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Big data could mean big savings in health care – but here’s what has to happen first | GigaOM MedTech News

Big data could mean big savings in health care – but here’s what has to happen first | GigaOM MedTech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Properly exploiting big data in health care could mean up to $450 billion in savings health care organizations and consumers according to a recent reportfrom consulting firm McKinsey. But don’t get too excited yet – that data-optimized future isn’t just going to fall in our laps.

 

An abundance of newly available information — from research and development data aggregated by pharmaceutical companies to digitized patient records to recently-released health information from the federal government and other public sources — combined with new technology has the potential to transform health. But, according to the report, to really “jujitsu” that data (as the country’s CTO Todd Park likes to say), the industry may need to shift its thinking and scale some obstacles first.

 

“Stakeholders will only benefit from big data if they take a more holistic, patient-centered approach to value, one that focuses equally on health-care spending and treatment outcomes,” McKinsey’s report said.

 

To do that, the analysis laid out a few guidelines, including:

 

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NY: Genesee County tech park is key part of regional economic development pitch | Mike Pettinella | The Buffalo News

NY: Genesee County tech park is key part of regional economic development pitch | Mike Pettinella | The Buffalo News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A major Genesee County technology project could have the potential to create more than 10,000 jobs over the next 20 years. It’s an integral part of the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council’s draft of its application for a $500 million Upstate Revitalization Initiative award.

The Western New York Science, Technology, Advanced Manufacturing Park in the Town of Alabama could have a significant impact on the economy from Rochester to Buffalo for years to come, Genesee County Manager Jay A. Gsell said Thursday.

“We’re talking about the creation of thousands of jobs paying $60,000 to $70,000 a year just at the site itself, and a multiplier effect of two to three times that number in new employment opportunities in the region,” Gsell said. “All boats rise with the tide in this case.”

The Finger Lakes council released the document earlier this week, stating that it opens a month-long public review period leading up to the Oct. 5 submission of the final proposal to the state.

Finger Lakes is one of seven upstate economic development councils that are vying for three $500 million grants to be used for projects to spur growth and create jobs. The others are the Capital Region, Central New York, Mid-Hudson, Mohawk Valley, North Country and Southern Tier.

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Hitsville vs. Soulsville: How Detroit and Memphis are embracing their soul music heritage | Glen Morren & Criag Meek | SoapBoxMedia.com

Hitsville vs. Soulsville: How Detroit and Memphis are embracing their soul music heritage | Glen Morren & Criag Meek | SoapBoxMedia.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Only in the last decade have Cincinnatians come to appreciate the legacy of King Records. The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame's historical marker at its once-bustling, now-decrepit recording studio in Evanston explains the company's significance:

"From 1943-1971 King Records forever changed American music. Owner Syd Nathan gave the world bluegrass, R&B, rock and roll, doo-wop, country, soul and funk. With stars from James Brown to the Stanley Brothers and its innovative integrated business model, Cincinnati's King Records revolutionized the music industry."

A variety of music and neighborhood folks — including Bootsy Collins, Cincinnati USA Music Heritage Foundation and Xavier University — have been engaged in efforts to preserve the crumbling studio and celebrate King's place in music history. Meanwhile, one of building's owners has applied for a demolition permit. City agencies have come out against demolition, but the old building is far from saved.

There was a time when King Records stood shoulder-to-shoulder with the best-known independent record labels like Motown in Detroit and Stax in Memphis. Some time in the 1960s — probably when James Brown left — their paths diverged, and today most music fans appreciate the heritage of Motown and Stax while mostly forgetting King's impact.

A big reason why Motown and Stax are still known today is that their home cities have preserved and continue to celebrate what those labels and companies meant to local citizens and to the world. As this story explains, those efforts were hit-and-miss and the work remains unfinished — but ultimately Detroit and Memphis embraced their roles as music capitals, and those cities are reaping the benefits now in terms of tourism dollars and civic pride.

Cincinnati arguably had as big an impact on American music as Detroit or Memphis. But will Cincinnati follow their path, embrace our music heritage and make it relevant in the 21st Century?


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Katrina may be a metaphor to some, but it’s still a reality to New Orleans | Janell Ross | WashPost.com

Katrina may be a metaphor to some, but it’s still a reality to New Orleans | Janell Ross | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Come first to the corner of Flood and North Galvez streets, Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans.

Here, where the unauthorized Lower Ninth tour groups almost never come to gawk and the planning experts rarely do, it’s just silent enough to take it all in. This is not the stretch where Brad Pitt’s charitable organization has rebuilt a series of elevated, solar-panel-equipped homes. This isn’t the site of a big new school. This isn’t the place that President Obama spoke of Thursday, a city that is “coming back better and stronger.” This is where the remnants of sinking curbs and bits of concrete foundation betray the missing homes. They speak of the people lost and places of rest and community obliterated. They hint at what has not — and perhaps will not ever — be replaced.

Katrina is a one-word metaphor for major failing and limited redress, for belated reaction and selective improvement. Katrina, on some level during the storm and in the decade since, became synonymous with government abdication and abandonment.

Ten years after Katrina assaulted New Orleans, that assessment seems likely to follow George W. Bush, the president who called himself a compassionate conservative, into history. Bush and his handlers made the fateful choice to fly Air Force One over New Orleans during this city’s many hours of tremendous need — and never stop. Early requests for transportation assistance went unmet and post-storm efforts to evacuate those in the worst conditions stretched well beyond reason.

As the president who followed Bush, Obama has thus far borne the brunt of those comparisons. The expression, “X is Obama’s Katrina,” came up after the 2009 mass shooting at Fort Hood and amid revelations about the still-sputtering economy in 2010. It came up that same year during and after the U.S. response to the earthquake that devastated Haiti, as well as after the massive BP oil spill. We heard the phrase again following the Benghazi attack in 2012 and Obamacare’s rollout in 2013. And we’ve all heard the Katrina comparisons in the years since: to the spike in border crossings to Ebola and to domestic spying.


Sometimes the metaphor is overstatement. Sometimes it is part of an earnest attempt to convey the significance and danger presented by current events. And sometimes a reference to Katrina resonates because it connotes an inhumane distance and official desertion that many Americans did not know was possible before Katrina.


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Gigabites: Connecticut Fights the Gig Fight | Mari Silbey | Light Reading

Gigabites: Connecticut Fights the Gig Fight | Mari Silbey | Light Reading | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It's time for your Gigabites roundup. In this edition, Connecticut pushes forward with the CT Gig Project, another Kansas town lines up for gigabit broadband and more.


The state of Connecticut made news this week with an ongoing fight between municipal leaders and local broadband providers. The battle is over an initiative called the CT Gig Project, which aims to bring gigabit Internet to communities throughout the region.
While the project has been underway for about a year, politicians in New Haven only recently pushed the plan forward with a resolution submitted to the city services committee. The resolution proposes a feasibility study for network deployment and includes a request to sign interconnection agreements with other cities and towns that want to participate in the project.

Local ISPs, however, are vehemently again the entire CT Gig Project. The New England Cable and Telecommunications Association, like other opponents before it, notes that there is already private investment taking place, and that a government-backed initiative is both risky and unnecessary. (See also FCC Clears Way for Muni Network Expansion.)


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Finally, your Gogo inflight WiFi is about to get a lot faster | Brian Fung | WashPost.com

Finally, your Gogo inflight WiFi is about to get a lot faster | Brian Fung | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A new technology that could make your inflight WiFi a heck of a lot faster just got regulatory approval from the Federal Aviation Administration this week — meaning that on some flights, your Internet might actually become usable again.

Gogo said Monday it's won clearance to start rolling out 2Ku, a connection technology that it says will boost download speeds by up to 20 times over more conventional technology. The big difference?


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Shutting down a transparency tool in 29 countries? Twitter can do better. | Deji Olukotun Blog | Access Now

Shutting down a transparency tool in 29 countries? Twitter can do better. | Deji Olukotun Blog | Access Now | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Last week, Twitter shut down a tool that helps people hold politicians accountable in 29 countries around the world. The Netherlands-based civil society group Open State Foundation created Politwoops, which scans the Twitter accounts of politicians for tweets they’ve deleted. Deleted tweets can provide insight to the viewpoints of public officials, and journalists have been using Politwoops to keep representatives accountable for what they say publicly. In the spirit of transparency,


Open State allowed other organizations to use the code of the tool, and use it they have, everywhere from Argentina, to Turkey, to Spain, to the United Kingdom. But on August 21, Twitter turned it off.

Twitter informed Politwoops that it was violating the terms of its Application Programming Interface, or API. Three months earlier, Twitter decided to stop letting the Sunlight Foundation, a U.S. transparency organization, use the tool. To justify that decision, Twitter explained that “No one user is more deserving of that ability [to delete a tweet] than another. Indeed, deleting a tweet is an expression of one’s voice.”

Twitter is arguing that deleting a tweet is the same regardless of who does it — an elected official or an ordinary user. However, that ignores the fact that if the public suddenly can’t see what an official has said publicly, it creates problems for transparency and accountability.


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Sprint is dangling a year of free service in front of DirecTV customers | Brian Fung | WashPost.com

Sprint is dangling a year of free service in front of DirecTV customers | Brian Fung | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sprint is offering DirecTV customers a tremendous deal, potentially worth hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars.

The country's fourth-largest cellular carrier says it will give DirecTV subscribers a year's worth of free wireless service if they switch their cellphone plans to Sprint.

The promotion takes explicit aim at AT&T, whose recent purchase of DirecTV made it the country's biggest pay-TV provider. Rolling out a new plan to consumers this month, AT&T said it would give DirecTV customers a $300 credit if they made AT&T their wireless company, too.

Now Sprint is attempting to one-up AT&T with its own offer. The year-long deal gives you unlimited talk, text and 2 GB of monthly data per line. After the year is up, the company said in a release, customers will start paying at the following rates for the same package of features:


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Comcast Launches Video Calling | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com

Comcast Launches Video Calling | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In a FaceTime-like move that could bring some additional stickiness to its digital voice service, Comcast has quietly introduced a two-way, mobile-to-mobile video calling feature to its Xfinity Connect app for iOS and Android devices.

The feature lets Xfinity Voice subs make video calls to each other, and it was included in the 6.0 version of the Xfinity Connect app that was released on August 25 simultaneously for iOS and Android smartphones and tablets.


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Wi-Fi blocking debate far from over | Bob Brown | NetworkWorld.com

Wi-Fi blocking debate far from over | Bob Brown | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Following the FCC’s warning in January that it would no longer tolerate the Marriotts of the world blocking visitors’ WiFi hotspots, I set a reminder on my calendar to revisit the topic six months later.


After all, the issue of WiFi blocking sparked strong reactions from IT pros, end users and vendors of wireless LAN products early in the year, and I figured it wasn’t over yet.


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United In Flight WiFi Blocks Popular News Sites | Mike Masnick | Techdirt

United In Flight WiFi Blocks Popular News Sites |  Mike Masnick | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

So, just last month, we wrote about United Airlines idiotic inflight video system that forces you to install DRM on your own devices to watch a movie. And, now, it appears that the company is filtering out all sorts of news sites.


The EFF's Nate Cardozo was on a flight yesterday when he started noticing that he couldn't get to certain tech websites, including Ars Technica and The Verge -- instead receiving messages they were blocked due to United's "access policy." The same was true for political news site Daily Kos.


Eventually he even realized that United also blocks the NY Times (via his phone after the laptop battery ran out).


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U.S. paying price for lack of orderly transition plan to fiber telecom infrastructure | Fred Pilot | Eldo Telecom

U.S. paying price for lack of orderly transition plan to fiber telecom infrastructure | Fred Pilot | Eldo Telecom | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

FCC Orders Rules for Copper Retirement | POTs and PANs:


The biggest issue I see with getting rid of copper is where the phone company doesn’t have an alternate landline network ready for the transition. It doesn’t seem like a big issue to me when a company like Verizon wants to move customers from copper to FiOS. There have already been tens of millions of customers who have changed from copper to either FiOS fiber or to a cable company network who have experienced and accepted the required changes.

But AT&T has said that they want to walk away from millions of rural copper customers. That would force customers to migrate to either the cable company or to cellular wireless. This could be a huge problem for business customers because there are still a lot of business districts that have never been wired by the cable companies.


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NPD: 50% of U.S. Internet Homes Have Connected Televisions | Erik Gruenwedel | Home Media Magazine

NPD: 50% of U.S. Internet Homes Have Connected Televisions | Erik Gruenwedel | Home Media Magazine | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In a burgeoning digital marketplace for entertainment, 50% of Internet-connected U.S. households owned a device capable of linking the television to the Web at the end of the second quarter, according to new data from The NPD Group. The total number of homes that have a connected TV device topped 46 million, up 4 million homes from the previous-year period.

Connected devices including TVs, video game consoles, streaming media players and Blu-ray Disc players enable access to over-the-top video apps such as Netflix and Hulu Plus.


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AP sues feds over fake news story | Julian Hattem | The Hill

AP sues feds over fake news story | Julian Hattem | The Hill | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Associated Press is bringing a lawsuit against the Department of Justice seeking information about the government’s use of a fake news story to catch a teenager suspected of calling in bomb threats.

Along with the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, the AP asked a district court on Thursday to force the department to turn over records regarding the FBI’s impersonation of a journalist and creation of a fake story in 2007.

Reporters from the two organizations submitted Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests soon after news of the sting came to light in October but have not received any records in response, they said.

"We cannot overstate how damaging it is for federal agents to pose as journalists," Katie Townsend, the litigation director for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, said in a statement. “This practice undermines the credibility of the independent news media, and should not be tolerated.


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OR: Portland mayor kicks off TechCrawl, praises city for tech diversity push | John Cook | GeekWire

OR: Portland mayor kicks off TechCrawl, praises city for tech diversity push | John Cook | GeekWire | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Hundreds of engineers, entrepreneurs, designers and other technology professionals gathered in the hot sun Wednesday evening for the fourth annual Portland TechCrawl, the kickoff event of the two-day TechFestNW conference.

Portland Mayor Charlie Hales celebrated at the first stop, addressing the crowd in front of the Block 300 Building, home to fast-growing Portland companies such as Puppet Labs and CrowdCompass.

“We appreciate the fact that you have made commitments to be Portlanders,” said Hales. “You are competitors, but you are also collaborators and you are part of a community.”

Hales specifically pointed to the efforts by the tech community in Portland to push for greater diversity through the Portland Tech Diversity Pledge, a citywide effort to get more women and minorities involves in the industry.


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With Tech Garden, Syracuse seeds regional growth | Rachael Barker | The Avenue | Brookings.edu

With Tech Garden, Syracuse seeds regional growth | Rachael Barker | The Avenue | Brookings.edu | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

After several decades working at large companies on the West Coast, Amy and Joe Casper returned home to Syracuse, NY, laying the groundwork for the next phase of their careers: launching a start-up focused on specialized LED lighting. At The Tech Garden, the region’s growing business incubator, the Caspers refined their product, identified a specialized market in professional sports arena lighting, and grew from three employees to 25.

Since Ephesus Lighting moved out of the incubator, it has doubled its employment. Today the company sells to the NCAA and major league teams, with the 2015 Super Bowl between the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks played under Ephesus lights.

The Caspers’ story shows the payoff emerging from the region’s now decade-long bet that investing in a business incubator and other entrepreneurship supports can help revitalize an older industrial region.


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NY: Union says Verizon is needlessly passing up broadband money| Rick Karlin | Albany Times Union

NY: Union says Verizon is needlessly passing up broadband money| Rick Karlin | Albany Times Union | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The union representing many Verizon employees, and which has been in a contract dispute with the company, is criticizing their passing up federal dollars to expand broadband service into rural, underserved areas.

The company, according to the Communications Workers of America (CWA), turned down Federal Communications Commission “Connect America” funds to help pay for broadband in a number of states including New York.

Verizon, according to CWA, “Was offered $568 million over six years by the Federal government to bring broadband to 270,000 locations in Washington, DC, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Virginia.”

“Verizon’s track record is clear,” said Bob Master, Assistant to the Vice President of District One of the Communications Workers of America. “Even while raking in a billion dollars per month in profits, Verizon is turning its back on under-served communities by refusing federal subsidies to expand high-speed internet access.”

The total cost of the broadband extension isn’t clear, so it wasn’t immediately known how much the company would have to pay in addition to the federal money to adequately extend services in areas that are under-served.


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WA: Kitsap County Asks Residents Where to Expand | community broadband networks

WA: Kitsap County Asks Residents Where to Expand | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Kitsap Public Utility District (KPUD) is turning to residents to plot the course for expansion, reports the Central Kitsap Reporter. In order to find out where the greatest interest lies in municipal fiber connectivity, KPUD will be using the COS Service Zones survey system.

“Since this is a public network, we do not feel comfortable relying on anecdotal data to determine the next phase for broadband expansion,” said Bob Hunter, Kitsap PUD General Manager. “What’s most appealing with the COS Service Zones is that it enables us to let the gathering and push come from the citizens. We want to be sure the residents are driving this.”

We have reported on the KPUD, mostly as it related to other stories. The publicly owned open access fiber network in Kitsap County, Washington began providing wholesale only service in 2000. The goal was to provide better connectivity to public facilities and improve emergency communications and the KPUD has reached that goal.


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Apple Takes Washington | Tony Romm | POLITICO.com

Apple Takes Washington | Tony Romm | POLITICO.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As Apple chief Tim Cook quietly slipped out of a public meeting at the White House for a private lunch with Eric Holder in December 2013, the attorney general braced himself for a rough encounter. His Justice Department had sued Apple more than a year earlier, after all, for the way that the company priced its e-books, touching off a bruising legal war between the two. And this time Apple seemed even more apoplectic. It was seething over a flurry of reports that the NSA had quietly cracked its servers and gained access to untold millions of its customers’ personal communications.

Cook and Holder hotly debated security and privacy during their first-ever meeting on that freezing December day, but the attorney general said he sat across a much different leader than he had expected. “We found we had a mutual Alabama connection,” Holder recently explained in an interview. The sister of Holder’s wife had helped desegregate the University of Alabama, and Cook, a gay man born and raised in the South, knew firsthand the impact of discrimination.

Cook’s demeanor, however, wasn’t even the most remarkable part of the meeting. A private conference in Washington with the attorney general (in itself a rarity for many tech magnates) would have been unthinkable for Cook’s irascible predecessor, Steve Jobs, who actively disdained D.C. Cook, much as he sought to shirk Jobs’ shadow as CEO, had also endeavored quietly to rethink his company’s relationship with the nation’s capital, becoming a leader not only ready to engage its power brokers but challenge them openly when it mattered most.


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CenturyLink to Bringing Broadband to 24,000 Rural Households in Louisiana | MyArkLaMiss.com

CenturyLink to Bringing Broadband to 24,000 Rural Households in Louisiana | MyArkLaMiss.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

CenturyLink announced today that it will bring high-speed Internet services to more than 24,000 rural households and businesses in Louisiana by accepting the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)’s Connect America Fund (CAF) statewide offer in Louisiana.

CenturyLink is accepting 33 CAF phase II statewide offers from the FCC to bring Internet service with speeds of at least 10 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload to approximately 1.2 million locations in FCC-designated, high-cost census blocks. The company is accepting a total of approximately $500 million a year for six years.

High-speed Internet access brings many benefits to rural communities, including economic development and better access to education and healthcare services such as distance learning and telemedicine.


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CEOs Call for Wage Increases for Workers! What’s the Catch? | Jim Hightower | Truthdig

CEOs Call for Wage Increases for Workers! What’s the Catch? | Jim Hightower | Truthdig | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Peter Georgescu has a message he wants America’s corporate and political elites to hear: “I’m scared,” he said in a recent New York Times opinion piece.

He adds that Paul Tudor Jones is scared, too, as is Ken Langone. And they are trying to get the Powers That Be to pay attention to their urgent concerns. But wait—these three are Powers That Be. Georgescu is former head of Young & Rubicam, one of the world’s largest PR and advertising firms; Jones is a quadruple-billionaire and hedge fund operator; and Langone is a founder of Home Depot.

What is scaring the pants off these powerful peers of the corporate plutocracy?


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US agency to seek consensus on divisive, volatile topic of security vulnerability disclosures | Grant Gross | NetworkWorld

US agency to seek consensus on divisive, volatile topic of security vulnerability disclosures | Grant Gross | NetworkWorld | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A U.S. agency hopes to gather security researchers, software vendors and other interested people to reach consensus on the sticky topic of how to disclose cybersecurity vulnerabilities.

Beginning in September, the U.S. National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) will host a series of meetings intended to improve collaboration among security researchers, software vendors and IT system operators on the disclosure of, and response to, vulnerabilities.


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The Government Needs to Work With Silicon Valley to Create Our Military Future | P.W. Singer & August Cole | Slate.com

The Government Needs to Work With Silicon Valley to Create Our Military Future | P.W. Singer & August Cole | Slate.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

"In 1931, the city fathers of Sunnyvale, California, came up with a unique plan to rescue their town from the doldrums of the Great Depression. They raised $480,000 to buy nearly 1,000 acres of farmland and then sold off the land to the U.S. government for $1. The deal was that Sunnyvale would then become the home for a new planned Navy fleet of “flying aircraft carriers,” massive helium-filled airships that would serve as bases in the air for propeller biplanes.

"The plan didn’t work out as anticipated, neither for Sunnyvale nor the blimps. In 1933, the USS Akron, the Navy’s test airborne aircraft carrier, crashed. The plan was shelved, its only legacy that the airfield was renamed after Adm. William Moffett, the head of the Navy’s Aeronautics Bureau, who had been killed in the crash. But, fortunately for the town, World War II interceded a few years later, and Moffett Field became a base for patrol airplanes and then the home of the U.S. Air Force Satellite Test Center. By the 1950s, several big aerospace firms clustered around the base and the test center. The thousands of scientists and engineers who moved into the sunny valley built close ties with local universities, and the old farmland became the hub of a different industry. The city fathers’ plan of economic growth through blimp basing instead spawned what became known as Silicon Valley."

Those paragraphs (above) come from our new book Ghost Fleet. The little-known history is instructive, as today it is the U.S. military that is looking to Silicon Valley for help. Faced with disruptive technologies like robotics and 3-D printing and a new strategic competitor in China that many worry could some day risk outright war, the Defense Department has kicked off an effort to “woo Silicon Valley.”


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Is telecom a natural transition for utilities? | Jaclyn Brandt | SmartGridNews.com

Is telecom a natural transition for utilities? | Jaclyn Brandt | SmartGridNews.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As utilities are working to upgrade infrastructure around the world, some are working to cross new boundaries -- including in the telecommunications industry.

Southern Company jumped into the industry nearly 20 years ago, with the launch of SouthernLINC Wireless. Southern Telecom has been a Southern Company subsidiary since it was founded in 1997. And now the company is looking to upgrade its infrastructure to Southern Company utilities, to local businesses and to government in the utilities' service territories.

Although the telecom network is important to the overall company, having the use of a wireless network for utilities is especially important for utilities like Georgia Power and Alabama Power.


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Appeals Court Strikes Down Ruling Finding NSA Phone Records Collection Unconstitutional | Mike Masnick | Techdirt

Appeals Court Strikes Down Ruling Finding NSA Phone Records Collection Unconstitutional | Mike Masnick | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Back in December of 2013, judge Richard Leon of the DC district court, ruled that the NSA's bulk metadata collection under Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act was unconstitutional and issued an injunction against it (though, recognizing the inevitable appeal, Judge Leon stayed the injunction). This was in the case brought by Larry Klayman and FreedomWorks.

Leon's ruling was detailed and thorough... but the DC circuit appeals court has overturned it and sent it back to the lower court, focusing mainly on the "standing" question that has been raised in basically every case against NSA surveillance.


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AT&T to deploy "wireless local loop" fixed premise service in high cost areas | Fred Pilot | Eldo Telecom

AT&T to deploy "wireless local loop" fixed premise service in high cost areas | Fred Pilot | Eldo Telecom | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T will apparently use wireless technology to provide fixed premise Internet telecommunications services using funding from the Connect America Fund (CAF) to subsidize infrastructure costs in high cost areas of the nation.


The U.S. Federal Communications Commission announced this week that AT&T accepted $428 million in annual subsidies from the CAF to serve 2.2 million rural consumers in 18 states.


Since the FCC requires CAF recipients to provide connectivity of "at least" 10Mbps for downloads and 1Mbps for uploads, the wireless gambit could potentially meet that standard. AT&T's wireless strategy was communicated to the FCC in a letter dated August 27, 2015 (H/T to California-based Steve Blum of Tellus Venture Associates):


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