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Close the "Water's Edge" Loophole | Truth-Out.org

Close the "Water's Edge" Loophole | Truth-Out.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Corporations can't have their cake and eat it too.


Right now, corporations are making billions of dollars off of you and me, and are hiding those billions in offshore bank accounts to avoid paying taxes to our government.


But what if we closed the tax loopholes that allow corporations to skip out on paying taxes, and brought those trillions of dollars back home?


Some states are already doing that, and they're seeing some pretty amazing results.


Back in 2003, the Montana state legislature closed that state's tax loophole, a so-called "water's edge" loophole, that allowed companies to avoid state taxes by hiding their profits in offshore bank accounts.


In the decade since, Montana has brought in over $40 million, which is a lot considering that state only spends about $1.8 billion each year.


Last summer, Oregon jumped on the bandwagon, and closed a similar tax loophole. The state now expects to bring in an additional $17 million in tax revenue from corporations this year alone.


And, a new report by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (U.S. PIRG) found that if 21 other states and the District of Columbia had closed their offshore corporate tax-evading loopholes, they would have brought in over $1 billion in additional tax revenue in 2012.


Now just imagine what would happen if the federal government took similar actions, and closed corporate tax loopholes that allow giant transnational corporations like Apple to hide billions in profits overseas.


According to Apple, the giant tech company paid around $6 billion in taxes in 2012, and will probably pay around $7 billion in taxes for 2013.


But as multiple tax experts and lawmakers have said, Apple should be paying a lot more in taxes to our government.


After all, it's one of America's most profitable companies. In 2013 alone, it took home $37 billion in profits on $171 billion in revenue.


So, how is Apple making so much, but paying so little in taxes to support our nation?


It's hiding a lot of its money offshore.


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Can the Great Lakes become an engine for growth again? | Tom Precious | The Buffalo News

Can the Great Lakes become an engine for growth again? | Tom Precious | The Buffalo News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Many parts of the world are suffering through desperate droughts. Areas of California have enacted severe water restrictions, while wild fires rage through parched regions of the West and communities throughout the Southwest worry about how to get water for their growing populations.


Those scenarios are expected to get only worse with climate change.


Now travel north, to the Great Lakes, the world’s largest natural fresh water reservoir. They contain 20 percent of the world’s surface fresh water and 84 percent of North America’s.


The light bulb has gone on for a few people in the old Rust Belt.


Great Lakes optimists are talking of a new, water-driven moniker for the region’s future: the Blue Belt.


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Chicago, IL : State of the Suburbs: New road projects cement future | Marni Pyke | Daily Herald

Chicago, IL : State of the Suburbs: New road projects cement future | Marni Pyke | Daily Herald | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As the economy sputtered during the Great Recession, innovative transportation projects such as the Elgin-O'Hare Expressway extension sustained and created jobs.


Now that the City of Chicago and suburbs are rebounding, those projects will shape how we drive, live and work in the very near future.


To the north, the Illinois tollway is regenerating the Jane Addams Tollway (I-90) as a wider, "smart" corridor with new interchanges that are spurring retail and commercial development.

And just west of O'Hare, crews are pushing the Elgin-O'Hare Expressway (Route 390) east to the airport.

"It's a marvelous project with huge potential for economic development," DuPage County Board Chairman Dan Cronin said.


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Fox News Scores Big Court Win Against TVEyes | Eriq Gardner | The Hollywood Reporter

Fox News Scores Big Court Win Against TVEyes | Eriq Gardner | The Hollywood Reporter | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

On Tuesday, a federal judge in New York gave Fox News a partial win in an important copyright dispute that could influence the future of the news business.

Fox News has been taking on a media monitoring service called TVEyes, which is probably unfamiliar to most but has been a resource for many well-known journalists, politicians and corporations who wish to track what cable news is saying about a given topic. The cable news network has argued that a company that records some 1,400 television and radio stations and charges customers $500 a month for access to a near real time index of clips — with the ability to share such videos — threatens its revenues and violates its copyrights.

Last September, TVEyes convinced Judge Alvin Hellerstein that the core part of its service relating to indexing and excerpting was protected as a fair use. The judge noted that TVEyes was the only company offering such a comprehensive service and held up its transformative value.

However, the judge wanted more discussion on some of TVEyes' other features.


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Sinclair: FCC had nothing to do with retrans deal | Kathryn Bachman | Katy on the Hill

Sinclair: FCC had nothing to do with retrans deal | Kathryn Bachman | Katy on the Hill | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sinclair Broadcast Group shot down claims by the Federal Communications Commission that the agency’s intervention was the reason that Dish and Sinclair finally hammered out a new retransmission consent agreement.

In a blunt statement, Sinclair said:

“We understand the temptation for the FCC to take credit for resolving this impasse, but their intervention had nothing to do with it. We were very close to a resolution well before Chairman Wheeler got involved. In fact, the FCC process actually delayed the resolution, because it added more issues to negotiate, which lengthened DISH’s service interruption, not shortened it. And it is important to remember that our stations never went off the air in any of those markets, but were consistently available free of charge to our viewers, as well as through DISH’s competitors.”

The two parties announced late Wednesday an end to a day-long blackout of 129 Sinclair stations in 79 markets on Dish and an agreement “in principle.”


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MA: Warwick still unsure on WiredWest | Rachel Rapkin | The Recorder

MA: Warwick still unsure on WiredWest | Rachel Rapkin | The Recorder | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

With months of complex negotiations in the works, Warwick still hasn’t joined WiredWest’s cooperative to bring high-speed Internet to the small rural town of Warwick in Western Massachusetts.

Earlier this year, state supported Mass. Broadband Institute (MBI) released a statement estimating the town’s projected cost to extend the existing fiber-optic network the “final mile” to homes and businesses at $2.4 million if it were to join WiredWest. The problem, however, was that the data used to come up with the estimate was based on digital maps that inaccurately measured the number of houses in the town. Broadband Committee Chairman Tom Wyatt said when MBI representatives came to Warwick to confirm the data, the building count requiring broadband connectivity had decreased and the process had to restart.

“We’ve been told that (the data is) coming soon, but it’s been a long time,” he said. “That is one of the reasons why we are hesitant to bring it to the town for a vote — because the $2.4 million figure may be changing.”

Wyatt said another reason why the town is skeptical of the cooperative is that Warwick — with fewer than 1,000 residents, very few businesses and a high tax rate — will endure higher taxes and generate debt for two to three years until WiredWest begins generating revenue.


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NY: Genesee County tech park is key part of regional economic development pitch | Mike Pettinella | The Buffalo News

NY: Genesee County tech park is key part of regional economic development pitch | Mike Pettinella | The Buffalo News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A major Genesee County technology project could have the potential to create more than 10,000 jobs over the next 20 years. It’s an integral part of the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council’s draft of its application for a $500 million Upstate Revitalization Initiative award.

The Western New York Science, Technology, Advanced Manufacturing Park in the Town of Alabama could have a significant impact on the economy from Rochester to Buffalo for years to come, Genesee County Manager Jay A. Gsell said Thursday.

“We’re talking about the creation of thousands of jobs paying $60,000 to $70,000 a year just at the site itself, and a multiplier effect of two to three times that number in new employment opportunities in the region,” Gsell said. “All boats rise with the tide in this case.”

The Finger Lakes council released the document earlier this week, stating that it opens a month-long public review period leading up to the Oct. 5 submission of the final proposal to the state.

Finger Lakes is one of seven upstate economic development councils that are vying for three $500 million grants to be used for projects to spur growth and create jobs. The others are the Capital Region, Central New York, Mid-Hudson, Mohawk Valley, North Country and Southern Tier.

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Hitsville vs. Soulsville: How Detroit and Memphis are embracing their soul music heritage | Glen Morren & Criag Meek | SoapBoxMedia.com

Hitsville vs. Soulsville: How Detroit and Memphis are embracing their soul music heritage | Glen Morren & Criag Meek | SoapBoxMedia.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Only in the last decade have Cincinnatians come to appreciate the legacy of King Records. The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame's historical marker at its once-bustling, now-decrepit recording studio in Evanston explains the company's significance:

"From 1943-1971 King Records forever changed American music. Owner Syd Nathan gave the world bluegrass, R&B, rock and roll, doo-wop, country, soul and funk. With stars from James Brown to the Stanley Brothers and its innovative integrated business model, Cincinnati's King Records revolutionized the music industry."

A variety of music and neighborhood folks — including Bootsy Collins, Cincinnati USA Music Heritage Foundation and Xavier University — have been engaged in efforts to preserve the crumbling studio and celebrate King's place in music history. Meanwhile, one of building's owners has applied for a demolition permit. City agencies have come out against demolition, but the old building is far from saved.

There was a time when King Records stood shoulder-to-shoulder with the best-known independent record labels like Motown in Detroit and Stax in Memphis. Some time in the 1960s — probably when James Brown left — their paths diverged, and today most music fans appreciate the heritage of Motown and Stax while mostly forgetting King's impact.

A big reason why Motown and Stax are still known today is that their home cities have preserved and continue to celebrate what those labels and companies meant to local citizens and to the world. As this story explains, those efforts were hit-and-miss and the work remains unfinished — but ultimately Detroit and Memphis embraced their roles as music capitals, and those cities are reaping the benefits now in terms of tourism dollars and civic pride.

Cincinnati arguably had as big an impact on American music as Detroit or Memphis. But will Cincinnati follow their path, embrace our music heritage and make it relevant in the 21st Century?


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Katrina may be a metaphor to some, but it’s still a reality to New Orleans | Janell Ross | WashPost.com

Katrina may be a metaphor to some, but it’s still a reality to New Orleans | Janell Ross | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Come first to the corner of Flood and North Galvez streets, Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans.

Here, where the unauthorized Lower Ninth tour groups almost never come to gawk and the planning experts rarely do, it’s just silent enough to take it all in. This is not the stretch where Brad Pitt’s charitable organization has rebuilt a series of elevated, solar-panel-equipped homes. This isn’t the site of a big new school. This isn’t the place that President Obama spoke of Thursday, a city that is “coming back better and stronger.” This is where the remnants of sinking curbs and bits of concrete foundation betray the missing homes. They speak of the people lost and places of rest and community obliterated. They hint at what has not — and perhaps will not ever — be replaced.

Katrina is a one-word metaphor for major failing and limited redress, for belated reaction and selective improvement. Katrina, on some level during the storm and in the decade since, became synonymous with government abdication and abandonment.

Ten years after Katrina assaulted New Orleans, that assessment seems likely to follow George W. Bush, the president who called himself a compassionate conservative, into history. Bush and his handlers made the fateful choice to fly Air Force One over New Orleans during this city’s many hours of tremendous need — and never stop. Early requests for transportation assistance went unmet and post-storm efforts to evacuate those in the worst conditions stretched well beyond reason.

As the president who followed Bush, Obama has thus far borne the brunt of those comparisons. The expression, “X is Obama’s Katrina,” came up after the 2009 mass shooting at Fort Hood and amid revelations about the still-sputtering economy in 2010. It came up that same year during and after the U.S. response to the earthquake that devastated Haiti, as well as after the massive BP oil spill. We heard the phrase again following the Benghazi attack in 2012 and Obamacare’s rollout in 2013. And we’ve all heard the Katrina comparisons in the years since: to the spike in border crossings to Ebola and to domestic spying.


Sometimes the metaphor is overstatement. Sometimes it is part of an earnest attempt to convey the significance and danger presented by current events. And sometimes a reference to Katrina resonates because it connotes an inhumane distance and official desertion that many Americans did not know was possible before Katrina.


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Gigabites: Connecticut Fights the Gig Fight | Mari Silbey | Light Reading

Gigabites: Connecticut Fights the Gig Fight | Mari Silbey | Light Reading | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It's time for your Gigabites roundup. In this edition, Connecticut pushes forward with the CT Gig Project, another Kansas town lines up for gigabit broadband and more.


The state of Connecticut made news this week with an ongoing fight between municipal leaders and local broadband providers. The battle is over an initiative called the CT Gig Project, which aims to bring gigabit Internet to communities throughout the region.
While the project has been underway for about a year, politicians in New Haven only recently pushed the plan forward with a resolution submitted to the city services committee. The resolution proposes a feasibility study for network deployment and includes a request to sign interconnection agreements with other cities and towns that want to participate in the project.

Local ISPs, however, are vehemently again the entire CT Gig Project. The New England Cable and Telecommunications Association, like other opponents before it, notes that there is already private investment taking place, and that a government-backed initiative is both risky and unnecessary. (See also FCC Clears Way for Muni Network Expansion.)


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Finally, your Gogo inflight WiFi is about to get a lot faster | Brian Fung | WashPost.com

Finally, your Gogo inflight WiFi is about to get a lot faster | Brian Fung | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A new technology that could make your inflight WiFi a heck of a lot faster just got regulatory approval from the Federal Aviation Administration this week — meaning that on some flights, your Internet might actually become usable again.

Gogo said Monday it's won clearance to start rolling out 2Ku, a connection technology that it says will boost download speeds by up to 20 times over more conventional technology. The big difference?


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Shutting down a transparency tool in 29 countries? Twitter can do better. | Deji Olukotun Blog | Access Now

Shutting down a transparency tool in 29 countries? Twitter can do better. | Deji Olukotun Blog | Access Now | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Last week, Twitter shut down a tool that helps people hold politicians accountable in 29 countries around the world. The Netherlands-based civil society group Open State Foundation created Politwoops, which scans the Twitter accounts of politicians for tweets they’ve deleted. Deleted tweets can provide insight to the viewpoints of public officials, and journalists have been using Politwoops to keep representatives accountable for what they say publicly. In the spirit of transparency,


Open State allowed other organizations to use the code of the tool, and use it they have, everywhere from Argentina, to Turkey, to Spain, to the United Kingdom. But on August 21, Twitter turned it off.

Twitter informed Politwoops that it was violating the terms of its Application Programming Interface, or API. Three months earlier, Twitter decided to stop letting the Sunlight Foundation, a U.S. transparency organization, use the tool. To justify that decision, Twitter explained that “No one user is more deserving of that ability [to delete a tweet] than another. Indeed, deleting a tweet is an expression of one’s voice.”

Twitter is arguing that deleting a tweet is the same regardless of who does it — an elected official or an ordinary user. However, that ignores the fact that if the public suddenly can’t see what an official has said publicly, it creates problems for transparency and accountability.


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Sprint is dangling a year of free service in front of DirecTV customers | Brian Fung | WashPost.com

Sprint is dangling a year of free service in front of DirecTV customers | Brian Fung | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sprint is offering DirecTV customers a tremendous deal, potentially worth hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars.

The country's fourth-largest cellular carrier says it will give DirecTV subscribers a year's worth of free wireless service if they switch their cellphone plans to Sprint.

The promotion takes explicit aim at AT&T, whose recent purchase of DirecTV made it the country's biggest pay-TV provider. Rolling out a new plan to consumers this month, AT&T said it would give DirecTV customers a $300 credit if they made AT&T their wireless company, too.

Now Sprint is attempting to one-up AT&T with its own offer. The year-long deal gives you unlimited talk, text and 2 GB of monthly data per line. After the year is up, the company said in a release, customers will start paying at the following rates for the same package of features:


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Comcast Launches Video Calling | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com

Comcast Launches Video Calling | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In a FaceTime-like move that could bring some additional stickiness to its digital voice service, Comcast has quietly introduced a two-way, mobile-to-mobile video calling feature to its Xfinity Connect app for iOS and Android devices.

The feature lets Xfinity Voice subs make video calls to each other, and it was included in the 6.0 version of the Xfinity Connect app that was released on August 25 simultaneously for iOS and Android smartphones and tablets.


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Chicago, IL: State of suburbs: Investors pump new life into business | Kim Mikus | Daily Herald

Chicago, IL: State of suburbs: Investors pump new life into business | Kim Mikus | Daily Herald | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

After weathering several years of stagnation, suburban Chicago economic development leaders and business experts like what they see when it comes to business expansion.

"Investors are coming back to the suburbs in a way that we haven't seen in years," said Karla Harmon, senior vice president at Jones Lang LaSalle. "I'm very optimistic. Things are good," said Harmon, who focuses on leasing in the Oak Brook and Naperville areas. She believes the economic environment is improving, tenants are expanding and new business is coming in.

Josh Grodzin is the director of development and marketing for Elk Grove Village.

"There is a lot going on in the area of manufacturing and logistics," he said. "That's the bread and butter of Elk Grove Village."

Ceva Logistics, Panattoni Development and Forsythe Data Centers are all in the expansion mode, he said, adding that a number of older buildings were torn down last year and developers are building new.


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New technology sees first braille tablet | RNIB | Supporting people with sight loss

New technology sees first braille tablet | RNIB | Supporting people with sight loss | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

NB talks to Kristina Tsvetanova, a co-founder and CEO of Blitab about a possible ground breaking braille tablet.


What is Blitab®?


BLITAB® is the first ever braille tablet, which uses a new liquid-based technology to create tactile relief outputting braille, graphics and maps for the blind and partially sighted. We call it BLITAB® – the iPad for the blind. It is a next-generation affordable and multi-functional device for braille reading and writing that displays a whole page of braille text, without any mechanical elements.

How did you come up with the idea for a braille tablet?


Everything started three years ago during my studies, when a colleague of mine, sitting next to me, asked me to sign him in for an online course. I did it, but after that I realised Peter was blind. For the first time, I understood that something sighted people take for granted can be a challenge for others. This was the trigger, how we started developing a revolutionary tactile technology that will disrupt the status quo. In the past 10 months, we transferred the concept and project into a start-up company with social impact. Within this short space of time, our tablet has become an 11-time award-winning social and innovative project, with more than 20 sustainability recognitions. And more importantly, we already have more than 2,500 sign-up testers, among them 300 children in 34 countries, and this was the reason we were spotted and awarded as social change makers.


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ACA to FCC: Smaller Cable Companies Are Shutting Down and Congress Should Know Why | Joan Engebretson | Telecompetitor

ACA to FCC: Smaller Cable Companies Are Shutting Down and Congress Should Know Why | Joan Engebretson | Telecompetitor | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The American Cable Association, which represents small, primarily rural, cable companies, is again asking the Federal Communications Commission to report on and study the closing of smaller cable systems, including why the closings occurred. Ninety-one cable systems serving more than 5,300 subscribers shut down in 2014, on top of 133 cable system shut-downs in 2013 and 129 shut-downs in 2012 that impacted more than 12,000 people, according to the ACA.

Using data from the National Cable Television Cooperative (NCTC), the ACA reports that all told, since 2008, NCTC members have closed a total of 1,169 cable systems, affecting over 55K subscribers. The filing comes as the FCC requested data for their “Annual Assessment of the Status of Competition in the Market for Delivery of Video Programming” report to Congress.


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CFO: Consolidated Communications Video Takes Backseat to Broadband | Joan Engebretson | Telecompetitor

CFO: Consolidated Communications Video Takes Backseat to Broadband | Joan Engebretson | Telecompetitor | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The latest conflict between content owners and video service providers may have been de-escalated this week when FCC intervention put a halt to Sinclair’s blackout of Dish Network, but conflicts remain. Some video providers – including Consolidated Communications — are finding video content economics so challenging that they are rethinking that whole line of business.

“We used to be very triple play and video-centric,” said Consolidated Communications CFO Steve Childers in a presentation at the Midwest IDEAS Investor Conference in Chicago today, which was also webcast. “But with the explosion of video content costs and the cost of [customer premises equipment] for video customers, we’re really trying to, from the consumer side, stabilize our broadband services – and we’ll offer subscription services . . . but we’d really rather work with somebody to help them with over-the-top or streaming capabilities.”


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Ten ISPs Sign On With FCC Fund, Will Expand Rural Broadband To Over 7M Customers In 45 States | Kate Cox | Consumerist

Ten ISPs Sign On With FCC Fund, Will Expand Rural Broadband To Over 7M Customers In 45 States | Kate Cox | Consumerist | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

While those of us who live in or near the country’s medium and large cities see slow but eventual improvements in broadband service and sometimes even some competition, the same is not true for millions of Americans who live in the more rural parts of the country. Running wires outside of the ‘burbs costs more money than it brings in, so carriers aren’t keen to do it without a boost. And that’s where the FCC’s Connect America fund comes in.

The Fund is a big pile of money that broadband carriers can tap into for funds to kickstart their own investments in bringing broadband to underserved rural markets. This week was the deadline for businesses to say if they’re going to take the money and participate or not, and the result is good news for consumers, 7.3 million of whom should be getting some service sometime soon.


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OR: Portland mayor kicks off TechCrawl, praises city for tech diversity push | John Cook | GeekWire

OR: Portland mayor kicks off TechCrawl, praises city for tech diversity push | John Cook | GeekWire | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Hundreds of engineers, entrepreneurs, designers and other technology professionals gathered in the hot sun Wednesday evening for the fourth annual Portland TechCrawl, the kickoff event of the two-day TechFestNW conference.

Portland Mayor Charlie Hales celebrated at the first stop, addressing the crowd in front of the Block 300 Building, home to fast-growing Portland companies such as Puppet Labs and CrowdCompass.

“We appreciate the fact that you have made commitments to be Portlanders,” said Hales. “You are competitors, but you are also collaborators and you are part of a community.”

Hales specifically pointed to the efforts by the tech community in Portland to push for greater diversity through the Portland Tech Diversity Pledge, a citywide effort to get more women and minorities involves in the industry.


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With Tech Garden, Syracuse seeds regional growth | Rachael Barker | The Avenue | Brookings.edu

With Tech Garden, Syracuse seeds regional growth | Rachael Barker | The Avenue | Brookings.edu | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

After several decades working at large companies on the West Coast, Amy and Joe Casper returned home to Syracuse, NY, laying the groundwork for the next phase of their careers: launching a start-up focused on specialized LED lighting. At The Tech Garden, the region’s growing business incubator, the Caspers refined their product, identified a specialized market in professional sports arena lighting, and grew from three employees to 25.

Since Ephesus Lighting moved out of the incubator, it has doubled its employment. Today the company sells to the NCAA and major league teams, with the 2015 Super Bowl between the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks played under Ephesus lights.

The Caspers’ story shows the payoff emerging from the region’s now decade-long bet that investing in a business incubator and other entrepreneurship supports can help revitalize an older industrial region.


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NY: Union says Verizon is needlessly passing up broadband money| Rick Karlin | Albany Times Union

NY: Union says Verizon is needlessly passing up broadband money| Rick Karlin | Albany Times Union | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The union representing many Verizon employees, and which has been in a contract dispute with the company, is criticizing their passing up federal dollars to expand broadband service into rural, underserved areas.

The company, according to the Communications Workers of America (CWA), turned down Federal Communications Commission “Connect America” funds to help pay for broadband in a number of states including New York.

Verizon, according to CWA, “Was offered $568 million over six years by the Federal government to bring broadband to 270,000 locations in Washington, DC, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Virginia.”

“Verizon’s track record is clear,” said Bob Master, Assistant to the Vice President of District One of the Communications Workers of America. “Even while raking in a billion dollars per month in profits, Verizon is turning its back on under-served communities by refusing federal subsidies to expand high-speed internet access.”

The total cost of the broadband extension isn’t clear, so it wasn’t immediately known how much the company would have to pay in addition to the federal money to adequately extend services in areas that are under-served.


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WA: Kitsap County Asks Residents Where to Expand | community broadband networks

WA: Kitsap County Asks Residents Where to Expand | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Kitsap Public Utility District (KPUD) is turning to residents to plot the course for expansion, reports the Central Kitsap Reporter. In order to find out where the greatest interest lies in municipal fiber connectivity, KPUD will be using the COS Service Zones survey system.

“Since this is a public network, we do not feel comfortable relying on anecdotal data to determine the next phase for broadband expansion,” said Bob Hunter, Kitsap PUD General Manager. “What’s most appealing with the COS Service Zones is that it enables us to let the gathering and push come from the citizens. We want to be sure the residents are driving this.”

We have reported on the KPUD, mostly as it related to other stories. The publicly owned open access fiber network in Kitsap County, Washington began providing wholesale only service in 2000. The goal was to provide better connectivity to public facilities and improve emergency communications and the KPUD has reached that goal.


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Apple Takes Washington | Tony Romm | POLITICO.com

Apple Takes Washington | Tony Romm | POLITICO.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As Apple chief Tim Cook quietly slipped out of a public meeting at the White House for a private lunch with Eric Holder in December 2013, the attorney general braced himself for a rough encounter. His Justice Department had sued Apple more than a year earlier, after all, for the way that the company priced its e-books, touching off a bruising legal war between the two. And this time Apple seemed even more apoplectic. It was seething over a flurry of reports that the NSA had quietly cracked its servers and gained access to untold millions of its customers’ personal communications.

Cook and Holder hotly debated security and privacy during their first-ever meeting on that freezing December day, but the attorney general said he sat across a much different leader than he had expected. “We found we had a mutual Alabama connection,” Holder recently explained in an interview. The sister of Holder’s wife had helped desegregate the University of Alabama, and Cook, a gay man born and raised in the South, knew firsthand the impact of discrimination.

Cook’s demeanor, however, wasn’t even the most remarkable part of the meeting. A private conference in Washington with the attorney general (in itself a rarity for many tech magnates) would have been unthinkable for Cook’s irascible predecessor, Steve Jobs, who actively disdained D.C. Cook, much as he sought to shirk Jobs’ shadow as CEO, had also endeavored quietly to rethink his company’s relationship with the nation’s capital, becoming a leader not only ready to engage its power brokers but challenge them openly when it mattered most.


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CenturyLink to Bringing Broadband to 24,000 Rural Households in Louisiana | MyArkLaMiss.com

CenturyLink to Bringing Broadband to 24,000 Rural Households in Louisiana | MyArkLaMiss.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

CenturyLink announced today that it will bring high-speed Internet services to more than 24,000 rural households and businesses in Louisiana by accepting the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)’s Connect America Fund (CAF) statewide offer in Louisiana.

CenturyLink is accepting 33 CAF phase II statewide offers from the FCC to bring Internet service with speeds of at least 10 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload to approximately 1.2 million locations in FCC-designated, high-cost census blocks. The company is accepting a total of approximately $500 million a year for six years.

High-speed Internet access brings many benefits to rural communities, including economic development and better access to education and healthcare services such as distance learning and telemedicine.


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CEOs Call for Wage Increases for Workers! What’s the Catch? | Jim Hightower | Truthdig

CEOs Call for Wage Increases for Workers! What’s the Catch? | Jim Hightower | Truthdig | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Peter Georgescu has a message he wants America’s corporate and political elites to hear: “I’m scared,” he said in a recent New York Times opinion piece.

He adds that Paul Tudor Jones is scared, too, as is Ken Langone. And they are trying to get the Powers That Be to pay attention to their urgent concerns. But wait—these three are Powers That Be. Georgescu is former head of Young & Rubicam, one of the world’s largest PR and advertising firms; Jones is a quadruple-billionaire and hedge fund operator; and Langone is a founder of Home Depot.

What is scaring the pants off these powerful peers of the corporate plutocracy?


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