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Can big tech overcome its love-hate relationship and destroy patent trolls once and for all? | GigaOM Tech News

Can big tech overcome its love-hate relationship and destroy patent trolls once and for all? | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

There has been a lot of talk in the tech world lately about defensive patent licenses and eliminating patent trolls, but I wouldn’t break out the celebratory champagne just yet. As much as technology companies seem to love the idea of killing patent trolls where they sleep — in a comfy bed of intellectual property acquired with proactive litigation in mind — they don’t yet seem willing to take a real stand. And some actually seem content to keep feeding the trolls the IP morsels they need as sustenance to stick around.

 

If tech companies were serious about getting rid of patent trolls and spurring innovation, their first steps might be building a unified front and applying their ideals uniformly across their IP efforts. On Friday, for example, Google teamed with BlackBerry, Red Hat and EarthLink to file comments with the Federal Trade Commission about the scourge that is patent-assertion entities — institutions that get the rights to IP from operational entities (i.e., companies that actually sell products versus just sue) and then file lawsuits on their behalf. It’s a meaningful action and it addresses a real problem — Red Hat and Rackspace just emerged victorious after a lawsuit with a patent-assertion entity, in fact — but the backstory is a bit more convoluted.

 

For starters, a skeptic might argue, Google’s interest (and possibly BlackBerry’s, as well) is primarily about sticking it to Microsoft in mobile. After all, it wasn’t so long ago — May 2012 — that Google filed a complaint with the European Union accusing Microsoft and Nokia of engaging with a known patent-assertion entity, called Mosaid, in order to stifle the growth of the Android operating system in Europe. Before ultimately teaming up to acquire Kodak’s patents out of bankruptcy, Google accused Apple and Microsoft of teaming up to buy them and dump them into a patent-assertion entity.

 

Ironically, though, the very same FTC to which Google is now petitioning recently said the search giant has been abusing its own standard essential patents in mobile by pursuing injunctions against competitors who sought to license them — namely Apple and Microsoft. And BlackBerry, under its former RIM moniker, was part of an Apple and Microsoft-led consortium that bought Nortel’s IP assets in 2011, much to Google’s chagrin. I suspect these apparent hypocrisies only scratch the surface of what’s going on in mobile and across the IT landscape.

 

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Q2 U.S.: Comcast strong. AT&T and other telcos weak | Dave Burstein | FastNetNews.com

DSL getting killed where not upgraded. AT&T lost 55K broadband customers. They want to abandon about 25% of their landline territory and go wireless only. The areas are profitable but rural wireless customers are extraordinarily profitable once the network is built. So they want to eliminate competition even from their own landlines. They stopped maintaining those lines years ago and many have 1999 technology 6 megabit DSLAMs.


AT&T and Verizon are best thought of as companies with two parts. The upgraded areas, FiOS and U-Verse, are doing fine against cable. They are getting clobbered where they haven't upgraded but allow that. They want to shut off most of those lines. Century/Qwest lost 2,000 customers and Windstream 17,000. 


Comcast added 203K subscribers to 21,271,000. Some received the $10 rate for poor families but I believe most at paying full rate. But Cablevision and Cable One actually lost customers. Telcos can compete just fine against cable; in Canada at Britain, telco DSL is beating cable.


Revisiting the debate on fiber versus DSL. AT&T lost 55K, Verizon added 46K. There have been several recent quarters where Verizon FiOS fiber home did noticeably better against the competition than AT&T's fiber/DSL. Verizon offered 25 and 50 megabits upstream, while DOCSIS is stuck at 1-5 megabits up. Fiber remains a magic word, with connotations of modernity and reliability. The glamour of Google's well-publicized gigabit fiber may be helping the (not so fast) Verizon variety. Different marketing and pricing strategies could explain the (relatively modest) difference in results.


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Comcast-Time Warner:$10 for poor families, 50 megabits for most | Dave Burstein | FastNetNews.com

Comcast-Time Warner:$10 for poor families, 50 megabits for most | Dave Burstein | FastNetNews.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

David Cohen announced at TPI Aspen most of the subscribers in both Comcast and Time Warner will soon have 50 megabit service. Poor families will be able to get broadband for $10/month in New York, Los Angeles and other Time Warner territories. Other groups in need may be covered. (I suggest Medicaid recipients and less affluent senior citizens.)


I applauded when Cohen said, "Comcast strongly supports net neutrality" some issues remain with their practice. I was sitting at a table with senior AT&T & Verizon execs who looked glum. Net Neutrality will sidetrack the Bells' effort to get their "New Telecom Act" through Congress, Congressman Rick Boucher predicted. "Unless Net Neutrality is compromised, the bill won't go through in the next two years." Any support for neutrality makes it harder for the Bells to get their bill.


Comcast's $10 offer for the poor has connected more people to the net than $billion of mostly wasted government money. The program's not perfect, but Comcast has consistently simplified procedures and eliminated red tape. It's tragic that JG allowed the other cable companies to renege on their commitment to do similar made to the broadband planners. The Bells have done nothing for the poor. They've now have some of the highest prices in the developed world. The cheapest offering on Verizon's FiOS website is about $75 including fees; it was about half that a few years ago.


CEO Brian Roberts and EVP David Cohen strike me as decent men who want to do the right thing, especially for the poor. Ivan Seidenberg of Verizon likewise demonstrated good faith in his dealings and was very proud he delivered two of the best networks in the world, FiOS fiber and the first really big LTE network. They are hard driving and very effective businessman who undoubtedly have charged over many on the way to great riches. Almost no one gets to their level without making choices that put their company's interests before consumers. Of course they know they get pr value from moves like these, but they at least get done. As we say in Yiddish, most top executives I've met would rather be mensches than gonifs.


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Bitcoin slowly goes global as businesses like Overstock expand to international customers | Biz Carson | GigaOM Tech News

Bitcoin slowly goes global as businesses like Overstock expand to international customers | Biz Carson | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Bitcoin has attracted the attention of a lot of large businesses from Expedia to Dell to Overstock. However when all of those companies started accepting bitcoin, it was only in the U.S. But the tide is starting to change as more businesses expand their bitcoin acceptance overseas.


Overstock is set to become the largest later on Monday when it turns on international bitcoin payments for O.co this evening. Other retailers, like Newegg and TigerDirect, have already moved north of the border and started accepting payments from Canadian customers.


Part of the draw of opening up bitcoin payments internationally is the cost savings. Instead of dealing with the hassle of foreign currencies and high processing fees, bitcoin coming from Albania costs the same to process as a bitcoin from Alabama. It also helps minimize cases of fraud, which can be higher among international customers, thanks to the technology behind blockchain confirmations.


For Overstock, there was no “deep strategy” to roll it out to international consumers, said CEO Patrick Byrne. Instead, it was about the distribution of resources needed to implement it. Bitcoin payments currently account for one quarter of one percent of Overstock’s daily transactions, Byrne said, so the company was limited by how many resources it could dedicate to the project during its development cycle.


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The Boy Who Invented Email -- History of Email (Part 1) | Larry Weber Blog | HuffPost.com

The Boy Who Invented Email -- History of Email (Part 1) | Larry Weber Blog | HuffPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

This is the first article in The History of Email Series.


In 1978, a 14-year-old boy invented email.


He created a computer program, which he called "email," that replicated all the functions of the interoffice mail system: Inbox, Outbox, Folders, Memo, Attachments, Address Book, etc., the now familiar parts of every email system.


On August 30, 1982, the US government officially recognized V.A. Shiva Ayyadurai as the inventor of email by awarding him the first US Copyright for "Email," "Computer Program for Electronic Mail System," for his 1978 invention. This was awarded at a time when Copyright was the only way to protect software inventions.


Email, however, emerged from somewhat unlikely circumstances. Email wasn't created, with a massive research budget, in big institutions like the ARPANET, MIT or the military. Such institutions had thought it "impossible" to create such a system, believing it far too complex.


Email was created at Livingston High School in the heart of inner city Newark, NJ with little to no funding.


Shiva was given something that big institutions, however, may have found hard to provide: an ecosystem of loving parents, a wonderful mentor, dedicated teachers and a collegial environment where he was treated as an equal though his colleagues were 20 to 40 years older.


In that ecosystem, Shiva thrived, and the world got email!


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Roku launches affordable and functional smart TV range | GizMag.com

Roku launches affordable and functional smart TV range | GizMag.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If you’re a fan of top media streaming services like Netflix and Hulu Plus, then you’re also likely aware of Roku, a company that specializes in low-cost streaming boxes that let you throw that content up onto the big screen. The company has announced partnerships with TV manufacturers Hisense and TCL to produce Roku TV, a range of smart TVs that make media streaming more convenient without breaking the bank.


As you might expect, the new smart TVs are all about media streaming, providing access to Roku’s 1,500+ streaming channels and library of 200,000+ movies and TV shows via the company’s official store. Continuing with the content-first theme of the device, the company is bundling in two months free Hulu Plus membership, plus a package of free trials reportedly worth in excess of US$100.


There are a number of ways to control that media, the first being a simple, 20-button remote similar to those used with company’s streaming boxes. More interestingly, the TVs can also be controlled using smartphones and tablets by means of the Roku Mobile app, available for iOS and Android.


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Out in the Open: Hackers Build a Skype That’s Not Controlled by Microsoft | Klint Finley | WIRED

Out in the Open: Hackers Build a Skype That’s Not Controlled by Microsoft | Klint Finley | WIRED | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The web forum 4chan is known mostly as a place to share juvenile and, to put it mildly, politically incorrect images. But it’s also the birthplace of one of the latest attempts to subvert the NSA’s mass surveillance program.


When whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed that full extent of the NSA’s activities last year, members of the site’s tech forum started talking about the need for a more secure alternative to Skype. Soon, they’d opened a chat room to discuss the project and created an account on the code hosting and collaboration site GitHub and began uploading code.


Eventually, they settled on the name Tox, and you can already download prototypes of the surprisingly easy-to-use tool. The tool is part of a widespread effort to create secure online communication tools that are controlled not only by any one company, but by the world at large—a continued reaction to the Snowden revelations. This includes everything from instant messaging tools to email services.


It’s too early to count on Tox to protect you from eavesdroppers and spies. Like so many other new tools, it’s still in the early stages of development and has yet to receive the scrutiny that other security tools, such as the instant messaging encryption plugin Off The Record has. But it endeavors to carve a unique niche within the secure communications ecosystem.


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What is the blue light from our screens really doing to our eyes? | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore | GigaOM Tech News

What is the blue light from our screens really doing to our eyes? | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

An eye doctor says he’s recently seen a few 35-year-old patients whose lenses, which are typically clear all the way up until around age 40, are so cloudy they resemble 75-year-olds’. A sleep doctor says kids as young as toddlers are suffering from chronic insomnia, which in turn affects their behavior and performance at school and daycare. A scientist finds that women who work night shifts are twice as likely to develop breast cancer than those who sleep at night.


What do all these anecdotes have in common? Nighttime exposure to the blue light emanating from our screens.


You’ve probably heard the hype these past few years: being in the presence of light at night disrupts the body’s natural circadian rhythms by suppressing the production of melatonin, a sleep hormone. But melatonin does far more than help us get sleepy – it’s also an antioxidant that appears to play a pivotal role in slowing the progression of cancer and other diseases.


“I’ve been spending a lot of the past 20 years worrying about it,” said Dr. Richard Hansler, who clocked in 42 years at GE Lighting developing “all kinds of bright, beautiful lights” before his move to John Carroll University in Ohio, where he studied the effects of light at night on our health. It was the mid 1990s, and at that point, he said, his concern wasn’t widely shared.


“I discovered that using light at night is bad for people’s health and interferes with their sleep. I felt a moral obligation to do something about it, particularly when I learned it’s the blue component in ordinary white light that is suppressing the production of melatonin. And melatonin not only helps you sleep but is a marvelous material that has a very big influence on health in general; specifically, if you don’t have enough you may develop diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and even a couple kinds of cancer.”


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Turn Your Place Into A Smart Home On The Cheap With These Beacons | FastCoLabs.com

Turn Your Place Into A Smart Home On The Cheap With These Beacons | FastCoLabs.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Most of us dream of the day when we can have a smart home like Tony Stark’s in the Iron Man movies or George’s from The Jetsons. A smart home that reacts to us without us having to lift a finger. One that knows where we are in it and then configures that room to meet our needs. But while we are slowly inching our way toward having homes full of smart devices, outfitting an entire house’s infrastructure to become a true smarthome costs tens of thousands to millions of dollars.


Until now anyway.


A startup called airfy have begun pre-orders on Indiegogo for the airfy Beacon, enabling people to convert their “dumb homes” into smart homes without the need for ripping up walls to install costly infrastructure.


The airfy is a hardware beacon that you place around your house--it looks like a smaller, slicker, futuristic version of the wireless routers we’re all familiar with. Once installed in the various rooms in your home, the airfy Beacons can enable virtually any device in those rooms to turn on or off based purely on your micro-location--that is, whether or not you’re in the room.


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The US government can brand you a terrorist based on a Facebook post. We can't let them make up the rules | Arjun Sethi | The Guardian

The US government can brand you a terrorist based on a Facebook post. We can't let them make up the rules | Arjun Sethi | The Guardian | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The US government’s web of surveillance is vast and interconnected. Now we know just how opaque, inefficient and discriminatory it can be.


As we were reminded again just this week, you can be pulled into the National Security Agency’s database quietly and quickly, and the consequences can be long and enduring. Through ICREACH, a Google-style search engine created for the intelligence community, the NSA provides data on private communications to 23 government agencies. More than 1,000 analysts had access to that information.


This kind of data sharing, however, isn’t limited to the latest from Edward Snowden’s NSA files. It was confirmed earlier this month that the FBI shares its master watchlist, the Terrorist Screening Database, with at least 22 foreign governments, countless federal agencies, state and local law enforcement, plus private contractors.


The watchlist tracks “known” and “suspected” terrorists and includes both foreigners and Americans. It’s also based on loose standards and secret evidence, which ensnares innocent people. Indeed, the standards are so low that the US government’s guidelines specifically allow for a single, uncorroborated source of information – including a Facebook or Twitter post – to serve as the basis for placing you on its master watchlist.


Of the 680,000 individuals on that FBI master list, roughly 40% have “no recognized terrorist group affiliation”, according to the Intercept. These individuals don’t even have a connection – as the government loosely defines it – to a designated terrorist group, but they are still branded as suspected terrorists.


The absurdities don’t end there. Take Dearborn, Michigan, a city with a population under 100,000 that is known for its large Arab American community – and has more watchlisted residents than any other city in America except New York.


These eye-popping numbers are largely the result of the US government’s use of a loose standard – so-called “reasonable suspicion” – in determining who, exactly, can be watchlisted.


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Trinidad & Tobago: Digicel applies for pay-TV concession in T&T | TeleGeography.com

Trinidad & Tobago-based mobile operator Digicel has applied for a pay-TV licence, the Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad & Tobago (TATT) has confirmed.


The application for the concession, technically named a ‘Subscription Broadcasting Service via a Telecommunications Network (National Geographical Class)’, is subject to comments or objections until 15 September.


Competition in Trinidad’s pay-TV sector comes from the likes of Flow, DirecTV, Green Dot and MayaroCable TV.


TeleGeography notes that the Digicel Group has taken steps in recent months to broaden its horizons in a number of markets, by agreeing takeover deals for a series of fixed line and pay-TV operators. Recent acquisitions include: Telstar (Jamaica, July 2014); WIV Cable (Turks & Caicos, April 2014); SAT Telecommunications (Dominica, February 2014) and Caribbean Cable Holdings (Anguilla, Nevis and Montserrat (November 2013).

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Istanbul, Turkey: The Ninth Annual Internet Governance Forum | IntGovForum.org

The Ninth Annual IGF Meeting will be held in Istanbul, Turkey on 2-5 September 2014. The venue of the meeting is Lütfi Kirdar International Convention and Exhibition Center (ICEC). The overarching theme for the meeting is: "Connecting Continents for Enhanced Multistakeholder Internet Governance" with the following subthemes.


Under-Secretary-General Wu Hongbo has issued an official invitation to the Ninth Annual Internet Governance Forum Meeting. The draft programme paper for the 9th IGF is available. It is a rolling document which will be updated as the preparatory process for the Istanbul meeting progresses.


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Five easy ways to keep your business secure that you might not have considered | GigaOM Tech News

Five easy ways to keep your business secure that you might not have considered | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Another day, another massive security breach, this time courtesy of hackers who somehow gained entrance into the systems of J.P. Morgan Chase, the biggest bank in the U.S. But if you’re thinking, “I don’t need to worry about my own business getting hacked, because I’m a small fish in a huge pond and there’s no reason hackers would ever target me,” that’s probably not the best line of reasoning to take.


According to statistics from the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, a non-profit advocacy group that logs data breaches, 206 security breaches have been recorded so far in 2014 alone, afflicting organizations as varied as Dairy Queen, the U.S. Investigations Services (USIS), a UPS Store in Atlanta, Georgia and online retailer Backcountry Gear. As you can tell, you don’t have to be a massive financial institution or a government agency to be at risk.


That being said, there are some steps you can take to protect your business, and while these tips may seem pretty obvious, sometimes you just need a nagging reminder that security is a process.


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Murfreesboro, TN: Aviation corridor proposed for city | Scott Borden | The Daily News Journal

Murfreesboro, TN: Aviation corridor proposed for city | Scott Borden | The Daily News Journal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Economic-development goals in a 2035 Comprehensive Plan should include the vision of an aviation corridor to tie in with other cities in the region, City Manager Rob Lyons said.


"This project will give us the opportunity to do that," Lyons told officials wanting to come up with plans for a fast-growing city that reached a U.S. Census estimated population of 117,044 in 2013.


"Let's think big. It may be aviation. We are well positioned to do extremely well for a long time."


Lyons shared his ideas during a recent joint meeting with the Murfreesboro City Council, the city's Planning Commission and Bret Keast, the owner of the Kendig Keast Collaborative consulting firm that's working with government officials and the community in crafting a comprehensive plan for a city expected to approach a population of 200,000 in the next 20 years.


The city manager mentioned several reasons why the aviation industry could be a key to Murfreesboro's future economic development, including how Middle Tennessee State University has one of the top aerospace colleges in the country with students training at Murfreesboro Airport.


Lyons said the aviation corridor includes Smyrna Airport with its large corporate park available for economic development, Nashville International Airport, the U.S. Army's 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell in the Clarksville area, the U.S. Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center in Tullahoma where wind tunnels are located for research and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.


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AT&T or someone orders half million fiber homes | Dave Burstein | FastNetNews.com

AT&T or someone orders half million fiber homes | Dave Burstein | FastNetNews.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

MasTec gets $250M contract for 2015, 2016. "We were awarded a contract for approximately a quarter of a billion dollars of 1-gigabit fiber deployment work," CEO Jose Mas announced. Fiber opportunities "are much greater than people quite understand. I think we are in for an incredible cycle in that business"


He added "Every time you pick a publication in the telecommunications sector, it’s got a carrier talking about building out 1-gigabit capabilities and what you are seeing is, you’re seeing multiple markets today where you have multiple carriers building in the same markets.... We’re going to be working 1-gigabit work for multiple customers over the next couple of years.


That this probably is AT&T is my conclusion. Mas carefully provided no information on who the customer was, despite being pressed by investment analysts.


AT&T and Google are the only likely candidates for a build this size. I'm sure Mas would welcome work from Google but it's not Google's style to contract so far ahead. Century/Qwest is not impossible. The cable companies have been looking at fiber for two decades, but DOCSIS is coming along so well they are unlikely to switch.


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Inventor Of Email: People Didn't Want To Credit A 'Dark-Skinned Immigrant Kid' | Emily Tess Katz | HuffPost.com

Inventor Of Email: People Didn't Want To Credit A 'Dark-Skinned Immigrant Kid' | Emily Tess Katz | HuffPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

V.A. Shiva Ayyadurai was 14 years old when he developed the technology we now know as email. But despite having received "official recognition" of his creation by the U.S. government, some still question whether he was the veritable founder.


Ayyadurai's former colleague Robert Field explained the discrepancy and defended Ayyadurai in a blog on The Huffington Post. According to Field, "multi-billion dollar defense company" Raytheon BBN Technologies generated "their entire brand ... based on claims of having 'invented email,'" then unleashed a PR campaign to "discredit email's origins" as well as Shiva's claim to having invented it.


Ayyadurai explained in a HuffPost Live interview on Thursday that he thinks these allegations stem from people who are both economically and racially prejudiced.


"The reality is this: in 1978, there was a 14-year-old boy and he was the first to create electronic office system. He called it email, a term that had never been used before, and then he went and got official recognition by the U.S. government," he told host Caroline Modarressy-Tehrani, referring to himself.


Ayyadurai said his modest background prevented him from getting the recognition he deserved.


"After that took place, you have a sense of disbelief among people that comes from not so much the technology issue, but there’s a lot of economic issues associated here," he continued. "[The discovery] wasn't done at MIT; it wasn’t done at the military; it wasn’t done at a big institution. It was done in Newark, NJ, one of the poorest cities in the United States. It was done by a dark-skinned immigrant kid, 14 years old."


The creation of email falls under the pretext of the "American dream," Ayyadurai explained, and he feels that those who challenge him as the inventor are afraid of upward mobility and change.


"The narrative there is what changes and shocks certain people who want to control the narrative that innovation can only take place under their bastions," he said. "The truth is that the American dream is really about [the fact that] innovation can take place anytime, by anybody."

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Apple said to be working with MasterCard and Visa for mobile wallet | Stacey Higgenbotham | GigaOM Tech News

Apple said to be working with MasterCard and Visa for mobile wallet | Stacey Higgenbotham | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Apple event rumors are coalescing into a more coherent picture that indicate Apple planning to put Near Field Communication chips inside next-generation iPhones for a mobile wallet effort. The latest rumor is from Bloomberg, which quotes a source saying that the hardware giant is working with MasterCard, Visa and American Express on a payments platform around the NFC chip reported to be in the phone.


The goal, according to Bloomberg is to ready a mobile payments platform built around NFC in the upcoming iPhone to launch at the Sept. 9 Apple event. While, every year, we seemingly hear of NFC launching in the anticipated iPhone, my colleague Kevin Tofel has written about how the looming transition to higher security payments that require using a password and chip inside cards in the U.S., and the utility of NFC’s tap-to-pair in a world of increasing connected devices, mean that Apple may finally be ready to take on NFC. From his story:


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Interested in IT Security? Insurance Companies Hope So! | Anthony Sequeira | NetworkWorld.com

Interested in IT Security? Insurance Companies Hope So! | Anthony Sequeira | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

What keeps the CEOs of major corporations awake at night? Certainly it is the top 10 threats against their companies, as identified by those in the business of studying such matters - insurance companies. Fire, hurricane, earthquake - sure. But now these CEOs have something else to add to the list - cybercrime. For the first time ever, many are identifying this area as a top 10 threat. Yikes!


Where does it fall exactly? Let's check the Allianz Risk Barometer survey of 400 corporate executives in 33 nations. The question is a frightening one - what is the worst risk of doing business? Here were the top 10 responses along with the percentages:


  1. Business interruption, supply chain risk - 43%
  2. Natural catastrophes - 33%
  3. Fire, explosion - 24%
  4. Changes in legislation and/or regulation - 21%
  5. Market stagnation or decline - 19%
  6. Loss of reputation or brand value  - 15%
  7. Competition - 14%
  8. Cybercrime, IT failure, espionage - 12%
  9. Theft, fraud, corruption - 10%
  10. Quality deficiencies, defects - 10%


The extent of this list certainly makes one shake their head, and when we think about cybercrime, we realize that it can come suddenly, seemingly out of nowhere, from some far-off continent, and many times can go undetected for a long period of time. Add to this the loss of reputation that can result (Number 6 above), and cybercrime seems to loom an even larger issue. 


Amazingly, many corporations still lack the awareness regarding the extent of this potential problem.


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Drone Video Shows Apple's Campus In Construction | Kaylene Hong | The Next Web

Drone Video Shows Apple's Campus In Construction | Kaylene Hong | The Next Web | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

There’s been a lot of hype about Apple’s new ‘spaceship’ Campus 2, a 2.8 million square-foot collection of buildings that was first proposed back in 2011.


Now, a video captured by a GoPro mounted on a flying drone gives a bird’s-eye view of what’s going on at the construction area, as spotted by 9to5Mac. We got a glimpse of the massive campus via an aerial photo released last month, but the new footage shows how much progress has been made since then, with the foundations of the buildings already laid down.


The city of Cupertino revealed earlier that work only started on the campus in Q2 of this year and is due to continue through the end of Q4 in 2016, although it’s possible that the campus will open before all the buildings are fully completed.


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Aereo Tells Judge It Can Beat Lawsuit Despite Supreme Court Ruling | Eriq Gardner | The Hollywood Reporter

Aereo Tells Judge It Can Beat Lawsuit Despite Supreme Court Ruling | Eriq Gardner | The Hollywood Reporter | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

On Friday, Aereo filed its opposition to an injunction demanded by television broadcasters. As expected, the digital TV company is asserting that it is a "cable system" and is therefore entitled to a statutory license under Section 111 of the Copyright Act.


Two weeks ago, after U.S. District Judge Alison Nathan said that broadcasters should get the opportunity to first make an injunction motion before Aereo opposed, the plaintiffs did just that with one that was aimed at stopping Aereo from "streaming, transmitting, retransmitting, or otherwise publicly performing any Copyrighted Programming over the Internet... or by means of any device or process throughout the United States of America."


The broadcasters said that it was in keeping with the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on June 25 to interpret Aereo's system of capturing over-the-air television signals and relaying them to subscribers' digital devices as a violation of broadcasters' public performance rights.


Justice Stephen Breyer likened Aereo to a cable system -- an unlicensed one -- which has led the company to fully embrace the designation in the interest of saving its company.


According to Aereo's memo opposing an injunction, "At oral argument, the [Supreme] Court made clear its understanding that its ruling would entitle Aereo to a Section 111 license when Justice [Sonia] Sotomayor specifically stated, 'We say they’re a c[]able company, they get the compulsory license.'”


"Indeed, the Court specifically found that with respect to its 'Watch Now' functionality, Aereo is a facility that receives television broadcast signals and makes secondary transmissions to its subscribers," continues the brief.


The broadcasters have pointed to arguments why Aereo won't prevail in the copyright case and can't attain a statutory license including WPIX, Inc. v. ivi, Inc., a 2nd Circuit opinion from 2012 that knocked down a statutory license attempt from a Aereo predecessor.


"But ivi concerned nationwide, out-of-market retransmissions that are fundamentally different from Aereo’s in-market-only technology and thus it does not apply here," responds Aereo. "Aereo has paid the statutory license fees required under Section 111, and thus Plaintiffs can no longer complain that they are not being compensated as copyright owners."


Aereo raises another argument about why it is likely to succeed in the case.


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Peru: MTC to begin regional fibre rollout | TeleGeography.com

The Peruvian government has begun preparation of pre-investment studies for the construction of a regional fibre-optic network, to complement the national fibre-optic backbone.


TeleSemana writes that the new network is expected to connect around 6,500 remote locations, covering more than six million Peruvians.


The Ministry of Transport and Communications (MTC) is aiming to award licences for ten regional fibre projects under the scheme by July 2015.

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NY: Syracuse MetroNet is exploring ways to bring municipal broadband here | Nader Maroun | Syracuse.com

NY: Syracuse MetroNet is exploring ways to bring municipal broadband here | Nader Maroun | Syracuse.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The members of Syracuse MetroNet have noted with great interest both the recent proposal by Mayor Stephanie Miner to build a municipal broadband network in Syracuse and Stephen Kimatian's recent endorsement of the idea in his guest column.


Syracuse MetroNet is a nonprofit consortium of local educational, health care and government organizations whose purpose is to use broadband technology to have a positive impact on economic opportunity, equity of access, and quality of life available to Central New Yorkers.


Syracuse MetroNet was originally formed in 1997 to take advantage of a grant opportunity enabling us to build a very high speed fiber network linking anchor institutions such as the Syracuse City School District, local hospitals, local colleges and universities, and city and county governments in Syracuse at a fraction of the cost of building such a network without such a grant.


We estimate that the MetroNet members have saved over $14 million in telecommunications and Internet costs over the past 15 years by virtue of their membership in the consortium.


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Leaked Nude Celebrity Photos Banned on Twitter #JenniferLawrence | Marvin Ammori Blog

Leaked Nude Celebrity Photos Banned on Twitter #JenniferLawrence | Marvin Ammori Blog | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The incident of celebrity photos being leaked on 4chan has everything to make it a fascinating law school exam question, a sociological novel, or a Supermarket tabloid--all wrapped in one.


If you talk to lawyers at the web companies, they’ll be quick to say there are 10 other hard questions they have to answer every day; this is just the tip of the iceberg.


 I just published an article in the Harvard Law Review about free expression on Internet platforms like Twitter and I’m sometimes asked my thoughts when Twitter bans photos or videos (LA Times, Fox Business, etc.) Since Twitter is suspending accounts for sharing  Jennifer Lawrence’s leaked stolen photos, I might get questions, but the questions (above) will be more interesting than the answers I’d give.


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OH: Cleveland welcomes growing field of server farms | Mark Gillispie | MorningJournal.com

OH: Cleveland welcomes growing field of server farms | Mark Gillispie | MorningJournal.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Northeast Ohio is hardly ready to usurp Silicon Valley as a high-tech mecca, but a growing number of data centers are choosing to locate in and around Cleveland to take advantage of cheap power, an abundance of fiber-optic cable and one of the safest environments in the country for storing digital information.


BYTEGRID, which got its start in northern Virginia, is investing millions to convert a small data center near downtown Cleveland into a large one capable of using enough electricity to power around 20,000 homes. At least one other company is looking for a site in Cleveland, and several more have established sites in the city and its suburbs.


“One of the things that is attracting data centers to Cleveland is we have a lot of industries with a lot of data,” said Tracey Nichols, director of city’s Department of Economic Development.


Data centers do not create large numbers of jobs directly, Nichols said, but their existence is a big attraction to companies that use massive amounts of data. Hospitals and medical research centers such as the Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals, for example, are prime customers for data centers. Nichols hopes these data centers will help grow the city’s fledgling health tech corridor. Information technology companies like Rosetta and Brandmuscle have come to Cleveland, in part, because of its high-speed, fiber-optic data and Internet connections, Nichols and others said.


“We have a very robust fiber trunk that runs through Cleveland, which means excellent connectivity,” Nichols said.


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The Evolution of ATM Skimmers | Ashley Feinberg | Gizmodo.com

The Evolution of ATM Skimmers | Ashley Feinberg | Gizmodo.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In a little over a decade, ATM skimmers have gone from urban myth to a wildly complex, ever-evolving suite of technologies that has the potential to be the worst nightmare of anyone with a bank account. Here's a look at how quickly skimmers have evolved—and why they're increasingly impossible to spot.


In its most basic form, skimming is really just a way to intercept an otherwise legitimate financial transaction. Whether it's a rig hooked up to an ATM, a cash register, or even something as low-tech as photocopying receipts, the thief uses their mechanism of choice to swipe your card's data, as you go about your business totally unaware.


To gain full, total access to all your hard-earned funds, thieves-to-be need to secure your PIN, too. That usually means rigging up a camera overhead to capture your keystrokes or, if they're particularly conniving, laying a device over the keypad itself. In other words—skimming can be sneaky as hell.


Tracing skimming back to its origins is difficult, if for no other reason that it was years before their existence was confirmed. There have been traces and whispers of skimmers, though, for well over a decade.


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$10 million loan fund for North Country businesses established through NY Power Authority & Alcoa | North Country Now

Businesses in St. Lawrence County looking to expand and create new jobs or retain existing ones might be eligible for loans through a new $10 million fund created with commitments between the New York Power Authority and Alcoa.


The fund for low-cost loans has been established through a long-term contract between NYPA, which operates the Moses-Saunders hydropower dam on the St. Lawrence River, and the giant aluminum company, which has smelting plants in Massena that require large amounts of electric power.


“This fund will give local businesses access to the capital they need to invest in land, equipment and technology that will enable them to remain competitive in the 21st Century,” said Gov. Andrew Cuomo as quoted in a news release from the New York Power Authority. “Supporting these efforts in turn will help strengthen the region’s economy and create jobs in the North Country.”


At a meeting Thursday, the Development Authority of the North Country Board of Directors approved the protocol needed to administer the loan fund jointly with the New York Power Authority and to receive applications from businesses looking to expand in St. Lawrence, Clinton, Franklin, Essex, Jefferson, Lewis, Hamilton or Herkimer counties. Expanding enterprises within the New York boundaries of the Akwesasne Mohawk Reservation are also eligible.


Applications will be reviewed regularly by the North Country Economic Development Fund Board, which consists of representatives from the New York Power Authority, the Development Authority of the North Country, the North Country Alliance and Empire State Development.


According to the agreement, for every $25,000 loaned from the fund at least one job must be created or retained.


Businesses are eligible to apply for loans of up to 30 percent of a project’s planned cost, with a ceiling for the loans set at $300,000. Businesses interested in applying for funding can visit the Development Authority of the North Country’s website at www.danc.org for more information.


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