Surfing the Broad...
Follow
Find
127.2K views | +15 today
Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Twitter Hands Over Info After Judge Makes It Almost Impossible For It Not To | Techdirt

Twitter Hands Over Info After Judge Makes It Almost Impossible For It Not To | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Earlier this week, we talked about a ridiculous situation in NY, where Judge Matthew Sciarrino Jr. put Twitter in a nearly impossible position if it wanted to keep fighting for the rights of its users to keep private info private.

 

As you may recall, the government used a non-warrant process to seek private info from Occupy Wall Street protestor Malcolm Harris' Twitter account. Earlier decisions had more or less said that Harris had no standing to block the transfer of info, and that Twitter had to hand it over. Twitter sought to appeal the ruling, but the judge announced that if Twitter didn't just hand over the info, he would charge them with contempt.

 

Even worse, he told Twitter to disclose its earning statements from the past two quarters (which is otherwise private info) so he could figure out how much to fine them for contempt. As the EFF notes, by ordering Twitter to hand over the info, it would almost certainly kill off the appeal, since the DA would immediately argue that the appeal was moot since it already had the info.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Fight for the Future: The Internet, Censorship, Surveillance, and You | PDX

Andrew McLaughlin of Betaworks presents: The Fight for the Future: The Internet, Censorship, Surveillance, and You.

 

How is Moore's Law and ever-cheaper computing and interconnectedness affecting our world? Activists, individuals, and governments are using digital technologies like social media as powerful forces for change.

 

From 2009-2011, Andrew McLaughlin was a member of President Obama's senior White House staff, serving as Deputy Chief Technology Officer of the United States. In that role, Andrew was responsible for advising the President on Internet, technology, and innovation policy, including open government, cybersecurity, online privacy and free speech, spectrum policy, federal R&D priorities, entrepreneurship, and the creation of open technology standards and platforms for health care, energy efficiency, and education.

 

Click headline to watch the YouTube video of his presentation

recorded at the Portland Digital eXperience (PDX) 2012 Workshop

--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Divide to Conquer: 3 LTE iPhones not 1 model for the world | Fast Net News

Divide to Conquer: 3 LTE iPhones not 1 model for the world | Fast Net News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Article retraction: I've learned that AT&T and Verizon are pressuring Apple to hardware lock the LTE iPhone to their networks. It's therefore incorrect to speak of "an" U.S. iPhone.

 

Most likely, there will be several, each effectively unable to be used on other LTE networks. LTE phones require SAW filters and other RF components for each different frequency band.

 

Based on engineering recommendations, I thought the U.S. LTE iPhone would cover 4 or 5 bands. While it's impractical to cover all 35 LTE bands in a small phone, small cheap components that cover 4 or 5 bands would cover most of U.S. LTE. It's cheaper to have a single model.


But I hear - unconfirmed - that the Big 2 want to make it impossible to, for example, use the phone you get from Verizon later on on T-Mobile or Sprint's network.


Unbreakable phones are obviously anti-competitive but I doubt JG will do anything about this. Rather than the 3 phones the original article expected, there will be more models locked to carriers by frequency.

 

A World iPhone? Fuggedaboutit. There will be separate versions for Asia, Europe & U.S.. Each will work as 3G iPhones while visiting other parts of the world. 3GPP defines 25 different frequency bands to fit the spectrum owned by carriers in different countries, with different bands chosen by each country/carrier.

 

A world iPhone would be a half-inch or more longer than a regional model. For each of 10-15 bands, the phone would require saw filters and other passives. It would be bigger, heavier and a battery hog.Neither Steve Jobs nor Tim Cook would accept that choice.

 

Verizon is using 700 MHz; Deutsche Telekom 800; AT&T 850; Sweden 900; Deutsche Telekom, France Telecom 1800, and TeliaSonera 2600. Much of the spectrum coming to the European market will be around 900 MHz. Japan uses 1500 MHz and 2300 MHz. The U.S. is looking at 1900 and others.

 

Click headline to read more--

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

U.S. Worst Broadband Quarter Ever | Fast Net News

AT&T negative, Verizon flat on price increases. U.S. 260K net adds were down nearly a third from the same quarter last year. AT&T lost nearly 100K broadband customers; U-Verse construction is nearly frozen and they are getting clobbered in the areas they haven't upgraded. FiOS fiber home added 134K customers but Verizon's DSL lost 132K. Overall, telcos lost ~70K subscribers according to Leichtman in the table below. Teresa Mastrangelo of Boadband Trends believes the smaller telcos have added enough customers, especially fiber home, that the actual telco total is plus 44k. Since most of these companies are private, they fall out of most estimates.

 

In Canada, DSL did better than cable. Telus, which has mostly upgraded, added 20K DSL customers while Shaw Cable actually went negative. Rogers cable only added 9K. This confirms the data from France and Britain, where upgraded and attractive DSL offers are handily beating cable. Virgin cable in the UK added only 4K customers while BT added 85K.

 

Click headline to read more and view chart--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Why the government needs to free up more spectrum for wireless companies | GigaOM Tech News

Why the government needs to free up more spectrum for wireless companies | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In my twenty-five years working with leading wireless technology, media and research companies, as well as serving as an official in the Clinton administration, I have seen first-hand the blistering speed with which U.S. consumers are adopting wireless technologies and the tremendous strain those 330 million wireless connections are placing on our finite spectrum supply. As the board chair of Mobile Future, a coalition of technology and communications companies and non-profit organizations that support investment and innovation in wireless, I can tell you that swift government action to identify and free up additional spectrum must be a national priority. Not only do we need additional spectrum to meet current consumer demand, and to ensure America’s future economic vitality, but we also must prepare for the onslaught of next generation wireless innovations.

 

One just needs to look at analyst predictions surrounding the release of the new iPhone5 to begin to grasp American consumers’ unquenchable thirst for wireless technologies. J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. just this week estimated sales of the new iPhone could add between a quarter and a half of a percentage point to the annualized rate of economic growth in the fourth quarter. And Time magazine last month published a must-read special issue focused on America’s mobile future. Thanks to our ever faster and more ubiquitous wireless broadband networks and the smartphones that use them, Time rightly concluded that when it comes to our demand for mobile connectivity, “only money comes close” to our “always at hand, don’t leave home without it” attitude. Then again, the magazine notes, our smartphones are quickly replacing money, too.

 

There are more than 330 million wireless connections in the U.S. and counting. And as we increase our reliance on mobile devices, applications and networks, we also require more of the technology backbone that supports that use — spectrum. However, the FCC, the White House, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA)and industry leaders all agree that not enough spectrum is in place to meet increasing consumer demand.

 

Why?

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

WI: Waukesha Builds High-Speed Broadband Network at a Fraction of the Cost | WiscNet Wire

WI: Waukesha Builds High-Speed Broadband Network at a Fraction of the Cost | WiscNet Wire | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Waukesha is the latest Wisconsin community to take part in a growing trend to improve Internet access. “Community Area Networks” have brought high-speed Internet access to communities across the nation and last month the Waukesha Community Area Network put the finishing touches on a 1 Gigabit Internet connection.

 

Community Area Networks (CANs) are high-speed broadband networks for community organizations. CANs provide the network infrastructure that connects schools, libraries, healthcare facilities, educational institutions and governmental organizations within a community. These networks promote innovation, competition and economic viability through advanced fiber connections that provide fast, uncongested network access. CANs are owned and operated by the pooled technical staff within the various institutions, keeping costs down and allowing the freedom to grow and innovate.

 

The Waukesha CAN, dubbed “WECAN”, currently connects Carroll University, Waukesha County Technical College (WCTC), Waukesha Public Schools and the City of Waukesha to one another and to the Internet.

 

On August 30th, WECAN finished work on a new fiber-optic connection giving each organization a 1 Gigabit connection to the Internet. Steve Schlomann, Chief Information Officer for the School District of Waukesha, compares this upgrade to “opening a 10 lane freeway where we once had a single lane road.”

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

iPhone 5 NFC Feature Still Just A Dream: Why Did Apple Snub Emerging Mobile Payments Standard | Huffington Post

iPhone 5 NFC Feature Still Just A Dream: Why Did Apple Snub Emerging Mobile Payments Standard | Huffington Post | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

EBay Inc Chief Executive John Donahoe often quotes a merchant saying NFC stands for "Not For Commerce" - and dismisses the prospects of Near Field Communication technology used to turn cellphones into mobile wallets.

 

He got some support this week from Apple Inc, which did not embed NFC chips into the iPhone 5.

 

NFC proponents had hoped Apple would endorse the technology, which passes encrypted data between devices at close range without contact. So instead of swiping a credit card, shoppers can simply wave their phones at a checkout terminal to pay for their goods.

 

The technology is backed by the largest U.S. carriers and credit card companies, but has failed to take off in America because merchants have been reluctant to spend money to upgrade their checkout terminals until NFC is more widely adopted.

 

"Anyone hoping NFC would be a reality soon is disappointed," said Sanjay Sakhrani, an analyst at Keefe, Bruyette & Woods. "Many in the industry were hoping inclusion in the iPhone would be a springboard for more adoption. This takes the impetus away."

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Level 3 brings Vyvx broadcast services to Latin America - FierceTelecom

Level 3 brings Vyvx broadcast services to Latin America - FierceTelecom | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Level 3 Communications on Thursday said it is expanding its Vyvx broadcast solutions into the Latin American market, targeting new broadcast and media customer opportunities.

 

The service provider said that it has signed agreements to transmit more than 35,000 hours of video over its network in Latin America.

 

The Vyvx service, delivered over Level 3's IP fiber network, will provide in-region video content to broadcasters and media companies in Latin America and other regions.

 

Thus far, the service provider has made inroads with a number of major Latin America-based broadcast companies, including ESPN Brazil, Terra (a global digital media company and content producer) and TV Azteca, one of the largest producers of Spanish-language television programming.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Will ACTA Ever Be A Real Treaty? | Techdirt

Will ACTA Ever Be A Real Treaty? | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

With the EU Parliament rejecting ACTA over the summer, and the Japanese legislature doing a drive-by ratification, there are some legitimate questions as to whether or not ACTA will ever become a real, valid international treaty.

 

Without the EU's support, it's a hell of a lot less likely, certainly. I'd been joking that it was beginning to look like it's going to become an agreement between the US... and Morocco, but the actual process to make ACTA official requires six participants to have "ratified" it.

 

While a bunch of countries have signed, that's still a step short of ratification. And, to date, only Japan has done so (though there are arguments over whether or not the US needs Congressional approval for ratification). Monika Ermert, over at IP-Watch, details the current situation. Here's a snippet:

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

West Va. broadband council's grant fails to attract applicants | FierceTelecom

West Va. broadband council's grant fails to attract applicants | FierceTelecom | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

West Virginia's Broadband Deployment Council on Thursday said that while it has $4 million in funds to distribute to telecom service providers and other nonprofit groups to use, it has not been able to attract any interest.

 

Anyone interested in using the money has until the close of business Friday to apply for grants to extend broadband services into the rural segments of the state.

 

As of the end of Wednesday, the council said it had not received one application.

 

"We have no applications officially submitted," said Jan Fox, a broadband council member, in a Charleston Gazette article. "Nobody's going to go early."

 

The council did say that 11 organizations began filling out applications and 36 groups registered at the council's website, www.broadbandgrants.wv.gov.

 

When the deadline expires on Friday, the council said that while it would reveal applicant names and proposed projects on the West Virginia secretary of state's website, it would not say how much money each applicant was requesting.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Video is a tough business for small telcos and cable companies | Blandin on Broadband

Thanks to Ann Higgins for sending me a couple of articles on small broadband providers. It’s interesting to see the impact of video on business. And it’s interesting to see shared problems between small telecommunications companies and cable companies. A sign of how similar the providers are – despite different modes of delivering services.

 

According to Telecompetitor…

 

'The nation’s smallest telephone companies saw their operating margins increase by 5.3% in 2011 to an average of 10.3%, reversing a downward trend they experienced in 2009 and 2010, according to a comprehensive financial study of the small telco industry completed recently by the Telergee Alliance. …'

 

'On the non-regulated side, small telco operating margins increased 13% after increasing 4.9% the previous year. On the regulated side, operating margins were up 1.3% after dropping 15.4% the previous year. The reversal on the regulated side was particularly surprising considering that telcos continued to see declines in voice lines, which decreased an average of 3.7% and in inter-carrier compensation (ICC), where minutes declined an average of 8.9% on the interstate side and 12.1% on the intrastate side. …'

 

Cost saving measures and better predicting of usage/budget seem to be key for improving margins on the regulated and non-regulated sides.

 

It does seem that video remains a tough nut to crack…

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Demanding A Student's Facebook Password A Violation Of First Amendment Rights, Judge Says | Techdirt

Demanding A Student's Facebook Password A Violation Of First Amendment Rights, Judge Says | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

For some strange reason, a large number of schools adhere to the notion that their students are not actually citizens of the United States and therefore, not granted the same rights as the "grownups." The rationale for the limitation of these rights usually involves the word "safety," a word that has been (ab)used in various forms to curtail rights of full-grown American citizens in other arenas.

 

This isn't to say that all, or even most, schools are violating students' rights, but the sheer number of incidents reported isn't very comforting. Fortunately, some decisions are being handed down that should, if nothing else, provide precedent for those challenging administrative overreach.

 

On September 6, a decision was handed down in a suit brought against the Minnewaska Area School District (Minnesota), dealing with a twelve year old student who was coerced into giving school officials the password to her Facebook account so they could search it for messages they deemed inappropriate.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Buyers in impulse mode as last ‘tax-free’ shopping day for Californians on Amazon looms | Wash Post

Buyers in impulse mode as last ‘tax-free’ shopping day for Californians on Amazon looms | Wash Post | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Online retailer Amazon.com has tried to become all things to all consumers, but in California, it is about to take on a role it has fought against for years: tax collector.

 

The change, which takes effect this weekend, comes after years of bitter back and forth between the world’s largest online mall and the California Legislature over whether Internet retailers should have to charge sales tax. The two sides reached a deal in 2011 that included a one-year grace period set to end Saturday.

 

The deadline has spurred at least some consumers into impulse-buying mode, making big-ticket purchases and stocking up on essentials before the tax collection kicks in.

 

“Even the mailroom is laughing at me,” said Derek Daniels, 37, who has had Amazon packages delivered to his Los Angeles office every day this week. He’s loading up on household supplies like trash bags and collecting birthday and Christmas presents for his Superman-loving 2 year-old.

 

“We are hoping he won’t fall in love with Batman by the time November rolls around,” Daniels said.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

UK: Move to improve broadband services | Ellon Times

Within the UK, rural Scotland’s broadband services are among the poorest and in Aberdeenshire, 17% of all addresses (19,374 premises) widely dispersed across more than 2,000 different postcodes, have a slow internet connection.

 

This is insufficient to undertake many essential applications such as remote working, tele-health and video streaming.

 

It is recognised that access to high speed broadband is essential to support a robust local economy and deliver educational benefits, as well as offering important social interactions particularly in remote and rural areas.

 

The Scottish Government has begun a procurement programme to deliver upgraded infrastructure capable of delivering much-improved broadband speeds to 75% of premises by the end of 2015.

 

Aberdeenshire Council recognises that the provision of a broadband service of at least 2Mbits to all premises should be a priority and will focus its resources in this area.

 

In addition, the council is keen to invest £2 million alongside Aberdeen City Council to implement an open access fibre optic cable around the western boundary of Aberdeen with a loop around Westhill. This will provide world class ultrafast services to the area and provide a significant economic advantage to businesses.

 

The aim is to ensure that telecommunications infrastructure in Aberdeenshire is genuinely world class that will, in turn drive economic growth and social wellbeing.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Hackanooga happening this weekend | Nooga.com

Hackanooga happening this weekend | Nooga.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Hackanooga—a 48-hour hack-a-thon—kicked off Friday and goes through Sunday, when participants will demonstrate the applications they created during the weekend.

 

The event is presented by US Ignite and Mozilla and sponsored by EPB, Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce, the National Science Foundation, CO.LAB, Lamp Post Group and Easy Designs.

 

The 48-hour event will connect experienced Web developers to Chattanooga’s unique 1-gigabit-per-second Internet speed, officials said in a news release.

 

“We are very excited to work with the Chattanooga community—experimenting, hacking and tinkering on the city's leading-edge gigabit network,” Ben Moskowitz, media program officer for Mozilla, said in a prepared statement. “We're proud to be part of the effort to create new, public benefit applications with transformative potential. The work we do here will hopefully provide roadmaps and building blocks for those future apps.”

 

Hackanooga attracted 80 hackers from across the world. They will create teams and use the gig to make apps, which require high bandwidth or use a large amount of data.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Google, Reaching 89%, Dodges Discrimination Charge in Kansas City | Fast Net News

Google, Reaching 89%, Dodges Discrimination Charge in Kansas City | Fast Net News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Bodies on the street get $10 deposits. Early maps of Google's "fiberhoods" in Kansas City were ugly. Affluent, mostly white areas on the west side (green in the map) were scheduled. Poorer, mostly black, neighborhoods on the east side (yellow) were not likely to be covered.

 

Scott Canon at the Kansas City Star reported “many neighborhoods — chiefly the least prosperous pockets of the metro area — remain far behind the pace needed to hit the Google-established thresholds of customer penetration.” Google had offered a generous deal for the poor: $25/month for the first year for a gigabit to cover some of the install costs, then nothing for the next six years. Despite that, few of the east side neighborhoods reached minimum signup levels.

 

Google adjusted the levels, reducing them in areas with vacant homes. They did major press outreach, aided by almost every local politician. Most important, they put both paid staff and local volunteers out in the neighborhoods. They went to almost every community group meeting and even went door to door.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

DSL Tsunami Rolling Over Europe (First Look) | Fast Net News

DSL Tsunami Rolling Over Europe (First Look) | Fast Net News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

20M lines at Deutsche Telekom and French approval confirm an almost unbelievably rapid switch. Fiber home across Europe is not the future; 80%, maybe 90% of new lines constructed will be vectored VDSL. Telecom Austria and Belgacom have already begun and their field results are convincing almost every European telco to go with vectored VDSL.

 

$300/line costs (5-6 billion euros for 20 million lines) were determined by DT’s engineers. Top management threw out five years of plans for fiber and brutally won regulatory concessions because they believe full fiber would cost upwards of 40B. In France, France Telecom and Iliad/Free will continue fiber in the major cities but regulator Jean-Ludovic Silicani has accepted vectored VDSL for other areas.

 

KPN has already switched plans and Telia, Telecom Italia, and Telefonica are looking closely. Poland is controlled by France Telecom and most of East Europe by DT, so likely to follow. British Telecom is following closely, trying to cut a deal with competitors and get this through the regulator.

 

The 10+ megabit upstream is also a key selling point. Most of us except heavy downloaders rarely would use 50 megabits or even 20 meg down. But we’ve all been frustrated by the typical 1 meg uploads.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

LEAKED! Here's The White House's Draft Cybersecurity Executive Order | Techdirt

LEAKED! Here's The White House's Draft Cybersecurity Executive Order | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Earlier this week, we wrote about how the White House was working on an executive order to act as a "stand in" for cybersecurity legislation that has so far failed to pass Congress (CISPA passed in the House, but a different effort, the Cybersecurity Act, failed in the Senate, and it would have been difficult to get the two houses aligned anyway).

 

Last weekend Jason Miller from Federal News Radio wrote about a draft he saw... but failed to share the actual draft. We got our hands on a draft (and confirmed what it was with multiple sources) and wanted to share it, as these kinds of things deserve public scrutiny and discussion. It's embedded below.

 

As expected, it does have elements of the Lieberman/Collins bill (to the extent that the White House actually can do things without legislation). It's also incredibly vague. The specific requirements for government agencies are left wide open to interpretation. For example, the State Dept. should engage other governments about protecting infrastructure. Well, duh. As expected, most stuff focuses on Homeland Security and its responsibilities to investigate a variety of different cybersecurity issues -- but, again, it's left pretty vague.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

UK: Nesta's PLAN I : The Case for Innovation-led Growth | Broadband Policy Watch

UK: Nesta's PLAN I : The Case for Innovation-led Growth | Broadband Policy Watch | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Earlier this week, Nesta, the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts, published PLAN I: the case for innovation–led growth. From the related press release:


"Plan I outlines how all sectors in the UK - public, private, third sector and higher education - have a critical role to play in restoring economic growth. With no additional public spending requirements, Plan I makes recommendations that will quadruple the government's discretionary investment in innovation, give the UK the most cutting-edge technological infrastructure in Europe and tear down barriers that discourage businesses from investing."

 

Further investment in broadband infrastructure is one of the plan's key recommendations. From the executive summary:

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

ITC hands Apple initial victory in Samsung’s patent suit | Wash Post

ITC hands Apple initial victory in Samsung’s patent suit | Wash Post | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The U.S. International Trade Commission in an initial finding Friday said Apple’s iPhones, iPods and iPads don’t violate Samsung’s patents, handing the mega tech firm another victory in a contentious patent war between the world’s biggest handset makers.

 

The decision was preliminary and must be voted on by the whole commission. But it set Samsung back another step as the ITC both defended and fired its own shots at Apple.

 

ITC Judge James Gildea disagreed with Samsung’s allegations that Apple violated four of its patents being used in the iPhone, iPod and iPad. The ITC handles global patent disputes and has the ability to block imports of infringing products.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Sprint Contract Results Demonstrate Competition for High-Capacity Services | USTelecom Blog

A recent filing at the FCC indicates that the vast majority of Sprint’s recent purchases of backhaul for its wireless network are from competitive providers, rather than the large incumbent telcos. This fact runs counter to its long-standing claims that it has no choice for such services other than special access services purchased from AT&T and Verizon.

 

Verizon supplied the commission with data it learned from studying bids that Sprint awarded as part of the company’s network modernization plan launched in December 2010. Sprint is rapidly moving away from TDM-based services to next-generation higher-capacity services which are necessary to support 3G and 4G wireless broadband services. The company issued a request for bids to provide high-capacity backhaul to approximately 38,000 wireless sites across the United States.

 

Using longitude and latitude measurements, Verizon determined that Sprint awarded Verizon backhaul business in less than 6 percent of the sites within its incumbent local exchange carrier (ILEC) footprint. “While Verizon has no direct information about what Sprint did with the contracts and sites that Verizon did not win, public reports indicate that” Sprint has nearly finished the contracts and Verizon is not a significant vendor, the filing said. Other public reports indicate that all of the major cable companies were awarded part of the contract to provide Ethernet services to Sprint.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

USDA invests in smart grid infrastructure | Hydrogen Fuel News

USDA invests in smart grid infrastructure | Hydrogen Fuel News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has announced that it has reached its $250 million goal of improving the rural smart grids of the country. The agency has been keen to improve these grids for some time, hoping to better prepare them for the adoption of alternative energy systems.

 

USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack claims that taxpayers will see minimal cost in maintaining the smart grid infrastructure due to the fact that the agency was able to reach its financial goals.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

New Ways of Thinking about Broadband Competition | USTelecom Blog

Regulators need to broaden their horizons when evaluating competition in broadband markets, panelists said at a USTelecom Breakfast Briefing today featuring policy experts Jonathan Sallet and Jeffrey Eisenach. In a discussion moderated by Robert Atkinson, president of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, Sallet and Eisenach called for new ways of thinking about competition among Internet-reliant companies that transitions away from the silos created in outdated telecom laws.

 

Click headline to read more and view the webcast of this event--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Exclusive: Some Comcast Users Will See 500 GB Cap - Company to Scale Cap Size With Tier Speed | DSLReports.com

Exclusive: Some Comcast Users Will See 500 GB Cap - Company to Scale Cap Size With Tier Speed | DSLReports.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It appears that Comcast is tinkering with the idea of offering higher caps with higher tiers of service, and will again shake up their speed options sometime in the next year for the majority of users. A reliable source tells Broadband Reports that it does appear that Comcast is going to go forward with the model they're currently testing in Nashville, which implements a 300 GB cap with users paying $10 per each additional 50 GB in overages. In the ongoing trial, customers were given a "grace period" wherein they were only being charged after they crossed the cap three previous times in one month.

 

Interestingly, our source claims that when Comcast proceeds with the deployment of this new cap system nationally, faster speed tiers will see higher caps. For example, users on the company's "Performance" tier (currently 15 Mbps down, 2 Mbps up) will see a cap of 300 GB. Users on the company's "Blast" tier (currently 25 Mbps down 4 Mbps up) will see a higher 500 GB cap.

 

Our source did not know what caps would be implemented on the company's faster 50, 105 or upcoming 305 Mbps usage tiers, or if Comcast is considering having no cap at all on their fastest tier. Generally, Comcast uses these caps as a way to differentiate between residential and business class services, and, like with other ISPs, to help protect TV revenues from Internet video.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Verizon's Shammo: We'll continue to migrate problem copper customers to FiOS | FierceTelecom

Verizon's Shammo: We'll continue to migrate problem copper customers to FiOS | FierceTelecom | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Fran Shammo, CFO and VP of Verizon (NYSE: VZ), said that if customers want their FiOS Fiber to the Premises (FTTP), they should pay a premium.

 

Looking to up the revenue gain it gets from FiOS, the service provider increased prices on its FiOS service in the second quarter, a trend that Shammo reiterated will continue into the third quarter.

 

"On the revenue side of the house, we really concentrated this year on getting our price points equivalent to where the rest of the market was," he said. "We were actually underpriced with a superior product to cable so the concerted effort was to do some price ups that will continue into to the third quarter."

 

Beginning in the first quarter, the price increase effort has begun to pay off in terms of increasing FiOS profitability in the second quarter. Verizon reported that it had a 2.5 percent mass market revenue increase during Q2.

 

One of the other notable changes with FiOS in the recent quarter was that it had a significant speed increase on a number of its key data tiers and introduced a new 300 Mbps tier.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.