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USTelecom & Juniper Discuss LTE Backhaul | USTeleCom Blog

On Thursday, March 21st, USTelecom and Juniper Networks conducted a webinar titled: “Preparing for LTE Backhaul.”  Humair Raza & Srini Bangalore  from Juniper Networks discussed today’s wireless network trends, LTE network requirements and various network architectures that operators can deploy to meet the ever growing demand for bandwidth.

 

They also discussed how MPLS technologies can be used to solve many of the challenges that service providers face when backhauling LTE traffic to the core Internet over an IP network.

 

You can view this webinar in its entirety, here.

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Yahoo slams new 'digital will' law, says users have privacy when they die | Zach Miners | NetworkWorld.com

Yahoo slams new 'digital will' law, says users have privacy when they die | Zach Miners | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

What should happen to your personal digital communications—emails, chats, photos and the like—after you die? Should they be treated like physical letters for the purposes of a will?


Yahoo doesn’t think so. The company is criticizing new legislation giving executors charged with carrying out the instructions in a person’s will broad access to their online accounts. The legislation aims to tackle the sensitive question of what to do when someone’s online accounts on sites like Facebook, Google or Yahoo outlive them.


This past summer, Delaware signed into law the “Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets and Digital Accounts Act.” It was modeled after legislation approved earlier by the Uniform Law Commission, a nonprofit group that drafts and lobbies for new state laws. In Delaware, the measure removes some of the hurdles that an estate attorney or other fiduciary would otherwise have to go through to gain broad access to the deceased’s online accounts.


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Uber doubles down on shared rides, enacts permanent pricing cut for UberX | Zach Miners | NetworkWorld.com

Uber doubles down on shared rides, enacts permanent pricing cut for UberX | Zach Miners | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Uber appears determined not to stand down in the face of a regulatory challenge to its new shared ride service.


Days after the California Public Utilities Commission said that Uber’s car-pooling service violated state law, the company sent an email to users in the San Francisco Bay Area on Monday that promoted it.


“Want to make your commute even cheaper? Give UberPool a spin,” Uber wrote to users.


UberPool is a new car-pooling service that lets multiple people split the cost of a ride. That service can be up to 40 percent cheaper than UberX, the company said.


The same email also said Uber would be permanently dropping the price of its lower-cost UberX service by 15 percent, extending an earlier summer promotion. That makes it 40 percent cheaper than a taxi, according to Uber.


After Friday’s announcement from the CPUC, which also targeted similar services offered by Lyft and Sidecar, Uber said it had no immediate plans to suspend the service and would work with the CPUC to keep UberPool alive.


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More Yahoo vs. The NSA: Government Tried To Deny Standing, Filed Supporting Documents Yahoo Never Got To See | Tim Cushing | Techdirt.com

More Yahoo vs. The NSA: Government Tried To Deny Standing, Filed Supporting Documents Yahoo Never Got To See | Tim Cushing | Techdirt.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

After having the court documents unsealed and the gag order lifted, Yahoo is finally free to talk about that one time when the government wanted to fine it $250,000 a day [!!] for refusing to comply with a FISA court order to turn over data on its customers. Two of the lawyers (Mark Zwillinger and Jacob Sommer) who represented Yahoo in that court battle, have written a post detailing the behind-the-scenes activity.

First off, they note that it's kind of amazing they're even able to discuss it at this point.


Having toiled in secret until recently, and having originally been told we would need to wait 25 years to tell anyone of our experience, it is refreshing to be able to write about the case in detail.


That's the normal declassification schedule, which at this point would still be nearly 18 years away. Fortunately, Ed Snowden's leaks have led to an accelerated schedule for many documents related to the NSA's surveillance programs, as well as fewer judges being sympathetic to FOIA stonewalling and exemption abuse.

We've talked several times about how the government makes it nearly impossible to sue it for abusing civil liberties with its classified surveillance programs. It routinely claims that complainants have no standing, ignoring the fact that leaked documents have given us many details on what the NSA does and doesn't collect. But in Yahoo's case, it went against its own favorite lawsuit-dismissal ploy.


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Google wants to fly drones above New Mexico | Martyn Williams | NetworkWorld.com

Google wants to fly drones above New Mexico | Martyn Williams | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Google is planning to test Internet delivery by drone high above New Mexico, according to a government filing.


On Friday, the company asked the Federal Communications Commission for permission to use two blocks of frequencies for the tests, which are scheduled to last about six months and begin in October. They will be conducted above an area of more than 1,400 square kilometers in the center of New Mexico to the east of Albuquerque.


“Google recently acquired Titan Aerospace, a firm that specializes in developing solar and electric unmanned aerial systems for high altitude, long endurance flights,” Google said in its application. “These systems may eventually be used to provide Internet connections in remote areas or help monitor environmental damage, such as oil spills or deforestation.”


Google said its application for temporary permission to make the transmissions was needed “for demonstration and testing of [REDACTED] in a carefully controlled environment.”


The FCC allows companies to redact certain portions of their applications when they might provide too much information to competitors.


In the application, Google said it wants to use two blocks of frequencies, one between 910MHz and 927MHz and one between 2.4GHz and 2.414GHz. Both are so-called “industrial, scientific and medical” (ISM) bands typically used for unlicensed operations.


The application has not yet been approved.


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Reflections on the Internet Governance Forum - Community Broadband Bits Episode 116 | community broadband networks

Reflections on the Internet Governance Forum - Community Broadband Bits Episode 116 | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

This week, Lisa Gonzalez interviews me about my recent trip to the Internet Governance Forum in Istanbul, Turkey. The IGF is an opportunity for anyone concerned with Internet Governance on planet Earth to discuss the perceived problems and possible solutions.


It uses a multi-stakeholder format, which means that governments, businesses, civil society, and academics are all able to come to the table... this means just about anyone who has the means to participate -- including by doing so remotely -- can do so.


I went as part of a delegation with the Media Democracy Fund, along with six other grantees of theirs to get a better sense of how we can contribute and what we might learn from these international discussions.


Lisa and I discuss my impressions, some of the topics we discussed, and why it is important for people in the United States to participate in these global deliberations.


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ILSR Submits Comments to FCC in Support of Restoring Local Authority | community broadband networks

ILSR Submits Comments to FCC in Support of Restoring Local Authority | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Institute for Local Self-Reliance recently submitted comments on FCC petitions filed by Wilson, North Carolina and Chattagnooga, Tennessee. We have been following the proceedings that may prove to be the tipping point in the movement to regain local telecommunications authority.


Our organization collaborated with eight other groups and two D.C. Council Members to provide detailed comments for the Commission's consideration. Our group supplied examples of the benefits munis bring to local communities. In addition to providing connectivity where the incumbents fail to meet demand, our comments point out that municipal networks encourage private investment. We provide concrete evidence of both.


With our partners, we also addressed the fact that state restrictions like the ones in North Carolina and Tennessee are not needed. Local communities must go through a rigorous, transparent process everywhere before investing. State legislative barriers are the product of intense lobbying from the cable and telecommunications giants.


As we point out to the Commission, municipal networks are an important tool to bring ubiquitous Internet access to the U.S.:


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Verizon's McAdam: We set a high bar for further FiOS expansions | Sean Buckley | FierceTelecom.com

Verizon's McAdam: We set a high bar for further FiOS expansions | Sean Buckley | FierceTelecom.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Verizon Communications is holding fast to its thesis that while it is on track to complete the buildout of FiOS to about 21 million premises, it will need a compelling reason to expand into new markets.


Speaking during the Goldman Sachs 23rd Annual Communacopia Conference, Verizon's CEO and Chairman Lowell McAdam said that it is not dismissing the idea of possible expansions, but they would have to provide a compelling return on investment.

"Expansion into other areas I wouldn't rule out, but it would have a very high bar," McAdam said. "If you look at some of the things that Google is doing around fiber, I think that's opened up a new model for us."

McAdam added that broadband data is more profitable than its linear TV service, so offering more fiber-based broadband services is a possibility.  


"Going in and offering broadband is another alternative for us, but the bar will be fairly high on that," he said. "If I see an opportunity to generate shareholder value, I wouldn't rule it out."


Today, the focus near-term FiOS opportunity is centered around extending its fiber into new apartment buildings and condominiums in major metro markets such as New York City and Newark, N.J.


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Supreme Court ruling has wiped out 11 “do it on a computer” patents so far | Joe Mullin | Ars Technica

There have been no less than 11 federal judicial rulings striking down patents as "abstract" since the US Supreme Court's June 26 decision in Alice v. CLS Bank.


It's a high number. The case was recognized as a big decision by commentators when it came, and what's happened since suggests the ramifications may be broader than first thought. Vox Media's Tim Lee (former Ars contributor) has an article rounding up the 11 rulings.


The list only highlights patents that have lost under Section 101 of the US patent law, which governs when a patent is an "abstract idea" that can't be patented. Section 101 wins are important to repeat defendants, because they're wins without going through discovery and hiring costly experts. However, some members of the patent bar see Section 101 as an overly blunt tool for weeding out bad patents from true innovations. Many of the patents being knocked out under 101 are "do it on a computer" patents that take everyday activity and add a lot of computer jargon.


"The courts are sending a pretty clear message: you can't take a commonplace human activity, do it with a computer, and call that a patentable invention," writes Lee.


This season's patent walk of shame includes the Digitech case, in which a unit of Acacia Research Corporation tried to use a circa-1996 Polaroid patent to sue 31 different camera companies and retailers. A July 17 decision by the Federal Circuit put that patent to rest. Lee also counts the "computer bingo" patent, another Section 101 strike down noted by Ars after an August 26 decision from the same court.


Since then, a Delaware court has knocked out a patent on a computer system for "upselling" that was used to sue Amazon.


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Community Broadband Media Roundup - September 12 | community broadband networks

Community Broadband Media Roundup - September 12 | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

This week, you might have been tripped up by some infuriating “spinning wheels of death” on the Internet, but don’t worry, the slow-down was largely symbolic— at least for now. Fierce Telecom covered the Internet Slowdown Day protest on Wednesday, organized by “Battle for the Net." It was designed to bring attention to what will happen if so-called “slow lanes” are allowed under new FCC net neutrality rules. 


Netflix, MuniNetworks, Kickstarter, Reddit, and thousands of other sites took part in the protest. “The New Yorker’s” Vauhini Vara writes that Internet Slowdown Day produced more than 700 thousand comments about proposed FCC rules. 


Meanwhile, Amazon is positioning itself to come out on top whichever way the Net Neutrality rules fall. Susan Crawford urged the FCC to take action and “Think Chattanooga.”


“This is not a story of huge companies fighting one another. This is a sweeping narrative of private control over the central utility of our era: high-capacity Internet access. We, the people of the United States, are the collateral damage in this battle; we are stuck with second-class, expensive service.”


Muni Networks are gaining more ground, with Chattanooga and Wilson, NC still in the spotlight. Anne L. Kim took up the issue of preemption on CQ Roll Call. She interviewed Chris Mitchell for the article:

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Apple: Four million new iPhones ordered in the first 24 hours | Hayley Tsukayama | WashPost.com

Apple: Four million new iPhones ordered in the first 24 hours | Hayley Tsukayama | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Apple said Monday that it has set a new pre-sale record: four million iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus within 24 hours. The phones, which were opened for pre-orders last Friday, don't hit store shelves until Sept. 19.


The pair of new phones, introduced last week, have bigger screens, thinner profiles and more rounded corners than their predecessors. Both are also compatible with Apple's new mobile payment system, Apple Pay, and will work with its forthcoming  Apple Watch. In a statement, Apple chief executive Tim Cook said the company is "thrilled" with the response. "Pre-orders for iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus set a new record for Apple, and we can’t wait to get our best iPhones yet into the hands of customers starting this Friday,” Cook said.


AT&T also reported it broke its record for the most iPhones sold during a pre-order, but did not say how many devices it had sold.


Last year, Apple did not break out its pre-sale figures, but said that it had sold a record 9 million iPhone 5c and iPhone 5s models in the first weekend the devices were in stores. Apple initially ran out of stock for the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c, causing week-long delays.


By the end of the day on Friday, some people trying to buy phones from Apple's Web site were seeing notices that their shipping could be delayed for up to three of four weeks, indicating that demand has far outstripped supply.


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The FCC has now received 3 million net neutrality comments | Brian Fung | WashPost.com

The FCC has now received 3 million net neutrality comments | Brian Fung | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Federal Communications Commission has just released an updated count of how many comments it's received on net neutrality — and the number completely blows the previous estimate out of the water.


To date, the public has filed 3 million comments on the matter, the agency confirmed Monday. That's more than double the last official count of 1.48 million — which itself was a substantial increase, attributed to last week's Internet slowdown protests. The new figure also far surpasses the previous FCC comment record, which belonged to Janet Jackson for her infamous Super Bowl wardrobe malfunction (Jackson's momentary indiscretion was never the subject of an official FCC docket, so the net neutrality proceeding already made history as the most-commented-on docket weeks ago).


The new numbers come as the FCC prepares to close the net neutrality docket and stop accepting further comments. Expect the final number to rise more in the coming hours while people try to squeeze their last comments in before the Monday night deadline.

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House to Vet FCC IT Issues, Process Reforms | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

House to Vet FCC IT Issues, Process Reforms | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Problems with FCC IT and contracting practices, IT personnel management "breakdowns" and the functionality of its website identified by the FCC Inspector General are among the topics on tap for a Sept. 17 FCC oversight hearing in the House Communications Subcommittee.


Also on the agenda is a review of ongoing process reform efforts undertaken by current FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler and former chairman Julius Genachowski.


That is according to a background memo from the committee's Republican majority staff.


The hearing follows a June 4 request from top subcommittee Republicans for data on the agency's workload and "backlog of issues."


Witnesses in the process reform hearing are FCC Managing Director Jon Wilkins and that FCC Inspector General, David Hunt.


Subcommittee Chairman Greg Walden (R-Ore.) has been a big supporter of FCC process reform, including helping achieve House passage of the FCC Process Reform Act, which passed the House in March.


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Comcast: Keep Peering Out of Net Neutrality Debate | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

Comcast: Keep Peering Out of Net Neutrality Debate | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In its comments on the FCC's proposed network neutrality rules, Comcast said Monday that it supported new rules, but they should not apply to exchanges of Internet traffic (like paid peering deals with Netflix).


Comcast said it supported new rules based on Sec. 706 authority, was strongly opposed to reclassifying the rules under Title II, and again reiterated its support for the FCC's tentative conclusion that peering was beyond the scope of the current rulemaking.


"Comcast is committed to maintaining an open Internet and we support the FCC adopting new, strong Open Internet rules under section 706 of the Telecommunications Act," blogged Comcast executive VP David Cohen (pictured). "Comcast doesn’t prioritize Internet traffic or have paid fast lanes, and we have no plans to do so.  We believe legally enforceable rules should continue to include strong transparency, no blocking, and anti-discrimination provisions."


As for Title II, the proposal to reclassify Internet access under some common carrier regs? “Importantly, we do not support reclassification of broadband as a telecommunications service under Title II,” Cohen said. “While some parties mistakenly conflate their advocacy for 'net neutrality' with Title II, our position on reclassification is not at all inconsistent with our support of strong open Internet rules.  Rather, we oppose reclassification because it would harm future innovation and investment in broadband and because reclassification is not necessary to put in place strong and enforceable Open Internet protections.”


FCC chairman Tom Wheeler has said that he sees peering as a separate issue, and one that he has concerns with. But Netflix and others have been pushing to apply nondiscrimination to that traffic, not just the nondiscriminatory access to content by ISP customers.


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IL: Is SWAT raid on wrong house, based on open Wi-Fi IP address, unconstitutional? | Ms. Smith | NetworkWorld.com

IL: Is SWAT raid on wrong house, based on open Wi-Fi IP address, unconstitutional? | Ms. Smith | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Although the EFF and a coalition of other organizations believe in the Open Wireless Movement, here’s a nightmare-like story regarding a SWAT team raiding the wrong house based on open Wi-Fi and an IP address.


Court documents filed on 9/11 revealed that Evansville Police did not look into all the IP addresses associated with anonymous posts before sending in SWAT. The owner of the house claims the raid violated her “Fourth Amendment’s protections against unreasonable search and seizure and excessive force.”


Before we dive into this, you really should take the time to watch the Evansville, Indiana, SWAT helmet cam video evidence that was released by the City Attorney’s office. The real action starts after the three minute mark.


Two years ago, online rumors of leaked police addresses and other personal information led to some pretty serious threats made against the Evansville Police. The online comments were posted on Topix.com. The warrant application (pdf) mentions a subpoena sent to Topix requesting information about three usernames and the IP addresses associated with threats the users made to the police. It turns out that all three users had the same IP, and so Time Warner Cable was subpoenaed for the subscriber name and address associated with that IP address.


According to a court document response (pdf) filed by the subscriber, Louise Milan, Topix found nine usernames that had used that IP to post threats, but the cops were focused on just three. Topix also warned the cops, “Multiple people could be using that same IP address so that may lead you to a different, unrelated user."


Time Warner also warned that the IP address associated with the online threats to the Evansville Police Department and Chief Billy Bolin did not mean it came from the individual registered as having that IP. “We do not make any representations as to the identity of the individual who actually used the above IP address on the time and date in question.”


In fact, according to testimony, a detective claimed that prior to SWAT busting the glass door, tossing in two flashbangs, and handcuffing the mom and daughter, “he drove down her street to check for open wireless connections and discovered one while in front of her house.”


City attorneys argue that “searching the home to examine the Internet router and computers was necessary.” They also admit, “Further investigation was necessary to determine if the person posting the threats from the IP address was the actual residence subscriber to the IP address or someone else.”


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'Tiny banker' malware targets US financial institutions | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com

'Tiny banker' malware targets US financial institutions | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A banking trojan, known for its small size but powerful capabilities, has expanded the number of financial institutions it can collect data from, according to security vendor Avast.


Tiny Banker, also known as Tinba, was discovered around mid-2012 after it infected thousands of computers in Turkey.


The malware is just 20K in size and can inject HTML fields into websites when it detects a user has navigated to a banking site, asking for a range of sensitive information banks would never request during an online session.


A version analyzed by Avast showed Tiny Banker has been customized to target many new financial institutions, many of which are based in the U.S. such as Wells Fargo, Bank of America and Chase, wrote Jaromir Horejsi, an Avast malware analyst.


A screenshot bearing Wells Fargo’s logo showed how Tiny Banker asks for more information when a person logs into their account. It shows a bogus warning about a system update, asking users to provider more information to verify their identity.


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Microsoft Buys Minecraft Maker Mojang for $2.5 Billion | Angela Moscaritolo | PCMag.com

Microsoft Buys Minecraft Maker Mojang for $2.5 Billion | Angela Moscaritolo | PCMag.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Heads up, Minecraft fans — the acquisition rumors were true.


Microsoft has purchased Mojang, maker of the massively popular sandbox building game, for $2.5 billion, the Swedish game developer announced on Monday. The company also announced that founders Markus "Notch" Persson, Carl Manneh, and Jakob Porser are leaving.


The news follows reports last week that Microsoft and Mojang were in "serious discussions" about a multibillion dollar acquisition.


"Change is scary, and this is a big change for all of us," the Mojang team wrote in a note on its website. "It's going to be good though. Everything is going to be OK."


The developer continued: "Please remember that the future of Minecraft and you — the community — are extremely important to everyone involved."


The acquisition is somewhat surprising given that Persson, who created Minecraft, has, in the past, avoided outside investment and derided big firms like Microsoft. But as Minecraft grew from a "simple game to a project of monumental significance," the pressure of owning it became too much for Persson to handle.


"Though we're massively proud of what Minecraft has become, it was never Notch's intention for it to get this big," Mojang wrote. "He's decided that he doesn't want the responsibility of owning a company of such global significance. The only option was to sell Mojang."


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FTC warns of using big data to exclude consumers | Grant Gross | NetworkWorld.com

FTC warns of using big data to exclude consumers | Grant Gross | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The collection and analysis of big data holds great promise, but may also lead some companies to create profiles of consumers leading to discrimination, the chairwoman of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said Monday.


The FTC is “committed to rigorous enforcement” of current law related to data privacy and discriminatory practices, but companies, U.S. policymakers and other groups need to have a deeper discussion about fair big data practices, FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez said during an agency workshop on big data and discrimination.


Monday’s workshop could “help foster a discussion about industry’s ethical obligations as stewards of information detailing nearly every facet of consumers’ lives,” she said. Ramirez said she hoped the workshop would also identify gaps in existing U.S. law related to the collection and use of big data.


Big data “has the capacity to save lives, improve education, enhance government services, increase marketplace efficiency and boost economic productivity,” Ramirez added. “But the same analytic power that makes it easier to predict the outbreak of a virus, identify who is likely to suffer a heart attack, or improve the delivery of social services, also has the capacity to reinforce disadvantages faced by low-income and underserved communities.”


FTC Commissioner Julie Brill, like Ramirez a Democrat, repeated calls for Congress to pass new transparency rules for data brokers. She also called on data brokers to police their own industry by better understanding how the companies that buy their data sets use the information and by prohibiting discriminatory uses of the data.


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United Way to begin accepting donations in Bitcoin | Hayley Tsukayama | WashPost.com

United Way to begin accepting donations in Bitcoin | Hayley Tsukayama | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

United Way Worldwide announced Monday that it will begin taking donations in Bitcoin, the digital currency.


Bitcoin users can now use the currency for donations to the United Way's Innovation Fund, a part of the United  Way dedicated to updating the organization through "technology, relationships and efficiency." Coinbase, one of the leading Bitcoin payment platforms, is partnering with the charity to let those interested donate directly from their digital Bitcoin wallets to the fund. According to a page on the United Way's Web site, anyone from around the world can donate to the fund using Bitcoin.


Bitcoin is making steady progress in gaining more mainstream acceptance, with companies ranging from Home Depot and Target to local food trucks jumping on board. eBay's PayPal announced last week that it will soon be offering developers of its Braintree payment platform the option to accept Bitcoin as a method of payment, also through a partnership with Coinbase.


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Intellectual Property Maximalist Lobbying Group Proposes A New Trademark SOPA (Plus Girl Scout Badges...) | Mike Masnick | Techdirt.com

Intellectual Property Maximalist Lobbying Group Proposes A New Trademark SOPA (Plus Girl Scout Badges...) | Mike Masnick | Techdirt.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) -- which is a sort of "super group" of companies looking to always ratchet up intellectual property laws -- had a brief note on their front page on Monday pushing for bringing back SOPA, but with a promise that it's for trademark law only (the story may disappear from the front page and apparently "archives" are for "members only"):


On September 7 the IPO Board of Directors adopted a resolution supporting in principle legislation to attack online trademark counterfeiting. Such legislation would enable brand owners to file suit against domestic websites selling or offering for sale or distributing counterfeit products, and also as to “foreign counterfeiting websites,” in order to obtain a court order that would require (a) that financial service providers cease processing payment transaction to the defendant(s) and the foreign counterfeiting website, at least in the United States, (b) that internet advertising service providers cease providing such services to the defendants and the foreign counterfeiting website, at least in the United States, and (c) any other injunctive relief the court may determine as appropriate.

The legislation should focus on trademark counterfeiting only; provide for nationwide personal jurisdiction and venue over any foreign counterfeiting website, so long as such is consistent with due process; and permit e-mail service of process to a domestic or foreign counterfeiting website without requiring leave of court based on the e-mail address listed in domain registration for the administrative or ownership contact and to the e-mail address found on the website, if no real or actual address is available for providing notice to the potential defendant.


All of that sounds nearly identical to parts of SOPA -- except the IPO seems to think that if they just focus on the trademark issue, it will be able to sneak it through without a SOPA-like eruption from the public. But the basics here are the same. Allowing companies a private right of action to block out sites (both domestic and foreign) deemed as "counterfeiting websites" is a dangerous plan. Note that, in the past, big brands have regularly declared perfectly legitimate resellers as counterfeiters, and have attacked and sued companies like eBay for not magically stopping people from selling counterfeit goods.


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Sprint, Windstream traffic routing errors hijacked other ISPs | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com

Sprint, Windstream traffic routing errors hijacked other ISPs | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Internet traffic routing errors made by U.S. operators Sprint and Windstream on the same day last week underscore a long-known Internet weakness, posing both security and reliability issues.


Both of the errors involved Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), an aging but crucial protocol that is used by networking equipment to route traffic between different providers. Traffic routes are “announced” using BGP, and the changes are then taken up by routers around the world.


But network providers frequently make erroneous announcements—known as “route hijacking”—which can shut off services, causing reliability issues or be used for certain kinds of cyberattacks.


For about a day starting last Tuesday, Sprint made a BGP announcement that directed Internet traffic from an ISP in Macedonia through its own network, wrote Doug Madory, a senior analyst with Dyn’s Renesys division, which monitors how global Internet traffic is routed.


On the same day, Windstream commandeered traffic destined for Saudi Telecom, and then a day later for networks in Gaza and Iceland, besides three in China, Madory wrote.


It’s not uncommon for operators to make such errors through misconfiguration. But Madory wrote that the problem of BGP route hijacking “has gone from bad to downright strange.”


“While we now detect suspicious routing events on an almost daily basis, in the last couple of days we have witnessed a flurry of hijacks that really make you scratch your head,” he wrote.


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Comcast Denies It Threatens Customers With Suspension for Using Anonymous Tor Web Browser | Stop the Cap!

Comcast Denies It Threatens Customers With Suspension for Using Anonymous Tor Web Browser | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Comcast has strongly denied reports it threatened customers with service termination for using the Tor anonymous web browser, designed to obscure a web user’s identity or location.


Over the weekend, Deep.Dot.Web reported that Comcast agents were contacting customers using the Tor web browser and warned them their Internet access was in peril if they continued using the anonymous browsing software, claiming it was against Comcast’s acceptable use policy.


Allegedly, Comcast representatives “Jeremy” and “Kelly” claimed Tor was “an illegal service” and demanded the customers reveal the web sites they were attempting to reach using the browser.


The representative identified as “Kelly” claimed:


“Users who try to use anonymity, or cover themselves up on the Internet, are usually doing things that aren’t so-to-speak legal. We have the right to terminate, fine, or suspend your account at anytime due to you violating the rules. Do you have any other questions? Thank you for contacting Comcast, have a great day.”


The Tor browser was designed to protect the identity of its privacy-minded users from nosy government agencies and law enforcement elements, but has also been used to hide illegal activities ranging from child pornography and drug dealing to murder-for-hire and espionage-related activities. But the majority of the estimated four million Tor users rely on the browser primarily to help them overcome Internet censorship blocks or geographic restrictions on online video content.


Tor directs each user’s Internet traffic through a free, worldwide,

volunteer network of more than five thousand relays to hide a user’s location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis. Technically, users who volunteer to run a relay may be in violation of Comcast’s acceptable use policy, which states (in part):


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Brain Gain and broadband: Communties need broadband and leadership! | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

I wrote about the role of broadband in the brain gain wave in 2011 – so it’s fun to see it pop up again. The idea is that rural areas aren’t necessarily losing populaiton.


Many young people do leave rural areas for high education and first jobs – but many move back when they have enough expereince and clout to choose where to live and get a job – more than move for a job.


Aaron Brown picks up on this in a recent article for Blandin Outposts


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The Magic in Apple’s Devices? The Heart | David Carr | NYTimes.com

The Magic in Apple’s Devices? The Heart | David Carr | NYTimes.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

During the last seismic Apple announcement, in 2010, I was at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco as Steve Jobs unveiled the iPad, a device he said was so singular it would create its own landing strip.


When the expected reveal came, there was a huge roar, and I looked around to see many of my fellow journalists clapping their hands red. I was an interloper in the land of tech announcements, but I was surprised that a group of cynical-by-nature reporters had been so completely won over in the moment.


I didn’t attend last week’s Applemageddon of multiple product announcements — new phones, a watch and a mobile payment system — but I saw more of the same when I checked the coverage. And while I may not have been clapping, I found myself rooting for Apple to unveil something extraordinary.


When the event was over, you didn’t need a watch from the future to know what time it was: Apple had done it again. By choosing the same site where Mr. Jobs announced the Macintosh computer 30 years ago, and by archly referring to “one more thing” — a Jobs tic when breaking big news — Tim Cook, the chief executive, directly embraced his legacy and sent a message that the company still had magical properties.


A lot of the subsequent coverage has been ecstatic, much of it tinged with palpable relief that a Jobs-less Apple can still set the bar in new and unexpected ways.


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Connecticut Mayors Seek Gigabit Partners | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com

Connecticut Mayors Seek Gigabit Partners | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Three Connecticut cities are putting the pedal to the metal on 1-Gig broadband service, and are inviting other cities to join their effort.

 

In a request for qualifications issued Monday, the mayors of New Haven, which will administer the RFQ (Stamford and West Hartford issued what it called a "global call" for companies and organizations to potentially develop Gig networks in their cities).

 

But it does not stop at their municipal boundaries. Other Connecticut cities are being invited to join the effort by submitting addenda to the request for qualifications describing their "interests and assets."

 

The goal: Speed up service and reduce network costs for everyone. For "underserved" or disadvantaged areas, that would mean low-cost or even free service of at least 10 Mbps to 100 Mbps minimum, and for the rest "at prices comparable to other gigabit fiber communities across the nation."

 

“It’s time we tear down the walls to gigabit Internet access in Connecticut,” said Senator Beth Bye (D-West Hartford), described by the mayors as a "prime mover" in the municipal broadband effort. “Not only will businesses and universities thrive, but consumers will benefit from the lower prices and wider access that this initiative will create. We have the will and I believe we have the ability to make this happen for Connecticut.”

 

FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is all for such efforts, and is looking to make them easier by potentially preempting state legislative attempts to limit municipal broadband.

 

Wheeler liked what he was hearing out of of Connecticut.


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NCTA: Title II is the "Un' Answer | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com

NCTA: Title II is the "Un' Answer | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The National Cable & Telecommunications Association said that anticompetitive paid prioritization would create Internet fast and slow lanes, but that the FCC's proposed approach to restoring net neutrality rules would prevent that from happening. By contrast, NCTA tells the FCC in its latest round of comments on new Open Internet rules, a change to a Title II approach would be "Unlawful, unnecessary, and profoundly unwise."

 

Instead, says NCTA, new rules supported by the FCC's Sec. 706 authority to promote timely and universal broadband gives the FCC the power to prevent "anticompetitive" paid prioritization that "would create" those fast and slow lanes, while allowing "commercially reasonable" arrangements between ISPs and edge providers.

 

FCC Chairman's proposal to use Sec. 706 authority would include allowing paid prioritization above a certain baseline of service, but would not allow commercially unreasonable discrimination. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has said he does not think anticompetitive paid priority that results in Internet fast and slow lanes is commercially reasonable, but critics say the next chairman may not agree with that judgment call.

 

One suggestion that has been raised in comments to the FCC for putting more teeth in the "no fast or slow lanes" comment would be to include a rebuttable presumption that paid prioritization is commercially unreasonable. It would not prevent it, but would mean that the burden of proof would be on the paid prioritizer.


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