Surfing the Broad...
Follow
Find
126.8K views | +102 today
Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NSA reportedly compromised more than 50,000 networks worldwide | NetworkWorld.com

NSA reportedly compromised more than 50,000 networks worldwide | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The U.S. National Security Agency reportedly hacked into over 50,000 computer networks around the world as part of its global intelligence gathering efforts, and also taps into large fiber optic cables that transport Internet traffic between continents at 20 different major points.


The agency installed specialized malware referred to as "implants" on over 50,000 devices in order to perform Computer Network Exploitation (CNE), Dutch newspaper NRC Handelsblad reported Saturday based on documents it said were leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.


The information is reportedly taken from a 2012 top secret presentation about the NSA's worldwide signals intelligence gathering capabilities that was shared with the intelligence services of Australia, Canada, the U.K. and New Zealand that form the Five Eyes partnership.


CNE is one of three types of Computer Network Operations that NSA computer specialists perform. It "includes enabling actions and intelligence collection via computer networks that exploit data gathered from target or enemy information systems or networks," the NSA says on its careers website.


According to a presentation slide published by NRC, the NSA deployed over 50,000 CNE "implants" world-wide.


The Washington Post reported in August that the attack tools used for these implants are developed by a specialized NSA team called Tailored Access Operations (TAO) and are designed to compromise routers, switches and firewalls to monitor entire networks.


The implants persist through software and equipment upgrades and can be used to harvest communications, copy stored data and tunnel into the compromised networks from outside, according to the Washington Post. Their number is expected to reach over 85,000 by the end of 2013.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Keith Alexander Offered To Resign, But White House Said No Because It Didn't Want Snowden To Win | Techdirt.com

Keith Alexander Offered To Resign, But White House Said No Because It Didn't Want Snowden To Win | Techdirt.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

One of the really big questions many of us have had throughout the revelations of the NSA's scandals is how the hell have Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and NSA boss Keith Alexander kept their jobs through all of this. Clapper has been caught directly lying to Congress. Alexander has been shown to have been extraordinarily misleading, if he hasn't outright lied.


Furthermore, it's been revealed that both have overseen massive levels of dysfunction and abuse within the NSA (even as they try to spin them as no big deal). And, even among NSA supporters, there's an argument to be made that Alexander should be fired for having system security so weak it allowed Snowden to do what he did undetected, even months after the basics were revealed.


So now it's come out, via a report by Siobhan Gorman in the Wall Street Journal, that Alexander did, in fact, offer to resign but that the White House rejected the request, because they didn't want to hand Snowden a victory.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

UT: Utopia's Reply to the Non-Disclosure Agreement Controversy (NDA) | UTOPIANet.org

Certain inaccurate charges have recently been leveled in media accounts regarding member cities of UTOPIA, their leadership, and compliance with GRAMA and open meetings law that must not be left unanswered.


It is true that we held a series of confidential discussions with member-city officials who willingly signed a non-disclosure agreement (NDA). It is not true that we violated Utah law in any way. GRAMA and the Open Meetings Act (OPA) both make specific provision for NDA in just such cases. Such agreements are not only allowed in the law, they are within both its letter and spirit. Any notion implied or stated that something illegal or unethical has occurred is absolutely false. If some action based on those talks is considered in the future, the process will be fully noticed and open to everyone.


Our discussions centered on the potential restructuring of the UTOPIA partnership along the lines of Google/Provo city, which could potentially bring huge benefits to our member cities. We understand why some might feel offended by such agreements; we certainly avoid them in general.


But if critics will take the time to fully consider the circumstances, we believe they will understand that confidentiality at this very early stage is necessary for exploring such options.


Private entities generally demand confidential negotiations when discussing potential agreements with public entities. It is standard practice at virtually all levels of economic development, including Utah’s Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED). Without confidentiality, many negotiations would simply cease. We need look no further than Proctor & Gamble’s development in Box Elder County or Google’s deal with Provo; neither would have happened without some level of confidentiality up front. Private companies are seldom willing to have their business strategies published on the front page prematurely.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

One million Xbox One consoles sold but Microsoft's cloud choked on launch day | NetworkWorld.com

Microsoft launched Xbox One game consoles in 13 countries, selling over one million consoles within 24 hours, making Xbox One the biggest launch in Xbox history. In the first 24 hours, Microsoft reported that Xbox One gamers killed over 60 million zombies in "Dead Rising 3," and drove more than 3.6 million miles in "Forza Motorsport 5."


Reuters pointed out that Sony also sold one million PS4 units, priced at $399, within 24 hours in just the U.S. and Canada. Sony, trying to avoid comparisons to Xbox's Red Ring of Death, said "less than 1%" of customers experienced a "Blue Light of Death" on PS4s. Similarly, after Xbox One launched, a reportedly "small number" of customers experienced hardware failure with their new $499.99 Xbox One units; Microsoft promised to quickly send out replacements.


With Xbox One sold out in retail stores, Yusuf Mehdi, corporate vice president of marketing and strategy at Xbox, said, "We are working hard to create more Xbox One consoles and look forward to fulfilling holiday gift wishes this season." However, Xbox vice president Phil Harrison told MCV that supplying retailers with stock "will be a struggle. There will be difficulty getting stock through until Christmas but we will do everything we can to accelerate that."


Xbox One "Day One" editions were only available to people who preordered consoles and were bundled with a special "Day One" achievement. Those "Day One" achievements quickly showed up for sale on eBay.


If you like cheat sheets for gaming, Microsoft put out a Xbox One cheat sheet for all of Kinect's new voice commands as well as Kinect gesture commands.


In what The Register dubbed as a "global Microsoft cloud catastrophe," the Xbox One launch coincided with the official Xbox.com site, microsoft.com and Office 365 going down and showing "Service Unavailable - DNS failure." Although people speculated that Windows Azure was to blame, after services were restored, Microsoft stated:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Canada: CRTC introduces model municipal access agreement | TeleGeography.com

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) last week announced that municipalities and telecommunications companies can now refer to a model municipal access agreement to facilitate negotiations regarding the installation of telecoms infrastructure.


The regulator’s chairman Jean-Pierre Blais stated: ‘Telecommunications companies often need access to streets and other municipal property to install, upgrade or maintain their facilities, which include fibre-optic cables. The model agreement will help municipalities save time and money in their negotiations, and enable telecommunications companies to provide high-quality services to Canadians.’


The watchdog’s release added that the model agreement was developed, at the CRTC’s request, by a working group that included representatives from municipalities and the telecoms industry. Certain terms will need to be negotiated between the two parties, which will allow the final agreement to accommodate unique needs and circumstances.


The CRTC expects that the model agreement will streamline the negotiation process and reduce the prospect of disputes between municipalities and network operators.


Telecom Decision CRTC 2013-618: http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2013/2013-618.htm


Model municipal access agreement: http://www.crtc.gc.ca/cisc/eng/ciscmanu.htm.

more...
JE Concursos's curator insight, December 8, 2013 10:11 AM

As melhores Apostilas para Concursos Publicos estao aqui, Apostilas Digitalizadas Prontas para você.

http://www.jeconcursos.com.br

Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Sobriety Checkpoints Paved Path to NSA Email Spying | Threat Level | Wired.com

Sobriety Checkpoints Paved Path to NSA Email Spying | Threat Level | Wired.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sobriety checkpoints and mandatory drug testing of student athletes and railroad workers are among the legal precedents justifying the U.S. government’s now-defunct and court-approved secret email metadata dragnet surveillance program, according to documents the authorities released late Monday.


The thousands of pages of records the President Barack Obama administration unveiled include the nation’s first opinion from a secret tribunal authorizing the government to obtain data from the “to,” “from,” “cc,” and “bcc” fields of all emails “to thwart terrorist attacks.”


“This concern clearly involves national security interests beyond the normal need for law enforcement and is at least as compelling as other governmental interests that have been held to justify searches in the absence of individualized suspicion,” Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly, then the presiding judge of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, wrote in an opinion (.pdf) believed dated in 2004.


(The 87-page opinion is heavily redacted, including its date. But parsed with other documents in the data dump, experts believe the opinion is dated July 2004. Because the opinion is repeatedly blacked out, it is unclear whether the order authorizes broader internet data collection.)


The President George W. Bush administration first implemented the program shortly after the 2001 terror attacks. But it wasn’t until 2004 that the administration sought authorization from the secret court after being faced with threats of resignation from senior officials. Those officials include James Comey, then the deputy attorney general who is now the FBI chief.


Rights lawyers blasted the decision, saying there was no legal basis for the secret court, formed in 1978 to assist the government in obtaining foreign intelligence, to approve the program.


“These documents show that the government asked the FISC for permission to collect information far beyond what was authorized by the statute and the court acquiesced,” said Elizabeth Goitein, co-director at the Brennan Center.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Tech Companies Help Make NSA Surveillance Possible—and They Can Help Stop It, Too - Dan Gillmor | Slate.com

Tech Companies Help Make NSA Surveillance Possible—and They Can Help Stop It, Too - Dan Gillmor | Slate.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

When Google chairman Eric Schmidt complained recently about the tapping of the company's internal network traffic by U.S. and U.K. intelligence agencies, he certainly had a point. America's National Security Agency and Britain's Government Communications Headquarters were clearly abusing their powers. But Schmidt's complaints had a hollow ring, because Google's own policies have left it—and its users—too open to abuse.


Unless Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and the rest of the Internet "cloud" providers stop using our data for their own commercial purposes, and start offering users a way to keep it truly private, we have to assume our information has been compromised. Unless they create a supplemental business model that allows us to pay directly for services in return for genuine security, they are making clear that their commercial priorities trump our privacy.


That's one reason why you should be highly skeptical of piece from the New America Foundation’s Weekly Wonk that's gaining some traction. The author, Marvin Ammori, argues that the technology industry is getting unfair criticism for its part in government surveillance. (Disclosure: Ammori is a Future Tense fellow at the New America Foundation; Schmidt is the chairman of the NAF board; I’m a professor at Arizona State University; and Future Tense is a partnership of Slate, New America, and ASU. Life is complicated.) Ammori approvingly cites Schmidt's remarks and condemns the “vilification of the tech companies.” (One reason you might be skeptical is that Ammori is "an attorney advising companies including Google and Dropbox on surveillance matters," as the tagline notes.)


No one I know in the civil liberties arena fully blames the tech companies for the government's shredding of our privacy and fundamental liberties. We do put the primary responsibility squarely where it belongs: on the government agencies—including the CIA, as we've just learned, and probably others—that treat the Bill of Rights like a doormat in their zeal to know everything at all times.


What we  question is the industry's commitment to privacy and liberty when a) some companies, notably the telecoms, are complicit enablers of untrammeled surveillance, and others are outright arms merchants to the warriors against privacy; b) they don't fight back as loudly and visibly as we believe they should; and c) they continue to engineer their services and products in ways that make surveillance easier for governments.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What Comcast Can Learn From Verizon ‘Flex View’ | Multichannel.com

What Comcast Can Learn From Verizon ‘Flex View’ | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Apple iTunes commands the electronic sell-through (EST) market for movies and TV shows, but, as Verizon Communications has shown with “Flex View,” pay-TV operators can jump in and generate tangible benefits with just a fraction of the market.


And that could bode well for Comcast as it enters the EST fray with the Xfinity TV Store, a service that will do battle with iTunes,  Vudu, Amazon Instant Video, Target Ticket and M-GO, among others.


According to Verizon spokesman Bill Kula, Verizon has seen the average EST revenue per FiOS TV customer quadruple since the company introduced an EST product in October 2010 (Flex View’s for-sale library currently offers more than 10,000 movies and 30,000 TV shows). “From our research, FiOS customers who use Flex View on demand are three times less likely to churn than customers who do not use the service,” he added.


And Verizon’s getting those results with just a small, albeit expanding, piece of the EST pie.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Community networks provide a public service - Chris Mitchell Commentary | BaltimoreSun.com

Community networks provide a public service - Chris Mitchell Commentary | BaltimoreSun.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake recently spoke the plain truth: "You can't grow jobs with slow Internet."


This simple statement is the best explanation for why Baltimore is examining how it can use existing city assets and smart investments in the near future to expand access to fast, affordable, and reliable Internet access. It is also a slap across Comcast's face.


The big cable and telephone companies have insisted for years that they already deliver the services residents and businesses need. But they also claim to offer reasonable prices that just happen to increase year after year with few customers having other options to choose from.


Baltimore's reality is that Comcast does indeed offer speeds that are faster than many those in rural Maryland can access. But they are not even in the same league as cities like Chattanooga, Tenn., where every address in the community has access to the fastest speeds available anywhere in the nation, and at some of the lowest prices. There, as in hundreds of communities across the country, the local government built its own next-generation network.


Whenever a city announces the possibility of investing in a network, the cable industry public-relations machine kicks into high gear. They argue that we have a plethora of choices for Internet access. The sleight of hand behind this claim is to include LTE wireless networks as a replacement for cable — something almost no household does because replacing your home wired connection with LTE will break your budget. According to bandwidth-management firm Sandvine, the average household uses more than 50 gigabytes of data each month. Between the data caps and overage fees from AT&T, that will cost over $500 per month.


Meanwhile, the overwhelming majority of community owned networks are doing exactly what they intended — breaking even financially while providing a valuable public service. Big cable companies argue that these networks have failed if they aren't making big profits each year, a misunderstanding of public accounting. Community owned networks aim to break even, not make a profit.


Click headline to read more--
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? The creator of Bitcoin | CoinDesk

Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? The creator of Bitcoin | CoinDesk | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

No one knows who Satoshi Nakamoto was – or at least, if they do, they’re not saying.


Whoever he is, he stopped working on the project around the end of 2010, and is worth a lot of money thanks to his early mining.


There are several theories about who he is.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Energy Internet, Cyber-Infrastructure and eVehicles: Green Bond Funds and the role of R&E networks | Green-Broadband.ca

Energy Internet, Cyber-Infrastructure and eVehicles: Green Bond Funds and the role of R&E networks | Green-Broadband.ca | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Around the world universities, R&E networks and researchers in general are looking at an increasingly austere future of budget cutbacks and reduced funding for higher education.


This environment is unlikely to change, even if the current global economic situation improves.  Healthcare, long term debt and aging populations are continue to put enormous pressure on government budgets for the foreseeable future.  In times of budget constraints education and research usually always gets the short shrift, even though it is argued that it is an investment in our future economic growth.


The only bright spot in terms of new funding are various public and private sector programs related to climate change.  Even “denialist” governments as in Ottawa, Washington and now Canberra have launched several programs to fund new initiatives in energy, GHG abatement,  green programs etc.  The private financial sector has also started to launch several new instruments in this area with the development of Green Bonds and revolving funds.  Many of these funds are also supported by generous tax breaks.


Green Bond, revolving funds and related initiatives are usually used to underwrite the capital costs of large renewable energy or energy efficiency projects.  Examples include deploying large solar arrays, wind farms, etc.  The funds earn their return on investment through the payback on energy savings or from feed in tariffs to the electrical grid.


Green bonds in the United States got a major boost from the America Jobs Creation Act of 2004. It was designed to provide funding - in the form of $2 billion worth of AAA-rated bonds issued by the United States Treasury - to finance environmentally friendly development. Many individual states are also issuing Green Bond funds.  Some countries like the Netherlands Green Fund programs also fund innovation through the use of these funds.


There is a significant opportunity for universities and R&E networks to tap into this programs.  But the challenge for most universities is their relative small size and lack of experience or knowledge in negotiating with Green Bond brokers.  Most Green Bond and Revolving funds are several hundred million dollars in size.  It is very hard for even a large university to come up with green projects of sufficient size to attract the attention of such investment vehicles.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MS: Horn Lake hopes super-fast home Internet service will give it an edge | HispanicBusiness.com

Mississippi isn't usually thought of as a leader in online technology, but a wireless provider based in the state hopes to change that. And Horn Lake hopes to go along for the ride -- a very fast ride.

The DeSoto County city is one of nine selected to be in the first wave of Mississippi communities to get ultra high-speed, fiber optics home Internet service from Cspire, the Ridgeland, Miss.-based regional wireless provider. If enough homes sign up to make the service economically viable for Cspire, the company promises Horn Lake and the eight other selected cities service faster than anything currently available, as well as the inviting environment that goes along with cutting-edge technology.

Cspire representatives and Horn Lake officials hosted a town hall meeting last week to explain the service to the public and discuss how it benefits the community.

"Our plan is to light up Mississippi and make it a leader in technology," said Steve Davidson, manager of brand and channel strategy for Cspire. He compared the planned fiber service to the Google Fiber initiative that has brought similar high-speed residential service to the Kansas City area.

A handful of other cities around the country, such as Chattanooga, Tenn., have introduced communitywide, superfast home Internet connections.

Like Google's fiber service and the service being offered in the East Tennessee city, Cspire plans to offer speeds touted as being up to 100 times faster than broadband connections now available for residential use in most areas. Most people, comfortable with current speeds, don't even appreciate the future possibilities that connections that fast would offer, Davidson said.

"It's not necessarily what you can do with it today," he said, "but what will come."

Selling the promise of future benefits to potential customers who may be happy for now with what they have is the challenge facing city leaders. They fought to get Horn Lake on the shortlist of early-adopting communities, and now they plan to begin the push to generate enough interest to actually bring the service to the city, which is looking for an edge in the economic battle with bigger neighbor Southaven and other area cities.

Davidson said being able to offer technological perks like this is just the ticket for spurring growth, attracting technologically savvy people who may want to run businesses from home or just have home service that's faster than they can get in most places. In Kansas City, Davidson noted, homes in neighborhoods that received Google Fiber have increased an average of 7 percent in value.

Horn Lake leaders don't need convincing about the merits. Mayor Allen Latimer admits he isn't technologically savvy, but he said John Whyte, the city's IT administrator, convinced him that the service would bring the city many advantages.

The city plans to talk to potential customers door to door, place signs explaining the service -- whatever it takes to encourage residents in areas where the service will be available, which is most of the city, to sign up.

Davidson said there is no specific deadline by which cities must complete sign-up -- he's not sure yet exactly when sign-up will even open -- but he hopes the first city to reach the number needed to begin laying fiber can have service up and running by April. Pressed for numbers needed to make the service viable, Davidson estimated that about 40 percent of homes in each area where service is available -- a "Fiberhood" -- need to sign up.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

KY: Pipe dream? A closer look at Louisville's push for fiber Internet connectivity | WDRB.com

KY: Pipe dream? A closer look at Louisville's push for fiber Internet connectivity | WDRB.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, Louisville,KY effectively declared itself "open for business" to any company willing to spend millions of dollars installing super-fast fiber Internet connections throughout the city.


By formally asking for gigabit-speed connections to homes and businesses, Louisville is not so much blazing a new path, but getting in line.


More than a thousand cities have expressed interest in having gigabit-speed fiber, the type of wire Google is installing in only three places: Kansas City, Kan.; Provo, Utah and Austin, Texas.


Google is not the only company capable of bring these connections to homes, but incumbent providers like Time Warner Cable have shown little interest in making the upgrade, so cities like Louisville are exploring their options.


"Neither cable nor AT&T are rushing to put fiber in the home," said Susan Crawford, a law professor at Yeshiva University and author of Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age. "They have no reason…to make the upgrade."


Crawford argues that so long as cable companies don't face more competition for residential Internet service, they're content to reap profits from coaxial cable lines installed long ago rather than spend millions to bring faster fiber lines into homes.


For the cable industry in general, big spending on fiber upgrades would likely mean less money for stock buybacks and dividends, the Wall Street Journal noted in January.


In Kansas City, Google's gigabit fiber service costs $70 a month – essentially the same price Time Warner Cable charges in Louisville ($65 a month for 12 months, $75 thereafter) for a connection that's 20 times slower in download speeds, and 200 times slower in upload speeds.


It's against this backdrop that Louisville has joined a growing number of communities seeking faster and less expensive (on per-speed basis) Internet connectivity --- from anyone willing to provide it.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Wheeler Blog Post Shifts Phone Transition Into Second Gear - Tales of the Sausage Factory | Wetmachine.com

Wheeler Blog Post Shifts Phone Transition Into Second Gear - Tales of the Sausage Factory | Wetmachine.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

First a belated welcome Chairman Wheeler. I must warn you that, after Chairwoman Clyburn’s short but extremely productive tenure, you have a very tough act to follow. Mind you, I give kudos for your shrewd opening move of poaching my (now former) boss Gigi B. Sohn for your front office.

 

I will add I am delighted to see another wonky telecom blogger on the scene. Which awkward segue brings me to  Chairman Tom Wheeler’s recent blog post announcing his intent to get an Order out on the transition of the phone system by January.

 

We could characterize the time since AT&T filed their application to “begin a dialog” last year as chugging along in first gear, and this blog post definitely kicks things up into second gear. I outline what I think this means, and where I think we’re going in the next few months, below . . . .


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

TV Is Dying, And Here Are The Stats That Prove It | BizInsider.com

TV Is Dying, And Here Are The Stats That Prove It | BizInsider.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The TV business is having its worst year ever.


Audience ratings have collapsed: Aside from a brief respite during the Olympics, there has been only negative ratings growth on broadcast and cable TV since September 2011, according to Citi Research.


Media stock analysts Craig Moffett and Michael Nathanson recently noted, "The pay-TV industry has reported its worst 12-month stretch ever." All the major TV providers lost a collective 113,000 subscribers in Q3 2013. That doesn't sound like a huge deal — but it includes internet subscribers, too.


Broadband internet was supposed to benefit from the end of cable TV, but it hasn't.


In all, about 5 million people ended their cable and broadband subs between the beginning of 2010 and the end of this year.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Did Satoshi Nakamoto transfer 1,000 bitcoins to the Silk Road? | NetworkWorld.com

Did Satoshi Nakamoto transfer 1,000 bitcoins to the Silk Road? | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Two computer scientists in Israel say a bitcoin transaction now worth more than US$1 million suggests a possible link between a creator of the virtual currency and Ross William Ulbricht, the 29-year-old accused of running the Silk Road underground online marketplace.


The 1,000-bitcoin transfer was found during an analysis of the movement of the Silk Road's bitcoins, according to a forthcoming research paper written by Adi Shamir and Dorit Ron of the Weizmann Institute of Science.


The finding suggests a partnership or investment in the Silk Road on the part of someone involved very early on in Bitcoin "but this is pure speculation," the researchers wrote.


The amount was transferred on March 20 from an account established just a week after the bitcoin network launched in January 2009. Early bitcoin accounts are believed to be controlled by Satoshi Nakamoto, a pseudonym for the person or group of people who created Bitcoin.


The receiving account has been linked to "DPR," short for "Dread Pirate Roberts," the operator of the Silk Road who authorities alleged is Ulbricht. The bitcoins were worth about $60,000 at the time, but the price of bitcoin has since surged.


"The short path we found suggests (but does not prove) the existence of a surprising link between the two mysterious figures of the Bitcoin community, Satoshi Nakamoto and DPR," they wrote.


Nakamoto's real identity has never been uncovered despite attempts to figure out who has the cryptography and mathematical skills to create such a system. He stopped writing posts on a bitcoin forum in 2010.


As many as 20,000 of the first groupings of transactions, known as "blocks" in bitcoin's public ledger, are believed to have been performed by computers controlled by Nakamoto, according to the paper. He may have accumulated up to 1 million bitcoins worth close to $1 billion today.


The bulk of the research paper focuses on the movement of the Silk Road's bitcoin commissions. Before it was shut down in October, the site collected as many as 633,000 bitcoins from its commissions, which ranged from 1.5 to 10 percent of the value a product sold on the Silk Road.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

FCC's in-flight cellphone plan carries a lot of baggage | NetworkWorld.com

FCC's in-flight cellphone plan carries a lot of baggage | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Anyone who dreads hearing one end of a loud phone call all the way from Anchorage to Miami, take heart: The plan to allow cellphones on planes could fail in more ways than an overbooked flight at a snowbound airport on Christmas Eve.


On Thursday, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission said it would consider a proposal to let airlines allow passengers to use cellular services while in flight. The services would use special onboard cells instead of regular towers on the ground and wouldn't be allowed below 10,000 feet. The FCC is scheduled to discuss the subject at its next public meeting on Dec. 12. If the agency adopts the rule, it will be up to airlines to install the onboard cells and decide whether passengers can talk, text or use cellular data.


Nearly everyone welcomed the Federal Aviation Administration's decision last month to let travelers keep electronic devices on from gate to gate, but allowing cellphone calls in flight is a whole other matter. A flight attendants' union came out strongly against the idea, polls indicate most consumers are worried about it, and a congressman who has fought in-flight calling in the past may revive a bill that would ban it.


"Just imagine the nightmare. You're sitting there in coach, three across, and you're in between two people who are yelling on their cellphones," said Rep. Peter DeFazio, a Democrat from Oregon. "You can't sleep, you can't work."


In 2008, DeFazio introduced the Halting Airplane Noise to Give Us Peace (HANG UP) Act, which would have limited in-flight wireless services on airliners to data. The bill failed, but DeFazio said he probably will reintroduce it, if only to give opponents of the FCC's plan something to rally around.


The U.S. is falling behind the rest of the world, if being able to use a cellphone in the air is progress. Many major international airlines, including Air France, Emirates, Singapore Airlines and Virgin Atlantic, already offer cellular service over countries where it's allowed. OnAir, a Swiss in-flight cell carrier, links onboard cellular servers to the ground via satellites. It boasts of roaming agreements with more than 350 mobile operators.


But even if the FCC lifts its rule, which was imposed in 1991 to prevent disruption of ground-based cellular networks, nothing will change in the U.S. unless airlines and service providers see a viable business in phone calls, analysts said.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Canada: Ice’s 3G reaches Iqaluit | TeleGeography.com

Canadian Far North telecoms operator Ice Wireless has announced the launch of high speed 3G mobile services for smartphones and tablets in Iqaluit, the capital of the Nunavut region, in partnership with equipment provider Huawei Technologies.


Ice activated two W-CDMA/HSPA+ base stations in Iqaluit, which are equipped for future upgrades to 4G. Ice Wireless connects customers in the local area via the SES AMC-9 24-transponder C-band satellite, managed by Juch-Tech, a Hamilton-based earth station.


The 3G expansion follows similar announcements by Ice in Whitehorse and Yellowknife, and forms part of this year’s CAD12.4 million (USD11.8 million) investment plan to expand and enhance telecommunications services in nine cities and towns across the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Bitcoin Survival Guide: Everything You Need to Know About the Future of Money | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

Bitcoin Survival Guide: Everything You Need to Know About the Future of Money | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The price of a bitcoin topped $900 last week, an enormous surge in value that arrived amidst Congressional hearings where top U.S. financial regulators took a surprisingly rosy view of digital currency. Just 10 months ago, a bitcoin sold for a measly $13.


The spike was big news across the globe, from Washington to Tokyo to China, and it left many asking themselves: “What the hell is a bitcoin?” It’s a good question — not only for those with little understanding of the modern financial system and how it intersects with modern technology, but also for those steeped in the new internet-driven economy that has so quickly remade our world over the last 20 years.


Bitcoin is a digital currency, meaning it’s money controlled and stored entirely by computers spread across the internet, and this money is finding its way to more and more people and businesses around the world. But it’s much more than that, and many people — including the sharpest of internet pioneers as well as seasoned economists — are still struggling to come to terms with its many identities.


With that in mind, we give you this: an idiot’s guide to bitcoin. And there’s no shame in reading. Nowadays, as bitcoin is just beginning to show what it’s capable of, we’re all neophytes.


Bitcoin isn’t just a currency, like dollars or euros or yen. It’s a way of making payments, like PayPal or the Visa credit card network. It lets you hold money, but it also lets you spend it and trade it and move it from place to place, almost as cheaply and easily as you’d send an email.


As the press so often points out, Bitcoin lets you do all this without revealing your identity, a phenomenon that drove its use on The Silk Road, an online marketplace for illegal drugs. But at the same time, it’s a system that operates completely in the public view. All Bitcoin transactions are recorded online for anyone to see, lending a certain transparency to the system, a transparency that can drive a new trust in the economy and subvert the anonymity sought by those on The Silk Road, which the feds shut down last month.


Bitcoin is much more than a money service for illegal operations. It’s a re-imagining of international finance, something that breaks down barriers between countries and frees currency from the control of federal governments. Bitcoin is controlled by open source software that operates according to the laws of mathematics — and by the people who collectively oversee this software. The software runs on thousands of machines across the globe, but it can be changed. It’s just that a majority of those overseeing the software must agree to the change.


In short, Bitcoin is kind of like the internet, but for money.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

FCC Commissioner Clyburn: Up To Marketplace to Set In-Flight Phone Policies | Multichannel.com

FCC Commissioner Clyburn: Up To Marketplace to Set In-Flight Phone Policies | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

FCC Commissioner Clyburn weighed in over the weekend on Chairman Tom Wheeler's proposal to modify the commission's rules on in-flight cell phone use, saying it should be up to the marketplace to decide.

 

Wheeler last week circulated an item to expand access and choice of in-flight mobile broadband, after which he got some pushback from Capitol Hill. He clarified that the FCC item was about the technical feasibility of in-flight phone calls, but that the airlines would make the ultimate calls about phone use. Clyburn agreed.

 

"Clearly, the travelling public is concerned about three things-- (1) safety, (2) security, and (3) a reasonable zone of silence," Clyburn said in a statement. "Government has well-defined roles concerning the safety and security of Americans. But when it comes to providing a reasonable zone of silence, things are not so well-defined.

 

"I think it's best to let competition and the marketplace regulate passenger engagements in flight. For while it is impossible for us to impose a gag rule on the flying public, I feel certain the airlines can, and will, find a workable solution."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Report: Charter, Comcast Mull Joint Bid For TWC | Multichannel.com

Report: Charter, Comcast Mull Joint Bid For TWC | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Just when you thought the pursuit for Time Warner Cable couldn’t get any wilder, reports surfaced Friday that Charter and Comcast – earlier in the day said to be weighing individual bids for the second largest MSO in the country – are now investigating the possibility of a joint offer for the cable giant.


According to Bloomberg News,  Charter and Comcast have discussed a joint bid for TWC and would divide the assets between them. The report, citing unnamed sources, said the discussions were preliminary and that a TWC breakup is one of several options being considered. The report did not say how big a joint bid would be, how the assets would be split or when the discussions took place.


The Bloomberg report is the latest in what has been a flurry of speculation touched off by a Wall Street Journal article late Wednesday that Charter was lining up bank financing for a TWC bid. That report begat a later revelation from CNBC that Comcast was “seeking advice” on regulatory issues surrounding its own possible TWC bid.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

California sues SAP over failed payroll software project | ComputerWorld.com

California sues SAP over failed payroll software project | ComputerWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

SAP has been slapped with a lawsuit by California's state controller over a payroll software implementation the office says cost taxpayers a vast sum of money, but has never worked correctly.


"After three years, and paying SAP approximately $50 million to integrate its own software into a new payroll and benefits system for the state of California, all the [state controller's office] has to show for its investment is a system that could not get the payroll right even once over an eight-month period for a pilot group of only 1,500 employees," the lawsuit states.


The suit, filed Thursday in Sacramento County District Court, comes after a lengthy back-and-forth between the state and SAP over the system, which was supposed to serve 240,000 workers and replace 30-year-old legacy systems.


Controller John Chiang terminated the state's contract with SAP in February, alleging that the vendor had failed to stabilize the system. It generated "significant errors" in payroll runs conducted during the pilot program, which centered on workers in Chiang's office, including "under or over-compensation of wages" and "failure to report contributions to retirement accounts," according to the suit.


SAP is reviewing the state's complaint, spokesman Andy Kendzie said via email Friday.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

N.S.A. Report Outlined Goals for More Power | NYTimes.com

N.S.A. Report Outlined Goals for More Power | NYTimes.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Officials at the National Security Agency, intent on maintaining its dominance in intelligence collection, pledged last year to push to expand its surveillance powers, according to a top-secret strategy document.


In a February 2012 paper laying out the four-year strategy for the N.S.A.’s signals intelligence operations, which include the agency’s eavesdropping and communications data collection around the world, agency officials set an objective to “aggressively pursue legal authorities and a policy framework mapped more fully to the information age.”


Written as an agency mission statement with broad goals, the five-page document said that existing American laws were not adequate to meet the needs of the N.S.A. to conduct broad surveillance in what it cited as “the golden age of Sigint,” or signals intelligence. “The interpretation and guidelines for applying our authorities, and in some cases the authorities themselves, have not kept pace with the complexity of the technology and target environments, or the operational expectations levied on N.S.A.’s mission,” the document concluded.


Using sweeping language, the paper also outlined some of the agency’s other ambitions. They included defeating the cybersecurity practices of adversaries in order to acquire the data the agency needs from “anyone, anytime, anywhere.” The agency also said it would try to decrypt or bypass codes that keep communications secret by influencing “the global commercial encryption market through commercial relationships,” human spies and intelligence partners in other countries. It also talked of the need to “revolutionize” analysis of its vast collections of data to “radically increase operational impact.”


The strategy document, provided by the former N.S.A. contractor Edward J. Snowden, was written at a time when the agency was at the peak of its powers and the scope of its surveillance operations was still secret. Since then, Mr. Snowden’s revelations have changed the political landscape.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Co-founder marks Comcast's 50 years: 'A natural monopoly' and how it grew | Philly.com Blog

Philly Startup Leaders' past head Bob Moul (Artisan Mobile), current head Rick Nucci (ex of Dell Boomi), dozens of their software-company-founder peers and scores of wanna-bes were at WXPN's World Cafe theater in U City on Thursday for Founder Factory 2013, an all-day symposium.


Keynote speaker was Julian Brodsky, a South Philly native and auditor by training, who cofounded what is by some measures Philadelphia's most successful tech start-up -- Comcast Corp. -- 50 years ago. In his booming voice, Brodsky told familiar stories -- and some new ones. Highlights:


Roots: "Comcast was started by three of us in November 1963, with the purchase of a 1,200-subscriber cable system in Tupelo, Miss." -- Elvis' hometown, and at the time a center of violent Ku Klux Klan racial reaction. "Tupelo had a dozen employees and less than $100,000 of annual revenues. A classic community antenna system bringing the three TV networks from Memphis, Tenn. into this TV-starved area.


"Today Comcast revenue is over $65 billion a year, we have 130,000 employees," tens of millions of cable, Internet and phone customers, a share value north of $100 billion, and nearly $50 billion in debt. After "hating" AT&T for much of his career, now "I am the telephone company," Brodsky exulted. "We did this by being obsessed with growth," taking advantage of "an unending series of buy and build opportunities, accompanied by innovative M&A and financing techniques."


How did Comcast scale from local to national? Through "changes in management style. We started with $100,000 of capital and a highly centralized management style, because every dollar was precious. Two of us made every single decision. The company became gridlocked outside the operating guy's door and my door.


"No way we could grow... So we went to a very strong decentralized" system, giving much power "to local and regional operating guys... We had to institute a highly disciplined budgeting and financial reporting process that allowed us to control a decentralized operation."


That later cycled back: "When we got to the size we are today we came to the conclusion we could no longer take advantage of our scale by being so highly decentralized. So we went to a moderately centralized operation, taking advantage of marketing research and decisions done on a centralized basis...


"With regard to capital, the greatest way to scale is to use other people's money... Not particularly through venture capital... but principally by slicing and dicing a whole lot of entities... owning 51 percent [of each] and keeping control... When you got all the way to the subsidiary, our economic interest might have been 5 or 10 percent, but we still controlled it... We used off-balance-sheet projections, master limited partnerships...


"And we used tax benefit transfers (to) scale our capital. Start-up companies, for the most part, can't use the tax losses they generate. But in certain fields such as cable (which run up) ridiculous start-up losses, [you could sell] those benefits for (cash and turn it into) equity. With that, we were able to scale our capital" for growth.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

With growing appetite for content, AT&T navigates the great video convergence | Dallas Morning News

With growing appetite for content, AT&T navigates the great video convergence | Dallas Morning News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

More and more, AT&T Inc. is becoming a creator of content, not just a conduit.


From aspiring filmmakers to the Dallas Cowboys, from lip-syncing country music fans to the Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival, the giant Dallas-based telecom is supporting efforts that produce video and other content that can be viewed on its networks.


It’s all part of the great convergence of television, the Internet and wireless technology that is changing the way we watch, especially entertainment and live sports. Soon, experts say, TV content and other video will be available anytime, anywhere and on almost any device.


The convergence is being guided by some of the biggest, most influential companies in the world in an environment where content — and who controls it — is more important than ever. These firms are mashing together wired and wireless networks that allow two-way communication between devices, marrying the wide reach of broadcast with the precision of digital, creating opportunity for extreme customization.


Much development work remains necessary on offerings as well as business models, but the potential is big.


Verizon Wireless, a major sponsor of the National Football League, is working with Ericsson to develop a wireless service that could give fans at the Super Bowl and other games access to multiple live camera angles and replays.


“100,000 spectators, 100,000 perspectives, and 100,000 different video experiences on thousands of different devices,” an Ericsson executive wrote earlier this year, addressing the potential of the technology, called evolved Multimedia Broadcast Multicast Services. Broadcast essentially refers to the ability to reach everyone with a single feed; multicast refers to the ability to reach particular audiences and devices.


That has implications for content and advertising.


“An advertiser has the opportunity to target not just a community but an individual living room,” said Vish Nandlall, the chief technology officer for Ericsson North America, based in Plano.


This transforming convergence of TV and the Internet involves traditional broadcasters, cable and satellite operators, and giant telecoms, as well as aggressive startup companies and proven masters of Internet distribution.


Netflix, Hulu and Amazon are underwriting original series for viewing on TV and other devices. And everyone is watching what Google and Apple do, Nandlall said.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.