Surfing the Broad...
Follow
Find
119.3K views | +45 today
Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

In Supreme Court Opinions, Web Links to Nowhere | NYTimes.com

In Supreme Court Opinions, Web Links to Nowhere | NYTimes.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Supreme Court opinions have come down with a bad case of link rot. According to a new study, 49 percent of the hyperlinks in Supreme Court decisions no longer work.


This can sometimes be amusing. A link in a 2011 Supreme Court opinion about violent video games by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. now leads to a mischievous error message.


“Aren’t you glad you didn’t cite to this Web page?” it asks. “If you had, like Justice Alito did, the original content would have long since disappeared and someone else might have come along and purchased the domain in order to make a comment about the transience of linked information in the Internet age.”


The prankster has a point. The modern Supreme Court opinion is increasingly built on sand.


Hyperlinks are a huge and welcome convenience, of course, said Jonathan Zittrain, who teaches law and computer science at Harvard and who prepared the study with Kendra Albert, a law student there. “Things are readily accessible,” he said, “until they aren’t.”


What is lost, Professor Zittrain said, can be crucial. “Often the footnotes and citations,” he said, “are where the action is.”


For most of the Supreme Court’s history, its citations have been to static, permanent sources, typically books. Those citations allowed lawyers and scholars to find, understand and assess the court’s evidence and reasoning.


Since 1996, though, justices have cited materials found on the Internet 555 times, the study found. Those citations are very often ephemeral.


“It is disturbing that even at the Supreme Court, where creating and citing precedent is of the utmost importance, citations often fail to point the researcher to the authority on which the court based its decision,” Raizel Liebler and June Liebert, librarians at the John Marshall Law School in Chicago, wrote in a second recent look at the topic, “Something Rotten in the State of Legal Citation.” It was published in The Yale Journal of Law and Technology.


Even links to the Supreme Court’s own Web site have stopped working. One is to a video of what Justice Antonin Scalia called “the scariest chase I ever saw since ‘The French Connection.’”


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

New California law will let minors digitally erase their online past | TheVerge.com

New California law will let minors digitally erase their online past | TheVerge.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Earlier this year Google's Eric Schmidt suggested that the internet should have a "delete" button for individuals that wanted to remove troubling information from the web, and thanks to a new law minors in California will get that chance.


The SFGate reports that California governor Jerry Brown signed a new law today that will require internet companies to pull down online activity from their services should a minor make the request. While the law is a step forward it has more than a few loopholes.


Companies won't need to remove any data from their servers — they'll just need to take it offline — and it only covers photos, data, or other online activity that is generated by the requesting individuals themselves. Minors won't be able to force companies to pull information posted, or reposted, by others. It's scheduled to go into effect in 2015.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Bruce Schneier Discusses the NSA Documents | MIT Technology Review

Bruce Schneier Discusses the NSA Documents | MIT Technology Review | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Bruce Schneier, a cryptographer and author on security topics, last month took on a side gig: helping the Guardian newspaper pore through documents purloined from the U.S. National Security Agency by contractor Edward Snowden, lately of Moscow.


In recent months that newspaper and other media have issued a steady stream of revelations, including the vast scale at which the NSA accesses major cloud platforms, taps calls and text messages of wireless carriers, and tries to subvert encryption.  


This year Schneier is also a fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society. In a conversation there with David Talbot, chief correspondent of MIT Technology Review, Schneier provided perspective on the revelations to date—and hinted that more were coming.


Click headline to read the conversation--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Inside Time Warner Cable’s Free Cable/Reward Programs for Realtors, Property Owners, and Landlords | Stop the Cap!

Inside Time Warner Cable’s Free Cable/Reward Programs for Realtors, Property Owners, and Landlords | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

When you bought a home or moved into an apartment, were you offered a special discount deal to sign up with Time Warner Cable? Or is cable television already provided as part of your lease?


While everyone enjoys saving on cable television, telephone and broadband service, chances are your landlord or the person who lets the cable installer into the building is getting a better deal than you ever will.


Cable companies often (quietly) offer realtors, builders, condo association leaders, landlords, superintendents and even their assistants free or deeply discounted cable service for a variety of reasons:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Report: TV Everywhere Falls Short | TeleCompetitor.com

Report: TV Everywhere Falls Short | TeleCompetitor.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Despite all the rapid growth and media attention, “cord cutters” and over-the-top (OTT) video services don’t pose a serious threat to Pay-TV providers, at least not yet, says Altman Vilandrie & Co. Ominous signs are there, however, particularly when it comes to competition for fast growing mobile device viewing, according to an Altman Vilandrie & Co.  annual survey of consumer viewing habits.


Less than 5% of U.S. consumers watch online video regularly instead of subscribing to cable TV,  an insignificant year over year increase, researchers said.


Most of those who “cut the cord” did so for reasons of affordability or perceived value of their cable service, “not because online video was a complete substitute,” Altman Vilandrie states in a press release. Those who did cancel their cable subscriptions moreover, “spent less and subscribed to fewer services than average subscribers.”


Live viewing of TV programming has proven resilient, according to the annual survey results, which Altman Vilandrie has conducted with Research Now since 2009. Live viewing is especially important to younger viewers, the market researchers found.


On the other hand, cable providers’ efforts to garner mobile viewing market share through “TV Everywhere” is falling short. “Cable’s initiatives to bring content to mobile devices, dubbed ‘TV Everywhere,’ have low awareness, and cable risks losing the mobile viewing battle to Netflix and other online providers,” according to Altman Vilandrie’s analysis.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Don't Expect FCC to Act on Verizon's Snub of Nexus 7 | DSLReports.com

Yesterday I noted that Verizon was taking heat for refusing to connect new LTE-enabled Nexus 7 tablets to their network, despite the fact that the company's network clearly supports the device. Journalist and professor Jeff Jarvis, who was the first to report on Verizon's practice, notes he's filed a complaint with the FCC. Jarvis claims Verizon is violating the conditions attached to the 700MHz spectrum they're using for LTE:


quote:

I am a Verizon Wireless customer registering a complaint regarding Verizon’s refusal to connect my Verizon 7 (sic) LTE tablet via its C Block LTE spectrum, in violation of:

•47 CFR 27.16 – Network access requirements for Block C, paragraph (b), reading in part: “Licensees offering service on spectrum subject to this section shall not deny, limit, or restrict the ability of their customers to use the devices and applications of their choices on the licensee’s C Block network…"

The problem being that those "Carterfone" provisions were intentionally designed with loopholes as to be unenforceable, and even if they were enforceable, you'd need regulators with the courage to enforce them (hint: we don't). As written, Verizon can simply vaguely claim their certification process (or their blocking of Google Wallet, whatever) is done for the health of the network, and therefore they're not violating the 700 MHz spectrum conditions.


So in short, what will likely happen is the FCC will do nothing, Verizon will stick to their existing certification timeline, and people will forget this ever happened. Verizon has issued a longer statement on their website saying the company "expects it will be certified shortly," and that their lengthier-than-others cert process is focused on "guarding the safety and security of our network."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Agriculture Secretary Announces Funding to Improve Broadband Service for Rural Customers in Four States | USDA.gov

Agriculture Secretary Vilsack today announced loans to help finance the construction of broadband networks in rural Iowa, Minnesota, Oregon and South Dakota. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) remains focused on carrying out its mission, despite a time of significant budget uncertainty. Today's announcement is one part of the Department's efforts to strengthen the rural economy.


"Rural Americans need full access high-speed telecommunications services," Vilsack said. "Broadband allows rural communities to tap into critical health care and social services systems. It also helps even the playing field in education, and gives small-town businesses a chance to compete globally. As part of the Obama Administration's goal to improve infrastructure, we will continue to fund projects that expand broadband service in rural areas."


Today's funding announcement will provide almost $40 million from USDA's Rural Utilities Service (RUS) to install fiber networks to improve telecommunications capability in the three recipients' service areas. USDA's Telecommunications Loan Program finances infrastructure that enables access to a seamless, nationwide telecommunications network.


The following recipients have been selected to receive telecommunications loan financing. The funding is contingent upon the recipients meeting the terms of the loan agreements.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Cut the cord for home broadband? Not so fast | USAToday.com

Cut the cord  for home broadband? Not so fast | USAToday.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Question: I need a broadband Internet connection — no phone, no TV, just data — for my new home in Naples, Fla. What are my options?


Answer: This British reader arranging a trans-Atlantic move was considering Verizon Wireless' HomeFusion service. That residential broadband offering has decent speed, but she should have two other options free of the data caps that constrain HomeFusion. A little confusion may be understandable, though.


"VzW" launched this service in May of 2012 as a way to sell its 4G LTE wireless to homes where its parent company, Verizon, doesn't offer wired service. HomeFusion advertises download speeds from 5 to 12 megabits per second, with uploads running from 2 to 5 Mbps.


That's good — most digital-subscriber-line connections and some cable-modem links run slower. But even the pokiest DSL or cable doesn't come with the usage caps of HomeFusion.


The base $60 plan covers 10 gigabytes of use. Each extra gigabyte after a two-month grace period costs an extra $10, or you can step up to a $90 plan that covers 20 GB or pay $120 a month for 30 GB.


(HomeFusion is unrelated to Voice Link, a wireless-based, voice-only service Verizon has deployed in some markets to replace damaged wires, not always to the satisfaction of the customers involved.)


I've argued here before that clinging to an unlimited broadband plan is usually a waste on a smartphone. But the math flips around when 4G becomes the only access for every phone, tablet and computer at home.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

500 Mbps Has Become Cable's New US High Water Mark | DSLReports.com

500 Mbps Has Become Cable's New US High Water Mark | DSLReports.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

While there has been much talk of 1 Gbps connections (even though the vast, vast majority of Americans can't get anything close), the cable industry's new high-watermark for broadband bragging rights appears to be 500 Mbps.

Earlier this month Swedish cable operator Com Hem started offering 500 Mbps down, 50 Mbps up cable broadband service for SEK 899 (US$138.03) per month. Last week, we were the first to note that Comcast's top speed has now reached 505 Mbps ($300, plus $1,000 ETF, $250 install fee, $250 activation fee). Now Spain's largest cable provider Ono has joined the fun:


quote:

"ONO, the largest cable operator in Spain, is preparing to launch a 500 Mbps broadband service sometime next month, company CEO Rosalia Portela revealed at the CTAM Europe Summit in Barcelona...Portela didn’t reveal pricing on the tier, but the operator will look for it to keep ahead of Telefonica and other competitors, while also expanding on its current, fastest service, which delivers downstream bursts up to 100 Mbps."

No major cable operator in the States has yet to offer these speeds via coax and DOCSIS 3.0, though it does show that cable has ample legroom over the next five to ten years. Comcast's recent 505 Mbps bump technically runs over a hybrid fiber Metro Ethernet solution that's not available to the vast majority of the company's customers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

HP, allies launch Mopria to keep printers relevant in mobile era | CNET News

HP, allies launch Mopria to keep printers relevant in mobile era | CNET News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As the computing industry expands its attention beyond PCs to smartphones and tablets, one technology has struggled to keep up: printing. But a new alliance of printer makers and others called Mopria hopes to change that.


The group, which includes Hewlett-Packard, Canon, Samsung, and Xerox so far, announced its existence today that it believes will make printing from mobile devices easy. They've developed a set of interfaces that give mobile operating systems simplified printing software and let apps easily draw on that ability. Mopria technology also governs printer technology so people can send print jobs using Wi-Fi Direct wireless networking or by tapping a printer with a phone that supports near-field communications (NFC).


"If you are a printer vendor, and if you are solely attached to a PC, where is your future? We are moving from a device that is a PC peripheral to a mobile companion," said Phil McCoog, a distinguished technologist with HP's printing business. "You need to be print or you're going to force people to go back to their PC when they want or need to print."


The idea resembles Apple's AirPrint technology, but it's designed to work with any mobile operating system, McCoog said. Right off the bat, some Android devices will support it, including new Samsung Galaxy S4 and Note 3, but Mopria wants to extend much farther.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

ITU Broadband Report: U.S. Ranks 24th Globally in Internet Usage | Telecompetitor.com

ITU Broadband Report: U.S. Ranks 24th Globally in Internet Usage | Telecompetitor.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The U.S. ranks 24th worldwide in the percentage of residents who use the Internet, according to the International Telecommunications Union’s 2013 State of Broadband Report, released in New York Saturday at a meeting of the Broadband Commission for Digital Development.  Eighty-one percent of U.S. residents use the Internet, the ITU said.


The nation with the highest percentage of people using the Internet was Iceland, where 97% of the people are Internet users. The top 10 countries all had usage rates above 88% and all but two – New Zealand and Qatar – were in Europe.


The ITU got a lot of attention with a report issued last year that showed there were two times as many mobile broadband subscriptions as fixed broadband subscriptions worldwide. A year later, this new ITU research predicts there will be more than three times as many mobile broadband subscriptions as fixed broadband subscriptions globally by the end of 2013.


The U.S. ranks ninth worldwide measured on mobile broadband penetration, according to the new ITU research. Just under three-quarters (74.7%) of U.S. citizens use mobile broadband, the ITU said. Ahead of the U.S. were several Asian and European countries and Australia.


The top five countries – including Singapore, Japan, Finland, the Republic of Korea and Sweden – had mobile broadband penetration rates above 100%, indicating that a substantial number of people have more than one mobile broadband connection. Singapore topped the list with a mobile broadband penetration rate of 123.3%.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How a Crypto 'Backdoor' Pitted the Tech World Against the NSA | Threat Level | Wired.com

How a Crypto 'Backdoor' Pitted the Tech World Against the NSA | Threat Level | Wired.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In August 2007, a young programmer in Microsoft’s Windows security group stood up to give a five-minute turbo talk at the annual Crypto conference in Santa Barbara.


It was a Tuesday evening, part of the conference’s traditional rump session, when a hodge-podge of short talks are presented outside of the conference’s main lineup. To draw attendees away from the wine and beer that competed for their attention at that hour, presenters sometimes tried to sex up their talks with provocative titles like “Does Bob Go to Prison?” or “How to Steal Cars – A Practical Attack on KeeLoq” or “The Only Rump Session Talk With Pamela Anderson.”


Dan Shumow and his Microsoft colleague Niels Ferguson titled theirs, provocatively, “On the Possibility of a Back Door in the NIST SP800-90 Dual Ec Prng.” It was a title only a crypto geek would love or get.


The talk was only nine slides long (.pdf). But those nine slides were potentially dynamite. They laid out a case showing that a new encryption standard, given a stamp of approval by the U.S. government, possessed a glaring weakness that made an algorithm in it susceptible to cracking. But the weakness they described wasn’t just an average vulnerability, it had the kind of properties one would want if one were intentionally inserting a backdoor to make the algorithm susceptible to cracking by design.


For such a dramatic presentation — by mathematicians’ standards — the reaction to it was surprisingly muted. “I think folks thought, ‘Well that’s interesting,’ and, ‘Wow, it looks like maybe there was a flaw in the design,’” says a senior Microsoft manager who was at the talk. “But there wasn’t a huge reaction.”


Six years later, that’s all changed.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Hawaiki Cable project taps TE SubCom for deployment of Trans-Pacific system | TeleGeography.com

US submarine cable vendor TE SubCom will design and deploy Hawaiki Cable’s planned 14,000km trans-Pacific system linking Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii to the US west coast, ComputerWorld New Zealand reports. The cable, which is planned for completion in 2015, will be based on 100Gbps wavelength technology, and will be capable of supporting 10Tbps per fibre pair on the Australia/New Zealand to US trunk.


The online portal quotes Remi Galasso, CEO of Hawaiki Cable, as saying: ‘Our procurement process first started in October 2012 and has progressed according to plan. The supply contract with TE SubCom is a major step forward for Hawaiki and adds significant momentum to our project’.


The cable system will also include SubCom’s Optical Add Drop Multiplexing (OADM) branching unit technology to connect multiple regional branches to the main cable.


As previously reported by TeleGeography’s CommsUpdate in September 2012, Hawaiki Cable is effectively a re-tooled version of the mothballed South Pacific Island Network (SPIN) cable, which was first mooted in 2007 and expected to launch back in 2010. Not only does Hawaiki’s proposed cable closely trace the path of the failed SPIN, but the new project also features a number of the company’s veterans in its ranks, not least former Alcatel-Lucent executive Galasso.


Hawaiki is expected to connect to the likes of Norfolk Island, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji, Wallis and Futuna, Samoa and American Samoa, with additional links to the Cook Islands and Tahiti in French Polynesia mooted.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

New method of creating twisted light may allow fibers to carry more information | KurzweilAI.net

New method of creating twisted light may allow fibers to carry more information | KurzweilAI.net | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The images above show the spiral structure of the coherent light emitted from a beam of electrons accelerated to nearly the speed of light and arranged into a helix by a simple laser. Left: An intensity map. Note the dark center where the light cancels itself out, resulting in a cross section resembling a doughnut. Right: A phase structure map, clearly showing the helix described by the light.


Scientists at SLAC have found a new method to create coherent beams of twisted light — light that spirals around a central axis as it travels.


The method has the potential to generate twisted light in shorter pulses, higher intensities, and a much wider range of wavelengths (including X-rays) than is currently possible.


First described two decades ago, twisted light is attracting attention from researchers in fields as diverse as telecommunications, quantum computing, condensed matter research and astronomy because of one unique property:


Researchers have demonstrated that it can transmit more information through fiber optic cables than the current industry standard.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

US Senator Patrick Leahy backs sweeping NSA restrictions | Tony Romm | POLITICO.com

US Senator Patrick Leahy backs sweeping NSA restrictions | Tony Romm | POLITICO.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sen. Patrick Leahy, the powerful chairman of the chamber’s Judiciary Committee, on Tuesday strongly endorsed a series of sweeping restrictions on U.S. surveillance programs — from ending the bulk collection of Americans’ phone call logs to creating new oversight mechanisms to keep the NSA in check.


In a speech at Georgetown University Law Center, Leahy (D-Vt.) said the government “has not made its case” that the ability to collect Americans’ phone records en masse under the PATRIOT Act is “an effective counterterrorism tool, especially in light of the intrusion on Americans’ privacy rights.”


As the senator criticized the program, authorized under Section 215, he also pledged to explore “possible structural changes” to the secret court that reviews government surveillance requests. And Leahy said he planned to work with his Republican colleagues in the House to rein in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which governs the NSA’s ability to tap Internet communications as it scours for foreign terror suspects.


Leahy’s speech Tuesday marks his committee’s return to the thorny, complex surveillance debate sparked by contractor Edward Snowden. Even as Snowden’s leaks continued to make headlines, lawmakers disengaged as they turned their attention to Syria and the debt ceiling.


The chairman’s panel plans to hold a classified briefing on the NSA on Wednesday, with an open hearing to come next week featuring testimony from Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and Gen. Keith Alexander, the dual leader of the NSA and U.S. Cyber Command.


Click headline to read more--
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Mississippi’s C Spire Wireless Plans to Offer Gigabit Fiber to the Home Service | Stop the Cap!

Mississippi’s C Spire Wireless Plans to Offer Gigabit Fiber to the Home Service | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

C Spire, a wireless phone company serving the southeastern United States today announced ambitious plans to deploy a gigabit fiber to the home network in the state of Mississippi, now considered to be one of the worst states for broadband speed and availability.


C Spire Fiber to the Home was introduced by company executives at a news conference this morning attended by community leaders. C-Spire intends to build a fiber network offering 1,000/1,000Mbps broadband, telephone and television service at a competitive price starting in 2014 in select communities in the state.


“As a brand that’s been pushing the envelope of innovation our entire existence, it’s only natural for us to want to provide the ‘what’s next’ to the customers we serve,” said Hu Meena, president and CEO of C Spire Wireless. “The ‘what’s next’ is now here and we’re ready to release the power of 1 Gig fiber to communities that want to experience the immediate and lasting benefits of 100 times the speed and 100 times the opportunities.”


C Spire will use its existing 4,000 miles of fiber optic infrastructure now providing backhaul connectivity to the company’s cell tower network and its commercial customers. An additional 1,500 miles of fiber is scheduled for installation next year.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MN: St. Paul's cable, Internet future at heart of Comcast talks | TwinCities.com

Chad Johnston, director of the St. Paul Neighborhood Network and its six cable access channels, is watching attentively as a city committee engages Comcast in crafting a new 10-year franchise agreement.


Those negotiations have been unfolding for the better part of two years, Johnston said. With SPNN's future possibly in the balance, he announced this week that a series of public focus groups will be held in early October to gather input on what services St. Paul residents want from their cable provider.


For Johnston, who became SPNN's director in March, the stakes are huge. Roughly half of SPNN's budget comes from fees collected from Comcast. The existing agreement between Comcast and the city of St. Paul is wide ranging, determining everything from senior discounts to free cable access for public schools, libraries and government buildings, as well as Internet communications between municipal buildings.


"All in all, this whole situation, it's a negotiation, so it's fairly delicate," Johnston said.


The city's recent history with Comcast has not been an easy one.


Amid growing concern over outages and modem problems, city officials last year proposed ditching Comcast as provider of building-to-building communications. St. Paul officials had hoped to partner with Ramsey County on a "dark-fiber" network. That plan fell apart amid public scrutiny and opposition from Comcast and the St. Paul Area Chamber of Commerce, which called the idea risky and expensive.


That setback has delayed potential improvements and contributed to a time crunch. "Our intranet is failing," City Council President Kathy Lantry said.


For the past 15 years, the city's I-Net infrastructure -- which provides communications between municipal buildings -- has been free for St. Paul to use as part of its cable franchise agreement with the telecommunications giant. That contract expired at the end of July, but was extended six months to the end of January 2014.


Comcast has expressed no interest in upgrading the outdated system without considerable public investment, and city staff last year estimated those costs could total $9.4 million over the first 10 years.


At the time, St. Paul officials said that for $5 million more, they could effectively run their own fiber network in partnership with the county. By October 2012, however, the planned partnership between Ramsey County and a start-up provider, the Minnesota Fiber Exchange, had fizzled. St. Paul was forced to rethink its strategy and turned back to Comcast.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Nielsen TV ratings to include monitoring on digital devices starting in 2014 | Ars Technica

Nielsen TV ratings to include monitoring on digital devices starting in 2014 | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Nielsen, the premier American television ratings agency, will finally enter the modern age when it begins to count people watching TV on smartphones and tablets starting next fall.


The agency uses a special set-top box that plugs into the televisions of its 10,000 volunteers nationwide and monitors what shows Americans are watching. (The volunteers are called Nielsen families.) However, until September 2014, Nielsen's count hasn’t included anything watched in real-time on a digital device. (In other words, Hulu fans, you don't count).


“Networks are starving for a number they can publish that really represents their audience not just on TV but across all platforms,” Eric Solomon, Nielsen’s senior VP of global audience measurement, told Variety. “I think it will start changing the narrative that ‘people are not watching TV shows.’ It’s that they’re watching on different platforms.”


The new Digital Program Ratings will include 5,000 Americans and will pull demographic data from Facebook user data.


But as Nielsen has been dragging its feet, other networks have stepped forward, most notably ESPN’s Project Blueprint.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Digital Inclusion Infographic: The Internet is Important to Everyone | WebJunction.org

Digital Inclusion Infographic: The Internet is Important to Everyone | WebJunction.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

For the past year and a half, we at OCLC’s WebJunction have been guiding and documenting local leadership teams in nine pilot communities who are figuring out how to increase information technology access and use (referred to as "digital inclusion") in their communities.


The project is supported by the Institute of Museum and Library Service (IMLS) and based upon Building Digital Communities: Framework for Action (The Framework), also funded by IMLS. The Framework recommends community-wide digital inclusion efforts involve a variety of sectors. Local leadership teams representing government, libraries and nonprofits lead the nine pilot communities.


Our pilot communities have taught us many lessons, including:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

E-rate and the Lands the Information Age Forgot | Benton Foundation

E-rate and the Lands the Information Age Forgot | Benton Foundation | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As the Federal Communications Commission considers proposals and recommendations to update its E-rate program, the Benton Foundation is paying close attention to the role of the E-rate in bringing high-capacity broadband to underserved populations, especially those who either have no access to broadband at home, or cannot afford to pay for it.


The lack of fundamental telecommunications infrastructure throughout Tribal Lands and Native Communities in the U.S., and particularly on reservations, is an acute and nagging problem that a reformed E-rate program could do much to address. Members of federally-recognized American Indian Tribes and Alaska Native Villages, “[b]y virtually any measure, … have historically had less access to telecommunications services than any other segment of the population.” In starkest terms, these communities are the lands that the Information Age has forgot:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What if Verizon succeeds in killing the Internet? | InfoWorld.com

What if Verizon succeeds in killing the Internet? | InfoWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

I've posted countless essays over the years on the importance of Net neutrality and how big ISPs are trying to turn the Internet into a pay-per-view system, rather than the open-access system it was always intended to be. I've written open letters to federal legislators; remarked on the various games being played by AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, and the like; and cheered Google Fiber for demonstrating that the big ISPs are full of nonsense when they claim their backs are against the wall in terms of broadband speeds and reach.


And now, Verizon is claiming it has free speech rights to limit and block content flowing from the Internet to its customers. That stance is so ridiculous that the lawyers responsible for cooking up that one should either be canonized or jettisoned into space. I'm not sure which.


However, this is happening. Verizon is making a big push to begin actively blocking content and competition from its network. This is a bald-faced attack on the Internet in general. It's abhorrent.


But what happens if Verizon wins? What happens if Verizon establishes a precedent for censorship?


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

In Western Mass, Holyoke Gas and Electric Brings Broadband - Community Broadband Bits Episode #65 | community broadband networks

In Western Mass, Holyoke Gas and Electric Brings Broadband - Community Broadband Bits Episode #65 | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Holyoke Gas & Electric has been connecting community anchor institutions and local businesses in Western Massachusetts with fiber networks for years. Rather than using exception access to the Internet as a competitive advantage over more poorly connected neighbors, the Municipal Light Plant (in the parlance of Massachusetts law) is helping nearby towns to establish their own networks.


I met Senior Network Engineer Tim Haas in a lunch with people building community owned networks in Leverett and Princeton in late August. He joins me for episode #65 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast.


We discuss the Holyoke approach, its network, and enthusiasm for assisting others in the region to improve access to the Internet.


Click headline to listen to the podcast of the interview--

more...
John Tebbutt's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:42 PM

councils and networked communities US

Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Western Mass: Push on for broadband’s ‘last mile’ | Recorder.com

Legislation that could add $40 million for “last-mile” broadband service in unserved rural towns came up for a hearing last week before the Massachusetts House Committee on Bonding, State Capital and Assets, as part of a more comprehensive $870 million information technology initiative.


The three committee members who attended heard from most of the region’s legislators, including Rep. Paul Mark, D-Peru, who testified that he lives in a place that lacks broadband access, cell phone service, “and my TV doesn’t work.”


The panel also heard from selectmen, from four WiredWest cooperative executive board members as well as residents and received 250 pieces of written testimony from town officials, business leaders and others, according to Monica Webb, WiredWest Executive Committee chairwoman.


“It was so clear, at the hearing and in written testimony, that people are really desperate” for access to high-speed telecommunication around the region, said Webb, adding that there are potential business opportunities in rural communities that are being passed over because of limited broadband access.


Webb and others who attended the session said the panel appears to recommend the broadband bond.


In her testimony to the panel, Massachusetts Broadband Institute Executive Director Judith Dumont pointed out that the last $40 million in 2008 helped bring in an additional $110 million in public and private investment to build MBI’s “middle mile” fiber network that’s now being tested. And she said the new $40 million could help attract similar investment to link the fiber network to addresses that remain unserved.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Technology and Innovation Grant Opportunities | Blandin on Broadband

Below are some grants that I thought might be of interest to readers and Minnesota communities.


I heard about them from GrantStation


Click headline to read more about the two highlighted grants--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Canada: Rogers acquires Pivot Data Centres, Granite Networks | TeleGeography.com

Canada’s Rogers Communications has agreed to buy Pivot Data Centres for CAD155 million (USD150.6 million) and Granite Networks for CAD6.25 million, which it will integrate into the BlackIron Data unit of its Rogers Business Solutions (RBS) division. The purchases build on the acquisition of BlackIron Data earlier this year to boost RBS in the data centre and hosting services sector.


Together, the two newly acquired businesses currently generate annual revenue of approximately CAD30 million. Pivot Data Centres is a colocation data centre company in Western Canada that operates three colocation facilities in Calgary and Edmonton, with capacity of more than 130,000 square feet. In the coming months, Pivot Data Centres will open two additional colocation data centres with over 110,000 square feet, expanding capacity by approximately 85%; over 100 enterprise customers and government agencies use Pivot’s data centre services.


Granite Networks is based in Ottawa, Ontario, providing colocation, managed services and cloud hosting services to business and government clients in Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec. The acquisition of Granite has already been completed, and the Pivot deal is expected to close next month.

more...
No comment yet.