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Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
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Cisco Survey Touts Mobile Video Boom | TVTechnology

Cisco Survey Touts Mobile Video Boom | TVTechnology | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Cisco System’s annual Visual Networking Index anticipates an array of opportunities for mobile and wireless delivery, including vast expansion of mobile video services and multiscreen ventures. It also serves as strong ammunition for forces who want to seize spectrum for the growing global demand for mobile bandwidth. 

 

The VNI Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast, issued just before last month’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, envisions that video will constitute two-thirds of the world’s mobile data traffic by 2017, a 16- fold increase between now and then. The mobile video load will far exceed other mobile data usage, such as email, Web surfing and machine-to-machine services in the “Internet of Everything.”

 

Mobile video traffic accounted for 51 percent of the worlds’ Internet traffic at the end of 2012, the first time video took up more than half of all wireless bandwidth, Cisco says.

 

Several recent analyses and product announcements at the Barcelona mobile trade show underscore Cisco’s great expectations. For example, Parks Associates, a Texas market research firm, singles out the rapid increase of video viewing on tablets and smartphones, and Ericsson was among the technology suppliers to launch new multiplatform capabilities during the Mobile World Congress.

 

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BroadbandBreakfast's curator insight, March 25, 2013 7:57 AM

Very interesting complement to the discussion at the Broadband Breakfast Club last Tuesday, which is now visible at http://BroadbandBreakfast.com.

 

Interactly's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:58 AM

With increasingly high speed mobile connections video traffic is headed more and more to mobile devices. Currently the majority is still one-way, but there is no reason for it to stay that way so the future should be looking up for the visually oriented.

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Americans Cut Off From Opportunity Without Equal Access to the Internet | PBS NewsHour

Americans Cut Off From Opportunity Without Equal Access to the Internet | PBS NewsHour | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Internet use is now so ubiquitous in the U.S. that not having access or online literacy can create major hurdles. As part of the NewsHour's series on broadband technology and its effect on society, Hari Sreenivasan explores the so-called digital divide with Vicky Rideout of VJR Consulting and former FCC official Karen Kornbluh.

 

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Have You Heard of Bitcoin? | Truthdig

Have You Heard of Bitcoin? | Truthdig | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It’s a virtual currency that travels beyond the reach of banks and centralized regulatory institutions and allows you to transfer money to anyone with an Internet connection, anywhere at any time.

 

“Bitcoin is to banks what email was to postal offices,” says Mihai Alisie, editor of Bitcoin Magazine. “Instead of going through a bank, respecting their schedule, paying their fees, I can transfer money to Ethiopia, India or China without anyone knowing who’s behind address B and address A.” It is currently being used, for example, to surmount the funding block on WikiLeaks, in which American and European credit card companies have cooperated with government requests to prevent any money from being donated to the whistle-blowing organization.

 

In the introductory video by The Guardian below, Alisie and Bitcoin developer, Amir Taaki, can be seen in hooded sweatshirts and beanies, walking the brightly lit halls of the deserted London office where they live and work, talking eloquently and enthusiastically about what they’re creating.

 

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HBO legend sees a long road to 4K television | Steve Blum's Blog

HBO legend sees a long road to 4K television | Steve Blum's Blog | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Bob Zitter, HBO’s revered chief technology officer, retires this month, ending more than thirty years at the cutting edge of television technology. In a valedictory keynote at the TV Connect conference in London, Zitter expressed near-term skepticism about the future of 3D and 4K television technology, but held out long term hope.

 

HBO tried offering 3D content, but Zitter said they never believed in it. The stumbling block is the need to wear special glasses, something consumers don’t want to do at home. “3D with glasses is dead“, he said, according to reporting by Television Business International and others at the event.

 

Screen size will limit any future market for 4K technology, an ultra-high definition format that doubles both the horizontal and vertical pixel count, he thinks. In order for resolution that fine to make a difference, the screen needs to be in the 60 to 70-inch range. Some consumers have enough room in their homes, but most don’t. Given current technology.

 

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Rating the legacy of outgoing FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski | msoftnews.com

Rating the legacy of outgoing FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski | msoftnews.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

After almost four years in the role, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said Friday that he was stepping down.During his four years as the head of the FCC, he failed to stop a stunning loss of regulatory authority as a result of a court case started by his predecessor, and made minuscule strides in boosting broadband competition. To top it off he also oversaw regulations that may further diminish the FCC’s authority as we head into the IP age.

 

He did however, forge better connections between the tech industry and the FCC and managed to stop a merger that would have certainly hurt consumers. He also tried to make more wireless spectrum available — taking on the powerful broadcast industry to do so. But instead of listing his achievements and capitulations, I dug up a list that my colleague Om Malik and I wrote back in 2009 when he was named to the role.

 

In the post we told him what he needed to focus on during his tenure. Now, it’s time to look back and see what he has accomplished.

 

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Australia: Silver surfers fighting loneliness with technology | ABC Online

Australia: Silver surfers fighting loneliness with technology | ABC Online | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A study teaching older people how to use programs like Facebook has found social media can help reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness among seniors.

 

Researchers from the Connecting Older Adults project say that while technology has helped older Australians remain in their homes for longer, many feel cut off from society.

 

The Sydney University team trained 150 senior citizens to use Twitter, Facebook and Skype and checked in with them regularly over a period of six months.

 

"Based on early short training, they were able to find the technologies quite usable, and we had some measurable benefits in terms of loneliness and social engagement," lead researcher Professor Robert Steele said.

 

One of the participants, 67-year-old Mila Pinko from Sydney, says social media has once again made her feel like part of the community.

 

"It's just great. You don't feel isolated, you don't feel depressed," she said.

Ms Pinko says since the training she now uses social media every day.

 

"It introduced me to Facebook and Twitter, which I'd never touched before," she said.

 

"With Skype it helped me a lot because I can transfer files now and also speak over Skype and do a lot of photos, receive photos and send photos.

 

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A Tale of Two VoIPs | E-Commerce Times

A Tale of Two VoIPs | E-Commerce Times | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Ever since the first VoIP calls were made in 1973, packetized voice was supposed to be the nail in the coffin of enterprise PBX systems. Thirty-seven years later, conferencing and instant message and presence, or IM/P, have successfully penetrated the enterprise, but VoIP is still lagging behind traditional voice services in the large enterprise setting. It has found much broader acceptance among consumers and smaller businesses.

 

While there are several key barriers preventing widespread enterprise adoption of VoIP, more and more large companies are recognizing the usefulness of this technology. The enterprise VoIP equipment market will increase at a compound annual growth rate of 15 percent between 2010 and 2014, according to one study .

 

Meanwhile, more companies of all sizes have deployed unified communication (UC) solutions, including VoIP, this year than in 2010, found a recent report by InformationWeek.

 

The survey of more than 300 business technology professionals determined that 36 percent of organizations were using UC in 2012, compared to 30 percent in April 2010. Another 31 percent of businesses planned to implement a unified communications solution within the next two years.

 

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CO: PUC to Xcel Energy: That $16.6 million you wanted? No dice | Smart Grid News

CO: PUC to Xcel Energy: That $16.6 million you wanted? No dice | Smart Grid News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Colorado Public Utilities Commission on Thursday ruled that Xcel Energy will not be able to collect the $16.6 million balance it says it is owed for work performed on the SmartGridCity project in Boulder.

 

The ruling is in line with an earlier decision by an administrative law judge that the utility should not be allowed to collect the remaining $16.6 million in costs it incurred in the project because it had not met established criteria demonstrating customer benefits, according to a story in the Boulder County Business Report.

 

The PUC in early 2011 allowed Xcel to recover $27.9 million in program costs from customer rates, but withheld the remaining $16.6 million until the utility could demonstrate benefits to customers, and provide a comprehensive plan.

 

Referring to Xcel, PUC spokesman Terry Bote said "We gave you opportunities to come back and present your case, and you didn't do it."

 

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MI: Bayliss Public Library Boasts New Fiber-Optic Connection | MeritNetworks.edu

Merit Network, Inc. announced today that it has connected Bayliss Public Library with a new fiber-optic lateral as part of the REACH-3MC project.

The connection was successfully "lit" with service in late January. The newly constructed lateral has a whopping capacity of a 1 gigabit per second (Gbps).

For Bayliss Public Library Director, Ken Miller, that is quite a jump:

"We have seen an immediate difference in the new connection. It was a smooth transition. No glitches. This was a great experience because we demonstrated a need, and Merit responded to that need."

"It's just wonderful to see libraries like Bayliss get fiber connections because they are such a hub for their communities. For many residents, the library is the only place where they can access the Internet," said Jim Lundberg, Upper Peninsula member relations manager for Merit.

"Merit is very proud to support our Member, Bayliss Public Library. We have worked with Ken and the staff at Bayliss for many years and we are excited to take the next step with them in offering improved service to their community," said Elwood Downing, Vice President of outreach and member engagement for Merit.

Prior to the new Merit connection, the library had to make do with two T1 lines. Both lines had a combined capacity of approximately 3 megabits per second (Mbps). And due to the lack of bandwidth capacity, Bayliss regularly experienced slow-downs in their service.

Miller remembers an important meeting he had with Jim Lundberg and Elwood Downing of Merit. In that meeting, they examined Bayliss Public Library's usage graph, a tool Merit provides its Members that charts their connections and how much bandwidth they are using.

 

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Brazil's Music Collection Societies Convicted Of Price Fixing | Techdirt

Brazil's Music Collection Societies Convicted Of Price Fixing | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Almost exactly a year ago we wrote about how Brazil's performance rights organization, ECAD (which is the trade association for the Brazilian equivalents of ASCAP, BMI and SESAC), was trying to shake down anyone who embedded a YouTube video, even though ECAD already had an agreement with YouTube. Basically, they were trying to collect twice for the same thing. Around that time, it also was revealed that ECAD's directors were under investigation for providing no information on how it collects or distributes revenue... and then granting its directors huge bonuses.

Now, it appears those were the least of ECAD's problems, because (as reader Ninja passes along), ECAD and the six music licensing agencies that make up its members have been convicted of being an illegal cartel engaged in price fixing, and told to pay $38 million in fines. The fine is clear that they cannot use money collected for artists to pay this fine.

 

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The real breakthrough of Google Glass: controlling the internet of things | GigaOM Tech News

The real breakthrough of Google Glass: controlling the internet of things | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As the first apps start to come out for Google’s augmented reality glasses, we’re starting to see how viewing the world and consuming digital content could be transformed. You can capture photos and videos and send them to your friends with a simple gesture, or scan the New York Times headlines without moving a finger. But perhaps the real breakthrough app for Google Glass wouldn’t be about content consumption at all, but about control.

 

This week the folks at Engadget dug up a patent around Google Glass using wireless connectivity to control connected devices in your home. The glasses could use any number of wireless methods — from RFID, to infrared, to Bluetooth to QR codes — to identify a connected device that could be manipulated, and then, presumably, to manipulate it.

 

Picture arriving home from work, and the door of your house automatically unlocks to let you in as you walk up to it. Inside, your NPR app comes on the glasses screen and you can tune in or change the channel while you fiddle with turning on the connected sprinkler system for your lawn. Your Nest thermostat app then pops up on your Google Glass screen to let you know that you’ve been good this week and saved a lot of energy, but with a wink you override the conservation mode and crank up the heat.

 

The scenario isn’t as crazy as it sounds and all the basic technology is there. There are mobile apps that already do all of these things. Essentially you’d just be moving the control function from the cell phone touch screen and your fingertips to the screen in front of your eye and either a facial gesture or hand movement. All devices in the home that would benefit from having connectivity and control are getting it, and there will be a variety of remotes that will control them — why not one on your face?

 

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Stop Whining About Privacy, NYC's Mayor Bloomberg Says | Truthdig

Stop Whining About Privacy, NYC's Mayor Bloomberg Says | Truthdig | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

New York City's Mayor Michael Bloomberg thinks your concerns about privacy in a world of city- and drone-mounted surveillance cameras are unimportant. His advice to radio audiences Friday morning? “Get used to it!”

 

Bloomberg’s tough-guy, fatalistic attitude is well and fine for a man with $27 billion. He can buy all the privacy he wants. But you can’t. And he doesn’t care.

 

“You wait, in five years, the technology is getting better, ther’ll be cameras everyplace ... whether you like it or not,” Bloomberg said.

 

“The argument against using automation is just this craziness that ‘Oh, it’s Big Brother,’ ” he continued. “Get used to it!”

 

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How to Kick-Start Innovation with Free Data | Scientific American

How to Kick-Start Innovation with Free Data | Scientific American | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Government-funded projects have yielded a wealth of information, but much of this data has historically remained locked up in difficult-to-use form. To get this data to people who might start businesses with them, the Obama administration created the position of chief technology officer.

 

Todd Park, the nation’s current CTO, has plenty of innovation experience. In 1997, at the age of 24, he co-founded his first start-up, called Athenahealth, which provides online data management for physicians. After momentarily retiring to focus on his family he set up two other start-ups before joining the White House team four years ago.

 

At a media briefing in February he talked about getting government data into the hands of entrepreneurs to spark innovation and economic growth.

 

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A New Kind of Library | Metropolis Magazine

A New Kind of Library | Metropolis Magazine | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

What if you could create a network of libraries in Africa to feed communities with knowledge, creativity conduits, and revenue? David Dewane, a young architect with Gensler and a visiting assistant professor at Catholic University, is working with a diverse team—and a campaign through Kickstarter, the online funding platform—to make it real. (There are only 12 days left in the campaign.)

 

Dewane (who trained with Pliny Fisk III at the Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems in Austin) and his partners have conceived Librii as “a network of low-cost, digitally powered libraries deployed along the expanding fiber optic infrastructure in the developing world.” The idea is to bring digital and physical resources, managed by professional librarians, to emerging markets to that people in those communities can address their own educational, informational, and economic challenges.

 

“This is a new kind of library,” Dewane says. “It will be the first that will actively engage users as content creators, the first that will operate on a sustainable business model, and the first designed to maximize the potential of high-speed information exchange in developing markets.” The business model involves Librii paying the construction costs and content costs up front, after which revenue streams will shift operating costs to the users.

 

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Are social & digital media literacy the new financial literacy? | Dionne Kasian-Lew

Are social & digital media literacy the new financial literacy? | Dionne Kasian-Lew | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As stewards of their brands, leaders must have the right mix of technical and leadership skills.

 

Failures in corporate leadership however have shown this is not always the case with cases like Enron and WorldCom highlighting the need for specific technical skills.

 

These disasters have led to increased demand for governance and financial literacy at the uppermost leadership levels, rightly so.

 

So why aren’t we demanding the same of arguably the biggest game changer of all, technology?

 

While a lack of understanding of digital may not lead to fraud it could expose the organization to brand damage or loss of competitiveness with equally harsh results.

 

Putting aside its life-changing impacts on everything from the way we meet to the way we connect and collaborate, the figures alone tell a tale.

 

Gartner says worldwide total ICT spend will surpass $3.7 trillion by the end of this year.

 

That includes IT (hardware and software), digital (the content layer) and social (the way technology allows people to connect).

 

To date, around $34 billion has been spent on big data and $109 billion on cloud with predictions these will grow to $232 and $207 billion by 2016 respectively.

 

And this is just the start with the implications for staff and time management as yet unknown.

 

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Testing a new class of speedy computer | NDTV Gadgets

Testing a new class of speedy computer | NDTV Gadgets | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Our digital age is all about bits, those precise ones and zeros that are the stuff of modern computer code.

But a powerful new type of computer that is about to be commercially deployed by a major American military contractor is taking computing into the strange, subatomic realm of quantum mechanics. In that infinitesimal neighborhood, common sense logic no longer seems to apply. A one can be a one, or it can be a one and a zero and everything in between - all at the same time.

It sounds preposterous, particularly to those familiar with the yes/no world of conventional computing. But academic researchers and scientists at companies like Microsoft, I.B.M. and Hewlett-Packard have been working to develop quantum computers.

Now, Lockheed Martin - which bought an early version of such a computer from the Canadian company D-Wave Systems two years ago - is confident enough in the technology to upgrade it to commercial scale, becoming the first company to use quantum computing as part of its business.

Skeptics say that D-Wave has yet to prove to outside scientists that it has solved the myriad challenges involved in quantum computation.

But if it performs as Lockheed and D-Wave expect, the design could be used to supercharge even the most powerful systems, solving some science and business problems millions of times faster than can be done today.

 

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A Tale of Two Genachowskis | MIT Technology Review

A Tale of Two Genachowskis | MIT Technology Review | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
In Hong Kong, I’m told you can get 500 megabits-per-second Internet service for $25 a month.  In my Massachusetts neighborhood–which happens to be served by Verizon FIOS fiber service–getting one-tenth that speed will set you back $80 (plus taxes and fees).  And whereas in Hong Kong uploads are as fast as downloads, the Verizon service gives me half-speed on the uploads.

Today’s announcement by FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski that he intends to step down -– to what greener pasture, we don’t yet know – is a good moment to reflect on his impact on communications technology over the past four years.   Depending whom you ask, the United States is either at the cutting edge in broadband expansion and investment, or a laggard on the global stage.  Both are true.


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U.S. Senate vote promotes investment in broadband infrastructure for rural areas | Blandin on Broadband

According to Nebraska .TV…

 

"U.S. Senators Deb Fischer (R-Neb.) and Al Franken (D-Minn.) announced that, early this morning, the United States Senate approved a bipartisan amendment they introduced to promote investment in broadband infrastructure for rural areas. …"

 

“Access to reliable Internet is critical to growing our economy. People living in rural parts of Minnesota are just as entitled to high quality Internet as those living in our cities and towns. Passing my bipartisan amendment will prioritize the expansion of broadband connectivity in rural areas, something that I will continue to work toward until every Minnesotan has broadband access,” said Franken."

 

The amendment was offered by Senators Fischer and Franken to the Senate budget and was approved unanimously by voice vote.

 

It’s a good sign – but according to Bloomberg, it sounds as if it’s mostly just that – a sign…

 

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Jobs: Is telecommuting bad for business? | Asbury Park Press

Jobs: Is telecommuting bad for business? | Asbury Park Press | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It was another working day, and talent agent Bonnie Deroski had a choice to make.

 

Should she commute more than an hour to her company’s office in Manhattan? Or should she roll out of bed, plop down on her couch with her daughter’s Norwich terrier, Chloe, snugly on her lap, turn on the computer and get to work?

 

“It almost doesn’t make sense to go into the city anymore,” said Deroski, 51, of Tinton Falls.

 

Some workers, plugged in with technology, are skipping the commute altogether and working from home. They say it has made them more productive, helped them spend more time with their children and saved them hundreds of dollars a month in transportation and day care.

 

Telecommuting is an attractive solution to a harried work force struggling to cross off the items on their daily to-do lists. But it comes with hazards, too. Some employers see benefits in face-to-face collaboration. And some workers who telecommute say working at home can be isolating.

 

“The misnomer is it’s simple to telecommute and work from home,” said Mary Gatta, senior scholar at Wider Opportunities for Women, a Washington-based advocacy group. “It’s not as if you’re sitting at your home, working on your computer and all is well.”

 

Telecommuting has become water-cooler talk — at least for workers who still go to the office. Yahoo recently banned telecommuting, although it hasn’t explained why. And Best Buy followed suit, scaling back the practice.

 

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A Tale Of Two Studies: Can File Sharing Both Harm And Help Sales? | Techdirt

A Tale Of Two Studies: Can File Sharing Both Harm And Help Sales? | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In part one of this series, we looked at a study that suggested that file sharing (mainly via Megaupload) likely harmed the sale and rental of digital movies. In part two, we looked at a study that suggested that file sharing of music (across many sites) likely helped the sale of digital music.

 

So is one right and the other one wrong? Not necessarily. It's possible both are correct. Unlike some other studies we've seen, the methodologies used by both studies appear to be fundamentally sound, without any obvious problems.

 

As with just about any study, both studies correctly note that there is the possibility of unknown or unexplained variables impacting the data. However, both run through a series of tests to try to eliminate a number of possible outside variables, and both come out with results that suggest their initial arguments are robust.

So, let's try to look at why the two studies might both be right -- and what that might actually mean.

 

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USTelecom & Juniper Discuss LTE Backhaul | USTeleCom Blog

On Thursday, March 21st, USTelecom and Juniper Networks conducted a webinar titled: “Preparing for LTE Backhaul.”  Humair Raza & Srini Bangalore  from Juniper Networks discussed today’s wireless network trends, LTE network requirements and various network architectures that operators can deploy to meet the ever growing demand for bandwidth.

 

They also discussed how MPLS technologies can be used to solve many of the challenges that service providers face when backhauling LTE traffic to the core Internet over an IP network.

 

You can view this webinar in its entirety, here.

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Big Data: The Key to Economic Development? | Innovation Insights | Wired

Big Data: The Key to Economic Development? | Innovation Insights | Wired | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In recent years, we’ve seen an explosion in the amount of data generated by humanity. This data explosion is the direct consequence of significant advances in technology. Interestingly, the “Big Data” work currently being done has the potential to invert the classic relationship between data and technological advancement. If the Big Data boosters are to be believed, the recent explosion of data will in fact drive significant advances in technology.

 

According to this line of thinking, we can apply new approaches to old problems, approaches that are only possible now that data is so abundant. An oft-cited example is speech recognition. With so many people talking to Siri, Apple engineers have the raw material they need to finally deliver speech recognition technology that actually, um, recognizes speech. As with many claims about the wonders of technology, the promise of Big Data will likely take longer to realize than many of us would like. (If you’ve used Siri recently, I’m sure you’ll agree.)

 

But today I’d like to make a different claim, a claim that some might consider more outrageous than the claim that Siri will one day work. My claim is this: Big Data has the potential to accelerate economic development in parts of the world where development has been most elusive.

 

If you look at the rise of America’s industrial economy over the last few hundred years, it’s clear that economic development has been accompanied by – and aided by – the rise of institutions that provide data. Take, for example, credit agencies, which – love ‘em or hate ‘em – pioneered the collection of information on people and companies around the United States. These agencies, by giving companies a clear sense of who could be trusted with credit and who could not, gave companies the confidence they needed to do business with people and companies they’d never met. Without question, these data providers facilitated economic growth.

 

Over the last few decades, companies have increasingly looked to do business across borders, helping to drive economic growth around the world (see Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Mainland China, India). Companies doing business across borders have largely done so without the benefit of data, because our data-providing institutions have been focused on the domestic market. This has meant higher risk, but typically the rewards of expanding into big new markets or finding massive cost savings through low wage labor have more than compensated the risk-takers.

 

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IN: Indianapolis Power & Light to use Landis+Gyr smart grid network | Electric Light & Power

Landis+Gyr and Indianapolis Power & Light Co. (IPL) announced the two companies have reached agreement on an extension of their existing network management agreement for the utility's advanced metering network that has been in place since 1997.

 

As part of the agreement, Landis+Gyr will migrate the network to its advanced two-way Gridstream solution, allowing IPL to deploy the latest advanced meters and distribution devices for smart grid applications.

 

The Gridstream solution is a mesh network that connects advanced meters, distribution devices and home area networks as part of a smart grid. Once the new network is installed, IPL will have a scalable and future-ready platform that will support both currently deployed meters and new meters with two-way communications capabilities and advanced data functions.

 

Based in Indianapolis, IPL provides electric service to more than 470,000 consumers in the city and surrounding central Indiana communities.

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Microsoft Releases Details Of Law Enforcement Requests | Techdirt

Microsoft Releases Details Of Law Enforcement Requests | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Kudos to Microsoft for joining companies like Google and Twitter in releasing transparency reports about government/law enforcement requests for information. On Thursday, Microsoft released data on law enforcement requests from 2012. The report covers requests for pretty much all of Microsoft's key online services, including Hotmail/Outlook, SkyDrive, XBox Live, Office 365 and even Skype. Microsoft has actually gone a step further than others in some areas, such as separating out which law enforcement requests involved sharing "customer content" data (such as images or email subject lines) vs. those that shared "non-content" data (such as identifying information).

Because of this distinction, Microsoft points out how rarely it ends up giving law enforcement customer content, noting it happened in only 2.1% of cases (1,558 requests). Nearly all of those requests came from the US government. The only non-US requests that resulted in the sharing of customer content were 14 disclosures given to Brazil, Ireland, Canada and New Zealand.

 

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EneryoneOn - digital literacy programming at the library and beyond | Blandin on Broadband

EneryoneOn - digital literacy programming at the library and beyond | Blandin on Broadband | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

I’m on a listserv for librarians – the following message was posted there. I wanted to share it here (with permission) for two reasons. One, it’s a great program. Two, it’s a great reminder to get your librarian involved in digital literacy programming. We’ve been showing patrons how to use computers and the online card catalog since the old shelves went away about 20 years ago. People come to librarians for help. Librarians are trained on how to help with digital and information literacy!

 

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