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Once feared, redevelopment of Myrtle Beach Air Force Base has been a resounding success | Myrtle Beach Online

Once feared, redevelopment of Myrtle Beach Air Force Base has been a resounding success | Myrtle Beach Online | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The federal government’s report had an ominous sounding name – “Socioeconomic Impact Analysis Study.”

 

Its conclusions appeared to be just as ominous: the loss of nearly 5,100 jobs; as many as 1,500 homes dumped on the resale market; a 15 percent drop in students attending local schools; unemployment rates topping 20 percent; and an economic loss topping $91 million from payrolls, taxes and other revenues as soon as the Myrtle Beach Air Force Base shut down its operations.

 

Just as foreboding to many Myrtle Beach area residents was the sense of losing a longtime friend.

 

“You could never find a better neighbor than the Air Force, it was a great community,” said John Maxwell, a former Myrtle Beach city councilman who helped lead efforts to redevelop the base after its March 31, 1993 closure.

 

Now, 20 years later, the 3,937-acre former base has been transformed into a model for how closed military facilities can be revitalized to serve their communities.

 

Its mix of higher-education facilities, ball fields and parks, more than 1,200 homes with more on the way, a Red Cross headquarters and Veterans Affairs clinic, new general aviation and commercial airport terminals, a new technology and aerospace business park and a centerpiece commercial district called The Market Common, with its upscale shops and restaurants, has exceeded nearly everyone’s initial vision for what the base could become.

 

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Read more here: http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/2013/03/30/3409955/once-feared-redevelopment-of-myrtle.html#storylink=cpy
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WordPress gets a patch for critical XSS flaw | Lucian Constantin | ComputerWorld.com

WordPress gets a patch for critical XSS flaw | Lucian Constantin | ComputerWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Developers of the popular WordPress blogging platform have released a critical security update to fix a vulnerability that can be exploited to take over websites.

WordPress 4.2.3, released Thursday, resolves a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability that could allow users with the Contributor or Author roles to compromise a website, said Gary Pendergast, a member of the WordPress team, in a blog post.

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Want to listen to radio on your phone? AT&T’s about to make it a lot easier. | Brian Fung | WashPost.com

Want to listen to radio on your phone? AT&T’s about to make it a lot easier. | Brian Fung | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Like many consumers, I've mostly stopped listening to the radio — mainly because I rarely drive anymore and many of my favorite shows are available as online podcasts.

But AT&T customers who miss listening to FM channels will soon be able to flip on their local stations and listen live anytime they want. That's because starting with every new Android phone it sells in 2016, AT&T will be activating the receiver inside that's designed to tap into FM signals.

Many smartphones today already come with FM chips. In other countries, these get turned on. But not all cellular carriers in the United States support FM radio out-of-the-box. Sprint only began "lighting up" those FM chips in 2013.

Now AT&T is the latest telecom company to add support for FM radio, partnering with the company NextRadio to offer access to radio programs that come to you over the traditional airwaves rather than the Internet. NextRadio is an app that adds an FM tuner to your smartphone, letting you select and change channels.


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New York City Decides To Actually Pay Attention To Its Verizon Contracts After Getting Ripped Off On FiOS Deal | Karl Bode | Techdirt

New York City Decides To Actually Pay Attention To Its Verizon Contracts After Getting Ripped Off On FiOS Deal | Karl Bode | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

New York City has decided to actually pay attention to city money paid to Verizon after city officials discovered Verizon's broadband-related-promises don't always hold up to scrutiny.


As recently noted, a city audit found that Verizon's 2008 promise to wire the entire city with FiOS fiber broadband by 2014 has only been half completed, the telco using loopholes in the language to argue that getting fiber relatively close to many apartment buildings was good enough.


The audit also found Verizon was withholding FiOS from some buildings unless landlords promised broadband exclusivity, something that the FCC supposedly outlawed in 2007.

Basically, Verizon did what Verizon's been doing for the better part of a generation now: getting special perks, subsidies and tax breaks in exchange for promises it has absolutely no intention of actually keeping. Former city leaders likely knew this; the 2008 deal was hashed out behind closed doors with then Mayor Mike Bloomberg's office with little to no serious public input.

Moving forward the city appears to have come up with a novel idea, more closely monitoring Verizon's other business relationships with the city:


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HBO Now Is Coming to Verizon Wireless and Its 100 Million Customers | Peter Kafka | Re/Code.net

HBO Now Is Coming to Verizon Wireless and Its 100 Million Customers | Peter Kafka | Re/Code.net | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Here’s another big shot in the arm for HBO Now, the service that lets you pay for HBO without buying any other TV subscriptions: Verizon is going to sell the service directly to its 100 million Verizon Wireless customers.

Depending on how aggressively Verizon pushes HBO Now — and Verizon is one of the country’s top marketers — the deal could be as big for HBO as its pact to give Apple a three-month exclusive when it launched the service last spring.


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GovDelivery buys government-to-citizen texting startup | Katharine Grayson | Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal

GovDelivery buys government-to-citizen texting startup | Katharine Grayson | Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

GovDelivery has acquired Textizen, a Philadelphia-based startup that lets government agencies communicate with the public through text messaging.

St. Paul-based GovDelivery didn't disclose terms of the deal.

Government agencies can use Textizen to send texts containing surveys, event reminders, project updates and other notifications. It also allows governments to receive and analyze messages sent by residents.


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Cyber Bill Gives Companies Perfect Cover to Gut Your Privacy | Sandra Fulton | Free Press

Cyber Bill Gives Companies Perfect Cover to Gut Your Privacy | Sandra Fulton | Free Press | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Following several high-profile data breaches — such as those at Sony and the U.S. Office of Personnel Management — Congress is once again feeling the pressure to push “cybersecurity” legislation.

The problem is, the bill they’re laser-focused on is misguided, wouldn’t protect us — and is a huge gift to companies wanting legal cover if and when they choose to violate Americans’ privacy rights.

In March, the Senate Intelligence Committee voted 14–1 in favor of the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 2015 (CISA). The bill, like its infamous predecessor CISPA, would allow companies to share vast amounts of users’ private and personally identifiable data with the government. That information would go straight to the Department of Homeland Security and then on to the NSA.


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Uber and the lawlessness of 'sharing economy' corporates | Frank Pasquale & Siva Naidhyanthan | The Guardian

Uber and the lawlessness of 'sharing economy' corporates | Frank Pasquale & Siva Naidhyanthan | The Guardian | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In February, Airbnb chief executive Brian Chesky compared his firm’s defiance of local housing ordinances with that of Gandhi’s passive resistance to British rule. Meanwhile, a tweeter compared Uber to Rosa Parks, defying unjust laws. Chesky quickly backed down after widespread mockery. Companies acting out of self-interest comparing themselves with the noble heroes of civil rights movements is as absurd as it is insulting.

But there is a better analogy from the US civil rights era for law-flouting firms of the on-demand economy. It’s just not the one corporate leaders claim. They are engaged in what we call “corporate nullification”, following in the footsteps of Southern governors and legislatures in the United States who declared themselves free to “nullify” federal law on the basis of strained and opportunistic constitutional interpretation.


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The Gig Economy is Coming. What Will It Mean For Work? | Arun Sundararajan | AlterNet.org

The Gig Economy is Coming. What Will It Mean For Work? | Arun Sundararajan | AlterNet.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Not so long ago, the only people who looked for “gigs” were musicians. For the rest of us, once we outgrew our school dreams of rock stardom, we found “real” jobs that paid us a fixed salary every month, allowed us to take paid holidays and formed the basis for planning a stable future.

Today, more and more of us choose, instead, to make our living working gigs rather than full time. To the optimists, it promises a future of empowered entrepreneurs and boundless innovation. To the naysayers, it portends a dystopian future of disenfranchised workers hunting for their next wedge of piecework.

In the US, the “gig economy” is now so salient that the phrase and issues have entered the early exchanges of the presidential race. Earlier this month, as one frontrunner, Jeb Bush, took a well-publicised Uber ride to signal solidarity with the company, another, Hillary Clinton, was more cautious in her support. In a speech laying out her economic plan, she said: “This on-demand, or so-called gig, economy is creating exciting economies and unleashing innovation. But it is also raising hard questions about workplace protections and what a good job will look like in the future.”

Today’s digitally enabled gig economy was preceded by marketplaces such as ELance and oDesk, through which computer programmers and designers could make a living competing for short-term work assignments. But the gig economy isn’t just creating a new digital channel for freelance work. It is spawning a host of new economic activity. More than a million “makers” sell jewellery, clothing and accessories through the online marketplace Etsy. The short-term accommodation platforms Airbnb, Love Home Swap and onefinestay collectively have close to a million “hosts”.


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FCC Helps Revive Retrans Debate | John Eggerton | Multichannel

FCC Helps Revive Retrans Debate | John Eggerton | Multichannel | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Federal Communications Commission’s congressionally mandated review of the “totality of circumstances” definition of good-faith retransmission-consent negotiations has helped rekindle the fiery rhetoric from cable operators and broadcasters in a long-fought war over blackouts and pricing.

Broadcasters have charged cable operators with “manufacturing” disputes over carriage of their stations to get the FCC to step in, while cable operators have said the negotiations process is broken and needs fixing.

Per language in the STELAR satellite-reauthorization bill — itself a way to accommodate some cable critics of the retransmission-consent regime without holding up that must-pass legislation last year — the FCC is gathering string on what should constitute fair, or unfair, negotiations.


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NC: Google Fiber Gets Ready to Rally in Raleigh | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel

NC: Google Fiber Gets Ready to Rally in Raleigh | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Google Fiber’s build out in Raleigh, N.C., is gearing up now that the ISP/pay TV provider has identified nine initial locations for its “fiber huts,” The News & Observer reported (hat tip: DSL Reports).

Those huts, each 28 feet long and nine feet tall, will supply the backbone of a network that will deliver a mix of gigabit broadband and pay TV services, the paper noted, citing Mike Basham, Raleigh’s broadband manager.


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Over 10 million Web surfers possibly exposed to malvertising | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com

Over 10 million Web surfers possibly exposed to malvertising | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Upwards of 10 million people may have visited websites carrying malicious advertisements in the last ten days, possibly infecting their computers with malware, according to computer security company Cyphort.

For the past month, Cyphort has been tracking various malicious advertisement campaigns, which involve duping online advertising providers into distributing their malicious ads.

If someone views a malicious advertisement, it can cause their browser to be automatically redirected to another website that attacks their computer.


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Director Of National Intelligence Hammers Final Official Nail Into Bulk Phone Records Program | Tim Cushing | Techdirt

Director Of National Intelligence Hammers Final Official Nail Into Bulk Phone Records Program | Tim Cushing | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence has issued a statement addressing the inevitable shutdown of the Section 215 bulk phone metadata program.

NSA has determined that analytic access to that historical metadata collected under Section 215 (any data collected before November 29, 2015) will cease on November 29, 2015. However, solely for data integrity purposes to verify the records produced under the new targeted production authorized by the USA FREEDOM Act, NSA will allow technical personnel to continue to have access to the historical metadata for an additional three months.

Caveats apply. Data will still be held as required by a handful of ongoing lawsuits. With the "bulk" part of the bulk records program shut down (but not completely), the government is obviously hoping for a speedy end to the litigation resulting from the Snowden leaks. That's the other motivating factor behind this public statement that not only states an end date, but the additional restrictions past that point.


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AT&T: FCC Fine Is 'Indefensible,' 'Coercion' | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

AT&T: FCC Fine Is 'Indefensible,' 'Coercion' | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T has come out swinging at the FCC over the $100 million proposed fine for allegedly violating the transparency rule in FCC's 2010 network neutrality order, calling it "unprecedented and indefensible" — and in part unconstitutional — and saying a court will throw it out if it is imposed. AT&T wants the FCC to withdraw the proposed fine.

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N.Y. Public Service Commission Reminds Verizon of Its FiOS Obligation in NYC, Requests Documents | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

N.Y. Public Service Commission Reminds Verizon of Its FiOS Obligation in NYC, Requests Documents | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

After the N.Y. Public Service Commission heard an earful about Verizon’s broken promise to deliver FiOS service to every resident in New York City, the head of the PSC has sent a letter to Verizon reminding them of their obligation and requesting an explanation:


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Microsoft Windows 10 Update: 4-6GB Per Computer Helps Blow Through Your Allowance | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

Microsoft Windows 10 Update: 4-6GB Per Computer Helps Blow Through Your Allowance | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If you find your Internet connection a bit slower and your usage meter spiking, it could be courtesy of Microsoft, which began quietly sending Windows 10 installation software this morning to those reserving a copy for their home computer(s) and laptop(s).

Though not officially available until July 29, some users report Windows 10’s software installation files are already arriving in a new, usually hidden, folder on your operating system partition. If you disable hidden files and folders, you may see this new directory: $windows.~BT

If you do, that is Windows 10 winding its way to your computer. Microsoft is not mass blasting the update to every computer all at once, so there is an excellent chance you may not have the new OS just yet, but it is on the way.

Unfortunately, it is huge, with some users reporting file sizes ranging from 4-6GB per computer, so if you are subject to usage caps or an allowance, Microsoft may help push you over the limit. For now, the only way to stop the upgrade is by canceling the invitation:


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Industry groups push Congress for access to government spectrum | Thomas Mocarsky | Katy on the Hill

Industry groups push Congress for access to government spectrum | Thomas Mocarsky | Katy on the Hill | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Once the Federal Communications Commission wraps up the broadcast incentive auction, now tentatively planned to begin March 29, 2016, there is no other spectrum in the pipeline that can be transferred to commercial mobile services. That’s triggered increasing pressure on Congress to free up government-controlled spectrum to meet the demand for wireless data services.

In an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal, former FCC chairman Julius Genachowski and former FCC commissioner Robert M. McDowell called on Congress to create financial incentives for federal agencies to cough up unused government spectrum, to promote spectrum sharing, and to free up additional spectrum for unlicensed use.


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New York City Fiber Optic Smackdown: Verizon & the USTA vs the City of N.Y. | Bruce Kushnick Blog | Huff Post

New York City Fiber Optic Smackdown: Verizon & the USTA vs the City of N.Y. | Bruce Kushnick Blog | Huff Post | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Enlightening Summer Reading: "The Book of Broken Promises; $400 Billion Broadband Scandal & Free the Net"

This is Part 2: Click for Part 1.

In Part 1 we discussed Verizon's plan to go all-wireless-only and suggested that the reader might be thinking:

  • But isn't everyone already using wireless?
  • Hasn't everyone dropped their 'landlines'?


Let me use a recent panel discussion as an example of why you may have been misled if you believe that the wires don't matter or that wireless alone is the future.

Panel Discussion: City of N.Y. and the United States Telephone Association, (USTA) (screenshot above)


The Internet Society, New York chapter, has been active in documenting broadband and Internet related events for the last decade. ISOC-NY writes: "This clip is an excerpt from the Federal-State Broadband Conference, in New York City. In the video, USTelecom's Robert Mayer berates NYC for 'shaming' Verizon about their fiber deployments. Brittny Saunders of the Mayor's Office responds."


NOTE: By July 2014, 100% of New York City's citizens should have had the ability to get FiOS TV in their home under the cable franchise agreement. In June, 2015, the City of New York issued a scathing review and found major gaps in deployment. We found that the coverage of FiOS TV could be 60 percent or less.

Here are Some Other Data for N.Y.C. and Correcting the USTA Comments.


We've been following Verizon NY's business activities and financials since the 1990s. The USTA, (United States Telephone Association), represents the local incumbent phone companies, including AT&T, Verizon and CenturyLink.


Let me address three quotes from the USTA representative, which comes back to the issue of the wires and wireless services.


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Google Finally Admits Defeat on Google Plus | Will Oremus | Slate.com

Google Finally Admits Defeat on Google Plus | Will Oremus | Slate.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The company announced in a blog post Monday that it will no longer force people to use a Google Plus account to log in to other, more popular Google services. That includes YouTube, whose users have been howling for years about the Google Plus requirement. Soon they’ll be able to log in with a plain old Google account.


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Open letter petitions UN to ban the development on weaponized AI | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

Open letter petitions UN to ban the development on weaponized AI | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Future of Life Institute has presented an open letter signed by over 1,000 robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) researchers urging the United Nations to impose a ban on the development of weaponized AI with the capability to target and kill without meaningful human intervention. The letter was presented at the 2015 International Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI), and is backed with the endorsements of a number of prominent scientists and industry leaders, including Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk, Steve Wozniak, and Noam Chomsky.

To some, armed and autonomous AI could seem a fanciful concept confined to the realm of video games and sci-fi. However, the chilling warning contained within the newly released open letter insists that the technology will be readily available within years, not decades, and that action must be taken now if we are to prevent the birth of a new paradigm of modern warfare.


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IP Transition: FCC Should Not Import Monopoly Rules for a Competitive Future | Bruce Mehlman | Internet Innovation Alliance

The nation’s historic transition away from the copper wire toward a modern Internet Protocol-based (“IP”) communication system represents a critical technological leap forward. The United States aims to complete this transition by 2020; indeed, the impetus for this effort actually first came from FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, then in his role as head of an advisory board on technology transition.

This transition will ultimately bring consumers new technology, billions of dollars in new infrastructure, and faster and better broadband services and applications. Today, test trials for the transition are underway in Alabama and Florida to work out technical issues and ensure superior service quality for consumers.

Recently, however, Chairman Wheeler publicly outlined his proposed next steps for the IP transition that include applying old monopoly-style telephone rules to favor and advance certain carriers’ business models. Applying such rules to IP-based broadband communications networks of the future would benefit companies that serve businesses, yet provide little to no benefit to the average consumer.

Specifically, in response to the supposed need to “preserve competition in the enterprise market,” the FCC plans to require that “replacement services be offered to competitive providers at rates, terms and conditions that are reasonably comparable to those of the legacy services.”


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Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc's insight:

Harold Feld of Public Knowledge wrote:


"Industry trade group knocks imposition of "monopoly era regulation" designed to break up monopolies. Apparently, this regulation works too well for the folks at AT&T and Verizon."


My comment: I guess the Incumbent telcos do not want to comply with Open Access requirements to their fiber networks so they can wipe out the competitive ISPs once again like they did after the unbundling of the copper infrastructure as imposed on them by the 1996 Telecom Act.

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Comcast WiFi Net Surpasses 10M Hotspots | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com

Comcast WiFi Net Surpasses 10M Hotspots | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Following recent deployment expansions in areas such as its “Keystone” region, Comcast announced Monday that its WiFi network now spans more than 10 million quasi-public hotspots nationwide.

That’s up from the 8.6 million hotspots that the company said were deployed when Comcast discussed first quarter results in May.

Comcast hit the 10 million mark through a mix of deployments in outdoor venues and business services locations as well as in home-side routers (sometimes called “homespots” or neighborhood hotspots) that emit a secondary SSID signal.


Comcast hasn’t shared its deployment breakdown, but the MSO is part of the “Cable WiFi” roaming consortium (Time Warner Cable, Cablevision Systems, Cox Communications and Bright House Networks), which has deployed more than 400,000 hotspots that are accessible by their respective high-speed Internet subs.


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FCC's Clyburn Calls for Carriage, Access Rules Inquiry | John Eggerton | Multichannel

FCC's Clyburn Calls for Carriage, Access Rules Inquiry | John Eggerton | Multichannel | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

FCC commissioner Mignon Clyburn has called on agency chairman Tom Wheeler to launch an inquiry into the program access and carriage rules and ongoing barriers to independent and diverse programming in the wake of the FCC's decision to approve the AT&T/DirecTV deal.

Those are the rules meant to ensure nondiscriminatory access for distribution outlets to programming and programmers to distribution outlets.

Clyburn voted for the deal and said she believes in the public interest benefits of the conditions and commitments on broadband deployment and affordable stand-alone broadband for lower income residents.

But she said she is concerned with the potential impact of the deal on smaller carriers and independent programmers given that the combined company will have over 25 million video subs.


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Car and pedestrian collision? There'll soon be an app for that | Martyn Williams | NetworkWorld.com

Car and pedestrian collision? There'll soon be an app for that | Martyn Williams | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A safety system that ties cars and smartphones together to stop those heart-stopping near misses between cars and pedestrians could be standardized by the end of this year.

The technology involves smartphones broadcasting data over a short-range radio channel to nearby cars, so the cars can determine if a collision is likely. Unlike today’s radar-based systems, this has the ability to warn around blind corners and can alert both the driver and pedestrian.

It’s being developed by engineers at Honda and was demonstrated last week at the company’s new research and development center in Mountain View, in the heart of Silicon Valley.


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NSA will lose access to 'historical' phone surveillence data Nov. 29 | Zach Miners | NetworkWorld.com

NSA will lose access to 'historical' phone surveillence data Nov. 29 | Zach Miners | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The U.S. National Security Agency will lose access to the bulk telephone records data it has collected at the end of November, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence announced Monday.

Congress voted in June to rein in the NSAs mass collection of U.S. phone metadata, which includes information such as the timing and location of calls. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court then gave the NSA 180 days to wind the program down.

The Director of National Intelligence had been evaluating whether the NSA should maintain access to the historical data it collected after that 180 days is up. It’s now determined that access to that data will cease on Nov. 29.


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The automation myth: Robots aren't taking your jobs— and that's the problem | Matthew Yglesias | Vox.com

Over the past five years, American politics has become obsessed with robots.

President Obama has warned that ATMs and airport check-in kiosks are contributing to high unemployment. Sen. Marco Rubio said that the central challenge of our times is "to ensure that the rise of the machines is not the fall of the worker." A cover story in the Atlantic asked us to ponder the problems of a world without work. And in the New York Times, Barbara Ehrenrich warns that "the job-eating maw of technology now threatens even the nimblest and most expensively educated."

The good news is that these concerns are wrong. None of the recent problems in the American economy are due to robots — or, to be more specific about it, due to an accelerating pace of automation. Moreover, even if the pace of automation does speed up in the future, there's no real reason to believe that it will be a problem.

The bad news is that these concerns are wrong. Rather than an accelerating pace of automation, we've actually been living through a slowdown in the pace of productivity growth. And that slowdown is a huge problem. Unless it reverses, we'll be waking up soon to find ourselves in a depressing world of longer working years, unmanageable health-care needs, higher taxes, and a public sector starved of needed infrastructure resources.

In other words, don't worry that the robots will take your job. Be terrified that they won't.


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