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US government seeks to hold phone data beyond five-year limit | NetworkWorld.com

US government seeks to hold phone data beyond five-year limit | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The U.S. government has asked a secret surveillance court to allow it to hold telephone metadata for a period beyond the current five-year limit, for use as potential evidence in civil lawsuits regarding the collection of the data.


In June last year, former National Security Agency contractor, Edward Snowden, revealed that the agency was collecting bulk phone records of Verizon customers in the U.S.


The government subsequently confirmed that it had a program for the bulk collection of phone metadata, which triggered a number of privacy law suits in various courts challenging the legality of the NSA program under section 215 of the Patriot Act.


When litigation is pending against a party, or is reasonably anticipated, the party has a duty to preserve relevant information that may be evidence in the case, the Department of Justice stated in a filing Tuesday before the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that was made public Wednesday.


"A party may be exposed to a range of sanctions not only for violating a preservation order, but also for failing to produce relevant evidence when ordered to do so because it destroyed information that it had a duty to preserve," it wrote, while pointing out that it hasn't received a specific preservation order so far in any of the civil lawsuits.


The American Civil Liberties Union, U.S. Senator Rand Paul and the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles are among those who have filed lawsuits challenging the phone records program.


The telephony metadata retained beyond five years for the purpose of the civil litigation will be kept in a format that prevents access or use of it by NSA staff for any purpose including queries for gathering foreign intelligence information, according to the filing.


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Economics Has Math Problem | Noah Smith | BloombergView.com

Economics Has Math Problem | Noah Smith | BloombergView.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A lot of people complain about the math in economics. Economists tend to quietly dismiss such complaints as the sour-grapes protests of literary types who lack the talent or training to hack their way through systems of equations. But it isn't just the mathematically illiterate who grouse. New York University economist Paul Romer -- hardly a lightweight when it comes to equations -- recently complained about how economists use math as a tool of rhetoric instead of a tool to understand the world.

Personally, I think that what’s odd about econ isn’t that it uses lots of math -- it’s the way it uses math. In most applied math disciplines -- computational biology, fluid dynamics, quantitative finance -- mathematical theories are always tied to the evidence. If a theory hasn’t been tested, it’s treated as pure conjecture.

Not so in econ. Traditionally, economists have put the facts in a subordinate role and theory in the driver’s seat. Plausible-sounding theories are believed to be true unless proven false, while empirical facts are often dismissed if they don’t make sense in the context of leading theories. This isn’t a problem with math -- it was just as true back when economics theories were written out in long literary volumes. Econ developed as a form of philosophy and then added math later, becoming basically a form of mathematical philosophy.

In other words, econ is now a rogue branch of applied math. Developed without access to good data, it evolved different scientific values and conventions. But this is changing fast, as information technology and the computer revolution have furnished economists with mountains of data. As a result, empirical analysis is coming to dominate econ.


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Comcast has a plan to go after the cord-cutters | Tali Arbel | AP.org

Comcast has a plan to go after the cord-cutters | Tali Arbel | AP.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Comcast, which became a TV powerhouse by signing up Generation Xers, baby boomers, and their parents, is now fighting for millennial eyeballs.

The TV giant is investing in online media outlets like BuzzFeed and Vox that attract young viewers. It is setting up a TV-streaming service for millennials who don't watch a boob tube. And it's developing a YouTube-like video app and website.


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Verizon Said to Start Pared-Down Video Service in Coming Days | Scott Moritz | Bloomberg.com

Verizon Communications Inc. will make its Internet-based mobile video service widely available in the coming days, offering free shows aimed at young viewers, at least initially, according to a person familiar with the situation.

The Go90 service -- until now in testing stage -- will feature content only from a handful of media partners including AOL, DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc.’s Awesomeness TV, Vice Media Inc. and Viacom Inc., according to the person, who asked not to be named since the information isn’t yet public.

The service, which will show ads, is a pared-down version of what the carrier envisioned earlier this year.


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Microsoft Retrofitting Windows 7, 8.1 With Windows 10's Privacy-Invading 'Features' | Karl Bode | Techdirt

Microsoft Retrofitting Windows 7, 8.1 With Windows 10's Privacy-Invading 'Features' | Karl Bode | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Last week we noted that while Windows 10 has generally seen good reviews in terms of spit and polish, there's growing concern that the OS is too nosy for its own good, and that the opt-out functionality in the OS doesn't really work. Even when you've disabled a number of the nosier features (like Windows 10's new digital assistant, Cortana), the OS ceaselessly and annoyingly opens an array of encrypted channels back to the Redmond mother ship that aren't entirely under the user's control.

Now some of the information being transmitted is purportedly harmless, and some of the problems appear to be overblown (like Windows 10 being banned from some BitTorrent trackers for fear of it reporting user piracy activity), but an operating system you can't fully control is still undeniably stupid and annoying. And it's a curious choice for a company intent on moving beyond the fractured Windows adoption of yesteryear and encouraging the lion's share of Windows users to hop on to a new platform.

Making matters worse, Microsoft now seems intent on retro-fitting its older operating systems (specifically Windows 7 and Windows 8.1) with many of the annoying, chatty aspects of Windows 10.


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ID: Rexburg business leaders working to get advanced technology education program up and running | Chris Nestman | LocalNews8

ID: Rexburg business leaders working to get advanced technology education program up and running | Chris Nestman | LocalNews8 | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

High tech manufacturing is a booming business across eastern Idaho as well as across the country. Yet for all the job openings, many employers in these tech based manufacturing fields can't find enough workers.

"We see a lot of demand, a lot of openings in advanced manufacturing specifically, but not a lot of workforce going into that," said Scott Johnson, the Director of Economic Development for Rexburg.

That's why the Madison County Economic Partnership is looking to use a $25 thousand grant, as well as over $300 thousand worth of money and services, to create a new training program in Rexburg.


"Ultimately we would like to have a place where people could come in, and where they could learn about STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math based programs) through casual learning. Some projects based learning courses that cover all of the STEM areas," said Brandon Moffat of the Department of Labor.


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FCC Approves Charter-TWC Protective Orders | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

FCC Approves Charter-TWC Protective Orders | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The FCC has approved the protective orders and associated framework for treating sensitive information in the Charter-Time Warner Cable deal.

That means the FCC can start the shot clock on the merger review and open a comment window.

The three Democrats had already voted to approve, but the item could not be official until the other two votes were in or the time to vote had run out. The Republicans had issues with how the FCC had addressed protection of sensitive info more generally as part of a court remand of its protective orders in the AT&T-DirecTV and Comcast-TWC deal reviews.

The votes are now all in, with commissioner Ajit Pai dissenting in part and approving in part and commissioner Michael O'Rielly dissenting.

The order won't released immediately until the FCC incorporates the dissents.


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Despite reports of hacking, baby monitors remain woefully insecure | Lucian Constantin | NetworkWorld.com

Despite reports of hacking, baby monitors remain woefully insecure | Lucian Constantin | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Disturbing reports in recent years of hackers hijacking baby monitors and screaming at children have creeped out parents, but these incidents apparently haven't spooked makers of these devices.

A security analysis of nine baby monitors from different manufacturers revealed serious vulnerabilities and design flaws that could allow hackers to hijack their video feeds or take full control of the devices.


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Cable to FCC: Avoid One-Size-Fits-All Lifeline | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com

Cable to FCC: Avoid One-Size-Fits-All Lifeline | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Cable operators have definite opinions on how the FCC should revamp its lifeline subsidy program and they include widening the pool of eligible carriers by making it easier to apply, establish a third party to verify subscriber eligibility, and allowing subsidy recipients to use the money for more than the basic level of service.

That came in a filing at the FCC from the National Cable & Telecommunications Association, where the cable trade group warned against a "one-size-fits-all" approach and said the FCC needs to increase choices for Lifeline users and make it easier for carriers to participate.

As preamble to its arguments, NCTA pointed out that cable operators were already doing a lot on their own to deliver affordable broadband to low-income families, including the Connect2Compete initiative from Cox, Suddenlink, Mediacom and others, and Comcast's Internet Essentials program.


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USTelecom Supports FCC Efforts to Reform Lifeline | Anne Veigle | USTelecom

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has proposed some workable ideas for reforming the Lifeline program, which subsidizes phone service for eligible low-income consumers, USTelecom said in comments filed with the FCC. A more streamlined and efficient program will benefit companies and consumers, and allow more providers to participate. The FCC can facilitate this process by removing barriers to entry, such requiring the “eligible telecommunications carrier (ETC)” designation to provide Lifeline service, while ensuring sufficient safeguards to protect against waste, fraud and abuse.

There is sufficient competition in the voice marketplace to allow ETCs to opt out of providing Lifeline service, USTelecom said. Congress did not mandate that Lifeline service providers be ETCs, and the commission’s rules could be amended to permit, but not require, ETCs to participate in the Lifeline program.


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Hulu Offers Ad-Free Subscription Tier | Dade Hayes | Broadcasting & Cable

Hulu Offers Ad-Free Subscription Tier | Dade Hayes | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Continuing a newsy 2015, Hulu announced Wednesday it has added a new commercial-free subscription tier, confirming speculation from earlier this summer.

For $11.99, $4 more than the regular subscription fee, viewers get an SVOD experience comparable to that of Netflix and Amazon Prime.

Just two years after yanking Hulu off the market after months of sale attempts, Hulu’s majority stakeholders (Disney, Fox and NBCUniversal) have been investing heavily and making aggressive moves in the war for SVOD attention against its even-deeper-pocketed rivals.


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CYC 2.0 comments support FCC action on Lifeline broadband option | Connect Your Community 2.0

CYC 2.0 Director Bill Callahan yesterday submitted comments to the Federal Communications Commission supporting the agency’s proposal to create a low-income broadband option as part of the Federal Lifeline telephone program.

The FCC has asked for public comments on the idea itself, as well as on a long list of related questions laid out in a “Notice of Proposed Rulemaking”. Yesterday was the deadline for initial comments. A second round of “reply comments” will be due at the end of September.

In a three-page letter addressed to FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, Callahan wrote:


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OH: More than 3,000 jobs created in Hamilton since 2013 | Wayne Baker | Journal-News.com

OH: More than 3,000 jobs created in Hamilton since 2013 | Wayne Baker | Journal-News.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

New job opportunities are quickly replacing several years of stalled growth and closing companies in Hamilton — a product of a plan outlined — and questioned by many — when Joshua Smith was hired as city manager five years ago.

Many insisted Hamilton wouldn’t find its fiscal footing with Smith’s plan that called for patience mixed with aggressive steps to reinvent the city’s image and to improve infrastructure.

Still, some lament the loss of small businesses like Tom’s Cigar Store, which marked its final day of operation this past week after 98 years, and the city’s toughest neighborhoods still wrestle with crime and drugs.

“I took a look at some numbers since 2013,” Smith said. “We have created 3,064 net new jobs in Hamilton and that includes the Barclays announcement of 1,500 jobs coming with Barclays. Total corporate investment in Hamilton has been $176.5 million in the last five years and since 2010 there has been $65 million invested in downtown.”


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NE: Fiber to the farm: Yours for only $383,000 | Matt Olberding | Journal Star

NE: Fiber to the farm: Yours for only $383,000 | Matt Olberding | Journal Star | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Nelson Schneider was unhappy with the home Internet service he was getting from Windstream, which he said was slow and unreliable, as was satellite service, so he decided to try a different route.

How much would it cost, he asked Windstream, to run optic fiber out to his farm about 3 miles from Ceresco, Nebraska so he could get business-class Internet?

Windstream's response: About $383,000.

Though extreme, the situation highlights the hurdles rural residents in Nebraska and elsewhere can face when trying to get high-speed Internet.


The $383,000 cost included $350,000 to run the line and about $33,000 for three years of business-class Internet service. 


Windstream spokesman Michael Teague confirmed the price and said it was so high because the request was unusual and would have required multiple miles of fiber installation.


Schneider eventually found another provider, Northeast Nebraska Telephone Co., which agreed to run a fiber line to his property for the relative bargain price of $42,000. Northeast's nearest installation is 3 miles away.


Gene Hand, director of the telecommunications division of the Nebraska Public Service Commission, said the issue is not necessarily an urban vs. rural one.


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Sharks! Skateboarders! Trees! Here's What Discovery Learned From Filming in VR. | Eric Johnson | Ra/Code.net

Sharks! Skateboarders! Trees! Here's What Discovery Learned From Filming in VR. | Eric Johnson | Ra/Code.net | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It may not have a figurative “ocean of puppies” like MTV, but Discovery Communications is starting to experiment with virtual reality — in a literal ocean of sharks, among other places.

The cable network released a mobile app this week that features VR videos spun off from some of its top shows, such as “Mythbusters,” “Gold Rush” and “Survivorman.” These 360-degree videos can be viewed just by moving the phone around, but the app — made by VR video platform Littlstar — also features a Google Cardboard mode that splits the video in two, making it possible for Android and iOS users with a Cardboard or similar headset to watch the videos in VR.

The videos are also available on YouTube, on the Web and in one of the Samsung Gear VR’s dedicated video apps, Milk VR.


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Microsoft, Google, Amazon, others, aim for royalty-free video codecs | Peter Bright | Ars Technica

Microsoft, Google, Amazon, others, aim for royalty-free video codecs | Peter Bright | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Microsoft, Google, Mozilla, Cisco, Intel, Netflix, and Amazon today launched a new consortium, the Alliance for Open Media. The group plans to develop next-generation media formats—including audio and still images, but with video as the top priority—and deliver them as royalty-free open source, suitable for both commercial and noncommercial content.

It's better than H.264, but it's going to cost more than H.264, too.
The issue of patent licenses and royalties continues to plague the video industry. While H.264/AVC video had relatively cheap licensing, it looks as if its successor, H.265/HEVC, is going to be considerably more expensive. Organizations that derive significant income from patent royalties and IP licensing weren't happy with the low-cost model used for H.264, and so are pushing back. This is a great threat to open source and non-commercial streaming, which has no obvious way to pay the royalties. The HEVC royalty structure would even threaten the viability of commercial streamers such as Netflix.

The Alliance for Open Media would put an end to this problem.


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Union claims Verizon making inadequate investment in its copper phone lines | Bob Fernandez | Philly.com

Union claims Verizon making inadequate investment in its copper phone lines | Bob Fernandez | Philly.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Communications Workers of America (CWA) officials claim that Verizon has failed to fund the upkeep of its copper phone lines that still serve 8 million customers and called Wednesday for Pennsylvania regulators to investigate.

The CWA also sent letters to regulators in Delaware and Virginia seeking investigations. The union is expected to eventually send one to New Jersey regulators.

The union criticism comes as Verizon and the CWA are locked in thorny contract negotiations that include issues related to Verizon's commitment to its hybrid network of copper and high-speed fiber-optic lines, or FiOS.

The CWA would like Verizon to wire its entire multistate area for FiOS, a capital investment that would support CWA jobs.

But Verizon has said it will soon halt its FiOS expansion, leaving many areas with only copper lines. Without proper investment, the service quality in those copper-line areas will deterioriate for customers and could force them into a wireless service, the CWA said.


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Stephanie Santoso: White House maker advocate. Information Science PhD student. | Erin Carson | Tech Republic

Stephanie Santoso: White House maker advocate. Information Science PhD student. | Erin Carson | Tech Republic | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A funny thing happened to Stephanie Santoso. The now-researcher at the Tech and Innovation Division of the White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy was working in advertising. She was in account management, handling IBM Software, and she had this revelation: She was more interested in learning about her client's tech products than she was in her day job.

The idea crossed her mind that if she ever went back to school, she'd want to do something in tech.

Of course, a few things happened first. These days, she's involved in the maker movement at the White House, but before she got into making tech, she found herself making baked goods.


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The Cable Industry Is Fighting Tooth And Nail To Prevent Cable Set Top Box Competition | Karl Bode | Techdirt

The Cable Industry Is Fighting Tooth And Nail To Prevent Cable Set Top Box Competition | Karl Bode | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

For years now regulators have tried fruitlessly to bring a little more competition to the cable set top box market. While CableCARD was supposed to be a revolution on this front, regulatory enforcement was messy and inconsistent, and to protect set top box rental revenues and overall market control, cable companies rarely advertised the technology and made installations frequently nightmarish and expensive. When lackluster CableCARD stats then emerged annually, the cable industry just shrugged and apathetically declared that gosh -- nobody really wanted choice anyway.

Senators Ed Markey and Richard Blumenthal recently collected data from ten cable companies and found that things haven't really improved when it comes to set top box competition. Their data found that 99% of cable customers still rent a cable box, and pay $231 in fees annually for hardware that's usually not even worth a single year's payments. As a result, the cable industry generates $19.5 billion per year in rental fees, and has every incentive to keep things as they are.

Last fall, Congress passed the Satellite Television Extension Act Reauthorization (STELAR), which effectively killed the CableCARD and the FCC's sloppy attempt to crack open the set top market.


However, STELAR's passage included the creation of the the Downloadable Security Technology Advisory Committee (DSTAC), tasked with advising the FCC on how to move forward on a CableCARD replacement that actually works.


That's no small feat given the cable industry desperately wants to maintain the status quo, and the copyright brigades want hardware to be as locked and crippled as possible.


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CWA Calls for Regulators to Investigate Verizon's Refusal to Invest in Landline Upkeep | CWA-Union.org

CWA Calls for Regulators to Investigate Verizon's Refusal to Invest in Landline Upkeep | CWA-Union.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Communications Workers of America (CWA) today announced it is filing letters with telephone regulators in six states and Washington, DC calling on them to open investigations into the deterioration of Verizon’s copper landline networks. In July, Verizon admitted in a letter to the FCC that it had only spent $200 million over the last seven years to maintain its copper landline network in eleven states and the District of Columbia. (*)

The $200 million investment is less than one percent of the amount phone and DSL customers pay Verizon for service, which means the average customer is financing wireless and fiber expansion, rather than the upkeep of the network they rely on.(*)

In light of the new evidence presented by CWA to regulators, scores of legislators across the region joined the call for renewed investigation into Verizon's abandonment of the copper network.


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Aitkin County, MN: Broadbanding together | Adam Hoogenakker | MessageMedia.co

Aitkin County, MN: Broadbanding together | Adam Hoogenakker | MessageMedia.co | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

There seems to be as many phone company providers in Aitkin County as there are Johnsons in the phone book. When it comes to the availability of broadband, Aitkin County is hoping to bring the providers to the table to discuss expanding the service throughout the county.

Ross Wagner, Aitkin County economic development, appeared in front of the Aitkin County Board of Commissioners at its Aug. 25 meeting to request the Economic Development Fund be renamed to the Broadband Development Fund, and to authorize $50,000 for a pre-engineering study to be completed.

In a memo to the commissioners, Wagner requests the $525,297.61 balance be used for broadband development.

“The Economic Development Fund was created with excess PILT payments and revolving loan fund payments,” wrote Wagner. “After the revolving loan fund was abolished, the funds remained, to be used for future economic development infrastructure projects.”

Wagner hoped to use the funds as a way to engage with potential partners and providers in developing a partnership moving forward – to show the county was putting skin in the game.


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AT&T Maps Out GigaPower Progress | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com

AT&T Maps Out GigaPower Progress | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Taking a page from the Google Fiber playbook, AT&T has introduced a map that charts the deployment progress of its fiber-based GigaPower platform, highlighting cities that have the 1-Gig service today, have rollouts underway or are being “explored” for potential future launches.

Updated: AT&T pointed out that its new mapping system is more interactive in that it allows customers to view GigaPower markets but also drill down to the city level for more detail on where GigaPower is being deployed and where it will be deployed.

“Potential customers, city officials, gig seekers or anyone planning a move can use the new interactive map at att.com/gigapowermap to keep up on our progress as we add new cities,” Joey Schultz, AT&T’s vice president of home solutions, digital experience, expalined in this blog post.


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New York’s electricity market is a scam | David Cay Johnston Opinion | Al Jazeera America

New York’s electricity market is a scam | David Cay Johnston Opinion | Al Jazeera America | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If you agree with legislators in about half the states that the most efficient way to provide electricity is through wholesale auctions, take a leap down the rabbit hole into world of the New York Public Service Commission.

Electricity should be cheap in New York because the state’s capacity to generate power far outstrips demand. Its surplus is huge, as much as 63 percent in May, and never less than 4.6 percent, New England Power Coordinating Council reliability reports show.

Prices should fall when demand is below capacity. But when capacity falls short of demand by even 1 percent, electricity market prices soar. Demand in New York is falling, primarily because of “a decrease in upstate industrial” electricity use, the Northeast Power Coordinating Council’s latest report shows.

Yet instead of enjoying cheaper power, New Yorkers pay 40 percent more than the average for the 48 contiguous states, federal pricing data show. Adjusted for inflation, electricity in New York costs almost 17 percent more than a decade ago (though it is down a bit from last year).


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Benton Tells FCC: Use Lifeline to Make Broadband More Affordable | Benton Foundation

Benton Tells FCC: Use Lifeline to Make Broadband More Affordable | Benton Foundation | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In comments filed at the Federal Communications Commission on August 31, the Benton Foundation said that broadband service is crucial to full participation in our society and economy which are increasingly dependent upon the rapid exchange of information. In its filing, Benton focuses on the potential benefits of broadband for low-income consumers, especially ones that have: a) schoolchildren, b) unemployed or underemployed adults, c) people with disabilities, and d) people affected by illnesses.

“By making broadband more affordable for low-income consumers through its Lifeline program,” said Benton’s Director of Policy, Amina Fazlullah, “the FCC will help facilitate better connections within these people’s communities, and to the world.”

Benton asks the FCC to establish minimum service standards for Lifeline voice, text messaging and broadband services with two main goals: 1) to ensure Lifeline recipients receive services that facilitate meaningful, functional use, and 2) to afford adaptability for the different needs of Lifeline-eligible populations in different geographical areas and markets. In setting the standards, Benton says, the FCC should encourage competition and consumer choice for both voice and broadband service wherever possible. When setting minimum service standards for broadband, the FCC must discourage providers from rolling out wired or wireless services that include data caps, Benton says, due to their pernicious effects on low-income households. Data caps often come with hidden financial costs that confuse consumers and potentially bump up their bills in unforeseen ways.


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VA: Danville's Incremental Strategy Pays Off - Community Broadband Bits Episode 166 | community broadband networks

VA: Danville's Incremental Strategy Pays Off - Community Broadband Bits Episode 166 | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Danville, Virginia, has long been one of the municipal network approaches that we like to highlight. Built in a region hard hit by the transition away from tobacco and manufacturing economies, the open access fiber network called nDanville has led to many new employers coming to town and has shown the benefits of a low-risk, incremental investment strategy for building a fiber network.

Jason Grey, Interim Utilities Manager, is back on the show to update us on their approach. He introduced the network to us three years ago on episode 22.

Since we last checked in, Danville has continued expanding the fiber network to a greater number of residents and Jason talks with us about the importance and challenges of marketing to residents. We also discuss how they lay conduit as a matter of course, even in areas they do not plan to serve immediately with the fiber network.

Read all of our coverage of Danville here.


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Hamilton Partners With Local Provider to Serve Businesses in Ohio | community broadband networks

Hamilton Partners With Local Provider to Serve Businesses in Ohio | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Hamilton, Ohio, has entered into a partnership with local firm, CenterGrid, to use city-owned fiber to boost economic development. The firm will offer Internet access and data transport to local businesses via existing infrastructure as the two enter into a five-year pilot project agreement, reports the Journal-News.

The city's business incubator, the Hamilton Mill, is the initial pilot site where emerging businesses are already receiving high-speed connectivity:

“As the initial pilot site, CenterGrid’s service has resulted in the Mill receiving network connectivity that is better than 83 percent of Internet connections throughout the US — that is huge,” Chris Lawson, executive director of the Hamilton Mill said. “For the types of companies that we are attracting, this level of connectivity is imperative for them to be successful.”

A press release from CenterGrid describes rates as economical, competitive, and determined by individual business requirements. According to the press release, entrepreneurs at The Mill are already taking advantage of the service:


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