Surfing the Broad...
Follow
Find
64.1K views | +17 today
Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

A Few Thoughts on FaceTime | AT&T Public Policy Blog

As most observers are aware, Apple’s FaceTime application is currently enabled on AT&T’s popular Mobile Share plan as well as on Wi-Fi, though not at this time on our other billing plans. This approach has raised questions and some concerns. We decided to take this cautious approach for important reasons. AT&T has by far more iPhones on our network than any other carrier. We’re proud of this fact and the confidence our customers have in us. But it also means that when Apple rolls out new services or changes, as it did in iOS 6, it can have a much greater, and more immediate, impact on AT&T’s network than is the case with carriers who have far fewer iPhone users.

 

In this instance, with the FaceTime app already preloaded on tens of millions of AT&T customers’ iPhones, there was no way for our engineers to effectively model usage, and thus to assess network impact. It is for this reason that we took a more cautious approach toward the app. To do otherwise might have risked an adverse impact on the services our customers expect – voice quality in particular – if usage of FaceTime exceeded expectations. And this is important for all our customers regardless of which smartphone they may use.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Are we asking too much of the smart grid? | Smart Grid News

Are we asking too much of the smart grid? | Smart Grid News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Rick Nicholson correctly points out that our long-term future is what I will call "federated microgrids." Many small to mid-sized microgrids trading power back and forth and islanding themselves when needed due to outages in the main grid.

 

But that future is a long ways away – probably two decades until full build out. There is much the smart grid can do for us in the meantime. Things that can occur even if big sections of the grid are out of commission. Here are just four ways that occur to me. Please use the TalkBack form below to suggest others.

 

Click headline to read more and post suggestions--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Media Literacy Week begins in Canada | Google Canada Blog

Media Literacy Week begins in Canada | Google Canada Blog | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In the 21st century, Internet skills are life skills -- and digital literacy is the key to leading a healthy and productive life, both online and offline.

 

This week, Google Canada is proud to be participating in Media Literacy Week, an initiative of MediaSmarts, one of the leading media literacy organizations in Canada.

 

Young people don’t just use the Internet to play games or chat with their friends. According to Pew’s Research on the Internet and American Life (and my own experience as a parent), young people are going online to get material for schoolwork, follow arts and music interests, research health issues, play games, and get news. Just under half of them have bought things online like books, clothing or music. Of course, they are also using these tools to connect with their friends and family to share details of their lives and interests.

 

That’s why media literacy and digital literacy skills are increasingly important - for young Canadians, their parents, and their teachers, and why Google Canada works with organizations like MediaSmarts, and the Canadian Centre for Child Protection to provide Canadians with educational materials, teacher training, and online tools to help them make a safe and secure transition to a life lived online.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Which devices use Wi-Fi hotspots the most? Not laptops... | GigaOM Mobile Tech News

Which devices use Wi-Fi hotspots the most? Not laptops... | GigaOM Mobile Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Smartphones have overtaken laptops as the biggest users of Wi-Fi networks as society moves from part-time to full-time connectedness. According to a recent survey from Informa Telecoms and Media and noted by The Register, 40 percent of all hotspot connections are made by smartphones; nudging just past the 39 percent of laptop connections. Although the tablet market is young, it already accounts for 17 percent of Wi-Fi connections, says the Informa study.

 

Surely some of these results are powered by the fact that smartphone sales have surpassed those of computers and tablet sales are starting to catch up as well. More smartphones than laptops in use, for example, certainly add to more potential hotspot connections for handsets.

 

What else is driving such behavior? The cellular industry moving away from unlimited data plans has to be a big factor here. Wireless data demand continues to rise as fast as, if not faster than, the capability of network infrastructure. And device owners don’t want a connected device to be disconnected, even for a short amount of time: They want instant access to information, communications and media on demand but don’t want to break out the wallet for overages or access to additional amounts of broadband.

 

Smartphone usage on Wi-Fi hotspots — and tablets too — isn’t likely to slow down then. I’d expect this trend to continue as even more mobile devices are sold while more connected apps and services are developed over time.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

AT&T caves, opens FaceTime over cellular for more customers | GigaOM Mobile Tech News

AT&T caves, opens FaceTime over cellular for more customers | GigaOM Mobile Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T has backed down and agreed to make Apple’s video calling service, FaceTime, available over cellular networks to more of its customers, not just those who subscribed to a certain type of data plan. The service will roll out to customers subscribed to a tiered data plan who own an LTE-capable iPhone running iOS 6 in eight to ten weeks, the carrier said Thursday in a press release.

 

FaceTime has always been available to any subscriber for use over a Wi-Fi connection, but the carrier had come under fire this summer when Apple enabled it for cell networks and AT&T said only customers who subscribed to a new Mobile Share plan could use it. Several open internet groups threatened to file complaints with the FCC, saying AT&T’s action was a violation of net neutrality.

 

AT&T had initially argued that it wasn’t violating net neutrality; that it wasn’t blocking the use of the FaceTime app technically because any iPhone customer could still use it over Wi-Fi. It said it was simply “allowing more data access.”

 

A note from AT&T’s head of legislative affairs, Jim Cicconi, on the company’s policy blog explained the change of heart. He said the carrier was being “cautious” when Apple first released iOS 6 with the ability to make FaceTime calls over cellular because of an anticipated overload of activity on its cellular network:

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

LTE in the USA: An in-depth look at LTE coverage, competition, devices and pricing | FierceBroadbandWireless

LTE in the USA: An in-depth look at LTE coverage, competition, devices and pricing | FierceBroadbandWireless | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The United States may not have been the first to launch LTE (TeliaSonera launched the first commercial LTE service in Stockholm and Oslo in December 2009), but it is clearly leading the way in LTE today with the most coverage, devices and subscribers than any other country in the world.

 

Thanks to the aggressive efforts of Verizon Wireless (NYSE:VZ), which launched LTE in December 2010 and now covers 250 million POPs with LTE, as well as initiatives from MetroPCS, AT&T Mobility, Sprint Nextel, MetroPCS, U.S. Cellular and Leap Wireless, the United States is considered the world's leading LTE market. According to Informa Telecoms & Media September estimates, the United States and Canada account for 54 percent of all LTE subscribers worldwide.

 

In terms of U.S. competition, Verizon is ahead. Analysts I spoke with noted that despite Verizon's highly publicized LTE network outages in 2011, the carrier has used its aggressive LTE buildout to solidify its reputation as the provider of the nation's largest, fastest and most reliable network. Yet Verizon's first-mover advantage is under threat by AT&T, and to a lesser extent Sprint, as those operators rush to catch up in terms of coverage and device selection.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Little consensus in early FirstNet comments | FierceBroadbandWireless

Little consensus in early FirstNet comments | FierceBroadbandWireless | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) delayed the deadline for public comments on issues related to the Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network (NPSBN) due to the impact of Hurricane Sandy. However, a number of comments were filed by the original deadline and show a range of opinions regarding network design as well as initial steps that the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) should take to establish the 700 MHz public-safety LTE network.

 

Due to the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy along the Eastern seaboard, the deadline for comments was extended from Nov. 1 to Nov. 9. Comments were sought on business models and the design proposal for the FirstNet Nationwide Network (FNN), which was presented on Sept. 25 by FirstNet board member Craig Farrill.

 

Farrill cited three NPSBN implementation options: Build a standalone network, work with a single nationwide wireless operator or create a diverse nationwide network with multiple wireless networks and systems. He noted the idea of building a standalone network is "unworkable" and advocated for the third option.

 

Click headline to read more-

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

TX, CA utilities share smart grid successes | Fierce Smart Grid

TX, CA utilities share smart grid successes | Fierce Smart Grid | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As deployments of advanced metering systems (AMS) expand, so does the electric grid's transformation into a truly intelligent grid, capable of handling robust analytics applications and creating unimagined efficiencies. Grid investments can be expensive, however, and utilities are looking to squeeze the most value possible out of these upgrades. Getting there means embracing one of the grid's biggest assets -- the ability to anticipate both problems and solutions to lower costs and improve reliability.

 

It's a huge hurdle to clear, as some people still view smart grid as unnecessary bells and whistles to the system. After all, utilities have used what is largely the same system and meters for decades. But the fact of the matter is that analytics and smart grid are here to stay and have become an economic imperative for utilities.

 

Click headline to read more--

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Australia: Wireless NBN for outlying areas creeps closer | Tenterfield Star

As Telstra announces it will start shutting down its copper network 18 months after the National Broadband Network (NBN) hits its first release area, Tenterfield has been warned the fibre network is still a long way off.

 

NBN Co Limited stakeholder and community relations representative Tony Gibbs told Tenterfield Shire Council at a presentation recently that while the shire was about to see things happening to assist those in the outer areas of the shire, the town of Tenterfield itself would not see a fibre optic roll-out for at least another three years.

 

Council has already been approached to use one of the Mt Mackenzie towers to assist in the delivery of fixed wireless technology to the areas outside the town of Tenterfield, and Mr Gibbs said it could soon expect development applications for two further towers – one in the town of Tenterfield and another in Wallangarra/Jennings.

 

“Fixed wireless is fundamentally designed to fit a maximum number of users,” Mr Gibbs said.

He said this meant even if all users were accessing the internet at the same time, the speed would not slow down.

 

“This is the latest technology carriers are rolling out around the world,” Mr Gibbs said. “It’s a great technology for us to be able to develop and over time, it will deliver great speeds.”

He said the electro-magnetic signals sent out by the towers had been assessed and the maximum signal strength was still “thousands of times below the safety standards”.

 

Interim satellite services are already available to many residents outside the Tenterfield township.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

New Zealand government's UFB network passes 100,000 homes | FierceTelecom

New Zealand government's UFB network passes 100,000 homes | FierceTelecom | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Amy Adams, New Zealand's ICT minister, on Thursday said that over 100,000 homes, businesses and schools can connect to the government Ultra Fast Broadband (UFB) network, up from the 76,000 premises it said the network passed in August.

 

Leading the deployment charge is Chorus, a new wholesale company created when Telecom New Zealand divested the business last year, with 72,000 premises connected. Enable Networks, the fiber operator subsidiary of Christchurch City Holdings Limited, has made 1,021 connections.

 

Despite making progress in building out the network, the response has been lukewarm with only 700 building owners agreeing to connect to the UFB fiber to their home or business.

 

Click headline to read more--

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Analysts don’t like AT&T’s upgrade plans | Dispatch.com

Analysts don’t like AT&T’s upgrade plans | Dispatch.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T Inc. will boost capital spending by about 16 percent to $22 billion a year for the next three years to fund upgrades to its wireless and wireline networks, the company said yesterday.

 

AT&T shares fell more than 2 percent after the news.

 

AT&T needs to invest to compete better with Verizon Communications Inc., which is ahead in delivering high-speed mobile services, and must improve its rural phone lines, composed of outdated copper technology.

 

The company also said that it hopes the investments will boost revenue growth by allowing it to chase new opportunities such as adding wireless connections to cars and home security.

 

AT&T said upgrading its wireline network was more attractive financially than other options such as carving up the business or divesting parts of the network. Previously, it said it was considering selling some rural phone lines.

 

Investors worried about the hike in annual spending compared with AT&T’s capital budget of $19 billion to $20 billion for 2012 even though the company vowed to come in at the low end of the target range this year.

 

“It’s a big number, and it’s not just for one year,” Hudson Square Research analyst Todd Rethemeier said.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How my mobile devices are ready for the next storm: Fenix ReadySet | GigaOM Mobile Tech News

How my mobile devices are ready for the next storm: Fenix ReadySet | GigaOM Mobile Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Having just gone through four days without power, heat and water thanks to Hurricane Sandy, I can’t express how happy I was to see the latest gadget delivered to my home. Several months ago I backed the Fenix ReadySet Solar Kit on Kickstarter with a $199 pledge and the device is here. That’s good timing too as we’re expecting another storm with high winds to barrel through the area tonight. The ReadySet won’t help me with heat or water in an emergency, but it will provide renewable power for small electronic devices, tablets, phones and even light bulbs.

 

We wrote about the ReadySet back in June, but if you missed our coverage, let me explain what the product is. Essentially, this is a a portable battery housed in a case with two charging inputs and several outputs.

 

The ReadySet comes with a small (17-inch x 11-inch x 0.9-inch), weatherproof 15 Watt solar panel that can fully recharge the internal battery with roughly eight hours of direct sunlight. You can add more solar panels to reduce the charge time. Also included is an AC adapter that will charge the ReadySet battery in about four hours. A single button press shows how much juice is in the battery and there’s an LED indicator to show when the ReadySet is charging.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

FCC Commissioner Clyburn—A 'Fighter' For Diversity | CableFAX

FCC Commissioner Clyburn—A 'Fighter' For Diversity | CableFAX | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A day after President Obama was re-elected, the NAMIC Mid-Atlantic Chapter presented FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn with its annual Diversity Champion Award at a reception Wednesday night. As chapter president Sherry Hubbard put it, Commissioner Clyburn has been a “conscientious advocate to encourage inclusion and diversity throughout the communications industry,” from her days as a newspaper publisher and general manager to her work today at the FCC. Clyburn, along with former commissioner Michael Copps, shed some light on moving diversity forward post-election.

 

When it comes to diversity, “now it’s time to deliver,” said Copps, currently senior advisor for nonprofit Common Cause’s Media and Democracy Reform Initiative. Diversity spoke convincingly Tuesday night, he said. “Diversity says do not take me for granted…Diversity is African Americans, diversity is Latinos, diversity is Asian Americans, native Americans, diversity is the disability communities, diversity is gay and lesbian communities and the list goes on and on…All looking for action…All looking for help…” he said.

 

That means broadband infrastructure for everyone, justice in media ownership, and a commission that will enforce equal opportunity, rules and regulations, he said. “Diversity says if you want to give spectrum rights to a lot of people, make sure you play fair and square…” Diversity can’t be delayed any more, he said. Calling Clyburn “a fighter” for it, Copps said the commissioner is leading the diversity effort at the Commission and “we should all be behind her.”

 

However, the fight won’t be easy and rewards “might not come when we want them to come,” Clyburn said. “But don’t give up. We don’t give up…We move at a steady pace in order for us to realize these objectives,” she said. “The seeds we plant now, the beneficiaries are children and grandchildren that will come behind us,” she said.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Apple Quietly Removes The Need To Scroll To Its Samsung Apology | Techdirt

Apple Quietly Removes The Need To Scroll To Its Samsung Apology | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Oh, Apple. As someone who (as yet) has no children, it's been an educational experience watching the company's reaction to a UK judge ordering them to put a public apology on their website over false claims that Samsung copied them. From the very beginning, it felt like Apple had gone out of its way to prepare me for raising children. It all started with a little "But, Daaaaad! He's copying me!"

 

Then, once parental admonishment is administered, Apple went into what child psychologists call "pouty-pants mode," with the kind of apology statement that was almost literally playing one parent/country off of another, by which I refer to their referring to the fact that all of the other countries' judges that had ruled opposite of the UK courts.

 

And when the UK courts were less than thrilled with that petulance, they issued another apology, with a link buried at the bottom of the page -- using a little javascript magic to ensure that you wouldn't see it unless you were specifically looking for it. If this isn't a perfect analogy for a young child mumbling a half-hearted apology to his little brother for kicking him, I don't know what is, but I thank Apple for all the lessons in child-rearing they've given me. I feel, having watched the judge in this case, I have a good understanding on how to handle a petulant child.

 

The good news is that Apple has quietly removed this digital monument to foot-stomping, but only after Hacker News and Reddit blew up about it. Apparently, at some point since Monday, amidst the kind of backlash normally reserved for US Senators discussing women's health issues, Apple pretended like the whole thing never happened.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MA: After Sandy, Town Officials Eye Utilities’ Response | WBUR

MA: After Sandy, Town Officials Eye Utilities’ Response | WBUR | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Nearly 90,000 Massachusetts customers were still without power early Wednesday afternoon, following Sandy. (Outages: NStar, National Grid, Unitil, WMECO). That’s down from almost 400,000 outages at the height of the superstorm Monday.

 

Sandy was supposed to be a demonstration of an improved response from the state’s utilities, but so far it appears that reaction to the utilities’ power restoration efforts is mixed.

 

On Tuesday in a field near the Wachusett Aqueduct on Bartlett Street in Northborough, Sandy’s wrath was evident. There was a massive tree, more than three feet in diameter, that downed a utility pole with the top snapped off nearby. And there were wires all over the field.

 

“We experienced some gusts of wind here that were 61 mph — pretty unprecedented,” said Northborough Fire Chief David Durgin. He said those winds knocked trees onto two main feeder lines, and about 80 percent of the town’s 14,000 residents lost power. As of Tuesday afternoon, that number still hadn’t changed.

 

“When these feeder lines are down this is a complex issue,” he said. “This is another whole division that handles this, not the guys in the bucket trucks. It’s high, high voltage, dangerous stuff to work with. I understand that. We just need better communication.”

 

Better communication, Durgin said, because even though National Grid did provide extra crews and a liaison to work directly with the town, communication is not much better this year than it was during last year’s major fall storms. And the chief is not the only one complaining.

 

“In my mind it’s time for change,” said Worcester City Manager Michael O’Brien. “Substantive change, honest conversations, no more bureaucracies.”

 

Click headline to read more and listen to the WBUR radio segment--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

3 Ways Obama’s Digital Marketing Won the Internet and the Election | Business 2 Community

3 Ways Obama’s Digital Marketing Won the Internet and the Election | Business 2 Community | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

No change this time. President Obama keeps his place in the White House for another four years and yet again, social media has played a big part. Four years ago, Obama’s social mediainspired campaign played a huge part in his election. It was so successful that it has inspired many digital marketing campaigns since. Including the aggressive social media activity of his opponent Mitt Romney this time around.

 

We’ve spoken many times on this blog about the similarities between digital marketing and political campaigning. Throughout this campaign, both sides have used digital marketing techniques and social media engagement to boost their chances. In fact, this whole election has been referred to as the social media election in some quarters. Obama’s victory in the actual election is a reflection of his general superiority as a digital marketer.

 

Three key moments stand out in defining why Obama won the online race while winning the political one too. Let’s look at those moments and the digital marketing rules that inspired them.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Australia: A list of android, iPhone, iPad and web applications for those involved in mobile agriculture and technology | e-Agriculture

Australia: A list of android, iPhone, iPad and web applications for those involved in mobile agriculture and technology | e-Agriculture | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A list of android, iphone, ipad and web applications that may be useful to those involved in mobile agriculture and technology.

 

In the coming years agriculture will change dramatically. A number of factors may coincide to see a 'green revolution' type evolutionary jump driven not by advances in synthetic pesticides and fertilisers but by changes in demographics and the information communication technology landscape.

 

Smartphone applications provide an opportunity for scientific outputs (that could greatly benefit growers) to be efficiently and rapidly deployed in the field where they could be most useful. At present, in Australia many agriculturalists don't see (enough) value in mobile applications, therefore demand is low. This in turn prevents the delivery of applications, by developers, of value to Agriculturalists.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Microsoft patents spy-TV to check you've paid for content | The Register

Microsoft patents spy-TV to check you've paid for content | The Register | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Microsoft has been granted a patent on a content distribution system that uses cameras built into televisions, PCs, and mobile phones to act as a "consumer detector," to enforce DRM licensing terms.

 

"A fee can be charged for each viewer of the content for each view," Patent US20120278904 reads. "Viewers may be uniquely identified and a count of the viewers determined, with the licensee then charged for each viewer accessing the content. Age and identity restrictions can be applied in this embodiment as well."

 

Redmond's patent suggests that cameras are not the only tools for checking you've paid up, saying they are "one of a number of suitable technologies." It lists gesture controllers and games consoles being used to spy (not mentioning Kinect or Xboxes by name, but it's a fairly obvious fit). Cameras that can scan on infrared, use "facial recognition techniques," and analyze audio input are also mentioned.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot link--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Comments on Nationwide Interoperable Public Safety Broadband Network NOI | NTIA

Comments on Nationwide Interoperable Public Safety Broadband Network NOI | NTIA | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Click headline to read the intial comments submitted so far in the FirstNet NOI--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Hey DSL, it is time for good-bye | GigaOM Tech News

Hey DSL, it is time for good-bye | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As someone whose first home broadband experience was a 256 kbps broadband connection from Verizon’s grammy Bell Atlantic, I have always retained a soft spot for DSL technology. Sure, I was jealous of my friends who got @Home cable-based broadband and its 1 Mbps service, but in Manhattan of the nineties, DSL was the only game in town. If you saw the cables in my East Village apartment block, you too would feel incredulous – how do these creaking, aging old copper wires bring fast broadband. As time went by, the speeds increased.

 

Cable broadband suffered from too much popularity — too many people shared an infrastructure and as a result the speeds delivered to the home were actually a fraction of what was advertised. And when I moved to San Francisco, I decided to stick with DSL and used Pacific Bell’s (now AT&T) connections. However, somewhere in the mid-2000s, things start to change.

 

DSL speeds, though nearly 15 times faster than my first connection, started to fall behind the cable broadband speeds. DSL performance became spotty. And I switched to Comcast. Today, I live in the future — I have a 200 Mbps fiber connection, thanks to my local independent ISP, WebPass. It costs a lot less money than what the cable company wants from me. And it is a heck of a lot faster than what AT&T has to offer.

 

Like me, a whole bunch of people have switched from the creaking DSL offerings to faster connections. I have been writing about the slow migration away from the classic DSL offering for a long time. People have switched in big numbers to cable companies, particularly those who offer better quality, higher speeds such as Comcast and Cablevision.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Police Chief's Custom Spam Filter Blocks Occupy Protestors, Brutality Complaints And (Oops) Federal Monitors | Techdirt

Police Chief's Custom Spam Filter Blocks Occupy Protestors, Brutality Complaints And (Oops) Federal Monitors | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

We all enjoyed a loud, incredulous laugh when Janet Napolitano, Homeland Security Secretary, went on record as being proudly computer illiterate. "Never use email," she said as part of statement delivered by teletype. Perhaps Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan should have chosen the Luddite Way, thus avoiding his current problems. Instead, he chose to perform the digital equivalent of plugging his ears and shouting nonsensical syllables at the top of his lungs in order to actively ignore news he didn't want to hear (found via the essential Police Misconduct Reporting Project).

 

'People who've e-mailed Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan over the past year about Occupy Oakland probably didn't get much of a response.'

 

'That's because he used a spam filter to dismiss messages sent to him with "Occupy Oakland" in the subject line, according to a federal court filing Monday. Same goes for the phrases "stop the excessive police force," "respect the press pass" or "police brutality." Instead of landing in his in-box, those messages went straight into his junk mail folder, which he apparently never looked at.'

 

It's tough work being Chief. A steady stream of complaints about the police force under your "control" is sure to be disheartening. But, if you can't take the heat, reroute it out the nearest opening, am I right? And he would have gotten away with it, too, if it wasn't for that meddling federal court monitor.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Sandvine Global Report: Internet Data Usage Up 120 Percent in North America | Sandvine

Sandvine Global Report: Internet Data Usage Up 120 Percent in North America | Sandvine | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sandvine, a leading provider of intelligent broadband network solutions for fixed and mobile operators, today released its Internet traffic trends report, entitled “Global Internet Phenomena Report 2H2012 ”, based on data from a selection of Sandvine’s 200-plus customers spanning North America, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Caribbean and Latin America and Asia-Pacific.Major findings from Sandvine’s Global Internet Phenomena Report include:

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

AT&T is glad to expand service, but wants pesky FCC regulations dropped | Ars Technica

AT&T is glad to expand service, but wants pesky FCC regulations dropped | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Industry watchers have pointed out AT&T now seems less than genuine with regulators. The company claimed that without being able to acquire T-Mobile it would not be able to expand its LTE offerings. According to the AT&T's most recent financial data (PDF), the company receives about three times as much quarterly revenue from wireless ($15 billion) as it does from traditional wireline voice service ($5.5 billion).

 

"They painted the stakes as dire as possible when they were trying to buy T-Mobile, but the fact is AT&T had to match its competitors in 4G market roll-outs," said Ken Rehben, an analyst at Yankee Group, told CNNMoney.

 

Some industry watchers are worried such a move would make an end-run around existing regulations that require a baseline level of phone service under federal law. If the FCC heeds AT&T’s advice, some fear there will be even further entrenchment of the dominant wired carriers, like AT&T and Verizon, who are pushing more profitable wireless services.

 

"For 100 years we’ve had the idea that everyone has a phone line," said Susan Crawford, a visiting professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and a telecom law expert. It's the principle known as "common carriage," she told Ars.

 

"Today the general purpose network is a fiber-to-the-home (FTTH). That’s what’s going on in Europe and Asia, but we seem to be abandoning that concept. Instead, we’re allowing private carriers to choose who has to rely on wireless and who gets a wire and who gets what type of wire. The whole system has been turned upside down."

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Comcast Takes Heat for Huge Lawn Utility Cabinets - After Mocking AT&T for Them Several Years Earlier | DSLReports.com

Comcast Takes Heat for Huge Lawn Utility Cabinets - After Mocking AT&T for Them Several Years Earlier | DSLReports.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Over the years several communities have gotten upset about the AT&T VRAD cabinets required to deliver the company's U-Verse FTTN/VDSL service.

 

In some areas, complaints involved anger of AT&T ignoring easement rights or childhood traffic dangers, while in other markets the complaints have been aesthetic or property-value driven. In Illinois, groups like Stop The Box fought to have a say in VRAD placement, with AT&T finally going so far as to agree to pay $1,500-$2000 for landscaping surrounding each box.

 

Now Comcast is baring the brunt of residents of historic Georgetown who are upset about new utility boxes residents say are ugly and were installed without Comcast following the proper procedures:

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Marquette County Broadband Initiative Teams Up With CONNECT Michigan | Marquette.org

Marquette County Broadband Initiative Teams Up With CONNECT Michigan | Marquette.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Marquette County Broadband Initiative has joined forces with ConnectMichigan by enrolling in the Connected Certified Community program. This initiative offers a comprehensive way to bridge the digital divide impacting many communities including Marquette County in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula by building community partnerships to assess broadband access, adoption and use issues.

 

The Marquette County Broadband Initiative is being lead by the County of Marquette, Lake Superior Community Partnership and Northern Michigan University’s Center for Rural Community and Economic Development. The group held its first meeting with community stakeholders in late September and is now compiling the information that was gathered during the session to complete the first steps in the community assessment process.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.