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Fiber to the Home: 'Awesome' - But What Is Its Purpose? | CircleID.com

Fiber to the Home: 'Awesome' - But What Is Its Purpose? | CircleID.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Two approaches can be taken towards the development of Fiber to the Home (FttH). One is all about its commercial potential — the sale of the most awesome commercial applications in relation to video entertainment, gaming and TV. The other is a perhaps more sophisticated approach — from the perspective of social and economic development.

 

Of course the two are not mutually exclusive. Those who successfully follow the commercial route create an infrastructure over which those other social and economic applications will eventually be carried as well. This is quite a legitimate route, but the reality is that most people in this situation will say 'the FttH entertainment applications are absolutely awesome, but totally useless'. In other words, nice to have but it is highly unlikely that people will pay for them.

 

We basically see this with such commercial FttH deployments around the world. Commercial FttH subscriptions cost consumers well over $100 per month, and at such a price penetration in developed countries will reach no more than approximately 20%. That will not be sufficient mass to launch other social and economic applications over such a network.

 

If we are serious about those national benefits we will have to treat FttH differently — not just as another telecoms network, but as national infrastructure. However the all-powerful telcos will fight such an approach tooth and nail, since that would make their network a utility. They are used to extracting premium prices based on their vertically-integrated monopolies and they are in no mood to relinquish this. Simply looking at the amount of money telcos spend on lobbying reveals that they do not want to see government making any changes to their lucrative money-making schemes.

 

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BroadbandBreakfast's curator insight, March 25, 2013 9:31 AM

Fiber is your friend; or fiber in the future - take your pick. We are going to need fiber to get to next-generation applications in the home (and in businesses), and we are going to need fiber backhaul to meet the neeeds of growing wireless demand. So let's get on with the fiber revolution!

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Ontario: Grey County hopes to turn $1M into $10M for fibre-optics | Denis Langlois | Sun Times

Ontario: Grey County hopes to turn $1M into $10M for fibre-optics | Denis Langlois | Sun Times | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Grey County wants to start putting more fibre-optic Internet lines in the ground within its boundaries soon, before Phase 1 of the regional SWIFT project is completed.

“What we’re trying to do is put infrastructure in place that will compliment the SWIFT network when it gets to us,” Geoff Hogan, the county’s information technology director, said Saturday in an interview.

The first phase of the South West Integrated Fibre Technology (SWIFT) initiative — the regional effort to bring high-speed fibre optic Internet to all residents in southwestern Ontario — is not expected to be finished until 2020.

The county has set aside $1 million to help fund work, in the meantime, to improve fibre-based broadband Internet infrastructure locally.

In an effort to increase that amount, county council is to vote Tuesday on a staff recommendation to submit an expression of interest for funding under the new Building Canada small communities fund.

The application would request $3.5 million — or a one-third share — from both the provincial and federal governments. The other one-third would be made up of the county’s $1 million and assumes a $2.5 million investment from private-sector Internet providers.


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Creating Consumer Choice in Set-Top Boxes | John Bergmayer | Public Knowledge

Creating Consumer Choice in Set-Top Boxes | John Bergmayer | Public Knowledge | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Imagine what the smartphone industry would look like if 99% of people used phones designed and sold by their carriers, instead of by companies like Samsung, Apple, and Motorola. You don't need to imagine too hard, though, since we have a pretty good idea already: they'd be as hard to use, ugly, expensive and outdated as cable set-top boxes, a market where 99% of users rent devices provided by their cable operators.

Congress tried to prevent this result when, in the 1996 Telecommunications Act, it directed the FCC to take steps to make it so that the cable box market was just as open and competitive as other areas of consumer electronics. The standard it came up with--CableCARD--found a niche, but failed to achieve its purpose.


As a result, not only are the devices people use not as good as they would be in a competitive market, but consumers are paying upwards of $20 billion dollars a year to rent them.


While in most consumer electronics markets, new products with new features are offered at the same price or cheaper, in cable land, when new features like DVR recording, multi-room, and HD come around, the cable industry charges a premium for them--and continues to do so thereafter.


Just a few month’s cable box rental fees can add up to what it would cost to buy a tablet computer outright.


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The disaster-recovery lessons we learned after Katrina | Tony Bradley | NetworkWorld

The disaster-recovery lessons we learned after Katrina | Tony Bradley | NetworkWorld | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A decade ago New Orleans and the Gulf Coast of the United States were devastated by the sixth strongest Atlantic hurricane ever recorded. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration claims Hurricane Katrina was the most destructive storm to ever strike the United States.

The destruction from the hurricane itself, and the subsequent flooding that put most of New Orleans underwater knocked many businesses out of commission—and more than a few completely out of existence. Thankfully, we have learned a lot of hard lessons in the wake of Hurricane Katrina that businesses can use to be better-prepared for the next major disaster.


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Uber Hires the Hackers Who Wirelessly Hijacked a Jeep | Andy Greenberg | Wired.com

Uber Hires the Hackers Who Wirelessly Hijacked a Jeep | Andy Greenberg | Wired.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If it’s possible to wirelessly attack an Internet-connected Jeep to hijack its steering and brakes, what could hackers do to a fully self-driving car? A pair of the world’s top automotive security researchers may be about to find out, with none other than Uber footing the bill.

Starting Monday, the ridesharing startup’s Advanced Technology Center will employ Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek, two hackers who have devoted the last three years to developing digital attacks on cars on trucks.


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Chrome muzzles auto-play audio | Gregg Keizer | ComputerWorld.com

Chrome muzzles auto-play audio | Gregg Keizer | ComputerWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Chrome will automatically silence any auto-played audio until that tab is explicitly brought to the foreground, a Google evangelist said Wednesday.

The sound deferment is a continuation of a move Google initiated almost two years ago, when it was the first browser maker to mark audio-playing tabs so that users can spot which website broke the silence.


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Why Silicon Valley Falls Short When It Comes To Education | Daniel Pianko | TechCrunch

Why Silicon Valley Falls Short When It Comes To Education | Daniel Pianko | TechCrunch | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Despite Silicon Valley billionaires’ remarkable track record of innovation, it appears they have decided to throw in the towel on higher education. Each year, many donate millions to old-line American colleges and universities that, together, graduate the same number of engineers as we did 25 years ago.

STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) jobs will grow by more than 17 percent in the next decade, but an aging STEM workforce and small number of students graduating today with STEM degrees means there are more than 2.5 million unfilled STEM jobs in the U.S. Today, only 18 percent of Computer Science graduates are women. The numbers for underrepresented minorities are even worse.

Failure to transform American higher education may undo the very building blocks of our nation’s innovation infrastructure. Instead, today’s current generation of entrepreneurs are spending their energy and resources lobbying for band-aid solutions like H-1B visas, when they could be reimagining the current pipeline to address the lack of female and minority engineers in their companies.


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FCC Group Presents Multiple Post-CableCARD Paths | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com

FCC Group Presents Multiple Post-CableCARD Paths | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As expected, an FCC-appointed committee on Friday presented the Commission with multiple paths toward a post-CableCARD world for retail video devices, including downloadable video security options that would allow for competitive user interfaces.

Formed in January, the Downloadable Security Technology Advisory Committee (DSTAC) provided its recommendations to the FCC a week ahead of a September 4 deadline. The DSTAC came together following the passing of the STELAR Act, legislation that will sunset the current set-top security integration ban in December 2015 and called on the FCC to take a look at a successor approach that could spur the retail market for video navigation devices for not just cable operators, but other MVPDs.


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FBI issues supplier scam warning to businesses | Steve Ragan | CSO Online

FBI issues supplier scam warning to businesses | Steve Ragan | CSO Online | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The FBI's Internet Complaint Center (IC3) issued a warning last week about a type of scam that has exposed businesses to a total of $1.2 billion in losses, once the numbers from October 2013 until August 2015 are added up.

The scam is targeted at businesses that deal with international suppliers. Criminals will compromise legitimate email accounts through social engineering or other means, and request financial transfers form the victims.

Because the email accounts are legitimate (or at least they look legit), and the victim is often used to international payments, these scams are having a moderate to high degree of success.


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Verizon could be sued by NYC over reportedly broken FiOS promises | Sean Buckley | Fierce Telecom

Verizon could be sued by NYC over reportedly broken FiOS promises | Sean Buckley | Fierce Telecom | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A number of New York City officials said they are considering suing Verizon for not meeting their proposed FiOS buildout obligations set in their 2008 franchise agreement.

"We want them to make it available to everyone in every ZIP code and on every block so that everyone can get online, to do research, to do their homework," said Maya Wiley, the chief lawyer for Mayor de Blasio, in a New York Times article. "We need our residents to get online."

Wiley said that her staff was working with Verizon and would like avoid a lawsuit, adding that "if that's what we have to do, then that's what we'll do."

John Bonomo, a Verizon spokesman told FierceTelecom in an e-mail that it wants to resolve the issues it has with the city in order to extend FiOS to more users.


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NSA Releases Latest Bulk Records Renewal Order On Same Day It Scores Win In DC Circuit Court Of Appeals | Tim Cushing | Techdirt

NSA Releases Latest Bulk Records Renewal Order On Same Day It Scores Win In DC Circuit Court Of Appeals | Tim Cushing | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The FISA Court has approved another three-month extension of the NSA's phone metadata collection, allowing the agency to run out the clock on the USA Freedom Act-triggered "transition period" with no additional stipulations attached. The transition will apparently be "business as usual" right up to the expiration date (Nov. 29, 2015), at which point everything will suddenly be compliant with the new law.

Until that date, the NSA will still collect (and store) phone metadata in bulk. The only limitation in place at this point dates back to February 2014 -- when searches of the data haul were limited to court-approved "selectors" backed by reasonable, articulable suspicion.


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New D.C. Circuit Decision Knocks Fairly Large Hole In Anti-Net Neutrality Case | Harold Feld | Tales of the Sausage Factory | Wetmachine.com

Every now and then, the D.C. Circuit throws you an interesting little curve ball. This opinion issued last week would appear to knock a serious hole in the argument made by the cable and telcos against the FCC’s reclassification of broadband as a Title II telecom service.

The case, Home Care Association of America v. Weil (HCAA) addresses the legal question that takes up about a quarter of the main brief for petitioners: does the Brand X decision that the Telecom Act was “ambiguous” mean that the FCC gets deference under the Chevron Doctrine when it reexamines the question in 2015 and comes out the other way? Or can Petitioners argue that the statute is not ambiguous and explicitly precludes the interpretation the FCC now gives it? Under HCAA, the D.C. Circuit appears to find that once the Supreme Court decides a statute is ambiguous, that settles the question. If the statute was ambiguous for an interpretation in one direction, it is still ambiguous — and thus subject to Chevron deference — when the agency reverses course. Nor does the agency have a higher burden when it reverses course then it did when it first made the decision.

Good lawyers can always distinguish cases, of course — as can a conservative panel of the D.C. Cir. that wants to find a particular result. Furthermore, Petitioners have lots of other arguments to make that are not impacted by the HCAA decision. Nevertheless, it seems clear this case is good news for the FCC (and those of us who support the FCC), and Petitioners will no doubt need to spend a good portion of their reply brief explaining why HCAA doesn’t dictate the result here.

I explain in more detail below . . . .


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Community Broadband Media Roundup - August | community broadband networks

Community Broadband Media Roundup - August | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

While we think they buried the lede (talking about cord-cutting and entertainment options when what we really need in this country is a locally accountable choice), the New York Times editorial board came out in support of local authority for municipal networks, in a roundabout sort of way.

Preparing for Life After Cable by Editorial Board of the New York Times

Although Americans now have more choices than ever for how they watch TV, about seven in 10 American households can only get broadband Internet service from one or two providers, usually cable and phone companies.

In other words, the big telecom companies will still have plenty of leverage. Some analysts predict that as customers desert cable TV packages for Internet-based services, the telecom giants like Charter and AT&T will simply charge more for Internet access, wiping out some or all of the savings consumers had hoped for.

That’s why it is important that Congress and the Federal Communications Commission push for more choices in the broadband market. Among other things, they should override laws some states have passed that make it difficult or impossible for municipalities to invest in broadband networks. State and local officials could also help by streamlining rules that make it hard for newer businesses to string fiber-optic cable on utility poles or below ground in order to compete with established cable and phone companies.

Community Broadband By State


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Amazon Offers Free Delivery of Workplace Hell | Sonali Kolhatkar | Truthdig.com

Amazon Offers Free Delivery of Workplace Hell | Sonali Kolhatkar | Truthdig.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A lengthy exposé by The New York Times about Amazon’s work environment recently revealed the depths to which American workplace culture has plummeted, particularly for white-collar workers. Journalists Jodi Kantor and David Streitfeld interviewed more than 100 current and former Amazon employees and concluded, “The company is conducting an experiment in how far it can push white-collar workers to get them to achieve its ever-expanding ambitions.”

“Amazonians,” as employees are referred to, are constantly monitored by their higher-ups and their time micromanaged ruthlessly. They are encouraged to engage in a brutal “Hunger Games”-style practice of snitching on one another to management. Those struggling with unexpected illnesses, caregiving needs or even childbirth are often pushed out for supposedly not being committed enough to their jobs. Regular performance evaluations are designed to weed out employees who don’t meet Amazon “standards,” and reasonable interpretations of work-life balance are frowned upon. One former worker told the Times, “Amazon is where overachievers go to feel bad about themselves.”

But it’s not just office workers at Amazon. The company’s poor treatment of its lower-paid warehouse workers has been well documented. Author Simon Head, in his 2014 book, “Mindless: Smarter Machines Are Making Dumber Humans,” wrote, “Amazon’s system of employee monitoring is the most oppressive I have ever come across,” and its management model is based on “pushing up employee productivity while keeping hourly wages at or near poverty levels.” Head described a level of brutality analogous to the barbarism of upper-level jobs that The New York Times found later.


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New iOS Malware Compromises 225,000 Apple Accounts | Lily Hay Newman | Slate.com

New iOS Malware Compromises 225,000 Apple Accounts | Lily Hay Newman | Slate.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A new family of malware being called KeyRaider has been used to compromise 225,000 Apple accounts, including private keys and purchase histories, along with other personal data and device control.


Though it is a huge breach—“We believe this to be the largest known Apple account theft caused by malware,” researchers wrote—the malware is only effective on jailbroken iDevices.


So if you haven’t monkeyed with your iOS, you’re probably safe.


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Graduated From An Engineering Bootcamp? Now What? | Ben Shippers | TechCrunch

Graduated From An Engineering Bootcamp? Now What? | Ben Shippers | TechCrunch | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

While hip hop may have ‘too many mc’s and not enough mics,’ in tech, there are too many startups and not enough seasoned technologists. Over the last seven years, hopeful entrepreneurs have flooded the market, looking to cut their teeth in the hopes of building the next billion-dollar business.

Many (probably most) of these recent business ideas should never be funded, nor affix themselves to the firmament of the web. But in reality they are… unceasingly.

If we agree that even the least fundable companies will continue to be funded for another few years, then we’d better come up with solutions for introducing new budding technologists into the field to support the ever-growing need for more social networks and photo sharing apps.

The current quandary is that our education system is inept at preparing students for jobs in the modern, web-related industry. The current liberal arts curriculum, while well-intended, focuses on softer skills. Though better, computer science-oriented degrees are still built on dated client-side syntax that leaves much to be desired when trying to transition to the web.

The solution: the rise of the 4-, 8- or 10-week pop-up product and engineering school.


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National Digtial Inclusion Alliance Comments to FCC: Lifeline Modernization | Angela Siefer | NDIA.org

National Digtial Inclusion Alliance Comments to FCC: Lifeline Modernization | Angela Siefer | NDIA.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

NDIA's comments to the FCC regarding the modernization of the Lifeline Program are built upon our affiliates' unique positions working directly with non-adopters to increase digital inclusion in the United States. Here are the big points we made in our Comments. We welcome you to read our full Comments.

Principles:

  1. NDIA agrees that broadband Internet service should be a supported service in the Lifeline program.
  2. NDIA encourages the Commission to address all three barriers to broadband adoption in this proceeding, and to recognize that local agencies and organizations are on the frontlines of broadband adoption.
  3. NDIA encourages the Commission to recognize that community-based low-cost broadband is an important strategy to address the cost issue.


Recommendations based upon specific paragraphs in the FCC's Notice of Public Rule Making:


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Crowd-sourced weather apps claim accuracy, but watch the sky anyway | Tim Hornyak | ComputerWorld.com

Crowd-sourced weather apps claim accuracy, but watch the sky anyway | Tim Hornyak | ComputerWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Predicting the weather is an inexact science. The weatherman often seems to get it wrong, and you find you really didn't need to lug that umbrella around on what turned out to be a sunny day.

Crowd-sourced, hyperlocal weather information has been touted as one solution, and web-oriented weather companies are pushing short-term forecasts, also known as "nowcasting," to sky watchers everywhere.

As weather apps and consumer hardware proliferate, advocates say millions of smartphones and other devices at hand are providing more accurate predictions than traditional models of forecasting.


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New Municipal Broadband Feasibility Study Underway in Firestone, CO | community broadband networks

New Municipal Broadband Feasibility Study Underway in Firestone, CO | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Board of Trustees for the city of Firestone, CO is evaluating the feasibility of a new municipal broadband service for this growing town of about 10,000 people that sits just 30 miles north of Denver. This according to a recent report in the Times-Call newspaper in Longmont, Colorado.


The feasibility study will compare Firestone’s existing telecommunications infrastructure with those in nearby communities such as Longmont and Boulder that already have municipal networks. It will also assess the potential for growth of the service in Firestone to a nearby 3,500-home community development project.

It would be travesty to build a 3,500 home development without having a plan for high quality Internet access. Even if CenturyLink or Comcast were to deploy fiber optics there, the community should ensure there are plans for conduit or an open network to allow multiple service providers to provide a real choice.


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Lexmark’s war against a man who recycles toner cartridges | Doug Kari Op-Ed | Ars Technica

Lexmark’s war against a man who recycles toner cartridges | Doug Kari Op-Ed | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The intellectual property interests are at it again, trying to leverage their rights to take away yours. No one knows this better than 44-year-old Eric Smith of Charleston, West Virginia. Smith has devoted his life to the office supply company founded by his father—a company that’s now under legal attack by printing behemoth Lexmark International, Inc.

Although Smith trying to fend off Lexmark is like a lone Ukrainian trying to stop the Russian army, when I reached the embattled businessman at his office, he said that he’s determined to stick it out. “We have nothing else to fall back on.”

Smith started in the business as a teenager, delivering typewriter ribbons to customers around town. When IBM Selectrics gave way to computers and dot-matrix printers, Smith found a niche in recycling ink cartridges—buying up empties and refilling them. As revenue grew he hired buddies to work in the shop, and eventually he became president.

But in 2013, Smith started getting threatening letters from lawyers representing Lexmark. The letters accused his family company Impression Products, Inc. of patent infringement, based on a theory that Smith found baffling.


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Cable Consolidation May Have To Wait | Mike Farrell | Multichannel.com

Cable Consolidation May Have To Wait | Mike Farrell | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The once inevitable cable distribution consolidation wave may have to wait a bit, according to two of the most aggressive participants in the M&A space.


On Friday, Charter Communications chairman Eric Zinterhofer (pictured) and Altice CEO Dexter Goei, told an audience at the CTAM Europe Conference in Amsterdam that after a flurry of deals, cheaper assets are getting harder to find.


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Preston Padden Targets Cable License | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

Preston Padden Targets Cable License | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Preston Padden, a former top News Corp. and ABC/Disney executive now representing auction-interested TV stations, wants broadcasters to mount a challenge to cable’s compulsory license, which is the blanket license that allows them to deliver out-of-market and in-market TV stations without negotiating separately for all the network and syndicated content they contain.

The National Association of Broadcasters has signaled it may be ready to push for its elimination as well, at least of the distant-signal license.

Not surprisingly, cable operators represented don’t want the license to go away.


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Why It’s Hard to Sue the NSA: You Have to Prove It Spied on You | Andy Greenberg | Wired.com

Why It’s Hard to Sue the NSA: You Have to Prove It Spied on You | Andy Greenberg | Wired.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Here’s a big problem with secret spying programs in the US: To dismantle them with a lawsuit, someone has to prove that their privacy rights were infringed. And that proof is almost always a secret.

That’s the Catch-22 that an appeals court served up Friday to plaintiffs who for the last two years have been attacking the NSA’s metadata collection program authorized under section 215 of the Patriot Act. The plaintiffs are led by constitutional lawyer and conservative activist Larry Klayman, who had sued the Obama administration for violating his fourth amendment privacy rights. In 2013, a lower court granted his request for an injunction to stop the NSA’s spying on his data. But the Obama administration appealed that ruling, and an appellate court has now thrown out that injunction based on a familiar and vexing problem for those who sue the government’s secret spying apparatus: The plaintiffs couldn’t sufficiently prove that the NSA secretly spied on them.

“In order to establish his standing to sue, a plaintiff must show he has suffered a ‘concrete and particularized’ injury,” wrote judge Janice Rogers Brown in her opinion. “In other words, plaintiffs here must show their own metadata was collected by the government…the facts marshaled by plaintiffs do not fully establish that their own metadata was ever collected.”

'The problem is that you can’t get a court to answer the question of whether a government’s activities are illegal until you prove something that the government won’t allow you to prove.'

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MN: Senator Franken talks about broadband and telehealth in Brainerd | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

According to the Brainerd Dispatch, Senator Franken was in Brainerd last week talking with local leaders about broadband and telehealth in the area…

Maureen Ideker, Director of Telehealth for Essentia Health, talked about how rural doctors use broadband for telemedicine, or health care conducted via phone, internet and video conferencing. For example, doctors can help detect congestive heart failure by having patients regularly weigh themselves and send in the results via the web, she said. If the data shows a weight gain of several pounds in just a few days, that could mean the patient’s heart isn’t functioning property. Telemedicine helps patients limit health care expenses and travel, and it allows them more freedom in their living situations, she said.

“There’s a lot of money to be saved,” she said. “(It keeps) patients in their homes longer.”

Medicare should allow reimbursement for more types of telemedicine providers, including audiologists, pharmacists, and speech pathologists, she said. A bill recently passed by the Minnesota Legislature on telemedicine would serve as an excellent template for nationwide Medicare reform, she said.

The Chamber of Commerce president noted that broadband is an investment that even folks who are fiscally conservative support…


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The Real Cost of Amazing Television | John Solit | NCTA.com

The Real Cost of Amazing Television | John Solit | NCTA.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

When evaluating the value of a product or service, one common measurement is the amount of the purchase weighed against the time spent using the service.


When it comes to cable’s video service, this metric is called price per viewing hour. And at just 25 cents per hour, cable offers among the lowest cost-per-hour form of entertainment available.


And the 25 cent price-point doesn’t even account for second-screen or on-demand viewing.


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Why I’m Not Looking to Hire Computer-Science Majors | Daniel Gelernter Blog | WSJ.com

Why I’m Not Looking to Hire Computer-Science Majors | Daniel Gelernter Blog | WSJ.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

I usually say the hardest part of running a tech startup is raising money, but that’s a bit of a smokescreen: We spend the money on software developers, who are an incredibly hot commodity in scarce supply. Finding them is the toughest task.

Part of the problem is that startups have to compete with hegemons like Google and Facebook that offer extraordinary salaries for the best talent. I recently met a college student whom Facebook recruited as a summer intern at $10,000 a month. A junior developer fresh out of college can expect to earn around $10,000 monthly, plus benefits, a $100,000 signing bonus and $200,000 in stock options. For a more experienced developer, the sky’s the limit. Business Insider reported last year that a startup offering an annual salary of $500,000 was unable to lure a senior developer away from Google because he was earning $3 million a year in cash and stock.

A small startup has to compensate for its relatively anemic cash offers with more generous stock grants, and—our best feature—a lifestyle of low authority and high responsibility, where each developer sees his work changing the product on a daily basis.

The thing I look for in a developer is a longtime love of coding—people who taught themselves to code in high school and still can’t get enough of it. The eager but not innately passionate coders being churned out of 12- and 19-week boot camps in New York tend not to be the best: There are too many people simply looking for a career transition, and not enough who love coding for its own sake.

The thing I don’t look for in a developer is a degree in computer science.


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