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Time, attention, and the content creation curve | BizGrows.com

Time, attention, and the content creation curve | BizGrows.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If you’ve read any of my previous posts here on {grow}, you know that I  view attention as a form of currency on the social web. In fact it’s the most valuable form of currency because it’s the start of every single relationship. However as the supply of attention decreases, the demand increases, and the mass attention myth becomes more prevalent, we need  to give some thought to how we’re going to get people to spend their attention with us.

 

Interactions on the web occur across multiple channels and the amount of attention that people spend at each channel varies greatly.  For the sake of this post, let’s use a rating system that assigns an attention cost (i.e. how much of their attention somebody spends with you). let’s take a journey together up the content creation curve:

 

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GAO: FCC Can't Ensure Station-Sharing Limits Further Public Interest | Broadcasting & Cable

GAO: FCC Can't Ensure Station-Sharing Limits Further Public Interest | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The FCC does not have enough data to determine whether its current of future policies toward station sharing arrangements—it has recently moved to limit them in some circumstances—actually serve the public interest, a shortfall that could undermine its goals.


That is one of the principal observations in a new Government Accountability Report on whether the FCC should review the effects of those broadcasters sharing arrangements on its media policy goals of competition, localism and diversity. GAO suggests that answer is yes, but leaves it up to the FCC to decide.


"[The] FCC does not collect data and has not completed a review on the prevalence of agreements, how they are used, or their effects on its policy goals and media ownership rules," said GAO in releasing the report, "yet federal standards for internal control note the importance of agencies' having information that may affect their goals. Without data and a fact-based analysis of how agreements are used, [the] FCC cannot ensure that its current and future policies on broadcaster agreements serve the public interest."


In addition to the lack of data, "the long delays in completing FCC's review makes it difficult to objectively determine the effect of the agreements on FCC's policy goals of competition, localism, diversity," GAO said.


In response to the report, FCC Media bureau chief Bill Lake agreed with the need for more info, and pointed out that the FCC has proposed requiring disclosure of sharing arrangements as a way to better understand their terms and prevalence in the marketplace.


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FCC Commissioners: FCC Needs to Review Designated Entity Rules | Broadcasting & Cable

FCC Commissioners: FCC Needs to Review Designated Entity Rules | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

On a panel at the Minority Media & Telecommunications Council Access to Capital Conference in Washington Tuesday (July 29) the FCC commissioners Tuesday agreed that the FCC needs to look at revamping its designated entity rules [the chairman had a previous engagement, and so sent a brief video greeting].


MMTC has been pushing for a review of those rules to insure that minorities and women are not excluded from the move to wireless communications, as many were in the rise of broadcasting and cable.


Commissioner Mignon Clyburn said that, no matter what the pressure to do otherwise, she would not support the notion that entrepreneurship opportunities are reserved for a particular class. She vowed that the commission would do all it can, in a legally sustained way, to promote meaningful participation for small and diverse businesses.


Commissioner Ajit Pai said that the key to incentive auction participation, and that one way that he has proposed it allowing people to bid on smaller economic areas, which he said would allow more smaller DE's to bid in the upcoming AWS-3 and broadcast incentive auctions.


Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel said that court decisions including Adarand and Council Tree have made DE rules less effective, and a review is necessary.


Commissioner O'Rielly said he was optimistic the incentive auction would be "very successful." To that point, he said the FCC had to balance helping designated entities with raising enough money for funding FirstNet, next-generation 911 and deficit reduction.


FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler announced an incentive auction timeline last month, that includes opening a proceeding to review the DE rules, "including whether any revisions made to the DE rules should apply to the incentive auction."


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FCC Seeks Comment On Mediacom Unbundling Petition | Multichannel

FCC Seeks Comment On Mediacom Unbundling Petition | Multichannel | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The FCC has put out for public notice Mediacom's request that the commission force media conglomerates to unbundle their package programming deals.

 

That is according to Mediacom, which says the FCC is providing 30 says for initial comment.

 

On July 21, Mediacom petitioned the FCC for an expedited rulemaking. The cable operator said the relationship between programmers and distributors was broken and that the marketplace is now anti-competitive and anti-consumer.

 

Mediacom is seeking the following new rule regime:


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TX: AT&T Adds San Antonio To ‘GigaPower’ List | Multichannel.com

TX: AT&T Adds San Antonio To ‘GigaPower’ List | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T has committed to roll out its fiber-based, 1-Gig-capable “GigaPower” network to parts of San Antonio, a city that is also on Google Fiber’s list of potential expansion sites

 

AT&T flirted with a potential expansion of GigaPower in San Antonio in April, about a month after San Antonio approved a long-term, master lease deal that will help to clear the deployment of 40 Google Fiber “fiber huts.

 

Time Warner Cable, which is in the process of being acquired by Comcast, is San Antonio’s incumbent cable service provider.

 

AT&T said locations and pricing for its GigaPower rollout in San Antonio will be announced at a later date.

 

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KS: Smaller Cable Ops Sing Blues in K.C., but Have Hope | Multichannel.com

KS: Smaller Cable Ops Sing Blues in K.C., but Have Hope | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As independent operators settle in Kansas City this week for their annual convention, they’ve got more on their minds than just barbecue and blues.


In the group’s hometown this year, National Cable Television Cooperative and American Cable Association members have gathered to hash out the myriad issues facing small, midsized and independent cable operators: the skyrocketing cost of programming, Internet-protocol delivery of video and data, retransmission consent and TV Everywhere. 


Multichannel News editor in chief Mark Robichaux caught up with ACA president and CEO Matt Polka to hear what’s on his legislative agenda for members.


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Canada blames China for cyber intrusion at National Research Council | Lucian Constantin | NetworkWorld.com

Canada blames China for cyber intrusion at National Research Council | Lucian Constantin | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The IT infrastructure of the National Research Council of Canada was recently compromised by highly sophisticated Chinese state-sponsored hackers, the Canadian government said Tuesday.


t’s not clear why the government believes that the attackers were state-sponsored, but the breach was discovered and confirmed with help from the Communications Security Establishment, Canada’s foreign signals intelligence agency. The agency is also responsible for securing government communications.


The National Research Council’s computer networks are not part of the Canadian government’s broader network and there is no evidence that data from the larger network was compromised, the Chief Information Officer for the Government of Canada said in a statement. Nevertheless, the research agency’s networks have been isolated as a precaution.


Steps have been taken to contain the security breach and protect information assets, the NRC said in a statement on its own website. An effort was launched to create a new secure IT infrastructure, but the process could take up to one year, the agency said.


The NRC has not releases details about how the attackers broke into its systems or what kind of information they obtained, if any.


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US Senator Leahy pushes new version of bill to limit NSA phone records collection | Grant Gross | NetworkWorld.com

US Senator Leahy pushes new version of bill to limit NSA phone records collection | Grant Gross | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy has introduced a new version of a bill to rein in the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of U.S. phone records in an effort to strengthen legislation that passed the House of Representatives this year.


The new version of Leahy’s USA Freedom Act, introduced Tuesday, would ban bulk collection of U.S phone records by the NSA and would prohibit the agency from collecting all the information from a single telecom carrier or from a broad geographic region such as a city or zip code.


Leahy, a Vermont Democrat, introduced the new version of the bill after the House passed a weakened version of the bill in May. The House version of the bill would allow the NSA to continue collect telephone and other records from large groups of people, critics said.


Leahy’s new version would require the NSA to use specific selection terms to target its telephone records collection.


The bill would also require the government to issue reports on the number of people targeted in surveillance programs. It would give communications providers options on how to report on the number of surveillance requests they receive, and it would require the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to appoint a panel of special advocates to argue in support of individual privacy and civil liberties during court consideration of surveillance requests.


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Drones for disaster relief | US National Science Foundation | NSFgov

Drones for disaster relief | US National Science Foundation | NSFgov | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

At the Smart America Expo, Yan Wan from the University of North Texas exhibited unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) she developed that are capable of providing wireless communications to storm-ravaged areas where telephone access might be out.


Typical wireless communications have a range limit of only a hundred meters. However using technology developed by Wan and her colleagues, they were able to extend the Wi-Fi reach of drones to five kilometers.


In a grant from NSF, Wan is applying similar technology to next-generation aviation systems. One day, Wan's research will enable drone-to-drone and flight-to-flight communications, improving air traffic safety, coordination and efficiency.


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Let's Break Down Forbes' Laughable "5 Reasons To Admire Comcast" | Consumerist.com

Let's Break Down Forbes' Laughable "5 Reasons To Admire Comcast" | Consumerist.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In spite of its two Worst Company In America wins, we know that not everyone hates Comcast. But if you’re going to go out of your way on a popular website to tell America why it should think more kindly of the Kabletown folks, then you’ll need to come up with better reasons than the ones given in a risible Forbes.com column.


In the “5 Reasons to Admire Comcast” column, contributor Gene Marks even admits that criticism of the cable giant for its stance on net neutrality and its poor serviced is “deserved.” But then he goes on to come up with perhaps the lamest reasons ever given to provide Comcast a pat on the back.


First up:


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Guns, vandals and thieves: Data shows US networks under attack | Martyn Williams | NetworkWorld.com

Guns, vandals and thieves: Data shows US networks under attack | Martyn Williams | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Early one morning in April last year, someone accessed an underground vault just south of San Jose, California, and cut through fiber-optic cables there. The incident blacked out phone, Internet and 911 service for thousands of people in Silicon Valley.


Such incidents, often caused by vandals, seem fairly common, but exactly how often do they occur? Since 2007, the U.S. telecom infrastructure has been targeted by more than a thousand malicious acts that resulted in severe outages, according to data obtained by IDG from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) under the Freedom of Information Act.


The FCC requires carriers to submit reports when an outage affects at least 900,000 minutes of user calls, or when it impacts 911 service, major military installations, key government facilities, nuclear power plants or major airports.


The reports themselves are confidential for national security and commercial reasons, but aggregate data provided by the FCC shows there were 1,248 incidents resulting in major outages over the last seven years.


While the data shows no clear overall trend, the years with the highest number of incidents were recent—222 outages reported in both 2011 and 2013.


For the last three years, vandalism was the single biggest cause of outages identified, accounting for just over a third of the incidents in each year.


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More mobile gadgets than people? Seven countries now qualify | Stephen Lawson | NetworkWorld.com

More mobile gadgets than people? Seven countries now qualify | Stephen Lawson | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Wireless broadband subscriptions now outnumber people in seven countries as consumers continue to snap up smartphones and tablets, according to a new report.


Finland, Australia, Japan, Sweden, Denmark, South Korea and the U.S. had wireless broadband penetration of more than 100 percent as of December 2013, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said Tuesday. That means there was more than one wireless broadband subscription per person, usually because consumers have more than one mobile device that can go online. The U.S. just barely crossed the bar, while Finland led the group with more than 123 percent penetration.


Across all 37 OECD countries, wireless broadband penetration rose to 72.4 percent as total subscriptions grew 14.6 percent. The group spans North America, Australia, New Zealand, and much of Europe, as well as Japan, South Korea, Turkey, Israel, Mexico and Chile. It’s sometimes treated as a barometer of the developed world.


Wired broadband subscriptions also grew in 2013, reaching an average of 27 percent penetration. That means there was just over one wired subscription per four people: Wired broadband services, such as cable and DSL (digital subscriber line), typically are shared. Switzerland led in that category with 44.9 percent penetration, followed by the Netherlands and Denmark. The U.S. had just under 30 wired subscriptions per 100 people, while Turkey came in last with just over 11.


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Chattanooga, TN and Wilson, NC Comment Period Open; Tell the FCC You Support Local Authority | community broadband networks

Chattanooga, TN and Wilson, NC Comment Period Open; Tell the FCC You Support Local Authority | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Last week, the communities of Chattanooga and Wilson, North Carolina, filed petitions with the FCC. Both communities requested that the agency remove state barriers preventing expansion beyond their current service areas. On July 28, the FCC established a public comment calendar for the request. It is imperative that all those with an interest in better access take a few moments to express their support for these two communities.


Opening Comments are due August 29, 2014; Reply Comments will be due September 29, 2014. That means you need to submit comments by the end of this month. If you want to reply to any comments, you can do that in September.


This is a pivotal moment in telecommunications policy. For months municipal network advocates have been following Chairman Wheeler's stated intentions to remove state barriers to local authority. Within the past few weeks, federal legislators - many that rely on campaign contributions from large providers - pushed back through Rep Marsha Blackburn (R-TN). Blackburn introduced an amendment to a House appropriations bill preventing FCC preemption if the amendment becomes law.


ILSR and MuniNetworks.org encourage individuals, organizations, and entities to file comments supporting the people of Wilson and Chattanooga. These two communities exemplify the potential success of local Internet choice. We have documented their many victories on MuniNetworks.org and through case studies on Wilson [PDF] and Chattanooga [PDF].


Now is the time to share your support for local decision-making. This is not about whether any given community should build its own network so much as it is about whether every community can decide for itself how to best expand and improve Internet access, whether by investing in itself or working with a trusted partner.


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Google’s Algorithm Local Search Update | Techmagnet.com

Google’s Algorithm Local Search Update | Techmagnet.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

There’s a New Google Algorithm in Town


And Search Engine Land’s calling it Pigeon. Because this algorithm affects local searches and apparently pigeons like to fly back home.


Yeah. That’s what we said too. Cue the exaggerated eye roll.


However, without further ado here’s more about the newest feather in Google’s cap.


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Honig Defends MMTC Against 'Smears' | Broadcasting & Cable

Honig Defends MMTC Against 'Smears' | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Minority Media & Telecommunications Council President David Honig came out swinging Tuesday against critics of the groups opposition to Title II and its support of the FCC's waiver to Grain Management, a minority tower company, and its leader, David Grain, who Honig said was akin to MMTC's Rosa Parks


That came in his keynote for MMTC's Access to Capital Conference in Washington.


Honig said MMTC, Rainbow Push and the over 40 other groups that joined in supporting the FCC's Sec. 706 approach to new net neutrality rules had studied the issue and did not believe a Title II approach made sense, an approach he called risky and irresponsible.


"You can't say these 42 organizations are too stupid to know what the net neutrality issue is about," he said, adding that the smears of his group smacked of....He did not finish the sentence, but if so, it probably would have been "racism."


He said the group had been pilloried for doing what it thought was right, and that while it has been "generally quiet" about the smears, "no more."  He said that MMTC would "take them on anywhere" that he had confidence in their research into the issue and that he would not allow anyone to continue to repeat a smear that was not true.


The defense came even before Honig could take to the rostrom. Dr. Nicol Turner-Lee, VP and chief research and policy offer for MMTC, said the organization would not tolerate "digital lynch mobs" trying to discredit Honig and MMTC.


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Netflix, AT&T Cut Interconnection Deal | Multichannel.com

Netflix, AT&T Cut Interconnection Deal | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T and Netflix on Tuesday confirmed that they have inked an interconnection deal that, once executed, should improve the quality of streams delivered on the telco’s broadband network.

 

Both companies released statements they reached the deal in May and have been working together since to provision additional interconnect capacity to “improve the viewing experience for our mutual subscribers.”  They have begun to turn up those connections, and expect the process to be “complete in the coming days.”

 

Word of the deal, reported first by Mashable, comes about five months after AT&T said it was in discussions with Netflix about forging a more direct connection. It also comes after Netflix begrudgingly signed similar paid interconnection pacts with Comcast and, more recently, with Verizon Communications. Netflix prefers that ISPs join Open Connect, its private content delivery network that relies on edge caches.

 

Netflix has openly complained that some major ISPs have allowed their peering points to degrade to force paid interconnection deals that Netflix views as an “arbitrary tax” on it and other over-the-top video service providers. Further, Netflix has been urging the FCC to include paid peering and interconnection deals into the discussion as the Commission pursues new network neutrality rules.


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CA: DirecTV Still Balking at TWC over SportsNet LA | Multichannel.com

CA: DirecTV Still Balking at TWC over SportsNet LA | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

While FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is scheduled to meet with Rep. Tony Cárdenas  (D-Calif.) Tuesday afternoon, following the Congressman’s letter last week asking the agency to mediate the carriage impasse between SportsNet LA, the television home of the Los Angeles Dodgers and a host of distributors. However, the prime players in the dispute don’t seem like they are ready to play ball anytime soon.

 

In the letter to Wheeler, Cárdenas along with six other House Democrats, Brad Sherman, Lucille Roybal-Allard, Alan Lowenthal, Linda Sánchez Julia Brown, Janice Hanh and Judy Chu sent to the FCC, they asked the agency to mediate the dispute over $4-plus monthly subscriber fees that has kept the rookie RSN from gaining carriage on Cox, Charter, Suddenlink, Dish, DirecTV, Verizon FiOS and AT&T U-verse

 

Indeed, as the 2014 Major League Baseball season heads into its final two regular-season months, only subscribers to Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks, which the nation’s No. 2 MSO negotiates programming deals for, have been able to see the first-place Dodgers on a regular basis within the team’s TV footprint.

 

In response to the letter, Time Warner Cable, which is paying the Dodgers some $8.35 billion over 25 years and is handling affiliate negotiations for the RSN, and the club said on July 28 that they would be amenable to entering into binding arbitration as a means to end the carriage impasse with DirecTV, which has a major presence in Los Angeles and throughout SportsNet LA’s footprint.


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Windstream Communications Soars on REIT Plans | Multichannel.com

Windstream Communications Soars on REIT Plans | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Stock in Windstream Communications, the Little Rock, Ark.-based competitive local exchange carrier soared more than 20% on Tuesday on news the company plans to spin off its network assets as a real estate investment trust (REIT), which could give the company significant tax breaks and have sweeping implications across the broadband market.


Windstream stock was trading as high as $13.30 per share (up $2.77 each or 26.3%) in early trading Tuesday after it said it had received approval from the U.S. Internal Revenue Service to spin off its network assets – copper and fiber plant – into a separately publicly traded REIT, which would then lease back those assets to Windstream for $650 million per year. The move, Windstream said in a statement, would allow the company to reduce debt by about $3.2 billion and would significantly reduce its tax burden, freeing up more cash for upgrades and infrastructure improvements. The stock settled down in subsequent trading, closing at $11.83 per share on July 29, up 12.4% ($1.30) each.

 

“As a result of the transaction, Windstream will offer faster broadband speeds and more robust performance to consumers,” Windstream said in a statement. The company said it would expand availability of 10 Mbps Internet service to more than 80% of its customers by 2018 and make 24 Mbps service available to 30% of customers by that same year, aboiut twice its current availability.

 

The transaction could have implications for other broadband service providers as well. Stocks in several CLECS and broadband providers were up significantly in early trading as well.


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Analysts to Cable Ops: Fear Silicon Valley | Multichannel.com

Analysts to Cable Ops: Fear Silicon Valley | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Finding a small cable operator complaining about high programming costs at the Independent Show is easier than finding a barbeque joint in this city, Kansas City.

 

But a group of analysts tried to persuade the cable faithful here that programmers shouldn’t be the focus of their fear and ire…Silicon Valley should be. 

 

The panel, “Wall Street Update for Main Street MSOs,” was featured at The Independent Show, the annual confab for small and mid-sized cable operators hosted by the American Cable Association and the National Cable Television Cooperative

 

Indeed, far from carping about increased programming costs, cable operators should feel good about their business. New digital entrants destroyed the newspaper, music and Yellow Pages business, but the cable industry has largely avoided the mass migration of subscribers and revenue to new digital entrants. 

 

“This is the only industry to date that has been able to fight the onslaught of digital platforms, and so far no leakage”  said Laura Martin (pictured), a managing director at Needham & Co. -- a testament to the collaborative relationship between cable operators and programmers. "If that fractures, said Martin, "seventy percent of gross revenue will disappear.”

 

Overall viewing of TV content on more devices in the home is up, Martin said, which should provide more cover on price increases. In round numbers, cable’s $75 billion of subscription revenue, in addition to $75 billion in advertising revenue, is up roughly 20% over the past five years.  Moreover, “all those consumers that are whining to you that they can’t possibly pay more money are paying another $3 billion to Netflix and another $1 billion in subscription fees.” 

 

“You’ve got a better mousetrap – it’s just a question of execution,” said Naveen Nataraj, a senior managing director at Evercore Partners. 

 

Martin suggested the operators in the room think more holistically about their business. True, video margins are getting squeezed, compared to broadband margins, but video content, in not so many years, will be moving to toward a more interactive, real-time experience. Cable operators have a strategic advantage with the double bundle – and far better discovery than online sites such as YouTube.

 

“You should think of your video and broadband product as integrated” because of interactive possibilities around the corner…”only you can do those fast speeds two way.”  “Keep the bundle… the bigger the bundle the better,” Martin said.


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Paid Peering, Paid Prioritization, and the Nuance of the Net Neutrality Debate | Benton Foundation

Paid Peering, Paid Prioritization, and the Nuance of the Net Neutrality Debate | Benton Foundation | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It is easy to conflate peering and paid prioritization. Recently, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Rep. Doris Matsui (D-CA) introduced bills in both chambers of Congress to ban so-called paid prioritization.


Coverage by the New York Times pointed out that the bills ban “deals similar to the recent agreement that allows Netflix to connect directly to Comcast’s system to avoid network congestion.” However, that is not strictly true.


The proposed Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2014 (S. 2476 and H.R. 4880) prohibits “paid prioritization” as understood in the Federal Communications Commission’s conventional discourse on net neutrality. The bills do not explicitly deal with interconnection, or peering arrangements such as the Netflix-Comcast deal.


Similarly, in its Open Internet rules, the FCC has so far focused on regulating the potential harms of last-mile paid prioritization rather than that of paid peering/ interconnection.


As the FCC reviews the recent flood of net neutrality comments, regulators should be mindful of rhetoric-masked, bad arguments that overlook the nuances between the two.


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Flexibility, asking questions key for recent college graduates looking to advance in IT | Fred O'Connor | NetworkWorld.com

Flexibility, asking questions key for recent college graduates looking to advance in IT | Fred O'Connor | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

When Cathy Lee started working at New York startup Faith Street last year, she quickly learned a lesson that could benefit other recent college graduates who want to advance their IT careers—soft skills like being flexible, taking on new tasks and asking questions matter a lot.


She originally handled office administrator tasks like answering phones and scheduling meetings and soon added marketing and front-end development to her duties. The New York University graduate even researched CRM (customer relationship management) software for the company, whose website and mobile application help people find churches and faith communities.


“I didn’t really have a job title at the time,” said Lee, who graduated in 2013 and double majored in marketing and information systems. “I was open and willing to try out new things. Whatever the need was at the time I just jumped on board and helped out.”


Her interest in user interfaces and user experience helped her get the job of FaithStreet’s “user happiness designer,” which involves front-end development and product and account management.


“I was able to figure out what I could do that was needed by the company but also something that I enjoyed,” Lee said. “I’m involved [with] everything from figuring out user needs, evaluating different prototypes to testing quality assurance of the final product or our latest iteration of the product.”


The company wouldn’t have initially hired her as a designer “but after six months of being available to do different kinds of work, we found she has a real knack for it,” said CEO Sean Coughlin. “Folks who are new out of college have ideas about what they’re going to do that are too fixed. The first 100 days or even year at your first job you’re going to learn a ton about what you are good at.”


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Google seeks public opinion on 'right to be forgotten' | CNET.com

Google seeks public opinion on 'right to be forgotten' | CNET.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Does the public have a right to information about the nature, volume, and outcome of removal requests made to search engines? Should individuals be able to request removal of links to information published by a government? These are just a couple of the questions thrown out by Google in a new Web form asking people affected by the "right to be forgotten" ruling to share their opinions.


The European Union right to be forgotten ruling, which went into effect in May, requires Google and other search engines to take down search result links pertaining to individuals who believe that such links invade their privacy or harm them in some way. The ruling has been controversial as it walks the tightrope between privacy and free speech.


Google has criticized the ruling but has also attempted to comply with it. Earlier this month, Google said that as of July 18 it has received 91,000 requests involving more than 328,000 individual webpages since May. Google is only taking down links in its European search engines, meaning that if users search for the same content on its US-based website they can see the results that were removed in Europe.


Google's recently formed advisory council has scheduled several public discussions on the matter that will use information collected by the new Web form. But will such discussions lend new insight to the matter or confuse it even further?


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Our View: Stay out of UTOPIA, Congress | Editorial | Standard.net

Our View: Stay out of UTOPIA, Congress | Editorial | Standard.net | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

An effort in the U.S. Congress to disallow federal regulators from supporting cities’ selling high-speed broadband directly to consumers should be stopped.


The recently passed legislation, attached to a high-priority funding bill, would stop the feds from assisting cities in battles with states over allowing municipalities to sell broadband service.


This “boring-but-important” legislation is important because across the nation, many states have tried to restrict municipalities from offering their own Internet services. In response to these efforts, the Federal Communications Commission has announced that its congressional charter, the Telecommunications Act of 1996, has precedence over any state restrictions. Also, a federal court agreed earlier this year, opining that bans were a “barrier to infrastructure investment.”


Hence the congressional amendment, which is couched as a “states right” proposal but is in reality anti-cities and anti-entrepreneurial. Appropriately, the Utah League of Cities and Towns opposes the congressional action, arguing it imposes on rights of cities.


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Gigabit Network Expansion Moves Forward in Longmont, Colorado | community broadband networks

Gigabit Network Expansion Moves Forward in Longmont, Colorado | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Construction on Longmont's fiber expansion will begin by August 13th, reports the Times-Call. TCS Communications of Englewood, Colorado recently signed an agreement with Longmont Power & Communications (LPC) to deploy the gigabit network for $20,095,022. Completion is scheduled for 2017.


A July 14th article on the project noted that LPC and TCS will complete construction in six phases. A substantial number of potential subscribers will have access early in the process:


"The first phase will be done in south-central Longmont, the area nearest to LPC itself. The work will then proceed into central Longmont by early 2015. At that pace, 11,147 of the utility's 39,061 customers would be able to get fiber service within a year of the start of construction."


Readers will recall that last November the people of Longmont voted to approve a $45.3 million bond issue to bring the network to every premise in the city. Chris spoke with Vince Jordan, one of LPC's champions, in episode #106 of the Community Broadband Bits podcast.


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A new breed of broadband satellites could have you living on a desert island | Patrick Nelson | NetworkWorld.com

A new breed of broadband satellites could have you living on a desert island | Patrick Nelson | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

What if I were to tell you that you could quit the burgs and move to an Alaskan hinterland cabin, then watch streamed movies all day, coupled with a touch of elk hunting for your sustenance, a la Discovery Channel?


Or you could slink away to a remote, thatched hut on the beach, hack a solar panel, nab a few flounder, and work like you’re in the middle of the city.


Nice idea, right? But the problem is, and always has been, bandwidth: you are at a competitive disadvantage in remote areas, because of trickling Internet.


Even the log-mansion sprinkled boonies, however seductive, are just not wired like the megalopolis. There aren’t enough consumers there to pay for it.


Well, that all might be about to change. It’s because of a slew of satellite launches recently completed, and upcoming.


That splurge of new satellites could fill Internet gaps for adventurous dwellers.


The new satellites use Ka-band spectrum, which has significantly more capacity over older Ku-band. Better, and narrower spot beams, where data is economically squirted at the ground onto small footprints, plays too.


These new birds promise to bring more bandwidth, capacity and competition, followed by falling prices, one hopes.


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Now you can tell the FCC to overturn state limits on municipal broadband | Ars Technica

Now you can tell the FCC to overturn state limits on municipal broadband | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Federal Communications Commission just started taking public comments on whether it should preempt state laws that limit the growth of municipal broadband in Tennessee and North Carolina.


Twenty states have passed such limits, which protect private Internet service providers from having to compete against cities and towns that seek to provide Internet, TV, and phone service to residents. After FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said he intends to use the commission's authority to preempt the state laws, the commission received petitions from two public entities that want to expand broadband offerings.


"On July 24, 2014, the Electric Power Board of Chattanooga, Tennessee, and the City of Wilson, North Carolina filed separate petitions asking that the Commission act pursuant to section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 to preempt portions of Tennessee and North Carolina state statutes that restrict their ability to provide broadband services," the FCC said today. "The Electric Power Board is an independent board of the City of Chattanooga that provides electric and broadband service in the Chattanooga area. The City of Wilson provides electric service in six counties in eastern North Carolina and broadband service in Wilson County. Both Petitioners allege that state laws restrict their ability to expand their broadband service offerings to surrounding areas where customers have expressed interest in these services, and they request that the Commission preempt such laws."


The FCC opened two proceedings, one for North Carolina and one for Tennessee. Initial comments will be accepted until August 29, and reply comments will be accepted until September 29.


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