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Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
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Google seeks to distance itself from $1B Apple patent verdict | Apple CNET News

Google seeks to distance itself from $1B Apple patent verdict  | Apple CNET News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Some two days after Apple's lopsided patent victory over Samsung, the Korean electronics giant's pseudo silent partner is breaking its silence.

 

Google, which provides the Android operating system that Samsung devices use, issued a statement this evening that sought to distance itself from the case, saying that most of the patents in question "don't relate to the core Android operating system."

 

The statement, provided to The Verge, also points out that an appeals court will review the verdict and that the U.S. Patent Office is re-examining "several" of the patents in the case:

 

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Gig City to host Hackanooga, tech development event | Nooga.com

Gig City to host Hackanooga, tech development event | Nooga.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In the next step in the quest to develop innovative uses for Chattanooga's high-speed Internet, local and national leaders have invited computer whizzes from across the country to the Gig City for a 48-hour hack-a-thon called Hackanooga.

 

"This particular event is for people that have hardcore tech development and coding skills," J. Ed. Marston, vice president of marketing and communication for the Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce, said. "Certainly we will be communicating with the broader public, but the people that are going to participate need to have those technical skills."

 

Mozilla, a nonprofit that coordinates hacker events around the nation, has partnered with the local chamber and other organizations to facilitate the September event.

 

Leaders with Mozilla are reaching out to experts in the field from their network, and local leaders are engaging the Chattanooga-area community, Marston said.

 

Those selected will gather in Chattanooga on Sept. 14-16 for a 48-hour event, where they will build applications and technical solutions that can solve large-scale challenges or benefit the community.

 

"This is focused on coding and applications, and these are community-benefit applications," Marston said. "It's not meant to be [business ideas] per se."

 

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Apple’s patent victory spells changes in smartphones for consumers | Wash Post

Apple’s patent victory spells changes in smartphones for consumers | Wash Post | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Apple’s big court victory against Samsung on Friday is expected to trickle down to consumers, affecting the creation of future mobile technology and potentially raising prices for devices, analysts and patent experts say.

 

A jury’s decision to award Apple $1.05 billion after finding Samsung violated six patents will make rivals think twice about smartphones and tablets that too closely resemble Apple products.

 

That could mean delays and hardship for Apple rivals as they scramble to change their roadmaps for products that may be too similar to the iPhone or iPad. They will be forced to create software workarounds to avoid legal pushback from Apple, experts say.

 

The nine-member jury in the U.S. District Court in San Jose agreed that Samsung violated three key touchscreen patents that have become commonplace in smartphones, such as one that allows users to tap on images and making them bigger and another to pinch an image and enlarge it.

 

And the legal tussle among rivals is far from over. Samsung, which has vowed to fight the jury decision, faces a separate but perhaps even more daunting hearing scheduled to begin Sept. 20 that could ban Samsung devices with infringing technology from U.S. sales.

 

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FCC suspends flexible pricing on coveted broadband lines | Reuters

Regulators have temporarily suspended pricing flexibility rules for high-capacity broadband lines, raising hopes for companies that say Verizon Communications Inc and AT&T Inc have overcharged them billions of dollars for access to the lines in recent years.

 

High-capacity, "special access" lines securely send large quantities of data to networks every time you send an email, withdraw money from an ATM, make a wireless call or even swipe a credit card. Though widely used, ownership of the lines lies largely in the hands of just a few large telephone companies, prompting 1999 rules from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission that regulate the price charged for using the lines.

 

The agency said its mechanism for gauging competition to grant petitions for pricing flexibility in the special access market is inaccurate, and it would not consider future petitions until more data is available to remedy the flawed system.

 

The decision comes after years of complaints from telecommunications companies that rent private, special access lines for services such as connecting their wireless broadcast towers to the Internet. Special access lines are also used by hospitals, government agencies as well as corporations.

 

"This action will at least prevent these continually rising, now exorbitant prices, from rising even further while the Commission evaluates this market failure," said Maura Corbett, executive director of the NoChokePoints coalition, which represents entities that rely on special access lines, including Sprint Nextel Corp, Clearwire Corp and US Cellular Corp.

 

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Involta Data Center Grand Opening in Duluth, MN | Blandin on Broadband

In May we wrote a bit about Involta and the potential economic impact it might have on Duluth. Well, Involta is planning the grand opening of their Duluth location next month.

 

Please join us in celebrating the grand opening of Involta’s world-class data center. This $11.5 million, 26,000 square foot, environmentally-friendly, fully-secure, fully-redundant world-class data center houses critical computer systems for businesses and public institutions creating quality jobs and driving new investments in Duluth and surrounding regions.

 

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Romney digital director: User engagement on social media trumps quantity of followers | The Hill's Hillicon Valley

Romney digital director: User engagement on social media trumps quantity of followers | The Hill's Hillicon Valley | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The success of a campaign's social-media effort should be measured by user engagement with its digital content rather than the number of followers a candidate has, the digital director of Mitt Romney's presidential campaign argued on Monday.

 

Zac Moffatt, who heads up the digital shop for the Romney campaign, credited user engagement on social-media platforms like Facebook and Twitter with helping push President Obama's "you didn't build that" line to the forefront of the national political conversation. Moffatt said Obama made the remark on a Friday, but it didn't get much attention until the following Monday.

 

"Social allows things to reignite and some things to come to the forefront," Moffatt said during a panel hosted by National Journal and The Atlantic at the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Tampa, Fla.

 

Moffatt took issue with the findings of a recent study published by the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism that said Obama's reelection team was leading the Romney campaign in social-media activity. He argued that measuring how many people are talking or sharing a campaign's digital content with their friends on social media is a more accurate metric than the number of followers a candidate has or the quantity of digital content a campaign publishes.

 

Representatives from Facebook, Twitter and Google also echoed that message.

 

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German consumer group: Facebook App Center violates German law | Ars Technica

German consumer group: Facebook App Center violates German law | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A major German consumer watchdog umbrella organization, the Federation of German Consumer Organizations, has alleged that Facebook’s new app center violates German law. Now the group is demanding that the company make changes.

 

The new Facebook App Center was released in July 2012. The consumer organization, known by its German acronym, VZBV, said that it shares user data with the apps, and doesn't adequately receive user consent. If the site is not fixed by September 4, VZBV says it may pursue legal action.

 

“[Sending] such comprehensive data to third parties [is allowed,] but their use is only allowed under German law with the conscious and informed consent of a user—in the opinion of the VZVB, a clear violation of the Telemedia Act,” the group wrote (Google Translate) in a German-language statement on its website on Monday.

 

In an e-mail sent to Ars, a spokesperson for Facebook said the company had no comment.

 

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AT&T, have you no shame? | Ars Technica

AT&T, have you no shame? | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Bob Quinn, one of the top AT&T lobbyists ("Senior Vice President-Federal Regulatory") in a company famous for lobbyists, must have drawn the short straw at the office staff meeting this week, because he got a truly unenviable job. Quinn's task was to explain to the world how AT&T's plan to keep blocking FaceTime video chats on some data plans but to unblock it on others was a good thing for customers, how AT&T was in "a learning mode," and—most importantly—why the decision was absolutely, completely legal despite what the unwashed peasants in "public advocacy" work would have you believe.

 

So Quinn walked down the hall to the closet next to the photocopier and pulled out something reserved for just such an occasion: the company's sole suit of adamantine armor, fortified against flame attacks by a special concoction distilled from the rage of 10,000 Internet commenters. (We are, admittedly, hypothesizing a bit at this point.) Bold Sir Quinn donned the suit and sallied forth to his desk, where he sharpened his quill pen and churned out a corporate blog post on "enabling" FaceTime for AT&T users.

 

In it, Quinn pointed out that AT&T's serfs customers could continue to use FaceTime over WiFi. With iOS 6, they can soon use FaceTime over the cell network, too, but only with certain data plans. On other plans, FaceTime wouldn't work. The restrictions apply only to FaceTime, however; Quinn even suggests that aggrieved users go out and download any other video chat app from the App Store—and they can run it on any data plan without problems.

 

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The FCC Scores a Hat Trick of Errors on Internet Regulation | Forbes

The FCC Scores a Hat Trick of Errors on Internet Regulation | Forbes | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

With Congress in recess and Washington largely abandoned last week, the FCC issued three major orders. Comprising some four hundred pages of dense text, the rulings addressed widely different topics: reporting the progress of broadband deployment by private networks, price regulation over middle mile Internet (what the agency calls “special access”), and the proposed sale to Verizon of wireless spectrum currently being warehoused by a consortium of cable companies.

 

The timing was no coincidence. In its last major overhaul of the agency in 1996, Congress left the FCC with almost no authority over the Internet, whether content, transmission or the devices and software that consumers use to enjoy it. All three of last week’s orders pushed well beyond the FCC’s legal authority. Issuing them in rapid succession was the act of a petulant teenager, loudly defying a parent he knows has already left the room.

 

Each decision in its own way reflected the fierce determination of FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and his two Democratic colleagues to recast the agency whenever possible for a starring role in the Internet economy. They genuinely believe their “prophylactic” agenda will help consumers, despite a long history that demonstrates repeatedly the folly of slow-moving governments trying to micromanage the evolution of disruptive technologies.

 

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WA: Q&A: Tech talk with Inslee and McKenna | The Seattle Times

WA: Q&A: Tech talk with Inslee and McKenna | The Seattle Times | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Whichever way the fall election goes, Washington will end up with a new governor that enthusiastically supports the state's tech industry.

 

That's my take on the gubernatorial candidates, Republican Rob McKenna and Democrat Jay Inslee. Both see education and innovation as keys to nourishing the high-tech sector, a cornerstone of the economy.

 

These similarities were highlighted earlier this month during a breakfast event in Seattle hosted by the Washington Technology Industry Association (WTIA).

 

Neither candidate has a tech background -- they're both lawyers -- but each has touched important tech issues.

 

As attorney general, McKenna made Internet safety a priority, going after a number of online scammers. In Congress, Inslee pushed the FCC to license unused TV spectrum that can be used for wireless broadband, a priority of Microsoft, Google and other tech companies.

 

But is that enough to lead a state that's the nation's "primary hub for software production," according to the TechAmerica Foundation?

 

For a closer look at the candidates' tech positions, I circled back after the WTIA event and interviewed them separately. I asked each the same set of questions, to see how they stand on issues they may face in office.

 

Here are their responses, edited for space:

 

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Torching California's Broadband Future: Why Your State Is Next | Wired Business | Wired.com

Torching California's Broadband Future: Why Your State Is Next | Wired Business | Wired.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

California Governor Jerry Brown recently declared a state of emergency in three northern California counties ravaged by wildfires. There’s another state of emergency for Californians: It’s called SB 1161, and it leaves Californians without a protector to keep watch on the cost, service quality, safety, and availability of access to information, data, and entertainment – everything on which modern life depends. Because just a few giant companies control the wires, they’ll be picking the economic and social winners and losers in America. Burning trees, burning up the state’s future – it’s all cataclysmic.

 

Few in the California Legislature likely understood the ramifications of the bill they just agreed to. It seemed to be all about deregulating “VoIP.” But the problem is that the bill covers all “IP-enabled services.” Pursuant to some current Federal regulatory gymnastics, “IP-enabled services” includes not only content and functions that use wires and airwaves but also the physical wires and towers themselves. Everything these days, from thick pipes in the ground to Wired.com, is an “IP-enabled service.” All communications are using the internet protocol, and the FCC has re-labeled all of them “IP-enabled services.” It’s like calling a highway an “electric-car serving conduit” and then making it available for only rich people because electric cars are really cool.

 

Now, the FCC did all that re-labeling based on its assumption that competition between different kinds of providers of communications (telephone, cable, wireless, even “broadband over powerline”) would protect consumers by keeping prices down and service quality high, and that therefore traditional communications regulation wasn’t necessary. But that confident prediction hasn’t come true. There has been a tremendous amount of consolidation in California, and across the country, leading to a situation in which the wireless and wired providers have divided up the market: AT&T and Verizon are abandoning their residential wires and focusing entirely on wireless; Comcast and Time Warner have a lock on local monopoly wired services.

 

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Wireless spectrum: What it is, and why you should care | Mobile CNET News

Wireless spectrum: What it is, and why you should care | Mobile CNET News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

There has been a lot of talk over the past year about spectrum shortages, spectrum interference, companies proposing mergers just to get their hands on spectrum and even spectrum auctions that will help bail the nation out of debt.

 

But what exactly is wireless spectrum? And why are people in the wireless industry talking about it in apocalyptic terms?

 

These are good questions, so let's step back and explain what wireless spectrum is, why it's become increasingly scarce, and what regulators are supposed to (or not) do about it.

 

All wireless communications signals travel over the air via radio frequency, aka spectrum. The TV broadcast you watch, the radio program you listen to, the GPS device that helps get you where you're going, and the wireless phone service you use to make phone calls and check Facebook from your smartphone -- all use invisible airwaves to transmit bits of data through the air.

 

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80% of UK households now have Internet access | thinkbroadband

The Office for National Statistics is good at doing what it is meant to do and produce statistics. The latest set of Internet Access figures for Great Britain have been published, and show how incredibly digitally connected the UK is.

 

Key Figures:

 

--21 million households in Great Britain have Internet access, a rise of 3% points since 2011;

 

--93% of households with Internet access using fixed broadband;

 

--30% of households use a fibre or cable broadband service;

 

--Households with children are most likely to have Internet access, 95%

 

--Households with one adult aged over 65 are least likely to have Internet access, 36% (1.2 million adults);

 

The ONS does not track actual Internet access speeds, but the figures produced do help to underline how important Internet access is for the majority of the population, and which parts of the population may need the most effort if a goal of total digital inclusion is part of the UK vision as we move through the 21st century.

 

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Is the FCC serious about broadband deployment? | The Hill's Congress Blog

Is the FCC serious about broadband deployment? | The Hill's Congress Blog | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Rarely has an agency exhibited a greater degree of schizophrenia than the FCC did last week, when it issued its Eighth Broadband Progress Report (Broadband Report) and its Special Access Report and Order. One decries the lack of broadband access for the 6 percent of the U.S. population that lives in the most sparsely populated areas. The other encourages America’s largest enterprises to perpetuate their use of non-broadband networks throughout the U.S.

 

On the one hand, in its Broadband Report, the FCC refuses to tell Congress that our country’s broadband deployment is reasonable and timely, despite access by 94 percent of Americans to high-speed broadband, defined as download at 4 megabit per second (Mbps) and upload at 1 Mbps (4/1) over wired networks. The FCC’s key reasons are:

 

First, 19 million Americans, i.e. 6 percent of the population, scattered across two-thirds of the U.S. land mass, lack access to wired 4/1 broadband connection.

 

Second, broadband adoption by consumers is too low--only 40 percent have chosen to adopt broadband at 4/1 speed or higher. Chairman Genachowski’s statement in the Broadband Order sets high goals: “We need to see ongoing increases in broadband speed and capacity, so that we’re routinely talking about gigabits, not megabits.”

 

On the other hand, in its Special Access Order, the FCC suspends its rules governing pricing flexibility in the special-access market. This is a market that the FCC sizes at $12 billion, providing mostly 1.5 Mbps connections, mostly to large enterprises and government but also to some small businesses.

 

Chairman Genachowski notes in his statement explaining the suspension: “As one group of businesses, including representatives from the financial services, automotive, manufacturing, insurance, aerospace, package delivery, information technology, and transportation industries, told us, ‘special access services [are] the building blocks of our corporate services’.”

 

These businesses are asking for lower prices on these 1.5 Mbps services, because they want to continue to use them in perpetuity.

 

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Edgewater Wireless and Aptilo Networks take mobile data offload into world of multi-channel WiFi | Muniwireless

Edgewater Wireless Systems, a supplier of wireless local area network (WLAN) solutions, has announced that it has completed interoperability testing of WiFi3 with the mobile data offload solution from Aptilo Networks (the latter is based on their WiFi service management platform and SIM authentication server). Mobile data offload, one of the fastest growing market segments for WiFi solutions, can now be delivered with Edgewater Wireless’ industry WiFi3 multi-channel architecture which provides significantly increased performance and flexibility to major carriers and service providers.

 

Mobile data traffic is growing at an unprecedented rate, well beyond the capacity of today’s 3G networks. Analysts forecast that by 2014, an average mobile user will consume 7GB of traffic per month, which exceeds 5 times the average used by today’s consumer. The use of mobile data applications creates an enormous strain on cellular infrastructure. As a result, mobile operators and service providers are turning to WiFi to divert much of the data traffic away from cellular networks.

 

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MPAA Joins RIAA In Having Budgets Slashed | Techdirt

MPAA Joins RIAA In Having Budgets Slashed | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Following the news that the RIAA's revenue was cut dramatically in the past few years, TorrentFreak has also posted the MPAA's 2010 tax filing, showing that it, too, has taken a pretty massive beatingin terms of revenue from its gatekeeper members.

 

'In just three years the revenue generated by the anti-piracy outfit reduced from $92.8 million to $49.6 million. The decreased budget is a direct result of the major Hollywood studios cutting back on their MPAA funding. In the same period membership dues dropped from $84.7 million to $41.5 million, more than a 50% decline.'

 

The filing (embedded below) includes some interesting tidbits. It's not at all surprising to see that the MPAA funds the Copyright Alliance, but I had not seen before that it funds ITIF. ITIF was the think tank who was the major "intellectual backer" of SOPA/PIPA. They had published the first paper that more or less suggested the approach found in SOPA/PIPA, and when the MPAA was absolutely desperate for technology "experts" who could argue that SOPA wouldn't break DNS, the only people they rolled out were ITIF staff members. It's not surprising that the MPAA funded them, but I don't recall that being disclosed anywhere previously.

 

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Governor Cuomo Announces Connect NY Broadband Grants | The Utica Pheonix

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that the state has started accepting applications for the $25 million “Connect NY” program to promote and expand broadband Internet access. The program, along with the more than $2 million awarded through the Regional Council initiative, represents the single largest direct investment of state funding into expanding broadband access in the United States.

 

Grants are made available through the Regional Economic Development Councils and Empire State Development and will help expand high speed Internet access in unserved and underserved rural upstate and urban areas of New York.

 

“This investment in high-speed Internet access will ensure that the information superhighway will be open to all New York businesses,” Governor Cuomo said. “By expanding the availability of high-quality broadband services, Connect NY makes our state a national leader in the digital economy and gives our businesses the tools they need to compete and prosper in the global economy.”

 

With over 700,000 New Yorkers unable to access broadband, and another six million citizens facing significant obstacles to Internet connectivity, expanding high-speed Internet was identified last year by the Regional Councils as a key priority to stimulate local business growth. Broadband Internet grants, such as Connect NY, both spur investment by service providers in communities and help boost economic development in each region by expanding the ability of local businesses to reach consumers globally.

 

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Apple may have won, but software patents are still evil | GigaOM Tech News

Apple may have won, but software patents are still evil | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In one of the biggest court decisions in recent memory for a technology giant, Samsung on Friday lost a billion-dollar patent-infringement case launched by Apple over the design and functionality of the mobile-handset maker’s smartphones.

 

We’ve written about the implications of this ruling for both companies, and where the case stands to go from here, but when you step back from the specifics of this decision itself, it becomes increasingly obvious that we are all losers in this kind of case — because software and design patents are inherently bad, not just for the technology industry but arguably for society as a whole. Apple’s win may satisfy its fans, and Samsung may be able to recover from the ruling, but that doesn’t make it right.

 

As my colleague Jeff Roberts has reported, this case was launched by Apple against Samsung last year, based on what Apple said was Samsung’s wilful infringement of software-related “utility” patents and four design-related patents it holds for the iPhone and iPad.

 

According to Apple, the company’s smartphones — including the Nexus S, Epic 4G and Galaxy S 4G — copied elements of the design and functionality of Apple’s iPhone models, and the Samsung Galaxy Tab copied design and functional aspects of the iPad. In its statement of claim, which contained drawings that jurors relied on to decide the case, Apple said:

 

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Samsung hits back at Apple but shares tumble after smartphone patent ruling | The Guardian Tech

Samsung hits back at Apple but shares tumble after smartphone patent ruling | The Guardian Tech | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Samsung has hit back at arch rival Apple as investors wiped $12bn (£7.6bn) off the South Korean group's market value in the wake of its dramatic loss to the iPhone maker in a high-profile US court battle.

 

Shares in the Asian smartphone manufacturer plunged 7.5% in the South Korean capital Seoul on Monday as shareholders reacted to Friday's ruling that the group had copied key elements of the iPhone's behaviour and appearance, resulting in a $1bn fine.

 

Samsung's management responded with an angry internal memo saying Apple had rebuffed attempts to settle the case out of court.

 

Urging consumers to shun Apple products, Sansung said: "History has shown there has yet to be a company that has won the hearts and minds of consumers and achieved continuous growth when its primary means to competition has been the outright abuse of patent law, not the pursuit of innovation. We trust that the consumers and the market will side with those who prioritise innovation over litigation, and we will prove this beyond doubt."

 

Analysts said the verdict could result in Apple broadening its attack on other handset makers that use Google's Android operating system, potentially hobbling them in the US, the richest segment of the $219bn (£138.6bn) global smartphone business.

 

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United States of Connectedness: What works for Internet of things | GigaOM Tech News

United States of Connectedness: What works for Internet of things | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Today you can buy an alarm clock, a pill bottle and even a scale that connects to the web. The question is, should you?

 

As I pondered the purchase of a $130-Wi-Fi enabled scale that would talk to my Fitbit, I realized that there are three things any connected device should offer in order for its connectivity to justify the (generally) higher price I’m paying for that item.

 

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly in the Verizon-Cable Pact | Huff Post

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly in the Verizon-Cable Pact | Huff Post | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Thursday, the Federal Communications Commission voted 5-0 to approve Verizon's purchase of a valuable slice of the public airwaves in exchange for a partnership with a cartel of cable companies. While both the FCC and the Department of Justice -- which signed off on the swap last week -- placed conditions on the deal, it signals dark days ahead for consumers.

 

At Free Press, we believe vigorous competition is the best way to compel companies to lower prices, invest in higher quality offerings, and pay close attention to customer satisfaction. Unfortunately, the market for high-speed mobile and at-home broadband service looks nothing like that.

 

Where there was once a glimmer of hope for competition between cable and phone companies, we now see Verizon and the cable companies dividing up the market. Where once Verizon's FiOS service was going head-to-head Comcast Xfinity, we now have former rivals signing up their own customers for their competitors. Consumers would be far better off if this union had never been proposed.

 

The good news is that the FCC and the DoJ agreed with many of the concerns raised by Free Press and its allies. And those agencies attempted to address some of the worst of the consumer harms created by this transaction.

 

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Apple/Samsung Jurors Admit They Finished Quickly By Ignoring Prior Art & Other Key Factors | Techdirt

Apple/Samsung Jurors Admit They Finished Quickly By Ignoring Prior Art & Other Key Factors | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Late Friday afternoon, the jury in the Apple/Samsung patent dispute surprised just about everyone by telling the court it had reached a verdict. Given the number of complex issues it needed to go through, most experts expected it to take well into this week.

 

According to observers in the courtroom, one of Apple's lawyers was so surprised and unprepared that he had to rush back to court without a suit, and showed up in a polo shirt. The quickness of the decision certainly resulted in some questions about just how thoroughly the jury carefully reviewed the instructions and then considered each of the approximately 700 questions it needed to answer (initial jury form is embedded below).

 

As we noted in an update to our post on Friday, about half an hour after the ruling was read out -- and long after most of the press was paying attention -- the judge announced at least two problems with the ruling, where the jury had awarded damages, despite not finding infringement.

 

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Apple targets 8 Samsung phones for sales ban | Apple CNET News

Apple targets 8 Samsung phones for sales ban | Apple CNET News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Following last week's court ruling in the trial between it and Samsung, Apple this morning laid out which Samsung devices it wants banned from sale in the U.S.

 

There are eight in total out of the 28 that were included in the case. That includes:

 

• Galaxy S 4G
• Galaxy S2 AT&T
• Galaxy S2 Skyrocket
• Galaxy S2 T-Mobile
• Galaxy S2 Epic 4G
• Galaxy S Showcase
• Droid Charge
• Galaxy Prevail

 

In its filing, Apple laid out which patents the devices were found to infringe in the trial, which ran a month long and wrapped up last week. The one with the most infringements is the Galaxy S 4G, which infringes two of Apple's design patents, three utility patents, and two claims of trade dress:

 

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Mobile app turns smartphones into “virtual radios” for first responders | gizmag.com

Mobile app turns smartphones into “virtual radios” for first responders | gizmag.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In an emergency, every second counts, and communication between various emergency services and government agencies can be of critical importance. While proven to be effective, current systems such as Land Mobile Radio (LMR) can still leave gaps in the lines of communications. However, a new mobile app developed by U.S. defense contractor and industrial corporation Raytheon aims to close some of those gaps by enabling first responders to communicate without LMR. The app is part of the company's Interoperability Communications Suite which aims to enhance interoperability between LMR radios, landline, VoIP phones, and P25 systems via ISSI, and 4G/LTE.

 

Rather than replace existing communications tools, Raytheon’s software is designed to complement the traditional methods used to facilitate communication between government agencies and emergency workers.

 

“These devices essentially become ’virtual radios‘ with the new application and greatly reduce communications gaps for first responders,” said TJ Kennedy, director of Public Safety and Security for Raytheon’s Network Centric Systems. “It also allows personnel to reach back to their home network from anywhere in the world that they have PC, tablet or smartphone access.”

 

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Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Apple, Microsoft, Google and the sad state of TV | GigaOM Online Video News

Apple, Microsoft, Google and the sad state of TV | GigaOM Online Video News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The latest news on Apple’s plans for the future of television is that the company is in talks with big pay TV operators to carry their live programming. This would turn a future Apple TV product into a kind of set-top box, reported the Wall Street Journal Wednesday. Negotiations with cable companies are ongoing, with no deal in sight, and operators are wary of Apple’s quest for control, according to the paper.

 

But the sad truth is that even winning a contract like this would be a defeat for Apple. The company originally set out to disrupt the TV space and sell programming directly to consumers. It wanted to unbundle cable much in the same way it unbundled the CD when it started selling single songs on iTunes for $0.99. A move like that would have been truly innovative. But as it looks now, Apple is just going to repackage the good old cable bundle and make it available through yet another device.

 

If it’s any consolation for Apple, it is not alone with this path. Numerous companies have tried to reinvent TV, only to end up with products that look just like more of the same:

 

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