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BroadbandUS TV Super WiFi Summit

BroadbandUS TV Super WiFi Summit | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

BroadbandUS TV teams up with CrossFire Media to bring you Hightlights from SuperWiFi Summit Miami 2012

 

Broadband US TV co-host and K&L Gates Partner Marty Stern was down at SuperWifi Summit in Miami, February 2 talking:

 

- the value of unlicensed spectrum with Mark Cooper of the Consumer Federation of America

 

- the incentive auction debate with Rick Whitt of Google, Harold Feld of Public Knowledge, and Hank Hulquist of AT&T

 

- the launch of the new White Spaces Alliance with Alliance Chairman Dr. Apurva Moday, and

 

- exciting new White Space technologies and some thoughts on jump starting secondary spectrum markets with Jim Carlson of Carlson Wireless and Darrin Mylet of Adaptrum.

 

Also featured:

 

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GigaOM: Forget consumers, gigabit networks are ready for business!

GigaOM: Forget consumers, gigabit networks are ready for business! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Consumer applications have driven the rapid take up of faster broadband services in the U.S. in the last decade as people downloaded iTunes songs and apps and watched streaming movies via Netflix. But as Google and others build gigabit networks to see what can be done with them, maybe it’s time to bring businesses back into the innovation cycle.

 

In Chattanooga, Tenn. the creation of a gigabit network has led to the formation of an incubator that wants to attract startups to the city this summer to play around with the nation’s first gigabit network. I spoke with Jack Studer, the managing partner at Lamp Post Group, which is the incubator hosting the contest, on what kinds of applications might drive people to get a gig.

 

Studer explained that while consumer applications were fun, the lack of other gigabit networks around the country made it a bit difficult to justify building a startup or business that needs a gigabit connection. Even if Studer has the bandwidth to receive a massively fat 3-D holographic image of me for a video conference, I couldn’t reciprocate on my 60 Mbps cable connection (that really delivers 30 Mbps) so building a consumer 3-D holographic web conferencing business is probably a long shot. Other similarly bandwidth-intensive ideas are also out … for now.

 

“Startups that require a gig — well, that business plan would suck. It’s like building up a business based on teleportation. It doesn’t exist yet,” said Studer.

 

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Expanding Broadband and Protecting Voice Service in Rural America | FCC.gov

Expanding Broadband and Protecting Voice Service in Rural America | FCC.gov | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Improving communications in rural America has always been a focus for the FCC, and the primary vehicle to achieve that goal has been the Universal Service Fund. Despite great strides in this arena, one area where rural America still lagged the rest of the country was access to broadband. Eighteen million Americans still have no high-speed Internet, and millions live, work, and travel in areas without mobile broadband coverage. To address this gap, we took on the massive, once-in-a-generation task of retooling our rural subsidy system, creating the Connect America Fund to finish the job of connecting rural America to broadband, while bringing accountability and fiscal responsibility to programs that for too long lacked both. We’re moving forward aggressively to implement these important changes.

 

Last Thursday, the Wireless and Wireline Bureaus began the process of implementing the Mobility Fund, which will allocate $300 million in support of the expansion of mobile broadband service into areas where it is not provided today. The Bureaus’ Public Notice announced that the Mobility Fund auction will take place September 27, 2012, and sought comment on various auctions-related issues. The Bureaus also released a preliminary list of the holes in current mobile broadband coverage that could be eligible for support from the Fund, along with a fully interactive map depicting those holes and providing demographic data. The Wireline Bureau also released on Monday a Public Notice to move forward the process of allocating an additional $300 million this year for extending new fixed broadband service to rural homes and businesses. These are examples of how we are pinpointing areas that lack broadband to make smart use of subsidies -- zeroing in on the rural communities that have been left behind, while ensuring continued availability of robust broadband in areas that already have it.

 

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Nebraska Public Service Commission Selects BroadMap for Data Collection & Mapping - DirectionsMag.com

The Nebraska Public Service Commission (NPSC), following a competitive bid process, announced that it has selected BroadMap, LLC, to collect, verify, report, and map the availability, speed, and location of broadband internet access across the State of Nebraska.

 

These efforts are part of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (NTIA) State Broadband Initiative (SBI), which is authorized and funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and the Broadband Data Improvement Act (BDIA). The goal of the program is to facilitate the integration of broadband and information technology into state and local economies.

 

“Access to high-speed internet is critical to the education, safety, health, and prosperity of all Nebraskans,” said NPSC Chairman Rod Johnson. “BroadMap’s experience and expertise in this field make them the ideal partner to support the NPSC’s ongoing efforts to understand where Nebraskans have broadband access to the Internet and where they do not.”

 

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Pay Attention to the Man Behind the Curtain: Listen to AT&T's CEO, not Lobbyists | community broadband networks

Pay Attention to the Man Behind the Curtain: Listen to AT&T's CEO, not Lobbyists | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T lobbyists in Georgia and South Carolina are arguing that local governments should not be allowed to build the networks that communities need, suggesting that the private sector is primed to make the necessary connections. But AT&T's CEO had a different message for investors a few weeks ago, in an earnings call on January 26:

The other is rural access lines; we have been apprehensive on moving, doing anything on rural access lines because the issue here is, do you have a broadband product for rural America?

 

"We’ve all been trying to find a broadband solution that was economically viable to get out to rural America, and we’re not finding one to be quite candid. The best opportunity we have is LTE."

 

Whoa! LTE is what you more commonly hear called 4G in mobile phone commercials. The best they can do is eventually build a wireless network that allows a user to transfer just 2GB/month. That is fine for hand-held devices but it does nothing to encourage economic development or allow residents to take advantage of remote education opportunities.

 

But even the CEO admits they are not bullish on LTE as the solution:

 

"[W]e’re looking at rural America and asking, what’s the broadband solution? We don’t have one right now."

 

Some may be wondering about "U-Verse" -- AT&T's super DSL that competes with cable in the wealthy neighborhoods of bigger cities. U-Verse cannot match the capacity or quality of modern cable networks but is better than older DSL technologies. But U-Verse is not coming to a rural community near you.

 

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GigaOM: An unexpected side effect of remote work: Denser communities

GigaOM: An unexpected side effect of remote work: Denser communities | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Will the rise of remote work mean we’re more spread out or more densely packed together? Obviously the latter, you could argue, pointing to the fact that logging in to work via the web allows colleagues to be spread from Abu Dhabi to Austin. But there is a case to be made that when the trend towards remote work is far enough along, the result will be denser communities of workers.

 

The Atlantic Cities explained this second point of view recently, noting data that points to a renewed and rising interest in downtown cores and trends towards more urban-style suburbs where residents live closer together and rely less on cars for transportation. Citing a post by Thomas Fisher, dean of the College of Design at the University of Minnesota, that appeared on the Huffington Post, the Atlantic piece argues that as telecommuting becomes more common these trends towards denser communities will accelerate.

 

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Ohio's Kasich touts education, broadband in speech - Huntington Herald Dispatch

Ohio's Kasich touts education, broadband in speech - Huntington Herald Dispatch | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Kasich announced a program that will use new technology to open up the state's broadband infrastructure. The Ohio Board of Regents said the state will invest about $10 million to connect areas around the state with the faster network connections.

 

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Is internet access now the world's most important resource?

Is internet access now the world's most important resource? | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Currently the internet accounts for 21 percent of economic growth in developed nations — that’s more than energy, mining, or agriculture.Given that, many americans are unaware there are over 100 million US households still lacking broadband internet access, and 46 percent of the “poorest households” are without access to a basica computer.

 

In comparison, only 4 percent of the world’s richest choose to NOT have a computer.

The data compiled by onlineitdegree.net establishes what is being dubbed asThe Digital Divide. The numbers show the FCC’s National Broadband Plan, still has a long way to go in providing fair and equal access to what might soon be considered one of the world’s most important resources.

 

Despite the incredible impact of the internet revolution and its ability to quickly become one of our most valuable and useful commodities, the U.S. still compares poorly to the rest of the world in providing internet access to its citizens.

 

Why does the US, where many of the world’s biggest technology companies reside, not even rank in the top 10 internet providing nations?

 

The least of our issues is the fact more than twice as many rural areas in the US are still using dial-up in comparison to urban areas, accounting for approximately 1 in 10 of all Americans in rural areas with no access to broadband at all. A bigger issue is how the US ranks among other nations for internet access (12th), and almost as important, broadband penetration (14th).

 

Perhaps one of the biggest reasons is the LACK of provider options. The FCC attributes the US’s ranking (15th according to some studies) to the fact 96% of Americans currently only have two or less options when it comes to selecting an internet provider. The lack of competition results in higher costs for the consumer, and arguably keeps the poor from having fair access to internet access. The FCC’s National Broadband Plan directly addresses this, but the numbers show there is still a massive divide.

 

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More Details About Paramount's Offer To Law Schools To Teach Them About The Evils Of 'Content Theft'

More Details About Paramount's Offer To Law Schools To Teach Them About The Evils Of 'Content Theft' | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

On Friday, we wrote about reports of Paramount Pictures sending overnight letters to a variety of universities, asking to come speak to their students about the whole SOPA/PIPA debate, and why they're all "content thieves," before asking for the students' thoughts on what Paramount should do. The whole thing seemed pretty sketchy. Either way, we've been getting more details on the letter, and have now seen three different copies of the letter -- with one copy (with identifying info redacted) embedded below. Separately, we've seen that the letters went to law schools -- and it appears that Paramount only chose to target some of the bigger name law schools. Basically, it looks like Paramount went through the top law school rankings and just sent the letter to an arbitrary number at the top. I'm curious what the reasoning is here. Why pick just law schools? And why just a few of the big names? And, if the real goal is to understand what happened with SOPA/PIPA... why target law schools at all? Those aren't the students who were heavily involved in all of this. It seems like a transparent attempt to try to convince the next generation of lawyers to come help them try to cripple the internet, rather than work towards advancing innovation.

 

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Free Press: Groups Ask FCC to Require Verizon, SpectrumCo and Cox Communications to Make Agreements Available | Free Press

On Tuesday, Free Press, the Media Access Project, Public Knowledge and the Greenlining Institute filed a letter with the Federal Communications Commission requesting that Verizon, SpectrumCo and Cox Communications make unredacted versions of their joint operating and marketing agreements in their spectrum deals available to parties in the proceeding. These agreements would still be subject to the strict confidentiality provisions of the protective orders, but would ensure commenters have an opportunity to present an informed analysis of the deals’ impact.

 

Free Press Political Adviser Joel Kelsey made the following statement:

 

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GigaOM: AT&T: We did fine at the Super Bowl, but give us more spectrum

GigaOM: AT&T: We did fine at the Super Bowl, but give us more spectrum | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T had quite the Super Bowl. At the game AT&T’s networks carried 215 GB of traffic, placed 74,204 phone calls and transmitted 722,296 SMS messages, according to its public policy blog. AT&T reported no problems in handling the traffic and had, in fact, been prepping for game day by adding permanent and temporary capacity. But in what is now becoming a common refrain, AT&T used the event to lobby regulators for more spectrum.

 

Here’s an excerpt from the post, written by AT&T VP Joan Marsh:

 

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RIAA Totally Out Of Touch: Lashes Out At Google, Wikipedia And Everyone Who Protested SOPA/PIPA | Techdirt

RIAA Totally Out Of Touch: Lashes Out At Google, Wikipedia And Everyone Who Protested SOPA/PIPA | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Remember all that talk of how the supporters of SOPA/PIPA were "humbled" by the protests of January 18th, and how they had learned their lessons about trying to push through a bill without actually involving the stakeholders? Remember the talk of how they hoped a new tone could be found in the debate? Yeah. Apparently someone forgot to send that memo to RIAA boss Cary Sherman, who has taken to the pages of the NY Times to lash out at those who fought against SOPA/PIPA, chalking the whole thing up to a massive "misinformation" campaign by Google and Wikipedia. The whole thing is chock full of ridiculous claims, so we might as well go through it bit by bit.

 

"THE digital tsunami that swept over the Capitol last month, forcing Congress to set aside legislation to combat the online piracy of American music, movies, books and other creative works, raised questions about how the democratic process functions in the digital age."

 

Why yes, it did raise questions about the process by which the RIAA and MPAA write bills to regulate other industries without even letting those the bill would regulate have a seat at the table. It also raised questions about the way the RIAA and MPAA have successfully expanded copyright law in their own favor sixteen times in the last 35 years, by playing the moral panic game over and over again... and keeping any hint of reality out of the debate. What it showed was that the tools of communication finally allow the public speak up and that the users of the internet simply won't accept the RIAA and MPAA's version of protectionism and crony capitalism any more. But somehow, I don't think that's what Sherman meant...

 

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Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee: 2012 State of the Net Conference

Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee: 2012 State of the Net Conference | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Attracting over 600 attendees annually, the State of the Net Conference provides unparalleled opportunities to network and engage on key policy issues. The State of the Net Conference is the largest information technology policy conference in the U.S. and the only one with over 50 percent Congressional staff and government policymakers in attendance. The State of the Net Conference is the only tech policy conference routinely recognized for its balanced blend of academics, consumer groups, industry and government.

 

The 8th annual State of the Net Conference will begin the 2012 State of the Net Conference Series in January, followed by the State of the Mobile Net Conference (Spring 2012) and the State of the Net West Conference (August 2012).

The 7th Annual State of the Net Conference featured in-depth discussions with leading Internet policy experts and panel tracks focusing on privacy/security, telecommunications regulation, intellectual property and innovation.

 

The conference was host to keynote speakers including Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn, Congressman Bob Goodlatte, Dr. Ed Amoroso, Chief Cybersecurity Officer with AT&T and Tony Melone, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Verizon to name a few. Video of the 2011 State of the Net panels/keynotes are available at the ICAC YouTube Channel and the C-Span Video Library. Audio MP3 Podcasts of the rest of the panels are available for free download from the Apple iTunes page.

 

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Meet Richard Mack, Republican challenger to SOPA's author

Meet Richard Mack, Republican challenger to SOPA's author | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Rep. Lamar Smith could pay a steep political price for authoring two bills, the Stop Online Piracy Act and an online surveillance measure, that have become loathed by millions of Internet users.

 

He's facing an unexpected primary challenge from an ex-lawman who believes Smith has little regard for the U.S. Constitution--and who plans to use those bills as a lever to pry his opponent out of a congressional seat he's occupied since 1987.

 

Richard Mack, an Arizona sheriff who retired to Fredericksburg, Texas, is a self-described "constitutional conservative" with a long history of supporting causes close to the hearts of Republican primary voters, including states' rights, individual rights, and Second Amendment rights.

 

Because Smith heads the House committee charged with writing copyright law, he's become Hollywood's favorite congressional Republican. The TV, movie, and music industries are the top donors to Smith's 2012 reelection committee, according to data complied by the Center for Responsive Politics, and Smith endorsed a 2002 proposal allowing Hollywood to hack into the PCs of Americans suspected of illicit file sharing.

 

Mack is hoping to convince Texas Hill Country voters that Smith is looking out for Hollywood rather than the interests of average Texans in the primary, which is tentatively scheduled for April 3, but is likely to be delayed because of an ongoing legal battle over redistricting. It will be a formidable task: Smith has $1.3 million in the bank to fund his reelection.

 

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KS: Gigabit Challenge prizes mostly skip Kansas City-area companies - Kansas City Business Journal

KS: Gigabit Challenge prizes mostly skip Kansas City-area companies - Kansas City Business Journal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The results of an entrepreneurship contest tied to Google Inc. Google Inc. Latest from The Business Journals Obama STEM education plan draws Google, Cal State, Bechtel foundationInterior Department attempts move to cloud for second timeGSA seeking small business tablet manufacturers Follow this company ’s planned ultra-fast broadband network in Kansas City and Kansas City, Kan., favored non-local companies, the Kansas City Business Journal reports.

 

Teams from New York and Chicago took home the top prizes — SEIN Analytics & Asset Management and Kauzu, respectively. However, the winner must have the ability to physically connect to the fiber to be able to take full advantage of the network.

 

“Yes, we were a bit disappointed that Kansas City companies did not win more of the awards,” organizer Herb Sih said. “... I think this means that Kansas City must continue to build out and support more local startups and entrepreneurs, and perhaps next time we will have more local companies participate with a better chance of winning.”

 

Still, the People’s Choice Award went to Grandview-based Paruzia Technologies, which resells IT and cloud services.

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Senate sneaks in SOPA under a new name — RT

Senate sneaks in SOPA under a new name — RT | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) launches a second round of attacks in an attempt to censor the Internet.

 

After trying to adopt Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA), both pieces of legislation turned out to be a disaster, causing outrage among Internet giants and ordinary users alike. Congress had to retreat. However it's determined to get what it wants this time.

 

After the shelving of SOPA and PIPA back in January Reid stated,“There is no reason that the legitimate issues raised by many about this bill cannot be resolved.”

 

As RT reported last month, Senator Reid added that lawmakers will“continue engaging with all stakeholders to forge a balance between protecting Americans’ intellectual property, and maintaining openness and innovation on the Internet.”

 

The vote on the anti-piracy legislation was postponed from its January 24date after Wikipedia and other popular websites went dark to protest the draft law.

 

Now the battle for online freedom continues.

 

The rebuttal to push Internet-regulating legislation has transformed into a new cybersecurity bill. The particulars of the latest attempt by senators to censor the Internet have not been disclosed to the public.

 

However some leaks suggest that the bill will grant the authority to crack down on the Internet to the executive branch of power, namely the White House. It looks highly possible taking into consideration that the legislation has to come out of the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee, chaired by Connecticut Independent Sen. Joe Lieberman.

 

The same Lieberman who earlier co-sponsored the so called Kill Switch bill that could allow the president of the United States to "declare a cybersecurity emergency," and practically shut down the Internet.

 

After outrage from Internet advocacy groups, Kill Switch never made it in the Senate. This time it may be back under a new name.

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Verizon and BT Make Video Conferences More Accessible to Businesses Across the Globe - MarketWatch

To meet the growing demand of businesses for video communications, BT and Verizon Enterprise Solutions are extending the range of their telepresence immersive-video offerings to enable virtual face-to-face collaboration in more locations around the world.

 

Under a new agreement, customers of Verizon and BT are now able to communicate with each other via Cisco TelePresence(TM). This new capability expands the community, helps clients collaborate globally and improves productivity.

 

Telepresence replicates face-to-face interactions so realistically that it feels as though everyone is in the same room -- even though they may be thousands of miles apart. By deploying telepresence to replace in-person meetings, professionals can meet "face-to-face" with co-workers, partners, suppliers and customers around the globe while reducing the travel time, costs and carbon emissions associated with business travel. Telepresence supports a wide range of business-to-business applications and vertical industries - ranging from joint product development to supply chain management to customer meetings.

 

Sandra O'Boyle, service director, business network and IT services, Current Analysis, said, "This initiative between BT and Verizon opens up new opportunities for enterprises to collaborate across their premium video platforms and will help multinational customers make the most of their Cisco TelePresence System investments."

 

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OH: Kasich's broadband plan would give Valley a boost - New Philadelphia Times Reporter

OH: Kasich's broadband plan would give Valley a boost - New Philadelphia Times Reporter | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Economic development in the Tuscarawas Valley could get a competitive boost through a statewide broadband initiative announced by Gov. John Kasich as part of his second State of the State address.

 

The speech Tuesday in Steubenville marked the first time the presentation has been made outside of Columbus.

 

Kasich announced a program that will use new technology to open up the state’s broadband infrastructure. The Ohio Board of Regents said the state will invest about $10 million to provide faster Internet connections statewide.

 

Gary Little, executive director of the Tuscarawas County Community Improvement Corp., said it would “make it possible for us to have the kind of capacity and speeds found on the East and West coasts and in major cities. It would give us the opportunity to compete with them for the research and development operations that we’ve been hoping” to attract locally, such as in the Tuscarawas Regional Technology Park in New Philadelphia.

 

In the past, companies contended that the broadband capacity they needed was unavailable in the region, he said.

 

“This will help us change that dynamic and become more competitive,” he said. “Then, the other factors, such as a lower cost of living and doing business than you would find in the urban areas, could help give us an advantage.

 

“The 100 gigabits (Gbps) per second is ‘the gold standard,’ the same capacity as in Japan and many European countries. I think that will help us a great deal.”

 

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We Don't Have A 'Wild West' Internet Now, But We Will If SOPA Or Similar Is Passed

We Don't Have A 'Wild West' Internet Now, But We Will If SOPA Or Similar Is Passed | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Nicolas Sarkozy, the President of France, has the sad distinction of being in the vanguard when it comes to really bad ideas concerning the Internet. On his initiative, France became the testing-ground for the three-strikes approach of throwing people off the Internet upon multiple accusations of copyright infringement, without the need for proof or a court order, known there as HADOPI. He also helped put into circulation a view that is much in vogue at the moment:

 

"Internet is a new frontier, a territory to conquer. But it cannot be a Wild West, a lawless place"

 

That's what he said in 2010, during a speech he gave in the Vatican. Since then, the "Wild West" Internet has become the standard justification for bringing in harsh new laws like SOPA and PIPA. After all, the argument goes, just as the Wild West had to be tamed in order to become civilized and productive, so must the Internet.

 

Of course, this overlooks the fact that the Internet is already subject to a whole host of laws in every country. Indeed, often it is subject to multiple jurisdictions because of its global reach and complicated legal position. But there's an even deeper sense in which the idea that the Internet is a Wild West that needs far-reaching laws like SOPA and PIPA imposed upon it is exactly wrong.

 

To see why, consider one of the key ideas of SOPA in the original version:

 

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Labor Department Projects Significant Contribution to Ten-Year Job Growth from Broadband and Info Tech

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) on February 1 released its ten-year Employment Projections for 2010-2020 Total public and private employment is expected to grow by 20.5 million jobs over ten years, from 143.0 million in 2010 to 163.5 million in 2020. This compares to a total decline in employment of 3 million from 2000 to 2010. Broadband and related information and communications technologies (ICT) are continuing to contribute to job growth. In fact, the underlying data reveal a significant contribution from industries and occupations driven by the deployment and adoption of broadband and ICT by businesses and consumers.

 

From an industry perspective, the Information Sector is projected to add a net of 140,000 jobs in the next ten years, compared to a decline of 920,000 over the last ten years. The Information Sector is the core of the broadband and ICT economy. It includes the following industries: Telecommunications; Data Processing, Hosting, and Related Services and Other Information Services; Broadcasting (except Internet); Software Publishing; Newspaper, Periodical, Book, and Directory Publishing; and Motion Picture, Video, and Sound Recording.

 

While BLS projects ten-year net job declines of 62,000 for Newspaper, Periodical, Book, and Directory Publishers and 25,000 for the Motion Picture, Video, and Sound Recording Industries, it projects net job increases for the rest of the Information Sector. The Telecommunications Industry, which includes wireline, wireless, cable, and other broadband service providers, is expected to add 74,000 jobs; Data Processing, Hosting, and Related Services and Other Information Services 31,000 jobs; Broadcasters (except Internet) 30,000; and Software Publishers 92,000. But the impact of broadband and technology deployment is not limited to the Information Sector. For example, in the Professional Service Sector, BLS projects the Computer Systems Design and Related Services industry – i.e., information technology and networking consultants – to add a net of 671,000 jobs in the next ten years. In the Manufacturing Sector, BLS projects the Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing Industry to continue its declines, but at a significantly slower pace: a loss of 157,000 jobs compared to the previous decade’s loss of 720,000.

 

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Who's Still Backing SOPA/PIPA... And Why?

Who's Still Backing SOPA/PIPA... And Why? | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

With all the talk about SOPA/PIPA it's worth noting that neither bill is really dead yet, and either one could come back at any time -- though you'd hope that Senator Leahy and Rep. Smith realize that they'd be crazy to just bring the bills back without being more open about the process. In the meantime, though, there's been lots of talk about all of the elected officials who dropped off as sponsors -- and they should be rightly commended. But what about the rest? Who is still sponsoring these bills, even though they're widely recognized as being toxic... and what are they thinking? Here's the list of the remaining SOPA sponsors, according to Govtrack:

 

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SD: BTOP Case Study Three: Mark Shlanta, CEO, SDN Communications

SD: BTOP Case Study Three: Mark Shlanta, CEO, SDN Communications | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As part of our BTOP series: Tales from the Front Lines, today we are highlighting South Dakota infrastructure grantee SDN Communications.

 

SDN Communications, a partnership of 27 independent telecom providers covering 80 percent of South Dakota, is using a Recovery Act grant to expand its 1,850-mile, 300-gigabit-per-second fiber-optic network by another 360 miles and add an additional 100 gigabits of bandwidth along high-capacity routes. The project will enable SDN to deliver broadband speeds of at least 10 megabits per second to 300 anchor institutions that will be added to the network, including schools, libraries, hospitals, clinics, public safety agencies, government buildings and National Guard facilities. It will also deliver faster connections to more than 220 anchor institutions already on the system.

 

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GigaOM: Supercomputer vet Cray wants to turn big data into fast data

GigaOM: Supercomputer vet Cray wants to turn big data into fast data | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It looks like Oracle has some competition when it comes to selling big iron for big data. On Wednesday, Cray, the Seattle-based company best known for building some of the world’s fastest supercomputers, said it’s getting into the big data game. A new division within Cray, called YarcData, will leverage Cray’s experience working within data-intensive environments for customers such as Boeing in order to woo large-enterprises with big data needs.

 

Cray was short on details in a press release announcing the new division, but new YarcData SVP and GM Arvind Parthasarathi, formerly of Informatica is quoted saying, “YarcData is the nexus of the world’s most advanced technologies from Cray being applied to solve the world’s most challenging Big Data problems.” The natural leap is that Cray will design parallel-processing systems capable of incredible data throughput — something already required in the supercomputing space, where incredible processing capacity would be wasted without a steady data stream — but that will support today’s popular big data tools (e.g., Hadoop, analytic databases and predictive analytics software).

 

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Blandin on Braodband: Broadband Mapping, USF, ICC, CAF from the Minnesota perspective (Notes from Energy, Utilities & Telecommunications Committee Jan 31)

I wasn’t able to attend last week – but I just listened to two presentations made to the Minnesota Energy, Utilities and Telecommunications Committee Jan 31 meeting. I thought I’d share my notes. The meeting was unabashedly policy-focused – but the legislators really wanted to know what policy at the federal level meant for them, for the state and for customers so in some ways this meeting was a good look at what polices mean at the ground level.

 

Connect MN mapping:

 

Bill Hoffman spoke on behalf of Connect Minnesota. (Special thanks to Bill for sharing his presentation!)

 

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Get Seniors Online: Can You Teach an “OId Dog” New Tricks?

Get Seniors Online: Can You Teach an “OId Dog” New Tricks? | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As a culture, we Americans tend to be of two minds when it comes to thinking about the intellectual capacity of seniors. On the one hand, the belief is that as we age, we do not have as great a capacity to learn new things…hence the adage that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks.”

 

On the other hand, many colleges have established educational programs for older adults, and mandatory retirement has been outlawed in numerous locales because many people, in fact, have come to realize that most of us operate at full intellectual capacity until the very end of our lives. Recent studies have lent evidence to this train of thought which supports the adage that “if you don’t use it you’ll lose it!”

 

Studies that compare brain function in adults who attended college and those who did not state, “We hesitate to say the brain is like a muscle. But using patterns of connectivity over and over and having those patterns prove useful to us in our life probably makes the synapses broader and the connections between neurons in these valuable and well-used systems stronger.” According to Jeff Victoroff, M.D., associate professor of clinical neurology at the Keck School and director of neurobehavior at Rancho Los Amigos, one study showed that cognitive challenge actually created new neurons in the adult rodent brain, “which means that the old idea that mammals have all the neurons in the brain when born is probably wrong,” he says.

 

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