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South Korea Set to Launch 100Mbps Wireless, Seamlessly Combines Mobile Broadband & Wi-Fi | Stop the Cap!

South Korea Set to Launch 100Mbps Wireless, Seamlessly Combines Mobile Broadband & Wi-Fi | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

While you ponder Verizon Wireless’ latest LTE 4G outage or try to convince yourself Sprint really is selling “4G” service from Clearwire, South Korea’s Sunkyoung Telecom (SK Telecom) is deploying new technology to enormously boost wireless Internet speeds to as high as 100Mbps.

 

SK Telecom has developed new Heterogeneous Network Integration Solution (HNIS) technology that weds 3G/4G service with any open Wi-Fi network to deliver speeds many times faster than North Americans can get from their wireless providers. The technology is designed to work without a lot of consumer intervention. For example, HNIS will automatically provision open Wi-Fi access wherever subscribers travel. The combination of mobile broadband with Wi-Fi works seamlessly as well. Currently, smartphones can use Wi-Fi or mobile data, but not both at the same time. HNIS changes that.

 

While mobile operators cope with spectrum and capacity issues, HNIS can reduce the load on wireless networks, without creating a hassle for wireless customers who used to register with every Wi-Fi service they encountered. The theoretical speed of an HNIS-enhanced 3G and Wi-Fi connection in South Korea will be 60Mbps when SK Telecom fully deploys the technology this year. As SK expands the technology to its 4G networks, theoretical maximum speeds will increase to 100Mbps.

 

SK is so confident in the technology, it plans to equip all of its smartphones with the new technology starting in 2013.

 

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Verizon’s N.J. Astroturfing Revisited: More ‘Phoney’ Pro-Verizon E-Mails Revealed | Stop the Cap!

Verizon’s N.J. Astroturfing Revisited: More ‘Phoney’ Pro-Verizon E-Mails Revealed | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

New Jersey’s Board of Public Utilities received more than 460 identical e-mails urging the regulator to approve Verizon’s proposed settlement permitting it to renege on broadband expansion commitments that would have brought high-speed Internet to every citizen in the state that wanted it.


More than a few of those e-mails were submitted with fake e-mail addresses or without the knowledge of the alleged senders. An Ars Technica piece this week confirmed Stop the Cap!’s own findings of the astroturf effort and found more customers denying they ever submitted comments to the BPU about the settlement.


“I am a customer only to Verizon and I was not contacted by them to submit anything,” one person told Ars. “If they did, I would’ve slammed them. They are gougers. If AT&T was where I lived, I would switch in a heart beat.”


When this customer was shown the e-mail he allegedly sent to state officials, he said, “That would mean someone did it on my behalf. I can assure you that I did not send that response.”


In other cases, Ars discovered some of Verizon’s vendors were misrepresenting the nature of the settlement and asking people they worked with or knew to sign the petition as part of a contest.


“I hope you are doing well. I have a favor to ask,” one e-mail read. “I’m working on a project for our client, Verizon, and they need some signatures to an online petition. Verizon wants to expand its offerings in New Jersey, but needs approval from the state. Higher-speed Internet, more FiOS, etc.”


“All you need to do is enter your e-mail and zip code,” the message continued. “I appreciate it. We’re in a contest with another vendor to see how many people we can get to sign it. Just let me know yea or nay, so I can get the credit for it.”


Of course signing the petition would result in the exact opposite of more FiOS deployment and higher speed Internet access.


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Voters Approve Local Telecommunications Authority in Montrose, Colorado | community broadband networks

Voters Approve Local Telecommunications Authority in Montrose, Colorado | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

By a 3,982 in favor and 1,397 opposed, the voters in Montrose decided on April 1st to take back local authority for telecommunications services. The state revoked the community's ability to establish a telecommunications utility in 2005.


Jim Branscome covered the election results in the Daily Yonder. Branscome, a resident of Montrose, knows the local broadband situation:


Internet service here is currently a hodgepodge. Some of us depend on broadcast towers, some on DSL from CenturyLink and some on cable service from Charter. Service is generally at less than 10MB. It’s expensive, and customer service is erratic.


Community leaders state that they want to encourage fair competition and ensure every one has the opportunity to fast, reliable, affordable connectivity. 


In addition to ensuring that local businesses are in a position to compete with any large corporations that might attempt to establish a major share of the market, Turner said the city also wanted measures to enable lower income households to benefit from the advantages of gigabit speeds and capacity. “We don’t want to create two levels of society here, those who are connected and those who are not,” he said.


While Montrose is a long way from getting every person connected, the community is discussing the idea of financing a network with revenue bonds.


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US pay-TV subscriptions poised for rebound | BroadbandTVNews.com

US pay-TV subscriptions poised for rebound | BroadbandTVNews.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Recent research from Strategy Analytics forecasts a return to growth in 2014 for the US pay-TV industry at 0.14%.


The findings are detailed in the Service Provider Strategies (SPS) service report, North America Digital Television Forecast: 1Q 2014.


IPTV will be the bright spot of the pay-TV market in the US. In 2013, IPTV subscriptions grew by 17.5% year-on-year and this trend will continue with a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 8.3% through 2019. IPTV service operators AT&T and Verizon are approaching the future with different strategies, but both are focused on driving advanced services and multiplay bundles with digital television and high-speed Internet at the core of their packages.


In the cable segment, Comcast has reversed a long-standing trend of subscriber losses, following the company’s rollout of its Xfinity X1 platform. Consolidation among US cable operators should enable faster digital transitions and a wider deployment of technology platforms. This trend will give customers better opportunities to access and consume content on multiple devices, when and where they want.


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Net neutrality ruling complicates US transition to IP networks | NetworkWorld.com

Net neutrality ruling complicates US transition to IP networks | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The transition from copper-based telephone systems to IP networks in the U.S. could become swept up in political fallout as the FCC figures out how to regulate such networks in ways that will appease the courts.


A switch to IP-based networks has been progressing for years in the U.S., but a January ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit calls into doubt the FCC's authority in several areas, such as prohibiting VoIP providers from degrading service or blocking calls from competing carriers, and requiring them to offer service to all customers who want it.


And the technological changes are rekindling the debate over whether the FCC as an entity should continue to exist at all, or at the least whether it needs a major transition itself.


"Should the commission have any ongoing role in communications networks, or does somehow, the change in the technology make the FCC obsolete?" said Matt Wood, policy director at Free Press, a digital rights group. "We'd say, clearly, it does not. Whatever the technology is, the FCC still has a duty to make sure broadband telecommunications are universally affordable and available and competitive."


The IP transition, combined with the net neutrality ruling, puts several features of the traditional telephone network, long taken for granted by customers, in doubt, said Harold Feld, senior vice president at digital rights group Public Knowledge. After the net neutrality ruling, "the FCC can no longer require VoIP providers to complete phone calls [and] can no longer prohibit VoIP carriers from blocking calls," Feld wrote in a January blog post.


Some telephone customers in rural parts of the U.S. have complained in recent months about dropped calls, and the problem could get worse in an IP transition, Feld said. Public Knowledge, Free Press and some other consumer groups have called on the FCC to reclassify broadband as a regulated, common-carrier service in an effort to restore its regulatory authority, but a move by the FCC to reclassify broadband would trigger a long and contentious battle with carriers.


"Post-IP transition, absent reclassification, the FCC would be unable to ensure that all calls go through when you dial your 10-digit phone number," Feld wrote. "They could -- as they can with net neutrality -- require companies to disclose if they are blocking calls or otherwise 'managing' traffic in a way that degrades rural traffic."


In some ways, the switch from copper to IP, predicted to happen over the next five or six years, should be relatively simple. Most carriers already offer voice-over-IP services, and at some telecom carriers, two-thirds of voice customers have already cut the cord and switched from traditional telephone service to mobile or VoIP service. Some technical issues will come up, including how to transition old phone-based services like school fire alarms and heart monitors, but the IP transition trials are designed to find and fix those issues.


Most telecom policy experts agree that it no longer makes sense for traditional telephone providers to maintain IP networks and the old copper network, often called the PSTN, for public-switched telephone network, used to deliver POTS, plain, old telephone service.


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AL: Broadband bill headed to ballots | Franklin County Times

AL: Broadband bill headed to ballots | Franklin County Times | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A group of community members and leaders have been working for over a year now to establish a reliable source for broadband services in Franklin County.


Thanks to a bill recently passed in the Alabama legislature, that process has moved one step closer to becoming a reality, according to Rep. Johnny Mack Morrow.


Morrow said the passage of HB 600 will make it possible for an existing authority to apply for grants and enter into contracts related to the county’s broadband initiative.


“This was Phase I of our broadband project that we’ve been working on for many months now,” Morrow said.


“Affordable, high speed internet should be available to all Franklin County residents in order for our citizens to have access to outlets for securing jobs and for our students to be able to have the tools to excel in their studies.


“Widespread broadband service is also crucial for our businesses and industries, and this initiative is something both Roger Bedford and myself are committed to seeing through to completion.”


Morrow said the Franklin County Water Authority was chosen to be the entity that would represent the county’s broadband interests.


“We needed an existing authority to be able to take on this responsibility of applying for grants and securing funds for our broadband initiative, and this was our best option,” he said.


Morrow said now that this bill has been passed, the decision to move forward with the project will now be placed in the hands of Franklin County’s voters.


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Mark Zuckerberg on the shift to mobile and the Great Unbundling of Facebook | GigaOM Tech News

Mark Zuckerberg on the shift to mobile and the Great Unbundling of Facebook | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

When you’re as big as Facebook is — with over a billion users worldwide and a stock-market value of more than $150 billion — it would be tempting to just sit back and watch the money roll in. But co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg is doing the exact opposite: he is busy thinking of ways to disrupt his own success, as a way of figuring out how Facebook can adapt to a mobile world full of fragmented social experiences like Instagram and Snapchat.


Zuckerberg talked to New York Times technology writer Farhad Manjoo about that and some other topics (including turning 30, a question he mostly ignored) during a recent interview. The piece is headlined “Can Facebook Innovate?” — which seems a little odd, given that Facebook has launched at least half a dozen new apps and services in the past year or two.


As I’ve argued before, Facebook is one of the few large companies that seems to have taken Steve Jobs’ approach to heart: namely, the need to disrupt yourself before others do so (as Apple did with the iPhone and iPad). It’s true that most of Facebook’s experiments have failed to set the world on fire, but that doesn’t make them not innovative. Innovation also means trying and failing.


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American Enterprise Institute Scholar Calls DSL Obsolete | community broadband networks

American Enterprise Institute Scholar Calls DSL Obsolete | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

For the second time this year, one of the major defenders of the cable and telephone companies has admitted that DSL cannot provide the Internet access we need as a nation. This admission validates our research as well as that of Susan Crawford and others that show most Americans are effectively stuck with a cable monopoly.


On April 7, 2014, the Diane Rehm show hosted another discussion on telecommunications policy with guests that included Jeffrey Eisenach, the Director of the Center for Internet, Communications, and Technology Policy at the American Enterprise Institute.


During that show, Eisenach stated, "The vast majority of Europeans still only have DSL service available, which we in the United States consider really almost an obsolete technology now."


Interestingly, Eisenach and others have repeatedly claimed that there is no market failure in the US - that we have plenty of choices. But most Americans have to choose between what most now admit is an obsolete DSL product and cable. Eisenach would add 4G LTE as another competitor, but as we have noted many times, the average household would have to pay hundreds of dollars per month to use their LTE connection as a replacement for DSL or cable.


The average household uses something like 40-55 GB of data per month. Given the bandwidth caps from LTE providers, the overage charges quickly result in a bill of approximately $500 or more depending on the plan. This is why the overwhelming majority of the market uses mobile wireless as a complement, not substitute to wired networks.


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First Phase Of Security Audit Finds Vulnerabilities But No Backdoors In TrueCrypt Encryption Software | Techdirt.com

First Phase Of Security Audit Finds Vulnerabilities But No Backdoors In TrueCrypt Encryption Software | Techdirt.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

n the wake of the serious Heartbleed flaw in OpenSSL, more people are becoming aware of how widely used and important open source encryption tools are, and how their security is too often taken for granted. Some people were already worrying about this back in September last year, when we learned that the NSA had intentionally undermined encryption by weakening standards and introducing backdoors. As Techdirt reported, that led to a call for a security audit of TrueCrypt, a very popular open source disk encryption tool. Fortunately, the Open Crypto Audit Project raised a goodly sum of money through FundFill and IndieGogo, which allowed the first phase of the audit to be funded. Here's what's now been done (pdf):


The Open Crypto Audit Project engaged iSEC Partners to review select parts of the TrueCrypt 7.1a disk encryption software. This included reviewing the bootloader and Windows kernel driver for any system backdoors as well as any other security related issues.


The good news:


iSEC found no evidence of backdoors or otherwise intentionally malicious code in the assessed areas.


However, it did still find vulnerabilities in the code it examined:


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MN: Annandale watches as lawmakers mull broadband funds | SCTimes.com

MN: Annandale watches as lawmakers mull broadband funds | SCTimes.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A Central Minnesota community will watch closely in coming weeks as state legislators decide whether to fund broadband Internet expansion in rural areas.


Spurred by residents' complaints with their Internet service provider, Annandale leaders are mulling a big step: partnering with public or private entities to build its own Internet network.


Annandale and other Minnesota communities that are unserved or underserved by broadband service could get a chance to apply for state grants to build new networks. Lawmakers and Gov. Mark Dayton,

who campaigned on expanding broadband in rural areas, are considering allotting $25 million for such grants in 2014.


A House budget bill that passed earlier this month set aside those funds and established a state grant program for broadband expansion projects. Local governments, nonprofits or private companies all could be eligible for the grants if they apply and meet certain criteria.


A corresponding Senate bill didn't include those provisions. The differences are expected to be resolved in a House-Senate conference committee after lawmakers' Easter-Passover break, which is underway until April 22.


Annandale City Administrator Kelly Hinnenkamp has worked extensively on the broadband issue in the area. She says the community consensus on the need to find an alternative to its current Internet provider, Windstream Communications, is so strong that the City Council is likely to pursue some plan to help provide that alternative. The council hasn't decided what direction to take, Hinnenkamp said.


The range of options the city can consider could hinge on what lawmakers do this year with broadband funding, Hinnenkamp said.


"The success of how we move forward is reliant upon this," Hinnenkamp said.


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NC: Asheville's Moogfest bets on economic development | Citizen-Times.com

Mike Adams is betting serious money the revamped Moogfest that opens April 23 is not just going to attract thousands of music fans and tech geeks.


If successful, the five-day event could become Asheville’s next signature event, possibly bringing new jobs, better wages and high-growth tech companies to the mountains, according to Adams, president and CEO of Moog Music, the private manufacturer of electronic musical instruments and the festival’s prime sponsor.


“This is about economic development,” Adams said. “This is about whether my children’s children can find good jobs in town.”


Before the first note of electronic music is played onstage, Moogfest will be talking about jobs.


Gov. Pat McCrory will join Mayor Esther Manheimer and Adams in the opening panel discussion “Wiring Silicon Mountain” at the Diana Wortham Theatre.


Moogfest organizers believe a successful festival will brand Asheville and the rest of North Carolina as a place not just to recreate or retire, but to work creatively.


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If TV Weren’t Everywhere Before, It Is Now | Cable Tech Talk | NCTA.com

Yesterday, CTAM, the Cable & Telecommunications Association for Marketing, announced a new, aggressive and first-of-its-kind campaign to promote the idea, the brand, and the value of tv everywhere.


For many, tv everywhere – the idea that we can watch cable content on myriad devices in any location – has been a part of the television experience for a number of years. Products like Comcast’s Xfinity and devices like tablets and smartphones have made tv everywhere possible for millions of early-adopter customers. But for others, it’s an entirely revolutionary concept – one that will take time and effort to incorporate into their TV watching routine.


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What This Year’s Survey Says About Broadband and Economic Development | Building the Gigabit City

What This Year’s Survey Says About Broadband and Economic Development | Building the Gigabit City | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Broadband has consistently been described as a tool or asset to help communities improve local economic development. In the past few years, a lot of effort has gone into positioning broadband as our newest utility, vital as our mainstay electric, gas and water utilities. Every year I dig a little bit via a survey to learn how much the hype about broadband’s impact on local economies reflects the reality.


This year’s survey asks members of the International Economic Development Council (IEDC), the largest professional association of economic developers, key questions regarding broadband’s impact on local economies. These questions test some general assumptions made about outcomes that broadband produces, and also enables survey respondents to assess some of the value broadband brings to their communities.


Get the full report here. Some of this year’s findings include:


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Advice for Starting a Community Network - Community Broadband Bits Episode #94 | community broadband networks

Advice for Starting a Community Network - Community Broadband Bits Episode #94 | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Community Broadband Bits podcast this week focuses on what people can do to start building a grassroots effort for a network in their community. John St Julien of Lafayette, Louisiana, returns to the show to discuss what they did and ideas for others to follow.


John was last on the show for episode 19, where we focused more on the specific approach used in Lafayette.


We discuss the early challenges and ideas for how to engage others, who may be the best people to approach, and how to maintain a sense of progress during what may be a very challenging organizing effort.


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The Washington Post’s Delusional Support of the Comcast-Time Warner Cable Merger Debunked | Stop the Cap!

The Washington Post’s Delusional Support of the Comcast-Time Warner Cable Merger Debunked | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If you have started to confuse the Washington Post editorial page with that of the Wall Street Journal, you are not alone.


Under the stewardship of Fred Hiatt, WaPo’s editorial opinions have grown increasingly anti-consumer and pro-corporate at home and decidedly neoconservative abroad.


It’s the same newspaper that wholeheartedly supported the merger of Comcast and NBC-Universal in 2010. Let’s check whether they called that one right:


Entities that compete with NBC-owned cable channels fear that Comcast will relegate them to hard-to-find channel locations. Consumer advocates warn that Comcast will use its newfound power to raise subscription rates and stifle new voices on television and the Internet.


The same newspaper reported last week that Comcast refused to let Back9Network, a golf oriented network in direct competition with Comcast-owned Golf Channel, on its cable systems.


For years, Bloomberg TV — in direct competition with Comcast-owned CNBC — has been stuck in Channel Siberia, in some areas like Chicago dumped between Comcast’s promotional “barker” channel and “Leased Access.” CNBC enjoys Ch. 29, certain to attract more viewers than Bloomberg’s Ch. 102.


As Stop the Cap! reported yesterday, no cable company raises cable television rates more than Comcast, blaming programming rate increases that in several cases originate with Comcast-owned cable networks.


Regulators should scrutinize the proposed merger but should be skeptical of the critics’ claims. [...] Advocacy groups have been poor prognosticators of the effects of large media mergers.


The Washington Post’s editorial accuracy record has more than a few blemishes, from its 2003 declaration Colin Powell’s “evidence” of Iraqi weapons of mass destruction was “irrefutable,” to suggestions that a wedding of Comcast and NBC Universal wouldn’t hurt anyone because the FCC was ready to manage any problems without pesky mandates or overbearing pre-conditions.


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Here are 3 ways Aereo will tell the Supreme Court that it's legal | GigaOM Tech News

Here are 3 ways Aereo will tell the Supreme Court that it's legal | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The stakes can’t get any higher for internet TV service Aereo. One week from now, the two-year-old company will go before the Supreme Court to face off against a group of big broadcasters that want to shut it down. If Aereo loses, its biggest investor says the company is “finished.”


More significantly, the Supreme Court’s decision could alter the current business model of TV, which relies on selling large bundles of channels for ever higher prices. If the Justices side with Aereo, which rents subscribers a remote antenna to watch and record over-the-air stations like NBC, more consumers may become tempted to become “cord cutters” — leaving their TV provider in favor of some combination of internet TV services, including Aereo’s smaller and cheaper bundle of channels.


While Aereo now offers its $8/month service in just a dozen cities, it plans to expand to 50 by next year. And while Aereo reportedly has only 100,000 subscribers in New York, that number would likely rise rapidly if the company engaged in a major marketing push — which it will no doubt do if it gets a final green light from the court.


Aereo’s opponents, supported in court by the Justice Department, believe that Aereo is a signal-stealing freeloader poised to wreak damage on the TV industry. So if it is to survive, Aereo must persuade five Supreme Court Justices to accept its view on copyright law (UPDATE: while Justice Samuel Alito was initially recused, news came on Wednesday this is no longer the case) .


Aereo’s side of the story, set out in a 100-page Supreme Court brief filed last month, is a double-barreled appeal to both the past and the future. The brief (embedded below) casts its technology as a natural evolution of the VCR, which the court declared legal three decades ago, while also claiming kinship with the emerging cloud computing industry — an industry Aereo says will suffer if the broadcasters prevail. While making those appeals to policy principles, Aereo also makes a third argument about the letter of the law and companies’ right to rely on it when building their business.


Here’s an overview of how the case arrived at the Supreme Court, a look at three of the arguments that Aereo will put before the Justices on April 22, and how this could all turn out.


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New Media Player To Join Sony’s 4K Lineup | Multichannel.com

New Media Player To Join Sony’s 4K Lineup | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sony updated the rollout plans for its new Ultra HD/4K TV lineup Tuesday, and will look to bridge the 4K content gap with a new media player, a bigger content library, and access to Netflix’s budding lineup 4K streaming titles.


As a follow-on to its original $700 4K media player, Sony’s new model, dubbed the FMP-X10, will provide access to hundreds of titles from Sony’s Video Unlimited 4K download library, including movies such as American Hustle and episodes of NBC’s The Blacklist, and be able to stream 4K content from Netflix, including season two of House of Cards. Netflix confirmed earlier this month that it had begun to offer those titles as well as some nature documentaries in the Ultra HD format.


The new Sony 4K Media Player, compatible with Sony-made Ultra HD sets, will come with 1 terabyte of storage. Sony hasn’t announced a price, but said the new player will be available for purchase this summer.  

 

Sony said its Video Unlimited 4K library is currently stocked with more than 200 titles, with about 50 available at no charge.  Sony confirmed last year that the size of its 4K movie files are in the range of 45 gigabytes to 60 GB.


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CA: Los Angeles moving closer to free citywide Wi-Fi | California Forward

CA: Los Angeles moving closer to free citywide Wi-Fi | California Forward | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

California Forward has kept an ear to the ground on Los Angeles City Councilmember Bob Blumenfield’s proposal for free citywide Wi-Fi ever since he introduced it last August. While some looked skeptically at the proposal when it was initially introduced, the speed with which the proposal has made its way through the City Council reveals this isn’t just a pipe dream.


The proposal is moving further away from fantasy and closer to reality every week, which is why we sat down with the Councilmember for his take on where things stand now and what needs to happen before citizens of Los Angeles will be able to log-on to the Internet for free.


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Cellular industry makes concession on kill switch | NetworkWorld.com

Cellular industry makes concession on kill switch | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Wireless carriers in the U.S., handset makers and the industry's lobbying group have made a significant concession on technology that could remotely disable stolen smartphones and tablets.


The companies say they will voluntarily offer software that can remotely disable and wipe phones, starting with new handsets sold in the second half of next year.


The mobile industry has faced mounting pressure from politicians and police to tackle an epidemic of smartphone and tablet thefts. But some critics Tuesday said the voluntary program does not go far enough.


"The wireless industry today has taken an incremental yet inadequate step to address the epidemic of smartphone theft," said California State Senator Mark Leno.


Thefts of smartphones and tablets, often at gun- or knife-point, account for more than half of all street robberies in San Francisco and a fifth of those in New York. As a result, police officials in both cities have been asking the cellular industry for over a year to install a remote kill switch on devices.


The kill switch, which would be triggered by the user, would lock a phone so that it can't be reused or reprogrammed. Advocates say that such a technology, if made standard on all phones, would dramatically reduce street crime.


The industry has so far rejected the idea, citing in part the inconvenience to consumers if a phone is accidentally disabled. But earlier this year, legislation was introduced in the U.S. Senate, the House of Representatives and California State Senate that would require the technology by law.


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Andrew Seipp's curator insight, April 16, 5:14 PM

With a kill switch I would have to wonder what a customer would do if they found the phone. Having seen how common phone theft is, this would be an interesting game changer if implemented properly.

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Mt. Gox set to liquidate as court denies rehabilitation | Reuters.com

Mt. Gox set to liquidate as court denies rehabilitation | Reuters.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Mt. Gox, once the world's biggest bitcoin exchange, is likely to be liquidated after a Tokyo court dismissed the company's bid to resuscitate its business, the court-appointed administrator said on Wednesday.


CEO Mark Karpeles is also likely to be investigated for liability in the collapse of the Tokyo-based firm, the provisional administrator, lawyer Nobuaki Kobayashi, said in a statement published on the Mt. Gox website.


"The Tokyo District Court recognized that it would be difficult for the company to carry out the civil rehabilitation proceedings and dismissed the application for the commencement of the civil rehabilitation proceedings," he said.


Mt. Gox filed for bankruptcy protection from creditors in Japan in late February, saying it may have lost some 850,000 bitcoins - worth around $454 million at today's rates - due to hacking into its computer system. It later said it had found 200,000 of those bitcoins.


In Wednesday's order for provisional administration, the court put the company's assets under Kobayashi's control until bankruptcy proceedings officially commence and a bankruptcy trustee is named.


"It is expected that, if the bankruptcy proceedings commence, an investigation regarding the liability of the representative director of the company will be conducted as part of the bankruptcy proceedings," it said.


Karpeles did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment.


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Visionary Communications expands broadband coverage | Wyoming Business Report

Visionary Communications – Wyoming largest Internet provider - today announced its expansion of Internet services to Chugwater, Guernsey, Pinedale and Torrington and deepening its coverage areas around Cheyenne, Douglas and Wheatland, allowing it to offer broadband coverage options to businesses.

The company, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this December, continues to grow in order to meet the state's demand for broadband. From 2005 through 2013, Visionary saw a 289 percent growth in revenue from $4.68 million to $13.51 million. The company expects revenue to top $16.46 million in 2014.
 
Visionary's broadened coverage to these new communities provide rural customers with a choice of Internet provider. The company is using licensed microwave back to fiber aggregation points to integrate those locations into its Wyoming network.

Historically, Chugwater, Guernsey, Pinedale and Torrington are island markets, with high fiber costs and non-optimal routing to the rest of the state. Visionary's plan allows services in these four communities to tie into any other community in Wyoming, and even the surrounding Rocky Mountain region.

"Our investment in these new communities and our recent expansion into Cheyenne will provide businesses and commercial locations with great coverage that has been lacking in the state," says Brian Worthen, Visionary CEO. "Our efforts to expand broadband coverage have been necessary to meet the growing demand by new clients in these areas."
 
The company's recent Cheyenne expansion provides additional coverage through microwave, installed in early April of this year. The addition will ensure the company can serve business clients in Cheyenne regardless of technology, and provide a greater reach into the surrounding area. Visionary has provided service on DSL in Cheyenne since 2001 and using fiber-based Ethernet since 2010.


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May 6th Spring Conference to feature sessions on entrepreneurship and innovation | Minnesota High Tech Association

May 6th Spring Conference to feature sessions on entrepreneurship and innovation | Minnesota High Tech Association | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

MHTA’s annual spring conference has been the premier technology and business conference in Minnesota for many years. Scheduled for May 6th, the conference will feature a full-day, education-based agenda; an exhibit hall featuring cutting edge technology and organizations and unparalleled networking opportunities. This year, due to attendee and industry feedback, the conference will feature six tracks of breakout sessions focused on different areas – two of these will be innovation and entrepreneurship.


“Innovation and entrepreneurship are core to our mission here at MHTA,” said Angela McLaughlin, MHTA events manager. “We are excited to be able to reflect that at our annual conference and offer a full track of sessions dedicated to each of these topics.”


The entrepreneurship track will offer attendees insights on communicating for successful results – whether you are starting your own company or working with entrepreneurs.


Local entrepreneur Robbie Cordo and angel investor Tom von Kuster will share tips and tactics from their successful experiences in pitching and funding projects. Bjorn Stansvik, CEO of Mentor Mate will challenge attendees to look at the big picture of the transformative power of technology in his session on elevating humanity. Taylor Cowan of Microsoft and Blake Miller of ThinkBig Partners will discuss strategies for successfully engaging with start-up communities.


The innovation track will feature companies with established track records in technologic innovation, companies like 3M, Mayo and H.B. Fuller – who make innovation look easy. Speakers will offer a glimpse behind the curtain and describe how these companies promote and incent innovation within their company cultures to keep their products and processes on the cutting edge.


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Heartbleed bug is irritating McAfee, Symantec, Kaspersky Lab | NetworkWorld.com

Heartbleed bug is irritating McAfee, Symantec, Kaspersky Lab | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Heartbleed Bug disclosed by the OpenSSL group on April 7 has sent many vendors scurrying to patch their products and that includes security firms Symantec, Intel Security's McAfee division, and Kaspersky Lab.


Heartbleed is basically a buffer-overflow vulnerability in the flawed versions of OpenSSL that would allow savvy attackers to steal data such as passwords or digital certificates. A German software engineer has admitted to unwittingly inserting the Heartbleed Bug vulnerability two years ago in OpenSSL, and it now has a significant portion of the high-tech industry patching servers, client software, network gear and security products. In investigating their own product lines in recent days, Symantec, McAfee and Kaspersky Lab, among others, have been busy de-bugging the Heartbleed Bug out of their products.


The process of  investigating the impact of Heartbleed is still ongoing and in some cases, patches for products seen as vulnerable are still to be released.


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CA: Pacific Grove picked for fiber-optic network | Monterey County Herald

CA: Pacific Grove picked for fiber-optic network | Monterey County Herald | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

An English-backed company wants to make Pacific Grove one of two California cities it wires with a high-speed fiber-optics network.


The network, which would offer internet speeds 20 times faster than existing systems, is being offered to the city as a large, very expensive test market.


"They are building these networks on spec," said Kurt Overmeyer, city economics development director.


The Pacific Grove City Council on Wednesday will consider approving development and license agreements with SiFi Networks that would allow it to install its "fiber-to-the-curb" network throughout the city.


The company, which has wired communities in the United Kingdom but not in the U.S., would spend an estimated $30 million to $40 million to wire Pacific Grove. "It's a huge investment," Overmeyer said.


The cost to the city would be virtually nothing — aside from some staff time checking plans and providing technical advice, a council report says.


"I can't figure out the downside. The worst case would be they build part and have to sell off to someone else," Overmeyer said.


The upside would be to give Pacific Grove a new network with world-class speeds, capable of serving many existing and emerging technology businesses that are heavy data users.


"It really changes things for our residents and our business community," Overmeyer said. Even in Silicon Valley, there aren't many systems like this.


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Google Fiber Seeking Sales Help In New York | Multichannel.com

Google Fiber Seeking Sales Help In New York | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Google Fiber has yet to unleash a plan to weave its 1-Gig network into the Big Apple for residential services, but the speed-happy ISP is already seeking sales help in the region.

 

As spotted by Geek.com, Google Fiber is looking for a full-time regional sales manager in New York City.

 

The job posting doesn’t mention when Google Fiber might actually try to deploy and launch services in the region, but the job description says the new Google Fiber Regional Sales Manager will be tasked with leading up “multiple teams that evangelize Google Fiber services to MDU (multi-dwelling apartments and condos) and large SMB owners. You will hire and manage a team that proactively reaches out and…articulates how Google Fiber Solutions can help make their work more productive.”


More specifically, the person, who will be based at Google’s New York City office, will seek out prospective MDU owners, property management companies and “large SMB owners,” and “negotiate contractual language and terms.”


Google Fiber was not immediately available for comment on the job posting as of early Tuesday morning, but if it was successful in securing franchise deals in New York, it could present more competition for several service operators in the area, including Time Warner Cable, RCN, Verizon Communications and Cablevision Systems.

 

Update: Google  Fiber downplayed the signficance of the job posting. A Google Fiber spokeswoman said the company has had staff working on fiber in the NYC area, as well as other locations, for years -- almost through the entire duration of the Google Fiber project.


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Heartbleed is about to get worse, and it will slow the Internet to a crawl | WashPost.com

Heartbleed is about to get worse, and it will slow the Internet to a crawl | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Efforts to fix the notorious Heartbleed bug threaten to cause major disruptions to the Internet over the next several weeks as companies scramble to repair encryption systems on hundreds of thousands of Web sites at the same time, security experts say.


Estimates of the severity of the bug’s damage have mounted almost daily since researchers announced the discovery of Heartbleed last week. What initially seemed like an inconvenient matter of changing passwords for protection now appears much more serious. New revelations suggest that skilled hackers can use the bug to create fake Web sites that mimic legitimate ones to trick consumers into handing over valuable personal information.


The sheer scale of the work required to fix this aspect of the bug — which makes it possible to steal the “security certificates” that verify that a Web site is authentic — could overwhelm the systems designed to keep the Internet trustworthy.


“Imagine if we found out all at once that all the doors everybody uses are all vulnerable — they can all get broken into,” said Jason Healey, a cybersecurity scholar at the Washington-based Atlantic Council. “The kinds of bad things it enables is largely limited only by the imagination of the bad guys.”


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