 21st century battle for some of the same old basic rights like free speech, freedom to assemble, and the League is here to fight and to win and to help Web users stay engaged,” Cheng added.

 

To those ends, the IDL is first setting up a new Web-based alert system to allow members to warn of new legislation that they think will harm the Internet’s functioning, and is hosting launch parties Thursday night in San Francisco, New York, Washington, DC, London and Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

 

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Verizon switches on LTE network in 33 new markets | TeleGeography

US mobile giant Verizon Wireless has announced that its in-deployment Long Term Evolution (LTE) network will launch in an additional 33 markets today, while coverage has also been expanded in 32 existing 4G markets.

 

According to the company, the latest batch of deployments means that it is on track to meet its goal of covering more than 400 US markets by the end of this year.

 

The 33 new market launches are as follows:

 

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Usage Based Billing - Time Warner Cable Latest Attempt to Increase Prices | community broadband networks

Usage Based Billing - Time Warner Cable Latest Attempt to Increase Prices | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Time Warner Cable's announced intention to expand its usage based billing for broadband has recently received a little media attention. The company currently uses tiers for customers in parts of Texas, allowing customers to sign on to a plan which limits the amount of usage per month. If they come in under the plan amount (currently 5 gigabytes), they get a $5 dscount. If they go over, they are charged $1 per gigabyte over the tier limit.

 

One commentary we find particularly insightful is from Susan Crawford, "The Sledgehammer of usage-based billing." Crawford not only addresses TWC's billing change, but critiques New York Times' "Sweeping Effects as Bradband Moves To Meters" by Brian Stelter.

 

Crawford points out several statements in Stelter's article that sound rational on paper, but are actually "holes" in the fabric of reality. Based on what we have seen from companies like Time Warner Cable, we concur.

 

Stelter justifies Time Warner's decision to shift to usage-based billing based on the fact that its competitors are doing it. Crawford points out that:

 

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Mobile Devices: A Solution to Fix ER Overcrowding | HealthTech

Mobile Devices: A Solution to Fix ER Overcrowding | HealthTech | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

You wouldn’t necessarily connect the two but emergency rooms and mobile phones are coming together to keep you from sitting for hours in the ER, and possibly, saving lives.

 

How? According to Kalorama Information attempts to avoid ER overcrowding are one of many factors leading hospitals to purchase advanced patient monitoring systems with wireless capability.

 

In order to meet the increasing need for emergency services, many U.S. ERs are being pushed to their maximum capacity. Nearly 120 million people visit a hospital emergency room every year, for everything from heart attacks to infected bug bites. As a result, many ERs need to divert patients to other hospitals, often when the ambulance is en route and the patient is in critical condition.

 

"Portable monitoring devices, which increase the ability of the staff to keep track of patients, may reduce some of the need for diversions," said Melissa Elder, Kalorama Information, analyst and author of the report. "Additionally, staff shortages are another cause of diversions which may be addressed with the improved efficiency and workflow gained by using more efficient monitoring devices."

 

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OpenStack faces the terrible twos | GigaOM Cloud Computing News

OpenStack faces the terrible twos | GigaOM Cloud Computing News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

OpenStack turns two this week. That means the open-source project — which fancies itself the Linux of the cloud — is entering a critical stage of its development process.

 

Rackspace(a rax) — which helped give birth to OpenStack in July 2010 — rolled out some stats to show OpenStack momentum and to push its OpenStack-as-Linux comparision. For example, in the 84th week of the project, there were 166 entities contributing to the effort whereas it took Linux 828 weeks to hit 180 active contributors, according to Rackspace’s tally.

 

By that count — and the fact that Internap, Hewlett-Packard, and Rackspace itself have OpenStack clouds in some degree of production — shows pretty fair momentum going into year three. Whether that’s enough to form a competitive counterweight to Amazon Web Services and VMware vCloud’s heft remains to be seen. And some competitors (most notably Eucalyptus’ CEO Marten Mickos) maintain that OpenStack has too many cooks in the kitchen. At GigaOM Structure last month, Mickos said OpenStack, rather than following in Linux’ footsteps, could become “the Unix of cloud.” The implication was that so many vendors weighing in could lead to a forking or fracturing of the OpenStack standard.

 

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