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Kagan: Retrans fees to hit $7.6B by 2019 | FierceCable.com

Kagan: Retrans fees to hit $7.6B by 2019 | FierceCable.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Pay TV distributors will have to shell out $7.6 billion to local broadcasters to package their stations in basic cable programming packages, SNL Kagan said in a report released Friday.


That means retransmission-consent fees paid to ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and other station groups will jump by 130 percent compared to the projected $3.3 billion broadcasters are expected to collect this year.


One of the most striking items in the report is that Kagan has reduced its projections for pay TV subscriber growth over the next five years by more than 3 million subscribers. Last year, Kagan said it expected the U.S. pay TV universe to grow from 100.4 million at the end of 2011 to 103.7 million in 2018. The market research firm said it now expects pay TV distributors will count a total of only 100.6 million subscribers in five years.


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Rural Broadband Association to FCC: "Satellite Is Not Broadband" | community broadband networks

Rural Broadband Association to FCC: "Satellite Is Not Broadband" | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Rural Broadband Association (NTCA) recently filed a report with the FCC as it examines the role of the Universal Services Fund (USF) in communications. Telecompetitor reports that NTCA filed the report as part of comments on November 7, 2013. The report by Vantage Point telecommunications engineering firm criticizes the argument that satellite is a magic pill for rural broadband availability. You can view a PDF of the report at FCC.gov.


The report lists high latency, capacity limitations, and environmental impacts the three main obstacles that complicate satellite usage. In the Executive Summary, the report goes on to note:


"While satellites will continue to provide an important role in global communications, satellites do not have the capacity to replace a significant amount of the fixed wireline broadband in use today nor can they provide high‐quality, low‐latency communications currently available using landline communication systems. While recent advances have increased satellite capacity, the capacity available on an entire satellite is much smaller than that available on a single strand of fiber."


Telecompetitor speculates that the organization was motivated in part by the potential loss of USF funding to NCTA members. From the article:


"The FCC has previously stated that as it transitions today’s voice-focused Universal Service Fund to focus instead on broadband, it envisions that homes in the areas that are most expensive to serve would receive broadband from a satellite (or possibly broadband wireless) provider. And depending how far the FCC is able to stretch its limited pool of USF dollars, it wouldn’t be surprising for the commission to consider expanding the number of homes targeted for satellite service – a move that eventually could leave some NTCA members without USF funding."


Regardless of the motivation, the fact remains that satellite is a poor replacement for wireline services. Latency, lack of capacity, and environmental factors degrade the quality of the service; data caps degrade its effectiveness. From the report:


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Blame the NSA, Not Facebook | The Weekly Wonk | NAF.org

Blame the NSA, Not Facebook | The Weekly Wonk | NAF.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Outrageous and possibly illegal. That’s what Google’s executive chairman called the latest chapter in the NSA saga – news that the NSA not only requests data from big tech and telecom companies, but also secretly hacks into their private lines. Yet, last week, seven privacy groups unmasked the real privacy villains in this story and filed a complaint against them with a federal agency. Who are those villains? Google, Facebook and Apple – in other words, the victims of hacking. The complaint says those companies should have done more to thwart the NSA.


These privacy groups aren’t the only ones blaming private companies for the NSA’s actions. Advocates have told both the Washington Post and the New York Times that large tech companies are partly “responsible” for the NSA surveillance programs because they have “ad-supported business models” that entice the NSA to their data. The advocates then invoke their long-term pet project of regulating behavioral advertising, claiming “we need to focus upon the activities of the private sector as well” because “[i]t’s hard to fix government access.” Essentially, privacy advocates argue, these companies are to blame for enticing the NSA with all the data they collect.


There are two problems with conflating the NSA’s surveillance with Facebook and Google’s advertising strategy: First, it signals a complete ignorance of technology and of how people use the Internet today. Second, it reflects political incompetence. By pursuing this strategy of conflation, advocates are undermining their credibility and imperiling their own larger efforts to advance privacy.


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We are becoming police states. Everyone OK with that? | GigaOM Tech News

We are becoming police states. Everyone OK with that? | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

We are becoming technologically-enabled police states. That’s a reasonable analysis of a situation where the average citizen is investigated as a matter of course, their lives recorded on the basis that they, or someone they know, or someone that person knows, is a “person of interest.”


We are treating this as an unstoppable development, with a variety of justifications. The intelligence services are building this future because they can, technologically and politically speaking. Politicians mostly don’t understand the technology and above all fear being accused of being soft on terrorism, or pedophilia, or whatever the panic of the day may be. They also know that information is power.


Technologists recognize the power and pervasiveness of this constant surveillance better than most, but are mostly reluctant to countenance the idea of moderating or regulating progress. And the average citizen either doesn’t realize what western societies are becoming, or feels powerless to shape that trajectory.


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The Underdog Internet Providers Head to Washington | Mashable.com

The Underdog Internet Providers Head to Washington | Mashable.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

“Kind of like a union?” I ask Craig Foster. “Eh, yeah,” he says, “except without the union part.” Foster, the CFO of Ubiquiti Networks, was in New York this week, in part to talk about the Ubiquiti World Network, a trade group that will bring together smaller wireless Internet service providers and give them what they really need: a lobbyist.


Ubiquiti, whose chief executive officer, Robert Pera, was profiled in Bloomberg Businessweek earlier this year, makes hardware that sends Internet signals over long distances without wires. Your phone carrier does this, but Ubiquiti’s customers, unlike your phone carrier, use unlicensed spectrum. That is, they don’t have an exclusive license from the Federal Communications Commission to transmit. Instead, they send their signals over certain, limited frequencies that have been set aside for anyone to use.


Ubiquiti has focused its engineering talent on strengthening signals, sending them through cluttered airwaves, and filtering signal from noise at the other end. This has created for them a large customer base in emerging markets, where there’s less capital to spare for expensive fiber-optic networks. It’s a market large enough that Pera has been able to buy the Memphis Grizzlies. But there are also places in America, mostly rural, where wired infrastructure is too expensive to build. And there are places in America, mostly urban, where wired Internet access is too expensive to pay for.


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Pressure Mounts Against Telcos To 'Fess Up About Their Involvement In NSA Surveillance | Techdirt.com

Pressure Mounts Against Telcos To 'Fess Up About Their Involvement In NSA Surveillance | Techdirt.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Ever since the Snowden leaks began, there's been a clear dichotomy in terms of how different industries have reacted. The various big internet companies, which were named early on as participants in the PRISM program, have been quite vocal (sometimes to profane levels) that they were not willing participants in most of these programs, and are currently involved in an important lawsuit arguing that they have a First Amendment right to reveal how much info they actually share with the government. While those eventual revelations (and they almost certainly will come out, either legally or through leaks) may reveal certain companies were more complicit than others, by all indications, the various internet companies have been very willing to fight the government over this.

On the other side, you've got the telcos -- mainly AT&T and Verizon (but Sprint and some others as well). What do you have there? Total, deafening silence. Seriously. They've said nothing about any of this, despite increasing evidence that they not only are happy and willing participants in the NSA's efforts to spy on everyone, but that they've volunteered to hand over more data than required. Furthermore, it's quite clear now that they've basically let the NSA put taps directly on the internet backbone, by which they can record just about anything, while the internet companies have (from all appearances to date) limited information sharing only to a specific segment of information following a specific court order (which probably doesn't have enough oversight, but that's a different issue).


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Wireless Competition In Canada: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly | Huffington Post Canada

Wireless Competition In Canada: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly | Huffington Post Canada | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Poor customer service. Hidden fees and charges. People being charged for wireless services after cancelling them. Fluctuating charges from month to month. Suspicions and allegations of price-fixing.


Those are just a few of the many complaints HuffPost Canada readers shared with us about their wireless services, when we carried out an informal poll last month. The theme was confirmed by a report from the telecommunications complaints watchdog last week, noting that complaints against wireless companies -- most of them having to do with billing -- had more than doubled in the past year.


And the single most common refrain among our readers? We pay among the highest wireless prices in the world, for some of the worst service.

That’s certainly a trope we’ve all heard. But here’s a question: Is it true? Do we actually pay the highest rates for some of the crappiest service?


When we dig into the data and talk to the experts, the image of Canada’s wireless prices becomes a little more complicated.


Some things aren’t in doubt. It’s an accepted fact that Canada lagged much of the developed world in building out its wireless network. While Europeans were chatting away on their cellphones in the 1990s, in Canada mobile technology was still in its infancy.


And what’s clear is that the arrival of the smartphone -- and possibly the arrival Canada’s small wireless carriers, now in danger of extinction -- changed everything.


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Bill Clinton Discusses IT as Key Driver of Growth | CIOInsight.com

Bill Clinton Discusses IT as Key Driver of Growth | CIOInsight.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Given the direct correlation between availability to high-speed network bandwidth and national prosperity, universal broadband access should influence how people vote more than any other political and economic issue, says former President Bill Clinton.


Speaking at a China Leadership Summit in Beijing hosted this week by SAP, Clinton says investments in network bandwidth not only lead to innovations that drive economic growth, but they create interdependencies between nations that ultimately reduce instability and conflict.


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Four Years Later: Just How Big is Google Fiber's Impact? | DSLReports.com

Four Years Later: Just How Big is Google Fiber's Impact? | DSLReports.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

t has been nearly four years since Google announced Google Fiber, though to date the service remains unavailable in any volume outside of Kansas City. While those totals should ramp up a little next year with launches in Austin and Provo (and a fourth unspecified Western state launch market I keep hearing whispers about for 2014), we're reaching the point where Google has had enough time where we can at least begin to measure Google Fiber's real-world impact.

Those playing along at home of course know Google Fiber was always primarily about lighting a fire under the uncompetitive US broadband market, regardless of suggestions in the tech press that Google Fiber would be a national affair. As Forrester analyst Dan Bieler notes in a piece this week over at Network World, the goal really was to put some much-needed pressure on national incumbents:


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NC: Chamber, EDC build support for new business strategy in Rowan County | Salisbury Post

NC: Chamber, EDC build support for new business strategy in Rowan County | Salisbury Post | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

“We have so many colleges and so much talent, we really could have the next Google in our community,” said Spalding, president of the Rowan County Chamber of Commerce.


If the next Steve Jobs lives in Rowan County, Spalding wants to make sure that he, or she, has the resources and support needed to launch the next Apple. And right now, the community isn’t doing enough to help entrepreneurs, an expert said.


Many people seem to agree. More than 150 turned out at the chamber’s monthly breakfast Thursday to hear Erik Pages, a nationally known expert on small business start-ups, talk about why Rowan needs a new strategy for economic development.


About 30 others — entrepreneurs and angel investors — gathered Wednesday night at the new Integro Technologies headquarters to hear Pages’ pitch for creating a culture that embraces innovation and risk-taking.


Pages also met Thursday with government leaders from Salisbury, Rowan and various towns, as well as education leaders from the public schools, Catawba College, Livingstone College and Rowan-Cabarrus Community College.


His two-day talking tour was organized by Spalding and Robert Van Geons, executive director for RowanWorks Economic Development Commission. They said they hope Pages will jumpstart a movement in Rowan County to embrace and encourage start-up businesses.


RowanWorks and the chamber are urging the community to develop a new strategy for the “entrepreneurial economy,” Van Geons said.

“We want to encourage creating innovative companies that will keep our children here,” he said.


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Grant aims to create 750 jobs, $40M in investment in state | Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal

Grant aims to create 750 jobs, $40M in investment in state | Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A nearly $2 million grant will be used in a reshoring initiative aimed at bringing jobs back to Mississippi .


Leading the way will be Mississippi State University, along with several partners, including Itawamba Community College, Three Rivers Planning & Development District, East Mississippi Community College, MSU’s Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems and the Franklin Furniture Insitute.


The three-year program is among 10 being launched nationwide. In Mississippi, the Mississippi Reshoring Team looks to add 750 jobs and $40 million in investment.


Says MSU:


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Privacy groups call on UN to condemn surveillance | NetworkWorld.com

Privacy groups call on UN to condemn surveillance | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A coalition of five privacy and digital rights groups is pushing the United Nations to take a stand against international surveillance programs deployed by the U.S. government and some allies.


The groups, including Amnesty International, the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Human Rights Watch, have asked members of the U.N. General Assembly to support a resolution advanced by Brazil, Germany and other countries this month that says nations are "deeply concerned at the negative impact that surveillance ... may have on the exercise and enjoyment of human rights."


The U.S. and four allies -- the U.K., Canada, Australia and New Zealand, sometimes called the Five Eyes -- have tried to soften the language in the resolution with only minor changes made so far. The resolution reaffirms the right to privacy, meaning "no one shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful interference with his/her privacy, family, home or correspondence."


The resolution, focusing on privacy in the digital age, also calls on U.N. member nations to "put an end to violations of those rights." The resolution doesn't specifically name the U.S. National Security Agency's surveillance programs, unveiled in leaks from former contractor Edward Snowden this year, but it's clear the NSA and similar surveillance efforts are its target.


The privacy groups, in a letter sent Thursday to U.N. delegations, encourage members to support the resolution, saying it would be the first major statement by the U.N. on privacy in 25 years.


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Broadband helps North Carolina emerge as 'The Connected State' | The Sacramento Bee

Broadband helps North Carolina emerge as 'The Connected State' | The Sacramento Bee | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

MCNC, the non-profit operator of the North Carolina Research and Education Network (NCREN), today announced that more than 250 educators, researchers, government officials, and business leaders from all over the state gathered to discuss the future of high-speed internet, networking, and the applications broadband enables during NCREN Community Day 2013 held at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library at NC State University.


For more than 30 years, North Carolina has set the pace for national research and education networking by leveraging NCREN, which provides true high-performance broadband connectivity for community institutions in K-20 public and private education, non-profit health care, public safety and many federal, state and private research institutions. Each year, MCNC recognizes and celebrates the progress and achievements from the NCREN community with this event.


This year is significant for MCNC as the organization celebrates the completion of the Golden LEAF Rural Broadband Initiative, which over the past three years has expanded the fiber-based network to cover more than 2,600 linear miles spanning the entire state. After completing this historic $144 million expansion through the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) in August, North Carolina has become one of just a handful of states with an open access, middle-mile fiber network available to economic developers, businesses and broadband service providers.


"The Connected State theme this year acted as the creative catalyst on expanding networks, increased bandwidth, and the horizons of our research teams," said Todd Broucksou, senior director of NCREN Community Support. "The expanded NCREN is a totally new infrastructure for the state that affordably and effectively removes the bandwidth restraints and connection barriers our schools, non-profit health care and other institutions have experienced in the past. For the next several generations, broadband infrastructure will be a highway to innovation in North Carolina for these institutions."


MCNC also announced the winners of this year's annual NCREN Community Awards during the two-day event.

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J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, November 25, 2013 9:56 AM

What's needed is coordination at a national level for expanded broadband. Also, LEAs need assistance and accountability to jump on. < 80% of schools are on board. From    http://www.k12hsn.org/about/: "Without a coordinated, state-funded initiative ensuring equal-access to cost-effective network services, students, teachers, and administrators throughout California will have disparate access.Providing better service for better value makes good fiscal sense for all of California." 

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AT&T and Verizon Pressed to Detail Roles in U.S. Surveillance Efforts | NYTimes.com

AT&T and Verizon Pressed to Detail Roles in U.S. Surveillance Efforts | NYTimes.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Shareholders are putting AT&T and Verizon Wireless on notice: Tell the public more about the companies’ role in government surveillance efforts or risk a ding to the bottom line.


Two separate but similar shareholder resolutions, from New York State’s comptroller and a large investment firm, say that the two dominant wireless carriers hurt customers’ trust by not disclosing more about the data they share with governments. The resolutions are the latest sign that the flurry of revelations about American spying efforts is putting business pressure on the companies lassoed into providing customer data to the government.


“If a customer is concerned about their privacy perhaps being compromised, they could switch to another service,” said Thomas P. DiNapoli, New York’s comptroller, the trustee of the $160.7 billion New York State Common Retirement Fund. He filed a resolution with AT&T this month demanding that the carrier publish reports on the information it collects and shares.


AT&T and Verizon Wireless, which juggle enormous amounts of phone calls and Internet data over their networks, have been quiet about the types of information they share about their customers. Internet giants like Yahoo and Google, meanwhile, have published so-called transparency reports detailing the types of information they share with government agencies.


Some tech companies, including Microsoft and Apple, have also been outspoken about their desire to release more information on government requests, including how many orders they receive to disclose the contents of email and other communications.


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America's Real Three-way Digital Divide | TMCNet.com

Americans are used to seeing things two ways. Elections are usually between two parties. Newspapers like to tell two sides to every story, regardless of how many different sides there really are. And there’s a “digital divide” between broadband-haves and broadband-have nots. But it’s really more complicated than that. Federal policy has “solved” the problem for some of the have-nots, but has been leaving others behind.


Urban and well-populated suburban areas get most of the providers’ attention. They typically have a cable company providing triple-play, and a telephone company providing broadband as well as voice-band telephone service. In some places the telephone company is providing video competition as well. So for the most part, these areas are pretty well served, if not quite up to world standards. And why not? The cost of providing local service, whether copper wire, fiber optic, or coax cable, is largely a function of population density, so these areas are where the profits are made.


The biggest incumbent telephone companies (ILECs) in the US, including the Bells and the biggest ones that used to be called “independents”, now operate under a regulatory model known federally as “price caps”, and sometimes “Alternative Form of Regulation” (AFOR) at the state level. Some states have granted their big ILECs full retail deregulation, so their retail prices aren’t even capped; they can charge whatever they please, even for basic dial tone service. (Broadband service has never been subject to price regulation.) Under AFOR or full deregulation, these companies, which the FCC refers to as price cap carriers, are allowed to make as high a profit as they can, within whatever price caps remain (mainly for wholesale services to other carriers). If they cut their costs and keep their customers, they make more prof


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47% of US jobs under threat from computerization according to Oxford study | GizMag.com

47% of US jobs under threat from computerization according to Oxford study | GizMag.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Almost 47 percent of US jobs could be computerized within one or two decades according to a recent study that attempts to gauge the growing impact of computers on the job market. It isn't only manual labor jobs that could be affected: The study reveals a trend of computers taking over many cognitive tasks thanks to the availability of big data. It suggests two waves of computerization, with the first substituting computers for people in logistics, transportation, administrative and office support and the second affecting jobs depending on how well engineers crack computing problems associated with human perception, creative and social intelligence.


Released by the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology, the study entitled The future of employment: how susceptible are jobs to computerization? evaluated around 700 jobs, classifying them based on how likely they are to be computerized, from low risk occupations (recreational therapists, emergency management directors and healthcare social worker) to high risk ones (library technicians, data entry keyers and telemarketers).


The availability of big data was identified as a major trend that's given engineers huge amounts of complex data to work with, which has made it possible for computers to deal with problems that, until recently, only people could handle. For instance, pattern recognition software applied to patient records, clinical trials, medical reports and journals makes it possible for computers to be used as diagnostic tools, comparing data to arrive at the best possible treatment plan.


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LA: The End of Carrier-of-Last Resort | Pots and Pans

LA: The End of Carrier-of-Last Resort | Pots and Pans | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Louisiana Public Service Commission granted AT&T relief from carrier-of-last resort obligations on November 13 in Docket R-31889. This docket also allows AT&T to stop calculating price floors. Similar changes have been ordered in other states and AT&T has been asking for this everywhere they are regulated.


What might this change mean to the average consumer? Just sitting here I can picture a number of possible ways that AT&T can use this ruling:


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Federal government seeks custody of Fitzgerald's FirstNet e-mails | Urgent Communications

Federal government seeks custody of Fitzgerald's FirstNet e-mails | Urgent Communications | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Claiming that Paul Fitzgerald’s e-mails associated with his role as a FirstNet board member are federal documents, U.S. government attorneys are seeking a summary judgment to block efforts by Story County, Iowa—where Fitzgerald is the longtime sheriff—to release FirstNet-related e-mails sent and received on the Story County system.


Story County has argued that 63 FirstNet-related e-mails tied to Fitzgerald’s county e-mail address should be subject to Iowa’s open-records law, because they are stored in the Story County data system. But federal attorneys cite Iowa case law in claiming that the location of the e-mail is irrelevant; if Fitzgerald sent or received e-mails in his capacity as a “special government employee” serving as a FirstNet board member, those e-mails are federal documents, according to a Nov. 15 filing. 


“This is not a case in which the United States is seeking to restrict any rights of the county to disclose its own records,” the filing states. “Instead, it is a case in which the United States is seeking to enforce its property rights in the records.”


In making the argument as to why Fitzgerald’s e-mails are not subject to a Congressional mandate that FirstNet be open and transparent in its procurement, federal attorneys provided hints regarding the content of at least some of the Fitzgerald e-mails.


“The e-mails at issue are not competitive requests by the board to the private sector for the purpose of building and operating the network,” the filing states. “Rather, the e-mails reflect internal communications among FirstNet board members and/or with FirstNet employees.


“They include discussions of legal advice, proposed budgets, draft board resolutions and minutes, and other internal deliberations,” the filing continues. “While some of these internal communications touch upon prospective procurement plans by FirstNet, those plans are not final, competitive requests to the private sector but internal, pre-decisional sensitive information which would prematurely reveal the agency’s proposed strategy, budget or schedule for acquiring goods and services.”


The federal filing does not state whether the Fitzgerald e-mails would be released if the court rules in favor of the U.S. government. However, the filing does reiterate the fact that Congress exempted FirstNet from the Freedom of Information Act when it created the organization last year.


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AIR.U Intros Program To Boost Broadband Networks with Unused TV Frequencies | Campus Technology

AIR.U Intros Program To Boost Broadband Networks with Unused TV Frequencies | Campus Technology | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The AIR.U Consortium has introduced a Quick Start Network Program intended to help AIR.U member institutions improve broadband network coverage and capacity.


The Quick Start Network Program is available exclusively to AIR.U higher education institutions. AIR.U is a consortium of education associations, public interest groups, and high tech companies that was formed by Declaration Networks in 2012. The founding higher education organizations represent more than 500 colleges and universities across the country.


The goal of the AIR.U initiative is to accelerate deployment of next generation networks in educational communities by deploying high-capacity broadband networks that make use of "White Spaces," which are unused television channel frequencies. AIR.U wants to help its member colleges and universities use these White Space frequencies to provide wireless broadband access to the Internet for the purpose of supporting campuswide public WiFi, residential broadband to students and faculty, and machine-to-machine services supporting campus security and monitoring.


“The Quick Start Network Program responds to the need at many colleges to quickly and easily close gaps in campus broadband connectivity,” said Michael Calabrese, director of the Wireless Future Project at the New America Foundation and an AIR.U co-founder, in a prepared statement.


Participating AIR.U institutions will receive:


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Copyright Lobbyists And The $1 Trillion Fallacy | Techdirt.com

Copyright Lobbyists And The $1 Trillion Fallacy | Techdirt.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Well, here we go again. Earlier this week, the IIPA (a sort of uber copyright maximalist lobbying group, made up of other copyright maximalist lobbying groups, including the MPAA, RIAA, BSA, AAP, NMPA, ESA and IFTA) released a new report on the economic impact of "the Copyright Industries."


This report comes out every few years, written by the copyright maximalists' favorite economist, Stephen Siwek, who is well known for both these reports and another set of reports in which he tries to calculate "losses" due to infringement using the most ridiculous and misleading methodology imaginable.


This report is slightly different. There's not much in the way of direct methodology: he's basically lumping together a bunch of industries as "core copyright" industries, and presenting some stats around them. There are also the "partial copyright" industries, which are kind of laughable, since it includes things like "furniture."

The report is incredibly misleading (and is being used in a misleading way), but we'll get to that. Instead, let's start out by taking the report at face value, and assuming that it is accurate. The claim that the backers of the report (including NBCUniversal, which funded it) are latching onto is the big round number: the claim that:


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Cable Industry's Broadband Growth Slows | The Hollywood Reporter

Cable Industry's Broadband Growth Slows | The Hollywood Reporter | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

High-speed Internet services have been the growth engine for cable operators amid continued pay TV subscriber losses. Accordingly, cable executives have in recent years repeatedly described their broadband service offering as a new core product.


Outgoing Time Warner Cable CEO Glenn Britt, for example, told investors in 2011: "It has become our primary product. People are telling us that if they were down to their last dollar, they would drop broadband last."


But third-quarter earnings season saw two big cable players – Time Warner Cable and Cablevision – report broadband subscriber declines, raising some concerns among investors about a slowdown in growth momentum. For TW Cable, it was the first-ever broadband drop.


"Broadband is growing at a moderating pace for the cable operators," said ISI Media analyst Vijay Jayant, highlighting that it was a maturing business. "While the industry continues to be mainly focused on where video subscribers are headed, more attention should be paid to the trend that broadband and voice subscribers are increasingly seasonal and tied to the movement of cable bundles."


But observers also emphasized that TW Cable faced particular pressure in the latest quarter amid its carriage dispute with CBS, which led some customers to drop pay TV and additional services, such as broadband.


Wunderlich Securities analyst Matthew Harrigan also noted that TW Cable and Cablevision are both exposed to more competition from telecom providers. "These two are subject to heavy [Verizon] FiOS and [AT&T] U-verse overlays," he said.


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Gig.U: More Gigabit Networks May be in the Pipeline | TeleCompetitor.com

Gig.U: More Gigabit Networks May be in the Pipeline | TeleCompetitor.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Gig.U initiative aimed at bringing gigabit connectivity to university communities has had some significant successes and appears poised for more, according to a new report issued by Gig.U today.


Seven university communities – primarily in North Carolina — are currently reviewing responses to requests for proposal (RFPs) for ultra-high-speed networks, the report notes. These include Champaign-Urbana, Ill.; Raleigh, N.C.; Durham, N.C.; Chapel Hill, N.C.; Cary, N.C.; Carrboro, N.C. and Winston-Salem, N.C.


In addition, two communities – College Station, Tex. and Louisville, Ky. – have requests for information pending.


“In ten years, whether a city has faster, cheaper, better broadband networks will affect everything it does,” the report notes. “Today many things a city does affect what kind of broadband networks it will have in 10 years.”


The report also recaps the status of ultra-high-speed network projects that are underway, most of which Telecompetitor has covered previously, including:


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France-based BIME Analytics Opens North American Headquarters In Kansas City, MO | Area Development Online

France-based BIME Analytics Opens North American Headquarters In Kansas City, MO | Area Development Online | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

BIME Analytics, a France-based business intelligence technology company, will open its new North American headquarters in Kansas City. Missouri. The company will invest $390,200 to locate in Kansas City’s Crossroads District, with plans to hire 44 new employees within the next five years.

Founded in 2009, BIME is a cloud computing company that delivers simple-to-use business intelligence data. The company’s interactive and customizable dashboards provide clients easy solutions to access, organize, and analyze big data. Although BIME is based in Montpellier, France, nearly one-third of the company’s clients are in North America. Locating in Kansas City gives the company better access to their current clients and allows for greater growth opportunities, The Missouri Department of Economic Development said.

“Locating in Kansas City, we’re afforded a lot of opportunities that aren’t available in other parts of the country,” said Rachel Delacour, CEO and co-founder of BIME. “Kansas City is a growing technology hub where we have access to a lot of great tech talent, but Missouri also has a friendly corporate tax structure that allows us to keep our cost of business low. It’s a winning combination that you won’t find anywhere but here.”

“Missouri was recently ranked the third-fastest growing state for tech jobs and today it’s easy to see why,” said Gov. Jay Nixon. “Our top-tier talent and favorable business climate continue to attract high-tech companies, fuel economic growth and most importantly, create jobs for Missouri families. I’m proud to officially welcome BIME as the newest member of Missouri’s growing tech network.”


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Motorola inks 3D printing deal for customizable smartphone parts | NetworlWorld.com

Motorola inks 3D printing deal for customizable smartphone parts | NetworlWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Motorola has signed a multi-year deal with the first maker of 3D printers and services to build cellular phone parts that can be functionally and aesthetically customized for owners.


The business partnership with 3D Systems will lead to "a continuous high-speed 3D printing production platform in support of Motorola's Project Ara, an open hardware platform for creating highly modular smartphones.


Motorola's Project Ara is an open hardware platform for creating highly modular smartphones (Image: Mark Serr).


"With Project Ara, we asked the question, 'How do we bring the benefits of customization and an open hardware ecosystem to 6 billion people?' That is our driving application. It requires technical advances in areas such as material strength and printing with conductive inks for antennas," Regina Dugan, head of Motorola's Advanced Technology & Projects group, said in a statement.


"And those advances must support production-level speeds and volumes, which is a natural partnership with 3D Systems," she added.

If the development phase of the deal is a success, 3D Systems is expected to be Motorola's exclusive manufacturer for Project Ara smartphone enclosures and modules, the companies said.


Avi Reichental, CEO of 3D Systems, said his companies machines -- combined with Motorola's phone designs -- will help create "the factory of the future."


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VA: Danville Continues to Attract Jobs to Region After Building Fiber Network | community broadband networks

VA: Danville Continues to Attract Jobs to Region After Building Fiber Network | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Danville's open access network has fueled economic development in the Virginia community's resurgence after tobacco’s demise and job losses from a once thriving textile industry put a hurt on the local economy. Danville’s technological prowess is now attracting companies from China, in addition to other economic development gains we covered previously.


Jason Grey, nDanville’s Network Manager, told us that Zeyuan Flooring International, a Chinese wood floor manufacturer, is locating its first U.S. facility in Danville. Zeyuan CEO, Sindy Cui, said the company initially thought about locating in Los Angeles, but was eventually swayed by the hospitality and resources available in Danville. Zeyuan plans to invest $15-million in a 40,000 square foot manufacturing plant that will employ 100 people within three years.


Zeyuan is the second Chinese company to locate in Danville in the past year. Last September, Chinese furniture assembler GOK International announced it will invest $12.5-million to establish its U.S. headquarters and showroom in Danville. GOK International plans to employ 300 people within three years.


Not coincidentally, both companies are locating in Cane Creek Centre, one of Danville’s five industrial parks connected to nDanville’s fiber network. Serving businesses was a high priority in building the network. As the first fully automated open-access network in the country, nDanville passes more than 1,000 businesses including every parcel in each of the industrial parks. Many businesses take 100-Mbps fiber connections, some take advantage of 1-Gbps connections. 


These recent additions to Danville’s thriving commercial sector are just the latest in a steady string of economic development successes for the area that include the likes of Goodyear and IKEA. And it’s not just manufacturing.


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