Surfing the Broad...
Follow
Find
117.9K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

Cable is Ready for an IPv6 World. Are You? | CableTechTalk.com

Cable is Ready for an IPv6 World. Are You? | CableTechTalk.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it


This week’s #BroadData is a look at the end of a limited Internet and the beginning of an endless one.


If you haven’t already heard of the end of IPv4, you’re sure to hear more in the future.  Essentially, the number of IP addresses – the unique codes that identify individual Internet connected devices – are running out.


Each IP address is 32-bits long, which allows for about 4 billion unique addresses. Some regions have already exhausted usable IP addresses and are under emergency IP measures.


The solution is IPv6 – a new 128-bit IP address that allows for trillions and trillions of unique IP numbers. Problem solved, right? Well, transitioning is easier said than done. Many websites and companies have made the switch and are ready for the new IP system, but for others it will take time and huge investments to make sure the new IP addresses work.


The cable industry has been a leader in preparing its networks for the transition. But solving this problem and getting everyone working with IPv6 is going to come from efforts across all IP-dependent industries and organizations.


To better conceptualize the need for the transition, see the chart below. It reveals the explosive growth in use of the old IPv4 standard and perfectly highlights the impending need for the switch. Just look at Brazil…


Click headline to view the infographic--

more...
No comment yet.
Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Would You Order Broadband From A Company That Can't Even Figure Out How To Let You Sign Up Online? | Mike Masnick | Techdirt

Would You Order Broadband From A Company That Can't Even Figure Out How To Let You Sign Up Online? | Mike Masnick | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Frontier Communications has been growing rapidly as other large broadband providers offload their unwanted DSL customers on the company that seems happy to gobble them up. The company doesn't have a particularly good reputation wherever it goes -- especially on the customer service front -- but it's quite astounding to see that it has now, apparently, stopped offering a way to sign up for service online, forcing anyone who wants service to call or do live chat:

Frontier is so out there on the... frontier of the internet, that apparently it can't even figure out how to use the web for ordering service, as noted by a source who shared this info with StopTheCap:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NCTA's Michael Powell Says Cable Industry's Reputation Contributed to Public Policy Defeats | Ted Johnson | Variety.com

NCTA's Michael Powell Says Cable Industry's Reputation Contributed to Public Policy Defeats | Ted Johnson | Variety.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Michael Powell, the CEO of the National Cable and Telecommunications Assn., said that the cable industry is “highly conscious” that defeats in some recent major public policy fights are in part due to its reputation with customers.

“I am a firm believer that words and message do not work if you are not liked,” Powell said at the Internet and Television Expo on Tuesday. “And when I was in the Army certain people said, ‘Well George S. Patton said, “You don’t have to be liked to lead.”‘ That is completely foolish. You have to be well-regarded by your customer base. You have to have a trusted relationship with them. And if that is frayed, you are just ripe for every next public policy fight to be turned against you just based upon reputational critique.”

In February, the FCC imposed net neutrality rules by reclassifying the Internet like a utility, a move that NCTA and other industry groups are challenging in court. Late last month, the FCC and the Department of Justice made clear that they would move to block Comcast’s planned merger with Time Warner Cable. The companies scuttled the deal.

In lobbying for their side, merger opponents hammered the cable industry’s reputation among consumers.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Streaming Delivers Viewers to Networks | James Careless | TVTechnology

Streaming Delivers Viewers to Networks | James Careless | TVTechnology | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Streaming is delivering some impressive results for America’s TV networks. To date, ABC has garnered a combined 1.78 billion views of its content across the Web, mobile and connected TVs. The network’s Watch ABC app, which serves a range of smartphone and tablet platforms, has been downloaded more than 23 million times.

NBC has had similarly impressive results through its NBC Sports Live Extra app, which serves authenticated cable/satellite TV subscribers. NBC Sports served 10.8 million hours of streaming video to viewers during the 2014 Sochi Olympics. During the 2015 Super Bowl weekend alone, there were over 500,000 downloads of the NBC Sports Live Extra app. According to Adobe Analytics, this app set a Super Bowl record for average viewers per minute (800,000), concurrent users (1.3 million) and total minutes viewed (213 million).

Clearly, streaming video is proving to be a rich resource for viewers. Here are a few examples of how the networks are mining this resource.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Minnesota-Based Pilot Project for Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

Always glad to hear that Minnesota and Minnesota companies are leading the way…

Wireless LTE for Public Safety Pilot Project Developed in Minnesota to Establish State Model for Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network

Key players in the wireless industry have partnered with government entities in the state of Minnesota in an attempt to encourage an innovative model involving private-public partnerships that establish a national public safety broadband system. This pilot project in Central Minnesota is a public-private collaboration between the State of Minnesota, Great River Energy (GRE), Motorola, NewCore Wireless, Central Transport Group, the City of Elk River, TESSCO and CommScope.

All private-sector partners participating in this project have donated equipment, tower space, technical services and carrier services at no cost to the government for this project.

Building upon their prior cooperation, the Minnesota-based group aims to provide the following:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Mere Threat Of Real Neutrality Rules Appears To Have Helped Calm Verizon, Level 3, Cogent Interconnection Feud | Karl Bode | Techdirt

The Mere Threat Of Real Neutrality Rules Appears To Have Helped Calm Verizon, Level 3, Cogent Interconnection Feud | Karl Bode | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A little over a year ago, Level 3 was busy accusing Verizon of intentionally letting its peering points get congested in order to degrade Netflix streaming performance, by proxy forcing Netflix to pay Verizon for direct interconnection if it wanted to remedy the situation. According to arguments by Netflix, Level3 and Cogent, big ISPs like Verizon, Comcast and AT&T decided to move the net neutrality debate out to the edge of the network, obtaining their pound of flesh by eliminating settlement-free peering and demanding new charges just to access last mile customers.

To hear AT&T, Verizon, and Comcast tell it, the fight was all just a big misunderstanding, and what was occurring was just run of the mill peering disputes. Meanwhile, their army of fauxcademics, astroturfers, lobbyists, consultants and think tankers were busy telling anyone who'd listen that Netflix was trying to destroy the Internet.

But in a series of blog posts from last year, Level 3 content and media VP Mark Taylor continued to argue that there was a major anti-competitive cabal afoot, with only the biggest ISPs holding network performance (and their own users) for ransom in a quest for more revenue:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Comcast's 4K Set-Top Box Is a Key Missing Piece of the UltraHD Future | Mario Aguilar | Gizmodo.com

Comcast's 4K Set-Top Box Is a Key Missing Piece of the UltraHD Future | Mario Aguilar | Gizmodo.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Comcast’s new X4 set-top box will finally deliver 4K content to whatever 4K TV you’ve got—bringing a key piece of the UltraHD future to a huge chunk of the market.

Comcast has been experimenting with 4K delivery since late last year when it launched Xfinity in UHD. The product delivered a smattering of 4K content via an app n Samsung UHD TVs. Now that content will be delivered through Comcast’s X1 TV platform.

X1 is Comcast’s “entertainment operating system” for Comcast’s TV/Internet packages. That’s a mouthful, but it basically means that the content will be viewable through the standard Comcast TV interface. Comcast also says it’ll be making hundreds of new titles available in 4K.

Over the last few years, 4K televisions have proliferated and come down in price, but one key missing piece of the puzzle has been content. There is no point in having a a TV with four times the resolution of a regular 1080p set if you don’t have content that you can watch on it.

Manufacturers and content providers have slowly been developing their products for HD. Primarily, this has been done through apps like Netflix, which are enabled for 4K on certain TVs. Additionally, TVs employ upscaling technology that turns HD content into UHD content—these’ll be necessary for a long time, and possibly forever.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Netflix to FCC: AT&T-DirecTV Deal Needs Work | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com

Netflix to FCC: AT&T-DirecTV Deal Needs Work | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Netflix has told the FCC not to approve the AT&T-DirecTV merger as it is currently constituted, saying the new company would have the incentive and ability to slow competing over-the-top video offerings and unbundled offerings.

In a letter to the FCC dated Monday (May 4), Netflix counsel Markham Erickson pointed in part to the collapse of the Comcast-Time Warner Cable deal, saying that now made a potential AT&T-DirecTV the "largest multichannel video programming distributor" in the country, and possibly largest broadband provider given "projected" AT&T broadband investments.

"AT&T already has a demonstrated ability to harm OVDs by leveraging its control over interconnection to degrade its own customers' access to Netflix's service," Netflix told the FCC. "Comcast degraded Netflix's service in late 2013 and early 2014. AT&T presumably could have used this episode to take customers from Comcast. Instead it engaged in a similar long-term degradation of its customers' access to Netflix," said the company. Comcast has disputed that characterization.

"AT&T also has shown an interest in using data caps and usage-based pricing methods, which it can apply discriminatorily to advantage its own services," Netflix said. "If AT&T is able to slow the development of the OVD industry, either by foreclosing access to broadband customers or imposing discriminatory data caps, AT&T would be able to preserve its market advantage by slowing or even reversing the shift toward competitive online video offering and away from bundled video/broadband offerings."

AT&T declined comment, but said in its own filing to the FCC last month:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Google Broadband By Balloon (Loon) Is About To Go Global | Karl Bode | DSLReports.com

Google Broadband By Balloon (Loon) Is About To Go Global | Karl Bode | DSLReports.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In June of 2013 Google unveiled Google Loon, the latest in a long line of similar projects that will use balloons to deliver broadband and wireless services to under-served or emergency prone areas. Project Loon will use balloons 49 feet wide stationed 12 miles above the planet, well above the range of commercial aircraft. Ground base stations set some sixty miles apart communicate with solar-powered radio transmitters affixed to the balloons, and Google steers the balloons using wind as they ride the 40th parallel.


In an update posted over at Youtube, Google says the company is preparing for a much larger deployment, and tackling the challenge of "moving from small scale, one-off launches and tests, to the scale and automation required to make balloon-powered Internet for all a reality."

Loon saw plenty of critics early on who claimed Google would be lucky to keep its broadband balloons aloft for more than a couple of days. Now, Google's busy keeping balloons in the air for hundreds of days over thousands of kilometers, and it's ready for the next big step.

"We're getting close to the point where can roll out thousands of balloons," Project Lead Mike Cassidy says. "In the beginning, it was all we could do to launch one balloon a day, now with our automated crane system, we can launch dozens of balloons a day, for every crane we have."


Click headline to read more, access hot links and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Residential Gigabit Drives Wi-Fi Advances in Home Network Hubs | Joan Engebretson | Telecompetitor

Residential Gigabit Drives Wi-Fi Advances in Home Network Hubs | Joan Engebretson | Telecompetitor | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

An announcement today from Alcatel-Lucent reminds us of a new problem that has arisen as more and more customers use residential broadband at speeds up to a gigabit per second: The customer’s Wi-Fi connection can become a new network bottleneck. According to Alcatel-Lucent, the problem gets worse as consumers increase the number of devices such as smartphones, tablets, smart TVs, and gaming consoles that are connected to the Internet.

Alcatel-Lucent attacks the problem on several fronts with a new optical network terminal (ONT)/ home network hub announced today, and I’m sure we’ll be seeing other manufacturers launching similar solutions.

Technology built into the new Alcatel-Lucent ONT/ home network hub with the goal of boosting in-home bandwidth includes:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Netflix asks FCC to reject AT&T-DirecTV merger unless changes made | Alina Selyukh | Reuters.com

Netflix asks FCC to reject AT&T-DirecTV merger unless changes made | Alina Selyukh | Reuters.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Netflix Inc has urged the U.S. Federal Communications Commission to reject the pending $48 billion merger of AT&T Inc and DirecTV unless its concerns about the deal are addressed.

A Netflix spokeswoman said on Tuesday that the video streaming company does not oppose the merger in principle but is rather seeking remedies that would help resolve its competitive concerns.

"While we are participating in the government's review, we are not opposing the merger," the spokeswoman, Anne Marie Squeo, said in a statement. "We've been highlighting concerns about AT&T's broadband practices and the need for appropriate remedies since last September."

According to regulatory disclosures posted on Tuesday, Netflix representatives met recently with more than 20 FCC officials and raised concerns about the combined company's gatekeeping power as it would become the country's largest pay-TV provider with potentially expansive broadband reach.

Though the filing does not amount to a formal "petition to deny" the merger, it marks the strongest language yet from Netflix on the proposed merger of the No. 2 wireless carrier and the largest U.S. satellite-TV company. Previous FCC filings from Netflix on the deal called for approval with conditions.

"The combination of these companies would increase the incentive and ability to limit competition and innovation in the online video space," Squeo said.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Peter Chernin Defends Periscope, Talks Future of Pay TV Bundle | Georg Szalai | The Hollywood Reporter

Peter Chernin Defends Periscope, Talks Future of Pay TV Bundle | Georg Szalai | The Hollywood Reporter | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Peter Chernin on Tuesday discussed the future of the pay TV bundle and Periscope, Twitter's video streaming app.

"I am not convinced that you are going to see the collapse of the bundle," he said at INTX: The Internet and Television Expo in Chicago, the annual industry conference organized by cable trade association NCTA. "I think that's wildly overstated. I do think you will see the bundle probably rationalized in some ways."

Added the former right-hand man of 21st Century Fox boss Rupert Murdoch and now chairman and CEO of The Chernin Group: "What you are going to see more than anything is this tremendous explosion of new alternatives, largely IP-delivered."

He added: "It will in some ways ultimately force the bundle to justify itself, and that’s honestly not the worst thing in the world."


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Comcast Shouldn’t Be Able to Stop Verizon from Offering Better TV Plans | John Bergmayer | Public Knowledge

Comcast Shouldn’t Be Able to Stop Verizon from Offering Better TV Plans | John Bergmayer | Public Knowledge | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Public Knowledge is on the other side of a lot of public policy issues from Verizon. That said, Verizon's new "Custom TV" plans are a move in the right direction. It’s great to see a company announce--and then launch--a new approach that is good for viewers, good for the provider, good for competition and ultimately good for programmers, as well.

The “Custom TV” plans aren’t perfect, and they're not quite à la carte. But they can allow some viewers to lower their bills and increase the amount of control they have over the programming they pay for. That’s a good thing.

Of course, there’s a reason why a company like Verizon would move first to offer packages like this. Even though you can trace Verizon’s corporate history back to the Bell System, when it comes to TV, it’s the new entrant compared with big cable. Most cable companies don’t face much “overbuilder” competition--sometimes cable companies like RCN come in and serve the same territory as an existing cable company, and sometimes cable companies face competition from telcos like Verizon or AT&T that offer a broadband/TV package. (Most cable companies face TV competition from DISH and DirecTV, but the broadband/TV package is most appealing to many customers, and satellite companies can’t compete there.)

But Verizon competes with cable in all the areas it serves. As a result, it has to work harder than cable to win customers. These new TV plans are part of that, and are an indication that, however slowly, the industry is moving in the direction of more consumer choice. It’s not just that online video unlocks a lot of potential competition--the traditional pay TV companies are going to have to adapt, as Verizon is starting to do. More choices from every kind of video provider, including traditional ones, will benefit viewers.

But some things could stand in the way of this--for example, if Comcast buys Time Warner Cable, its ability and incentive to prevent its competitors from offering more consumer-friendly plans would increase. There are hints of how that might work happening already.

Since Verizon announced its plans, a number of programmers have complained. They say their contracts with Verizon mean they have to be included in every subscriber's package, instead of as optional add-ons. If you're a programmer, it's better for your bottom line when every subscriber is required to pay for your product, instead of deciding whether your programming is worth the price.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

WA: Seattle activists push for city-run, high-speed Internet service | Daniel Beekman | Seattle Times

WA: Seattle activists push for city-run, high-speed Internet service | Daniel Beekman | Seattle Times | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Roughly a year ago, a group of friends and acquaintances began meeting up for happy-hour drinks in Seattle — but not to gab about work or dating or the Mariners.

What brought them together was whether and how Seattle can treat broadband Internet access like a public utility by providing high-speed connections to every home.

“We came up with the most ridiculous name we could, something like “The Municipal Broadband Dreamers Society Happy Hour Friday Club,” Sabrina Roach recalled.

The memory made Roach chuckle recently, but she and her friends are serious about municipal broadband. What started during a happy hour has since grown into a public-awareness campaign called Upgrade Seattle, with a website and a plan to impact this year’s Seattle City Council elections.


The group says municipal broadband would ensure equal access to the Web across the city’s many neighborhoods and more fair pricing. “Seattle is ready,” the website asserts.


Whether its campaign gains widespread relevance may depend on the findings of a feasibility study commissioned by Mayor Ed Murray’s administration. A report on the study by Columbia Telecommunications Corporation (CTC) is to be released this month.


“I believe, with the Murray administration, we have an opportunity to push for this,” said Roach, who has been coordinating Upgrade Seattle because her employer, Brown Paper Tickets, pays her to work on communications and social-equity campaigns.


Murray’s study won’t be the city’s first to look at municipal broadband. There were similar reports in 2005, 2007 and 2011, under then-mayors Greg Nickels and Mike McGinn. The 2005 report warned that “private markets, left alone, are unlikely to favor Seattle.” The 2011 report recommended a $700 million-plus investment in building a community broadband network.


So why is the city paying CTC $180,000 for yet another take on the same question?


Seattle’s Chief Technology Officer Michael Mattmiller, who joined Murray’s team last June from Microsoft’s cloud-privacy division, says market conditions are different now.


“We recognized that the world has changed since then,” Mattmiller said.


One change is President Obama has put his weight behind community broadband networks — cities and counties offering high-speed Internet access in competition with providers like Comcast and CenturyLink.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

TiVo: Most OTA Cord-Cutters Come From Satellite | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel

TiVo: Most OTA Cord-Cutters Come From Satellite | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

TiVo hasn’t revealed any specific sales figures for its Roamio OTA DVR model for cord-cutters, but a new study by the company indicates that most of them are coming at the expense of the satellite TV industry.

In a survey fielded late last year that polled more than 500 Roamio OTA DVR buyers, TiVo found that the majority of those who were pay TV cord-cutters (32%) were formerly satellite DVR users.

Those cord-cutting consumers also cited the cost of their monthly bill and dissatisfaction with the overall features as the primary reasons for switching to an OTA approach.

Following an initial limited rollout, TiVo launched the Roamio OTA DVR on a national basis in February. The device, equipped with 500 Gigabytes of storage, four tuners, and integrations with Netflix, Amazon, Hulu and other over-the-top video services, sells for $49.99 at retail, plus a $14.99 per month service fee. TiVo has also been experimenting with a Lifetime Service option that hawks the Roamio OTA for $300, but does not require a monthly service fee.

“The data we’ve collected shows a clear trend – satellite TV subscribers are more likely than cable subscribers to cut the cord in favor of an OTA DVR,” Tom Rogers, TiVo’s president and CEO, said in a statement. “TiVo has an OTA solution for operators that helps them capitalize on these potential new customers by packaging broadband with a unique OTA service that seamlessly combines OTA signals alongside popular streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video.”


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler faces frosty crowd at INTX | Meg James | LATimes

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler faces frosty crowd at INTX | Meg James | LATimes | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler scolded telecommunications companies, saying they provide America with an increasingly vital public service -- the Internet -- and regulation is warranted for an industry that lacks sufficient competition.

"More competition would be better," Wheeler said Wednesday during a speech from the Chicago stage of the Internet and Television Expo trade convention.

The FCC chief received a frosty reception at the gathering, which is hosted by the leading industry lobbying group, National Cable & Telecommunications Assn.


CEOs of cable companies, who were next to take the stage, lamented the FCC's more hands-on approach to regulations for the Internet. The new FCC rules, adopted earlier this year by a divided FCC, come after decades of the federal government allowing the companies to operate in a less restrictive environment. 


Michael Fries, chief executive of Liberty Global, said he was happy his company operated in Europe -- not the U.S. 

"I am baffled by the chairman’s remarks," Fries told the crowd. "There is a presumption of guilt and punishment for success that I’ve never seen before."


Fries' remarks prompted applause and cheers from the crowd.


The cable chiefs said they face plenty of competition. Charter Communications Chief Executive Thomas Rutledge, whose company wants to buy Time Warner Cable, told the group: "We, in the U.S., suffer from Stockholm Syndrome, and we have to be careful about what we think of our captors," meaning the FCC.


The conflict is expected to play out in the coming months. Telecommunications giant AT&T and industry organizations, including the NCTA, have sued the government to try to block the FCC's new Open Internet rules, which are scheduled to go into effect next month.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Cablevision CEO Finally Says It: He'd Like To Make A Deal With Time Warner Cable | David Lieberman | Deadline

Cablevision CEO Finally Says It: He'd Like To Make A Deal With Time Warner Cable | David Lieberman | Deadline | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Cablevision shares jolted to +7.1% a little while ago after CEO Jim Dolan acknowledged in a panel at the INTX confab something that most cable industry watchers have long suspected: He’d like Time Warner Cable — which serves Manhattan — to buy his Long Island-based company.

“Consolidation of that marketplace would fuel ingenuity, provide much more access to resources for the customers, and lower prices –and I think would be a great business,” Dolan said.

TWC chief Rob Marcus, also on the panel, responded that he didn’t know “whether I’ve just been asked out on a date or to get married.”


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Top Cable Lobbyist Laments Cable's Self-Made Bed Has Weighed Down and Damaged the Industry's Reputation | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

Top Cable Lobbyist Laments Cable's Self-Made Bed Has Weighed Down and Damaged the Industry's Reputation | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Decades of bad service, rate increases, and abusive employees have given the cable industry a bad name and America’s top cable lobbyist, former FCC chairman-turned-president of the National Cable & Telecommunications Association is sad about that.

“I hate the name […] cable,” Powell lamented Tuesday in Chicago during the opening of the NCTA-rebranded INTX 2015 show (formerly known as The Cable Show).

While years of bad service have done little to tangibly affect the industry’s fortunes in a barely competitive marketplace, Powell seemed convinced it was Comcast’s appalling reputation with customers (including regulators and politicians working in Comcast’s District of Columbia service area), that did more to derail its recent merger effort with Time Warner Cable than anything else.


Cable’s bad reputation has come home to roost, allowing everyone to assume the worst and see a need to erect protective fences like Net Neutrality to keep cable companies from capitalizing on new fees for Internet usage.


As long as cable has a “frayed relationship” with customers, Powell said he believed the industry will lose more policy battles than it wins, and it should be aware of that.


Click headline to read more, access hot links and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Promises, Promises: Comcast's 9th Annual Commitment to Improve Customer Service is Back for 2015 | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

Promises, Promises: Comcast's 9th Annual Commitment to Improve Customer Service is Back for 2015 | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Talk is cheap but your cable bill isn’t.

For the ninth year in a row, Comcast CEO Brian Roberts this week promised a transformational improvement in Comcast’s customer service experience. Comcast has routinely been rated one of America’s worst companies, often achieving the dubious distinction of scoring number one. Customers don’t just dislike Comcast, they loathe Comcast. Its customer service and support forums are infested with angergrams from hostile customers. The Better Business Bureau has a hard time keeping up with the avalanche of complaints. The company’s reputation is worse than the IRS.

For beleaguered customer service agents, it’s right back at ‘ya.

Almost a year after Roberts made his first solemn commitment to address his company’s sordid reputation with customers back in 2006, this unsolicited letter arrived at a website critical of the company’s reputation from one of the customer service agents on the front line:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Public Knowledge Asks FCC to Deny Stay Petition | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com

Public Knowledge Asks FCC to Deny Stay Petition | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Public Knowledge has filed its official opposition to a petition to stay implementation of the FCC's Title II reclassification order until a federal appeals court has heard numerous challenges.

In its filing, Public Knowledge said that granting a stay would "[deny] customers the guarantee of an Open Internet while causing uncertainty for companies and consumers alike."

Public Knowledge's petition was aimed at the first stay request filed, that of Daniel Berninger, VoIP pioneer and founder of the Voice Communication Exchange Committee. Others followed from cable and telecom associations. According to Public Knowledge senior VP Harold Feld, that is because the deadline was Monday (May 4) to respond to his petition, while it is Friday (May 8) for the others.

"Mr. Berninger argues that protecting consumer access to the Open Internet should wait while telephone and cable companies fight these protections in the courts," said Feld. "Mr. Berninger thinks it would be better for himself and his business if broadband companies could prioritize his services over those of rivals, and claims to suffer irreparable harm from his inability to negotiate such business arrangements.

"But as FCC chairman Tom Wheeler said on the day the FCC approved the net neutrality Order, 'The Internet is simply too important to allow broadband providers to be the ones to make the rules.'"

The FCC is expected not to grant the stays, which will trigger requests for a stay from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, which is hearing the legal challenges.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Bloomberg's 'What Works Cities' Initiative Targets 100 Mid-Sized Metros | Colin Wood | GovTech.com

Bloomberg's 'What Works Cities' Initiative Targets 100 Mid-Sized Metros | Colin Wood | GovTech.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Cities want to do new and exciting things with their data, and now they’re getting some extra help to do just that.

Bloomberg Philanthropies announced on April 20 the launch of What Works Cities, a $42 million, three-year initiative that will assist mid-sized American cities in developing data projects that improve life for their residents. The initiative now seeks 100 cities with populations between 100,000 and 1 million residents to receive guidance from program partners like The Behavioural Insights Team, Harvard Kennedy School of Government Performance Lab, Johns Hopkins University’s new Center for Government Excellence, Results for America and the Sunlight Foundation.

“While cities are working to meet new challenges with limited resources, they have access to more data than ever – and they are increasingly using it to improve people’s lives,” Michael Bloomberg said in a press release. “We’ll help them build on their progress, and help even more cities take steps to put data to work. What works? That's a question that every city leader should ask - and we want to help them find answers.”


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Zaller: There’s No Stopping The Move To IT/IP | Harry Jessell | TVNewsCheck.com

Devoncroft Partners' Joe Zaller is reluctant to make predictions about the media technology marketplace, even though he is a expert analyst of it. However, one thing he sees clearly is the inexorable movement of TV media from baseband video to IT files and IP infrastructure. The reasons for it, he believes, are many and compelling.

Zaller draws his insights from the two principal sources: The Global Market Valuation Report, a joint venture between him and the International Association of Broadcasting Manufacturers, which tabulates the sales of more than 2,500 tech vendors, and his own annual Big Broadcast Survey of media companies, which tries to ascertain technology trends and their technology spending plans.
Story continues after the ad

Zaller was as busy as anyone at NAB last week honing his expertise by presiding at a series of panels with tech buyers and sellers on Sunday and by meeting with executives of tech companies throughout the week.


Last Thursday as the convention began to wind down, he took time to discuss the IT/IP future and other trends with TVNewsCheck Harry A. Jessell.


Click headline to read the interview--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Kansas City Council gets formal plan for Cisco smart city partnership | Austin Alonzo | Kansas City Biz Journal

Kansas City Council gets formal plan for Cisco smart city partnership | Austin Alonzo | Kansas City Biz Journal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Kansas City and its partners plan to spend more than $15 million during the next decade on a "smart city" project.

City officials announced in May that Cisco Systems Inc. would make Kansas City its latest smart city, with the use of advanced technology to boost the efficiency of a range of services. On Thursday, Mayor Sly James introduced an ordinance authorizing City Manager Troy Schulte to enter into an agreement with the San Jose-based networking technology company.

The ordinance, which will be taken up by the City Council's Finance, Governance & Ethics Committee on April 22, also authorizes Schulte and Finance Director Randall Landes to execute various agreements regarding the project and its financing. The city declined to share those documents, which are still being negotiated, said Michael Grimaldi, a spokesman for the mayor's office.

An ordinance fact sheet prepared by city Chief Innovation Officer Ashley Hand indicates that Kansas City will spend $3.8 million on the project over the next decade and that the amount will be "matched and exceeded by nearly $12 million in private investment by Cisco ... and its growing list of partners." The figures give an idea of how much the project may cost in total.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Senate Bill Would Grandfather JSA's | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

Senate Bill Would Grandfather JSA's | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The National Association of Broadcasters Monday praised the introduction of a bill that would exempt all joint sales agreements in effect at the time of the FCC's decision that made most of them attributable as ownership interest.

The Bill is backed by a bipartisan quartet of powerful senators.

The one-paragraph bill simply says that parties to JSA's in effect on the effective date of the FCC decision (March 31, 2014) "shall not be considered to be in violation of the ownership limitations..."

A politically divided FCC voted to make all JSA's in which a station sold more than 15% of a second stations ad inventory equivalent to co-ownership for the purposes of local ownership caps. FCC chairman Tom Wheeler signaled that he was closing a loophole that allowed lawyers to game the ownership rules, while broadcasters said that was preventing combos that could help both stations and their viewers.

The bill was introduced by Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.).

Senators Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Tim Scott (R-S.C.) joined Blunt as original co-sponsors of the bill.

“This is about protecting our constituents’ access to local news, politics, sports, cultural events, and emergency notifications from their own states,” said Mikulski. “Local broadcasters who play by the rules should be able to trust that Washington won’t make rule changes apply retroactively in ways that harm their ability to serve their communities.”

The deadline for affected broadcasters to comply with the new joint sales agreements rule change is currently Dec. 19, 2016.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Free Internet Is a Global Priority | Senator Ron Wyden Opinion | WIRED

The Free Internet Is a Global Priority | Senator Ron Wyden Opinion | WIRED | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In recent weeks, some of my allies in the internet community have asked why I am working on the Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act, which they see as harmful to the internet. Many of these activists have stood shoulder-to-shoulder with me in the past as I fought against powerful special interests. I appreciate their views and their work to keep the internet open and free.

Let me explain my position clearly.

In my view, the trade promotion authority bill I introduced last week, along with the Trans Pacific Partnership that is still being negotiated, both present real opportunities to preserve and protect an open internet around the world.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Facebook’s Internet.org Isn’t the Internet, It’s Facebooknet | Josh Levy Opinion | WIRED

Facebook’s Internet.org Isn’t the Internet, It’s Facebooknet | Josh Levy Opinion | WIRED | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

This week Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced that Internet.org, its marquee project to “connect two-thirds of the world that don’t have internet access,” is now inviting any website or service to join the program. According to Zuckerberg, this change—which follows criticism that the program violates Net Neutrality principles—would “give people even more choice and more free services, while still creating a sustainable economic model to connect every single person in the world.”

But when you examine how the program would work, it becomes clear that rather than improve a service that is already busy violating Net Neutrality around the world, the change actually makes things worse.

It sets Facebook up to serve as a quasi-internet service provider—except that unlike a local or national telco, all web traffic will be routed through Facebook’s servers. In other words, for people using Internet.org to connect to the internet, Facebook will be the de facto gatekeeper of the world’s information. And unfortunately, Facebook is already showing what a poor gatekeeper it would be.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.