Surfing the Broad...
Follow
Find
123.6K views | +136 today
 
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

Federal loan will boost Internet speeds in central, southern Wyoming | StarTribune.com

Federal loan will boost Internet speeds in central, southern Wyoming | StarTribune.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

More than 1,000 Internet users in central and southern Wyoming will soon see a jump in their Internet speeds, thanks to an $11.4 million federal loan announced Monday.


Dubois Telephone Exchange will use the money from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Development Community Connect program to build and improve fiber optic cable lines to customers in Dubois and Baggs, as well as rural customers in Fremont County, the Little Snake River Valley, and on the Wind River Indian Reservation.


In all, the USDA announced $103 million in grants and loans to telecommunications companies in 16 states to help expand broadband Internet access to those areas of rural America that haven’t been reached by the high-speed service or are underserved.


Policymakers, public interest groups and telecom companies are seeking to bridge the digital divide by reaching even the most remote pockets of the U.S. with broadband internet, hoping to improve economic and educational opportunities there.


Dubois Telephone Exchange General Manager Mike Kenney said his company will use the loan to remove old, outdated copper cables to about 1,100 residences and businesses and replace them with fiber optic cable, which can deliver more information at a faster rate.


Part of the loan will also be used to improve infrastructure and build two new fiber optic cables between Jeffrey City and Wamsutter and Baggs and Craig, Colorado.


Baggs and Jeffrey City, Kenney said, currently rely on a single fiber optic cable for Internet, meaning that if that cable somehow goes down, area residents would have no alternative way to get online.


The loan is expected to create 100 jobs and save up to 150 others, according to a USDA media release. Under the terms of the loans, DTE has to finish the projects within five years, Kenney said.


The new cables and improvements, Kenney said, are being built in anticipation of a new fiber optic line built by Freedom-based Silver Star Communications that will bring broadband service to about a dozen counties in western Wyoming.


Kenney said the improvements will bring economic benefits to the entire area, as businesses and individuals increasingly require fast, reliable Internet service.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How Valuable is Low-Band VHF Anymore? | Bill Hayes | TVTechnology.com

How Valuable is Low-Band VHF Anymore? | Bill Hayes | TVTechnology.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

I recently fielded some questions from a colleague regarding the upcoming spectrum auction. The colleague observed that it appeared that the FCC was clearing the way for UHF stations that wanted to participate in the auction but still stay on the air to move to low-band VHF. He wanted to know what my feelings were on moving to low-band VHF and wondered if stations would really move there.

The decision on low-band VHF is really a business decision. I am a huge fan of over-the-air broadcasting and have that capability in my home. I travel with a USB tuner stick that lets me look at DTV services when I am on the road. But even I recognize that the majority of people that watch OTA broadcasts do it via a subscription-based service; thus they are not receiving the over-the-air services but a redistribution of which, in many instances, is provided via a direct feed from the stations' studio rather than receiving the over-the-air signal.


In my opinion, low-band VHF is what I would call a "technological cul-de-sac." It was a great technology in the early days of broadcasting when making power was an expensive proposition and generating RF at frequencies above 100 MHz was a challenge to do and keep stable, and receive antennas were mounted on the outside of homes high above the roof. Low-band VHF offered great “bang for the buck” for economical operation and the signals traveled considerable distances, even over the horizon. There were few television stations and few man-made noise sources to disrupt the service and when problems happened they were pretty easy to diagnose and correct. When I worked for WSAZ (channel 3) in Huntington, W.A., I frequently found power poles with dirty insulators using just my Sony Watchman as a locator and calling the power company to report down to the pole number the insulators that needed to be cleaned in a rural area.
 

Now the entire environment has changed.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

OH: What's the payoff when it comes to data centers? | Chuck Soder | Crain's Cleveland Business

OH: What's the payoff when it comes to data centers? | Chuck Soder | Crain's Cleveland Business | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Data centers don't employ that many people, but the state of Ohio is recruiting them with tax incentives anyway.

Why would it want to do that?

The answer is complex. Job creation is just one part of it. Increased tax revenue is another. And some people say that data centers — essentially high-tech warehouses that power massive amounts of computer equipment — can help a community attract other high-tech businesses.

One of those people is Ted Griffith, managing director of information technology for JobsOhio.

One of the private nonprofit economic development group's goals is to turn Ohio into “The Big Data Hub of the Midwest,” according to its website. Part of that effort involves recruiting data centers to the state.

A few companies have taken the bait, including Amazon.

One of its subsidiaries plans to build multiple data centers in the Columbus area. Another company, ByteGrid, recently opened the first phase of what could become a huge data center on the eastern edge of downtown Cleveland.

Griffith argues that attracting data centers could help Ohio attract and retain other businesses — especially those that process large amounts of data, be they major corporations or software companies that sell products that live on the Internet.

Being closer to the data center they use means they can process data faster and easily send in-house tech experts to work on their computer systems.

“IT departments do like to be near the data center,” Griffith said.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Salinas-backed TotalPlay eyes Mexican wholesale network | TeleGeography.com

TotalPlay, the fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) provider owned by Mexican billionaire Ricardo Salinas, is considering participating in the government’s upcoming tender for a USD7 billion wholesale mobile network, CEO Eduardo Kuri told Reuters late last week.


The network, which will have exclusive use of a 90MHz block of spectrum in the 700MHz band, was written into Mexico’s constitution in 2013 as part of a sector overhaul designed to curb the dominance of America Movil (AM)-backed Telcel.


The plan calls for groups of private companies to bid for the right to build and run the network, which would lease capacity to mobile providers.

TeleGeography notes that the move would represent something of a volte face, given Grupo Salinas’ recent mobile market exit strategy.


In November 2014 the conglomerate entered into an agreement with US telecoms giant AT&T to sell 100% of mobile operator Iusacell for USD2.5 billion. The acquisition took place after Grupo Salinas closed its previously announced deal to purchase the 50% of Iusacell that it did not already own, from co-owner Grupo Televisa.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Dept. Of Defense Defends Strong Encryption While Its Impetuous Child -- The NSA -- Continues To Lament The Coming Darkness | Tim Cushing | Techdirt

Dept. Of Defense Defends Strong Encryption While Its Impetuous Child -- The NSA -- Continues To Lament The Coming Darkness | Tim Cushing | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Between the FBI and the NSA, arguments against encryption that locks bad guys out (and, consequently, the government) have filled the air over the past several months. "Going dark" is the repeated concern, as if encryption would leave the nation's intelligence and investigative agencies without any options to pursue terrorists/child pornographers. It's all FUD and it's all dangerous, because carving small holes in encryption CARVES HOLES IN ENCRYPTION. Never mind the intended uses of golden keys/backdoors. A hole is a hole.

The Department of Defense seems to recognize this fact, making it one of the only government entities involved in fighting worldwide terrorism to openly do so. Bruce Schneier asked Admiral James Winnefeld Jr. (vice-chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff) a question about encryption during a recent cybersecurity summit (video here -- relevant part at 32:52) and received something almost entirely removed from the current party line.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Canadian activists turn to UN with challenge to controversial anti-terror bill | Jessica Murphy | The Guardian

Canadian activists turn to UN with challenge to controversial anti-terror bill | Jessica Murphy | The Guardian | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Canadian civil society groups are bringing their challenge to a contentious new anti-terror bill to an international audience: a key United Nations rights body in Geneva.

Opponents of bill C-51 will use a periodic review of Canada’s international rights obligations this week by the UN human rights committee to voice a laundry list of concerns related to the anti-terror legislation and other national security issues.

The Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) and Amnesty International Canada (AIC) are among the groups that will plead their case before the UN panel.

“We want to ensure the human rights committee is aware of a fairly long list of serious, and we would say worsening, human rights concerns,” said AIC secretary general Alex Neve.

“There’s a bundle of issues related to national security, even before bill C-51 came along.”

Canadian human rights groups have panned the anti-terror bill, which was introduced by the Conservative government early this year after two fatal attacks on military personnel in Canada linked to terrorism, including the deadly shooting of Corporal Nathan Cirillo in Ottawa in October by gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Hollywood Resists Revealing Details Of Its Cozy Relationship With Mississippi AG Jim Hood, But Glimpses Come Out | Mike Masnick | Techdirt

Hollywood Resists Revealing Details Of Its Cozy Relationship With Mississippi AG Jim Hood, But Glimpses Come Out | Mike Masnick | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The whole legal fight between Google and Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood has been pretty nasty from the very beginning, but it's been getting even nastier as it drags on. Even in many high stakes lawsuits involving large companies and the government, the filings tend to remain somewhat bland and low key. But this particular fight seems personal to many of the parties involved (going beyond just Google and Jim Hood to the MPAA and the studios it represents).


If you don't recall, for a few years now, Hood has been bizarrely blaming Google for the fact that people do bad stuff online, rather than understanding that a search engine isn't responsible for the content that it finds. The reasons for Hood's ignorance became a lot more clear after the Sony Hack, when internal emails revealed that Hood was acting as a puppet for the MPAA whose hand was shoved so far up Hood's behind that it was a bit unseemly.

The MPAA's lawyers ran the entirety of Hood's "investigation." Those lawyers actually wrote the subpoena that Hood sent Google (Hood merely added the opening and his signature). The studios paid for the investigation, and the program itself was explicitly designed not to protect anyone online but to bring down Google (dubbed "Goliath" in the documents). The MPAA hired Hood's best friend, mentor and predecessor to lobby Hood on this... and (coincidentally, I'm sure),


Hood hired the very same guy, Mike Moore, to help with the investigation -- which should raise serious conflict of interest questions. As these details were revealed, Hood launched into a bizarre anti-Google rant that was both ill-informed and often flat out incorrect. He insisted perfectly legal things (a news site about dark markets) were completely illegal, he blamed Google for not doing things it actually had done, and he couldn't seem to figure out the first thing about how the internet -- or the First Amendment -- actually work.

With this new info in hand, Google went to court to argue that Hood's demands were illegal, and a clear attempt of abusing the power of his office to attack a business. The courts have overwhelmingly sided with Google up to this point -- putting his demands (written by the MPAA) on hold and saying that it was clear Hood unconstitutionally acted in bad faith in violation of the First Amendment.

The judge also ordered Hood to cough up his communications with the MPAA -- something Hood was refusing to do the last time we checked in on this case about two months ago.

Since then, there has been a flurry of activity in multiple courts as Google, Hood and the MPAA fight it out in increasingly emotional terms.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Hacking Team responds to data breach, issues public threats and denials | Steve Ragan | CSO.com

Hacking Team responds to data breach, issues public threats and denials | Steve Ragan | CSO.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

On Sunday evening, someone hijacked the Hacking Team account on Twitter and used it to announce that the company known for developing hacking tools was itself a victim of a devastating hack.

The hackers released a 400GB Torrent file with internal documents, source code, and email communications to the public at large. As researchers started to examine the leaked documents, the story developed and the public got its first real look into the inner workings of an exploit development firm.

Hacking Team is an Italian company that sells intrusion and surveillance tools to governments and law enforcement agencies. However, their business has earned them a black mark from privacy and human rights organizations, as the company has been accused of selling tools and services to nations known for violent oppression.
hackingteam 010

Reporters Without Borders has listed the company on its Enemies of the Internet index due largely to Hacking Teams' business practices and their primary surveillance tool Da Vinci.

Sunday evening, documents circulating online, and documents shared by @SynAckPwn with Salted Hash, have linked Hacking Team to Egypt, Lebanon, Ethiopia, and Sudan.

The link to Sudan is especially newsworthy as the company previously stated they've never done business with the nation. There is a UN arms embargo on the Sudan, which is covered by EU and UK law. If they were doing business with the Sudanese government, Hacking Team could be in hot water.

In 2014, a Citizen Lab report revealed evidence that Hacking Team's RCS (Remote Control System) was being used by the Sudanese government, something the Italian company flat-out denied.

However, on Sunday a contract with Sudan, valued at 480,000 Euro, and dated July 2, 2012, was published as part of the 400GB cache. In addition, a maintenance list named Sudan as a customer, but one that was "not officially supported." Interestingly, Russia has the same designation.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What Washington really knows about the Internet of Things | Darren Samuelsohn | POLITICO Agenda

What Washington really knows about the Internet of Things | Darren Samuelsohn | POLITICO Agenda | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

President Barack Obama wears a FitBit monitor on his wrist to count his steps and calories, and has waxed poetic about the power of wearable technology to “give each of us information that allows us to stay healthier.”

On Capitol Hill, 13 members have joined together across party lines this year to launch the Internet of Things Caucus. Started by a former Microsoft marketing executive and a Republican who made his fortune in electronics, the caucus pledges to help foster the coming explosion of “products, services and interconnected opportunities that didn’t exist a generation ago and will be taken for granted by the end of this generation.”

Then again, the caucus hasn't even held its first meeting yet. Obama's own government panel has warned of a "small — and rapidly closing — window" for the U.S. government to successfully figure out how to deal with the tech explosion everyone is so excited about.

The number of web-linked gadgets surpassed the number of humans on the planet seven years ago, and today the Internet of Things, the profusion of networked objects and sensors that increasingly touch our lives, is quickly turning our physical world into something totally new. As American consumers start filling their homes and businesses with networked technology — smart watches sending health data wirelessly, cars that can take over for their human drivers, and drones tracking wildfires and cattle — POLITICO set out to determine how well government was keeping up. Beyond one fledgling caucus, how is Washington grappling with this sweeping new force?

The short answer: It's not.


Click headline to read more and access link to all of the articles in this POLITICO Agenda investigation--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Next Century Cities Grows to 100 Communities including four from Minnesota | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

I wanted to share the following press release with a quick note that the list of Next Century Cities now includes four Minnesota cities, which means three new additions. The Minnesota cities include Duluth, Monticello, Windom and Winthrop (which has been a member for a while).

Next Century Cities Grows to 100 Communities Nationwide Leading on Next-Generation Broadband Internet Collaborative of Rural and Urban Communities Sees Rapid Progress since October 2014 launch

Washington, DC (July 6, 2015) – Next Century Cities, a city-to-city collaborative of mayors who recognize the critical need for fast, affordable, and reliable Internet, has grown to 100 communities across the country since launching in October 2014. Boise, Idaho was announced today as the 100th city to join Next Century Cities, a bipartisan, nationwide effort that also includes inaugural members such as Boston, Kansas City, and Chattanooga, and more recent additions such as Charlotte.

“Since launching Next Century Cities in October, we’ve seen incredible demand from cities looking to lead the conversation about the crucial role next-generation Internet plays in helping communities thrive,” said Deb Socia, Executive Director of Next Century Cities. “The 100 city leaders who are part of Next Century Cities know that gigabit level Internet is critical infrastructure for their residents and are pushing to become more economically competitive now and in the future through better access to high-speed, low-cost solutions for all.”

Next Century Cities is a bipartisan initiative of mayors and city leaders dedicated to ensuring the availability of next-generation broadband across the country. As momentum grows around gigabit level Internet, more mayors and municipal leaders are joining together to show what’s happening in their communities and to join together to help one another realize the full power of truly high-speed, affordable, and accessible broadband.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Greece - What You Are Not Being Told by the Media | Chris Kanthan | Films for Action

Greece - What You Are Not Being Told by the Media | Chris Kanthan | Films for Action | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Every single mainstream media has the following narrative for the economic crisis in Greece: the government spent too much money and went broke; the generous banks gave them money, but Greece still can’t pay the bills because it mismanaged the money that was given. It sounds quite reasonable, right?

Except that it is a big fat lie … not only about Greece, but about other European countries such as Spain, Portugal, Italy and Ireland who are all experiencing various degrees of austerity. It was also the same big, fat lie that was used by banks and corporations to exploit many Latin American, Asian and African countries for many decades.

Greece did not fail on its own. It was made to fail.

In summary, the banks wrecked the Greek government and deliberately pushed it into unsustainable debt so that oligarchs and international corporations can profit from the ensuing chaos and misery.

If you are a fan of mafia movies, you know how the mafia would take over a popular restaurant. First, they would do something to disrupt the business – stage a murder at the restaurant or start a fire. When the business starts to suffer, the Godfather would generously offer some money as a token of friendship. In return, Greasy Thumb takes over the restaurant’s accounting, Big Joey is put in charge of procurement, and so on. Needless to say, it’s a journey down a spiral of misery for the owner who will soon be broke and, if lucky, alive.

Now, let’s map the mafia story to international finance in four stages.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Verizon and the NY State Public Service ('Captured') Commission | Bruce Kushnick Blog | HuffPost.com

Verizon and the NY State Public Service ('Captured') Commission | Bruce Kushnick Blog | HuffPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

"Regulatory Capture" is when an industry takes over the regulatory agency that is supposed to be doing oversight of the companies' business practices and is supposed to be protecting the Public Interest.


The newly released report by the NY State Public Service Commission (NYPSC) "Staff Assessment of Telecommunications Services", (June, 2015) is a model of how a corrupted government agency helped Verizon (and Time Warner) get continuous rate increases, allows for egregious communications bills and deceptive marketing to be 'business as usual', covers over Verizon's failure to deliver on the commitment for 'massive deployment of fiber optics' (but charged customers over $750.00 and counting) and then claims that competition truly exists.

And to top it off, the State report claims that there has not been any major telecommunications proceedings for over a decade! (NOTE: There appears to be another name used, "The Department of Public Service", for the report.)

NOTE: The State Commission controls local service and the use of the state utility, commonly known as the Public Switched Telephone Networks, while the FCC controls 'interstate' services, i.e., services that cross-state lines. These jurisdictions and distinctions are way too complicated to discuss here.

Let's present some facts to substantiate our conclusion of regulatory capture. Above is an excerpt from the report. See anything wrong?


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The cable box might solve the Internet of Things' biggest problem | Roberto Baldwin | Engadget.com

The cable box might solve the Internet of Things' biggest problem | Roberto Baldwin | Engadget.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The issue with the Internet of Things (IoT) and the connected home is that they're not even remotely connected. At least not seamlessly. Thanks to competing communication protocols and manufacturers building closed ecosystems, you need a new app every time you add something "connected" to your house. But developer Alticast has proposed another solution. One that uses something that's already in the home: your cable box.

Other than the fact that it gives you access to hundreds of channels and videos-on-demand, your cable box is about as exciting as a doorknob. It's a gateway to somewhere else, and it's forgotten as soon as you step through that door.


But that bland portal to the entertainment world could also be the answer to fixing the hydra of IoT hubs from Belkin, Lowe's, Quirky, Philips and others needed to create a connected home.


Alticast proposed in a recently published white paper that the cable box could become a protocol-agnostic Internet-of-Things hub. It would bring all your devices together into a single ecosystem that lets your lights talk to your oven that talks to your garage door that talks to your security camera. Everything working together like a truly connected home with a single app and the bonus of your TV being a giant notification center.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

About-face by Apple Music shows need for constant change | Drew Clark Op-Ed | Deseret News

About-face by Apple Music shows need for constant change | Drew Clark Op-Ed | Deseret News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

When a company as big and successful as Apple changes its mind about something as significant as the music industry, it's worth taking note of what's changing with consumers.

Apple, the world’s most valuable company, is betting that consumers want to spend more money through Apple Music, the $9.99/month music streaming service it launched on Tuesday.

It’s a far cry from the vision of the late Steve Jobs, the founder and legendary leader of Apple until his death in 2011. Originally a computer maker, Apple became a post-personal computer company with the launch of the iPod in 2001. This was a digital audio player with so much more storage capacity than its competitors.

That invited consumers — particularly young people with a strong emotional connection to their music — to load up shiny iPods with hundreds or thousands of digital songs.

This was the Napster era of rampant file-sharing. Napster had been the brainchild of a college student who wanted to share what he was listening to with his fellow students. As a company, Napster created an online catalog that allowed computer users to share, on a peer-to-peer basis, digital MP3 music files.

Napster was shut down for contributing to copyright infringement. As a service, it effectively enabled the sharing of digital music files, enabling a user to download a free copy of a song purchased by someone else.

Enter Steve Jobs, who was more of a counter-cultural rock-and-roll rebel than your stereotypical slide-rule-toting computer geek.

According to the biography written by Walter Isaascon, published days after Jobs' death from cancer, "He knew that the best way to stop piracy — in fact the only way — was to offer an alternative that was more attractive than the brain-dead services that music companies were concocting. 'We believe that 80 percent of the people stealing stuff don't want to be, there's just no legal alternative.'"

As with other great entrepreneurs, Jobs set out to create a win-win-win-win situation: One that would benefit the artists who composed and performed music, the record labels who cut CDs, the company (Apple) that sold the iPods, and consumers — who could finally listen to all of their music in one place.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Yankees-Mariners Match-Up Will Be First Baseball Game Shot Using 8K Ultra-High Def Technology | Maury Brown | Forbes.com

Yankees-Mariners Match-Up Will Be First Baseball Game Shot Using 8K Ultra-High Def Technology | Maury Brown | Forbes.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

On July 17th, Japanese public broadcaster NHK will position six, 8K cameras throughout Yankee Stadium and record the first-ever baseball game captured in the ultra-high definition format. While the game will not be broadcast, Major League Baseball and NHK will have the media view the game in a specially outfitted suite with 8K monitors in Yankee Stadium during the game.

Ultra-high definition TV is 7680 pixels wide by 4320 pixels tall (33.18 megapixels), which is a sixteen time higher resolution than current HDTV. NHK is one of the first television entities in the world to develop 8K technology, which it hopes to offer on a wide scale basis by the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

And while 4K seems like it just now has started working its way into consumer outlets, 8K is already right on its heels. LG showed off a whopping 98” 8K prototype at CES in January this year that blew attendees minds. If that wasn’t enough, how about a 110” 8K Samsung that transmits in 3D without the use of glasses?

Back to NHK and the game at Yankee Stadium against the Mariners, it will allow MLB, baseball, and sports business media types to gauge the experience, and begin the discussion as to how baseball looks in the ultra-high def format. For NHK, it gives them an early dry run of how the technology fares, sets up, and is broadcasted for sports in advance of the 2020 Olympics. In fact, NHK has been moving so quickly with 8K broadcasts that the Japanese broadcast company is looking to leap-frog over 4K and go straight to the ultra-high def format.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Free Blandin Webinar July 9: Creative Spaces, Creative Places | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

Free Blandin Webinar
July 9 at 3:00-4:00
Register!

Does broadband promote creativity? Not alone it doesn’t but it can be an ingredient that spurs or supports a community effort. You also need people to make it happen. In this webinar we’ll hear from people who have promoted creativity in their community at least in some part through technology. We’ll learn about what they are doing, how they started it and what it has meant to the community.

Matthew Marcus and Aaron Deacon on Kansas City Startup Village: A community situated around the first neighborhood to get Google Fiber in KC but built but local entrepreneurs to be fertile ground to grow startups from KC and beyond. They community grew organically as if something was in the air. Hear their story and think about how can we replicate that here.

Fred Underwood on Duluth Maker Space: A sustainable multi-field community workshop for local artists, inventors, experimentors, teachers, learners (Makers!) of all ages. It opened last Fall. They have classes available and just open space with cool tools for folks who want to use them. Imagine a place in your community where makers can meet and collaborate.

A Minnesota library yet to be named. Libraries have been harbors for information, technology and innovation for centuries. Find out how to make the most of your library!


Click headline to access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Sprint drops 600 Kbps video-streaming limit after outcry | Matt Hamblen | NetworkWorld.com

Sprint drops 600 Kbps video-streaming limit after outcry | Matt Hamblen | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sprint this week quickly reversed plans to impose a 600 Kbps limit on streaming video as part of a promotion called "All-In" that charges $80 a month for unlimited talk, text and high-speed data.

The All-In plan, announced Tuesday, ironically was intended to "end consumer confusion & frustration," according to a press release.

But the 600 Kbps video stream cap, originally contained in a footnote about the plan, incited widespread frustration and anger on social media sites and elsewhere.

The 600 Kbps limitation was interpreted by Roger Entner, an analyst at Recon Analytics, as a violation of Title II net neutrality rules, which Sprint had supported before the Federal Communications Commission. "To throttle video is such a clearcut violation of Title II," he said.

Even so, Entner said Sprint replaced the throttling language with "reasonable" terms that limit voice and data roaming off Spring's network onto other carrier networks. With the new language, he endorsed the All-In plan. "The whole experience [with All-In] is a net positive for Sprint," he said in an interview on Thursday.

Entner said Sprint probably mistakenly forwarded its older 600 Kbps limitation language from previous pricing plans first launched in June 2013. "They didn't pay attention and didn't dot their i's and cross their t's," Entner said.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Corporate Capitalism Is the Foundation of Police Brutality and the Prison State | Chris Hedges | Truthdig.com

Corporate Capitalism Is the Foundation of Police Brutality and the Prison State | Chris Hedges | Truthdig.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Our national conversation on race and crime is based on a fiction. It is the fiction that the organs of internal security, especially the judiciary and the police, can be adjusted, modernized or professionalized to make possible a post-racial America. We discuss issues of race while ignoring the economic, bureaucratic and political systems of exploitation—all of it legal and built into the ruling apparatus—that are the true engines of racism and white supremacy. No discussion of race is possible without a discussion of capitalism and class. And until that discussion takes place, despite all the proposed reforms to the criminal justice system, the state will continue to murder and imprison poor people of color with impunity.

More training, body cameras, community policing, the hiring of more minorities as police officers, a better probation service and more equitable fines will not blunt the indiscriminate use of lethal force or reduce the mass incarceration that destroys the lives of the poor. Our capitalist system callously discards surplus labor, especially poor people of color, employing lethal force and the largest prison system in the world to keep them under control. This is by design. And until this predatory system of capitalism is destroyed, the poor, especially people of color, will continue to be gunned down by police in the streets, as they have for decades, and disproportionately locked in prison cages.

“The strength of ‘The New Jim Crow’ by Michelle Alexander is that, by equating mass incarceration with Jim Crow, it makes it rhetorically impossible to defend it,” said Naomi Murakawa, author of “The First Civil Right: How Liberals Built Prison America,” when we met recently in Princeton, N.J. “But, on the other hand, there is no ‘new’ Jim Crow, there is just capitalist white supremacy in a state of constant self-preservation.”

“We should talk about what we are empowering police to do, not how they are doing it, not whether they are being nice when they carry out arrests,” she said. “Reforms are oriented to making violence appear respectable and courteous. But being arrested once can devastate someone’s life. This is the violence we are not talking about. It does not matter if you are arrested politely. Combating racism is not about combating bad ideas in the head or hateful feelings. This idea is the perfect formula to preserve material distributions in their exact configuration.”


Click headline to read more and access hot links--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Supreme Court justices hold stock in tech vendors, other firms | Grant Gross | NetworkWorld.com

Supreme Court justices hold stock in tech vendors, other firms | Grant Gross | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Two U.S. Supreme Court justices owned stock in tech vendors or other companies that filed briefs in cases under review by the high court in the past year, a watchdog group said Thursday.

The justices’ ownership of stock in three companies that filed amicus, or friend of the court, briefs in Supreme Court cases during the past year represent a “minefield of potential conflicts of interest and ethical problems” that could damage the court’s reputation, said Fix the Court, a group advocating for more transparency at the court.

Chief Justice John Roberts owned up to US $750,000 in shares of Time Warner and its subsidiaries at the time the media giant filed a brief in ABC v. Aereo, which broadcasters won 6-3 last June, with Roberts in the majority. Aereo was a start-up offering TV service to subscribers through specialized antenna farms.

Justice Stephen Breyer owned up to $100,000 in IT services firm EMC and Roberts held up to $50,000 in Hewlett-Packard last year when both businesses filed briefs in favor of Teva Pharmaceuticals, which won its patent case against generic drug maker Sandoz, 7-2, with Breyer and Roberts in the majority.

Justice Samuel Alito also held stock in publicly traded companies last year, Fix the Court said. The Supreme Court has nine justices.

The court’s media relations team didn’t immediately respond to a request for a comment on the Fix the Court report. Fix the Court planned to post the financial reports on its website late Thursday.

The Supreme Court released justices’ annual financial disclosure reports Friday. The financial reports are available as paper documents; the court does not post them online.

Fix the Court called on the justices to place their securities into blind trusts, as is done by presidents, presidential candidates and many members of Congress.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Bitcoin glitch expected to abate as software upgrades continue | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com

Bitcoin glitch expected to abate as software upgrades continue | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Bitcoin experienced a glitch over the weekend that is expected to be resolved as software clients that handle transaction data are upgraded.

Some software clients that “mine” bitcoins are creating invalid transaction data, which are referred to as blocks. Blocks are records of transactions, and the first miner to complete a block is rewarded with new bitcoins. The blocks are added to bitcoin’s public ledger, called the blockchain.

Some software clients that had not been recently upgraded are accepting invalid blocks created by other clients, according to a notice posted on bitcoin.org.

Bitcoin transactions must be confirmed by other miners on the network. The software problem means that clients are showing confirmations of transactions that aren’t accurate, the advisory said. Bitcoin mining operations have lost up to US$50,000 in income due to the problem, it said.

“Some software can detect that those blocks are invalid and reject them; other software can’t detect that blocks are invalid, so they show confirmations that aren’t real,” it said.

The Bitcoin clients most affected are ones that do Simple Payment Verification, which rely on connections to other trusted nodes. Those SPV clients continue to build new blocks based on invalid ones, Bitcoin.org said.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Hacking Team Hacked: Documents Show Company Sold Exploits And Spyware To UN-Blacklisted Governments | Tim Cushing | Techdirt

Hacking Team Hacked: Documents Show Company Sold Exploits And Spyware To UN-Blacklisted Governments | Tim Cushing | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Hacking Team -- purveyor of exploits and spyware to a variety of government agencies all over the world -- has been hacked. Late Sunday night, its Twitter account name was changed to "Hacked Team" and its bio to read:

Developing ineffective, easy-to-pwn offensive technology to compromise the operations of the worldwide law enforcement and intelligence communities.

Whoever's behind this (no group has claimed responsibility yet) has repurposed the official Hacking Team Twitter feed to send out screenshots of incriminating information it/they have uncovered. For those who want to take a look themselves, the liberated documents can be torrented. Here are two places the torrent file can be picked up. (CAUTION: Actual file is 400 GB, so use a robust client and check your drive[s] for free space…) [And, if those go down, I've also stashed the torrent file here.]

What has been exposed so far shows Hacking Team has been lying about its business partners. It claims to only sell to NATO partners and blacklists oppressive governments. But its "Customer" Wiki appears to show that it counts such countries as Kazakhstan, Sudan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Malaysia as partners.

Screenshots of emails accessed by Hacking Team's hackers show the company circumventing local regulations and restrictions on the export of exploits and spyware by using third-party resellers.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

EOBC: FCC Could Cut TV's Auction Opening Prices By Billions | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

EOBC: FCC Could Cut TV's Auction Opening Prices By Billions | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Expanding Opportunities for Broadcasters Coalition (EOBC) says that the FCC's opening prices for TV stations in the incentive auction could plummet by more than $8 billion collectively.

In a filing with the FCC Friday (July 2), EOBC, which represents most of a hundred TV stations interested in participating in the incentive auction at the right price, said the FCC needs to make three what it calls "relatively minor" changes to the auction framework, beginning with the "anomaly" that it says, if left unchanged, will cut opening prices to stations in the reverse auction by $8.3 billion.

EOBC also wants the FCC to reduce the decrements in each round (the degree to which prices drop as the FCC seeks the lowest bidder) and adjust the auction pricing formula.

When the FCC released its updated population data for TV stations (population is one factor, EOBC says too large a factor, in the FCC's calculation of opening bid prices), EOBC says station opening bid prices had dropped by 2.3%, or $8.3 billion) due to the new calculations.

The FCC is planning to vote July 16 on its auction framework public notice, which will include its pricing formula for opening bids, decrements, and much more.

In a blog post, EOBC executive director Preston Padden says that the FCC staff is pondering the drop prompted by the new calculation and how to address it.


Click headline to access hot link--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Podcast: Eye in the Sky | RadioLab.org

Podcast: Eye in the Sky | RadioLab.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Ross McNutt has a superpower — he can zoom in on everyday life, then rewind and fast-forward to solve crimes in a shutter-flash. But should he?

In 2004, when casualties in Iraq were rising due to roadside bombs, Ross McNutt and his team came up with an idea. With a small plane and a 44 mega-pixel camera, they figured out how to watch an entire city all at once, all day long. Whenever a bomb detonated, they could zoom onto that spot and then, because this eye in the sky had been there all along, they could scroll back in time and see - literally see - who planted it. After the war, Ross McNutt retired from the airforce, and brought this technology back home with him.


Manoush Zomorodi and Alex Goldmark from the podcast “Note to Self” give us the low-down on Ross’s unique brand of persistent surveillance, from Juarez, Mexico to Dayton, Ohio.


Then, once we realize what we can do, we wonder whether we should.


Click headline to listen to the podcast and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

WI: Sun Prairie Utilities advised against fiber optic plan | Jennifer Fetterly | The Star

WI: Sun Prairie Utilities advised against fiber optic plan | Jennifer Fetterly | The Star | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It’s no surprise that Frontier and Charter oppose Sun Prairie Utilities’ (SPU) plans to bring fiber optics citywide, but this week, they had the opportunity to state their case.

Industry competitors spent more than 90 minutes telling city officials why it’s a bad idea, highlighting failures in other municipalities, questioning the utilities’ ability to handle operations, and even hinting, if it goes through, they’ll cut jobs in the Sun Prairie area.

The city estimates the fiber-to-the-home initiative would cost $27 million for full buildout with a private-public partnership, and are looking at a $500,000 test pilot project in Smith’s Crossing by the end of the year, if approved by the city council.

Utility officials are confident in the plan, buoyed by projections that would see a positive cash flow within four years if 35 percent of residents would take service. They also say they have experience: SPU already offers fiber optics to more than 238 residents and 31 businesses, that generates $400,000 in annual revenue.

Municipalities across the country are getting into the fiber-optics game, either because it’s not made readily accessible or the service, either cable or fiber-optics, is lacking or too expensive.

Tim Moore, executive director of Wisconsin Cable Communications Association, said he came to the June 30 Committee of the Whole meeting to persuade the city not to go forward with the citywide project.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

George Washington’s Farewell Address: A ‘Warning Against the Impostures of Pretended Patriotism’ | Truthdig.com

George Washington’s Farewell Address: A ‘Warning Against the Impostures of Pretended Patriotism’ | Truthdig.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

On Independence Day, against official claims that mass domestic surveillance is needed to ensure U.S. security, Truthdig reprints the farewell address of the first president of the United States.

The period for a new election of a citizen to administer the executive government of the United States being not far distant, and the time actually arrived when your thoughts must be employed in designating the person who is to be clothed with that important trust, it appears to me proper, especially as it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should now apprise you of the resolution I have formed, to decline being considered among the number of those out of whom a choice is to be made.

I beg you, at the same time, to do me the justice to be assured that this resolution has not been taken without a strict regard to all the considerations appertaining to the relation which binds a dutiful citizen to his country; and that in withdrawing the tender of service, which silence in my situation might imply, I am influenced by no diminution of zeal for your future interest, no deficiency of grateful respect for your past kindness, but am supported by a full conviction that the step is compatible with both.

The acceptance of, and continuance hitherto in, the office to which your suffrages have twice called me have been a uniform sacrifice of inclination to the opinion of duty and to a deference for what appeared to be your desire. I constantly hoped that it would have been much earlier in my power, consistently with motives which I was not at liberty to disregard, to return to that retirement from which I had been reluctantly drawn. The strength of my inclination to do this, previous to the last election, had even led to the preparation of an address to declare it to you; but mature reflection on the then perplexed and critical posture of our affairs with foreign nations, and the unanimous advice of persons entitled to my confidence, impelled me to abandon the idea.

I rejoice that the state of your concerns, external as well as internal, no longer renders the pursuit of inclination incompatible with the sentiment of duty or propriety, and am persuaded, whatever partiality may be retained for my services, that, in the present circumstances of our country, you will not disapprove my determination to retire.

The impressions with which I first undertook the arduous trust were explained on the proper occasion. In the discharge of this trust, I will only say that I have, with good intentions, contributed towards the organization and administration of the government the best exertions of which a very fallible judgment was capable. Not unconscious in the outset of the inferiority of my qualifications, experience in my own eyes, perhaps still more in the eyes of others, has strengthened the motives to diffidence of myself; and every day the increasing weight of years admonishes me more and more that the shade of retirement is as necessary to me as it will be welcome. Satisfied that if any circumstances have given peculiar value to my services, they were temporary, I have the consolation to believe that, while choice and prudence invite me to quit the political scene, patriotism does not forbid it.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Privacy Is Freedom: Robert Scheer | Truthdig.com

Privacy Is Freedom: Robert Scheer | Truthdig.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In an excerpt from his new book, “They Know Everything About You: How Data-Collecting Corporations and Snooping Government Agencies Are Destroying Democracy,” Truthdig Editor-in-Chief Robert Scheer traces the Fourth Amendment’s enshrinement of privacy rights from English common law to Facebook and a defense by Chief Supreme Court Justice John Roberts.

What is the role of privacy in the twenty-first century? To the leaders of Internet commerce, whose basic business model involves exploiting the minutiae of their customers’ lives, the very idea of privacy has been treated as, at best, an anachronism of the pre-digital age. Meanwhile, those desiring to keep their personal data from prying eyes claim it as an unconditional constitutional right.

After making a pro-privacy pretense, in his company’s early years, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg began steadily advancing the argument that privacy is a luxury being willingly tossed aside by customers preferring convenience. “People have really gotten comfortable not only sharing more information and different kinds, but more openly and with more people,” he said while accepting a Crunchie award in San Francisco in January 2010. “That social norm is just something that has evolved over time. We view it as our role in the system to constantly be innovating and be updating what our system is to reflect what the current social norms are.”

Instead of viewing the protection of privacy as a business’s obligation to his customer base, Zuckerberg suggested that the very concept of personal privacy could be gradually disappearing. “[F]our years ago, when Facebook was getting started, most people didn’t want to put up any information about themselves on the Internet,” he told an interviewer at the Web 2.0 Summit in 2008.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.