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Time, attention, and the content creation curve | BizGrows.com

Time, attention, and the content creation curve | BizGrows.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If you’ve read any of my previous posts here on {grow}, you know that I  view attention as a form of currency on the social web. In fact it’s the most valuable form of currency because it’s the start of every single relationship. However as the supply of attention decreases, the demand increases, and the mass attention myth becomes more prevalent, we need  to give some thought to how we’re going to get people to spend their attention with us.

 

Interactions on the web occur across multiple channels and the amount of attention that people spend at each channel varies greatly.  For the sake of this post, let’s use a rating system that assigns an attention cost (i.e. how much of their attention somebody spends with you). let’s take a journey together up the content creation curve:

 

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NAB, NATOA Sue FCC Over Effective Competition Decision | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

NAB, NATOA Sue FCC Over Effective Competition Decision | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Broadcasters and local franchise authorities have filed suit in federal court to block the FCC's decision that cable operators are subject to effective competition unless proved otherwise.

The National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors (NATOA) and the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB)—along with a local franchise authority in Minnesota—filed the suit, saying the FCC decision was "arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion." The suit was filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, which has primary jurisdiction over FCC decisions.


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How the FCC is Bringing Broadband to Rural America | Benton Foundation

How the FCC is Bringing Broadband to Rural America | Benton Foundation | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Earlier this year, the Federal Communications Commission found that broadband deployment in the United States – especially in rural areas – is failing to keep pace with today’s advanced, high-quality voice, data, graphics and video offerings. Over half of all rural Americans lack access to broadband service with 25 megabits per second (Mbps) for downloads and 3 Mbps for uploads. Moreover, rural America continues to be underserved at all speeds, the FCC found: 20 percent lack access even to service at 4 Mbps/1 Mbps, down only 1 percent from 2011, and 31 percent lack access to 10 Mbps/1 Mbps, down only 4 percent from 2011.

In the 2015 Broadband Progress Report, the FCC found that:


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Too Much Fiber? | Doug Dawson Blog | POTs and PANs

Too Much Fiber? | Doug Dawson Blog | POTs and PANs | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

When communities consider building fiber, one of the first questions a community often asks me is how much fiber already exists in their community and how they can take advantage of it. The bad news I almost always have to give them is that their community probably contains several existing fiber networks that will be of little or no use to them. It seems there is a lot of fiber in the world that is not being put to good use.

So what do I mean by this? What I have found is that many communities have numerous existing fiber networks that have been built for one specific purpose and which can’t be used for anything else. Here are some examples:


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Letter from Langdon, MO: The Co-Op Model | Richard Oswald | Daily Yonder

Letter from Langdon, MO: The Co-Op Model | Richard Oswald | Daily Yonder | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Once upon a time, telegraphs and kerosene lamps were state of the art.

Telephones and 110-volt wall outlets were the next big thing.

Now we have the Internet.

Costs of hard-wired improvements are just too high for profit-driven development in rural America, but Missouri has been a hotbed for rural electric co-operatives. Our abundant underground supply of coal made us a natural for coal-fired electricity generation. Power plants were built conveniently on top of coal beds.

Those co-op jobs were good for rural Missourians, a lot of whom were farmers who gained electricity in the bargain.

The whole thing was turned on its head when someone figured out our high-sulfur coal was bad for the planet. Now we generate about 83% of our electricity needs from coal hauled in by rail from Wyoming.

But co-ops are still at the seat of power in Missouri because they hire local people to keep up electrical grids across the state. They have a reputation for service as they preserve cooperative principles and leave the door open for the next big thing in rural America.

I'm talking about fiber – not dietary fiber from farm-raised fruit and vegetables, but fiber optics capable of moving rural Internet connections at the speed of light.


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Judge clears tall buildings for Faubourg Marigny waterfront, but criticizes 'abhorrent' process | Robert McClendon | NOLA.com

Judge clears tall buildings for Faubourg Marigny waterfront, but criticizes 'abhorrent' process | Robert McClendon | NOLA.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A New Orleans judge Thursday (Aug. 27) denied an attempt by the Faubourg Marigny Improvement Association (FMIA) to block new zoning rules that allow for buildings up to 80 feet high in the neighborhood, sixty percent taller than was previously allowed.

Civil District Court Judge Kern Reese said that the city let down its residents when they adopted the new rules, which were a part of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance approved by the City Council this spring, without adequate public input.

"I'm not fond of this this particular aspect of the ordinance," Reese said. "To not allow citizens to comment on things they will have to live with, it is abhorrent to me.

"It denigrates our entire system of government when you don't allow citizens to comment."

Nevertheless, Reese said, the City Council made its decision, and, as a judge, he does not have the authority to undermine their judgment unless their choice was arbitrary and capricious.

Reese denied a motion for a preliminary injunction that would have blocked any developers from using the new rules to build buildings higher than the current, base limit of 55 fight.


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BitTorrent patches flaw that could amplify distributed denial-of-service attacks | Lucian Constantin | CSO Online

BitTorrent patches flaw that could amplify distributed denial-of-service attacks | Lucian Constantin | CSO Online | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

BitTorrent fixed a vulnerability that would have allowed attackers to hijack BitTorrent applications used by hundreds of millions of users in order to amplify distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks.


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Highway to hack: Why we’re just at the beginning of the auto-hacking era | Sean Gallagher | Ars Technica

Highway to hack: Why we’re just at the beginning of the auto-hacking era | Sean Gallagher | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Imagine it’s 1995, and you’re about to put your company’s office on the Internet. Your security has been solid in the past—you’ve banned people from bringing floppies to work with games, you’ve installed virus scanners, and you run file server backups every night. So, you set up the Internet router and give everyone TCP/IP addresses. It’s not like you’re NASA or the Pentagon or something, so what could go wrong?

That, in essence, is the security posture of many modern automobiles—a network of sensors and controllers that have been tuned to perform flawlessly under normal use, with little more than a firewall (or in some cases, not even that) protecting it from attack once connected to the big, bad Internet world. This month at three separate security conferences, five sets of researchers presented proof-of-concept attacks on vehicles from multiple manufacturers plus an add-on device that spies on drivers for insurance companies, taking advantage of always-on cellular connectivity and other wireless vehicle communications to defeat security measures, gain access to vehicles, and—in three cases—gain access to the car’s internal network in a way that could take remote control of the vehicle in frightening ways.

While the automakers and telematics vendors with targeted products were largely receptive to this work—in most cases, they deployed fixes immediately that patched the attack paths found—not everything is happy in auto land. Not all of the vehicles that might be vulnerable (including vehicles equipped with the Mobile Devices telematics dongle) can be patched easily.


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AT&T Accepts Almost $3 Billion in Broadband Subsidies | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com

AT&T Accepts Almost $3 Billion in Broadband Subsidies | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T said Thursday it had accepted $428 million per year in the second tranche of Connect America Funding over six years ($2.6 billion), with an option for a seventh, which means potentially about $3 billion in funds to deliver broadband to more than 2.2 million people in high-cost areas in 18 states--it denied to take the money for which it was eligible in Missouri, Nevada and Oklahoma.

CenturyLink also accepted about $3 billion in funds over six years, the FCC said earlier Thursday. Together that is about two-thirds of the $9 million in CAF II funds available over that time period.

“AT&T’s acceptance of close to one-half billion dollars annually from the Connect America Fund represents a huge investment in broadband for its rural customers,” said FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in a statement. “This is one of the largest amounts accepted by any company.


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Discovery Launches Virtual Reality Initiative | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com

Discovery Launches Virtual Reality Initiative | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Discovery Communications is jumping into the virtual reality game with a new brand and a suite of cross-platform apps and services for iOS and Android devices, the Samsung Milk VR premium video service and on YouTube.

The new initiative, called Discovery VR, launched today with a slate of original content, show extensions and plans for additional short-form programming that will be offered across several platforms.


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FCC Schedules Vote on Contest Rules | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

FCC Schedules Vote on Contest Rules | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The FCC has scheduled a vote at its Sept. 17 meeting on the order, circulated Aug. 12, allowing broadcasters to put contest rules online, rather than having to put them on air in tiny screen type or rapid-fire oral descriptions on radio, but a proposed framework for third-party access to sensitive information in the Charter-Time Warner Cable merger remains in limbo even though it has three votes to approve.

That is according to a tentative agenda for that meeting. It has support from both Democrats and Republicans, so passage should not be a problem. The contest rules item was one of a series of Media Bureau items circulated by the chairman for a vote several weeks ago.

Expected to be voted before that meeting is an item launching a review of the definition of retransmission consent good faith negotiations, which has to begin by Sept. 4 per a congressional deadline.


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TN: Tiger Jones Technology Park Designated As AT&T Fiber Ready | MarketWatch.com

TN: Tiger Jones Technology Park Designated As AT&T Fiber Ready | MarketWatch.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As part of AT&T's continuing efforts to drive economic development and investment in Tennessee, AT&T and representatives from the Jackson Chamber of Commerce today announced that the Tiger Jones Technology Park in Jackson, Tenn., has been designated AT&T Fiber Ready.


The Tiger Jones Technology Park – the only site in Tennessee to be designated as an Enterprise Site – is the first park in Tennessee to receive AT&T's Fiber Ready designation.


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How the government helped end Dish, Sinclair TV blackouts Cecilia Kang | WashPost.com

How the government helped end Dish, Sinclair TV blackouts Cecilia Kang | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

On Wednesday morning, a contract squabble between Dish and Sinclair Broadcasting was poised to become a brutal and long battle that would deprive millions of TV viewers of local programming.

After all, the retransmission fees disputes between TV programmers and distributors have become commonplace in recent years and almost always lead to blackouts. And this dispute would be the biggest on record, affecting 129 television stations in 79 markets.

But this time, the Federal Communications Commission took the unusual step of intervening, the latest move by an activist communications agency that has become impatient of the private sector's business disputes.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler called representatives from both companies to the agency in Southwest Washington to hash out their differences. By the close of business, in remarkably short time, the two sides came to an agreement.


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FCC Intervenes to End Blackout of 129 Sinclair-Owned TV Stations on Dish Network | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

FCC Intervenes to End Blackout of 129 Sinclair-Owned TV Stations on Dish Network | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

More than five million Dish Network customers in 36 states can once again watch Sinclair-owned TV stations on the satellite service after the head of the Federal Communications Commission intervened to end the largest TV station blackout in U.S. history.

On Tuesday, Sinclair ordered its 129 stations to pull the plug on Dish subscribers after the satellite company failed to reach terms on extending its carriage agreement.

Dish accused Sinclair of “failing to negotiate in good faith” and noted the two companies had reached an agreement on a price to continue carrying the TV stations. What derailed the deal? Sinclair demanded Dish carry a new cable network focusing on high school and college sports it was planning to eventually launch. The TV station group owner also wanted to right to negotiate carriage contracts for another 23 stations Sinclair does not own, but operates under joint-sales agreements. Last March, the FCC prohibited such agreements but Sinclair believed its stations were grandfathered and not subject to the FCC’s ruling.


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Why Gogo's Infuriatingly Expensive, Slow Internet Still Owns the Skies | Sam Grobart | Bloomberg.com

Why Gogo's Infuriatingly Expensive, Slow Internet Still Owns the Skies | Sam Grobart | Bloomberg.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In the fall of 2008, Louis C.K. was a guest on Late Night with Conan O’Brien and delivered a soon-to-be-viral rant called “Everything’s Amazing and Nobody’s Happy.” It was about how we live in a time of mind-blowing technological achievement, and all we do is complain about it. His main source of amazement was—again, this was seven years ago—airplane Wi-Fi. He recounted his experience with it, how incredible it was to watch YouTube while soaring above the clouds, and how the network broke down minutes after passengers started using it. “The guy next to me says, ‘This is bulls---,” Louis tells O’Brien. “Like, how quickly the world owes him something he knew existed only 10 seconds ago!”

It’s a clip Michael Small knows well. “Oh sure,” he says. “That’s huge around here.” Small is the chief executive officer of Gogo, the largest in-flight Internet provider in the U.S. You might think an old comedy bit about in-flight Wi-Fi would be charmingly quaint; that most of the kinks would have been worked out by now and service would be fast and reliable. But you don’t think that. If you’ve flown for work on a major U.S. airline over the past five years, you’ve probably used Gogo, and “fast and reliable” are probably not how you’d describe it. More like “hell-sent and extortionate.”


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Coming Soon: Building on Our Progress of Broadband Investment and Competition | Jeffrey Zients | Benton Foundation

Coming Soon: Building on Our Progress of Broadband Investment and Competition | Jeffrey Zients | Benton Foundation | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it
Summary: The White House has received input from all federal agencies on new ways to promote broadband investment, deployment, and competition.

President Obama has led a sustained effort to improve and extend the Internet to every corner of the country and improve broadband speed and quality. And under his leadership, we’ve made major gains. Since 2009, 45 million more Americans have adopted broadband. We’ve expanded high-speed wireless to cover more than 98 percent of the American people. We’ve installed and upgraded over 114,000 miles of fiber as part of the Recovery Act. And we’ve stood up for net neutrality, so companies of all sizes have the ability to provide innovative products and services to customers around the world without unfair barriers being put in their way.


All this progress brings real benefits for American students, workers, and businesses. But we still have work to do. There are places where Internet access and digital content can be a game-changer, but where service just isn’t keeping up.


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Baltimore, MD Broadband Coordinator Hardebeck: Municipal broadband a 'distinct possibility' | Rick Seltzer | Baltimore Business Journal

Baltimore, MD Broadband Coordinator Hardebeck: Municipal broadband a 'distinct possibility' | Rick Seltzer | Baltimore Business Journal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Baltimore City could eventually offer municipal Internet service as it seeks to expand high-speed access, its first broadband coordinator said Wednesday.

Jason Hardebeck is stepping into the new role of city broadband coordinator after receiving Board of Estimates approval Wednesday morning. Hardebeck is a veteran of the technology and startup sectors who sold software company WhoGlue Inc. to Facebook in 2011 and then became executive director of the Greater Baltimore Technology Council. He more recently co-chaired Baltimore's Smarter City Task Force, which Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake called together to find ways to boost technology and broadband in the city.

It was the task force that recommended the creation of the broadband coordinator position. In taking on the role, Hardebeck will now oversee efforts to expand connectivity in Baltimore and make broadband access more affordable, Rawlings-Blake said.


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New Malware Attack Tries To Trick People By Pretending To Be EFF | Techdirt

New Malware Attack Tries To Trick People By Pretending To Be EFF | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has put out an alert noting that, as part of a larger spear phishing attack campaign, to try to gain control over computers, a group has created a fake EFF website, designed to trick people into thinking they're going to EFF's actual website, but really installing some pretty nasty malware.


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Kentucky Issues Bonds for Statewide Internet System | Shelly Sigo | BondBuyer.com

Kentucky Issues Bonds for Statewide Internet System | Shelly Sigo | BondBuyer.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Kentucky is financing a statewide high-speed Internet system in a first-of-its kind P3 deal that market participants said should offer higher yield to investors.

The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority, as conduit issuer, is pricing $230.05 million of 30-year tax exempt bonds Thursday.

Bond proceeds will be loaned to the concessionaire in the Bluegrass state's first availability payment public-private partnership.

Co-managers on the transaction are Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Barclays Capital Inc.

The funds will be used to construct the more than 3,200-mile-long, fiber-optic "middle mile" system, which is expected to have an overall cost of $324 million, according to state officials.

Kentucky's transaction "is a first-of-its-kind approach to broadband connectivity statewide," said Fitch analyst Daniel Adelman, making it a unique, first-generation telecommunications project.


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US tech policy needs real tech research behind it | FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez Op-Ed | Ars Technica

US tech policy needs real tech research behind it | FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez Op-Ed | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As the chief US agency charged with protecting consumer privacy, the Federal Trade Commission strives to help foster a marketplace where technology flourishes, while also ensuring that consumer privacy is safeguarded.

To do this, we need to ensure that we stay on top of the latest research in data security and privacy. We know that innovators need freedom to innovate, and we also know that consumers care deeply about their privacy, whether that involves mobile and online tracking or the collection of other personal data streams such as geolocation.

So how can the FTC better protect consumers and promote innovation as personalization, connected cars, health and fitness devices, and other technologies emerge? By making sure our work is informed by the best minds helping to drive the digital revolution.

We hear frequently from industry groups, consumer advocates, and government colleagues about policy issues. We also hear from technologists, but not as much as we'd like—we need more of them to weigh in on these important issues.

Policymakers need to ensure that privacy is respected while innovation flourishes, and technology academics and researchers are crucial to hitting that sweet spot.

To make this meeting of minds happen, the FTC is announcing a new forum called PrivacyCon, which aims to bring together leading privacy and security researchers with policymakers to present and discuss their latest findings. The FTC will host the first PrivacyCon in Washington, DC, on January 14.


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AT&T grudgingly accepts $428 million in annual government funding | Jon Brodkin | Ars Technica

AT&T grudgingly accepts $428 million in annual government funding | Jon Brodkin | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T has struck a deal with the US government to get nearly $428 million per year to bring 10Mbps Internet service to parts of rural America after protesting that it shouldn't have to provide speeds that fast.

The money comes from the Connect America Fund, which draws from surcharges on Americans' phone bills to pay for rural Internet service. AT&T accepted the money even though it argued last year that rural customers don't need Internet service better than the old standard of 4Mbps downstream and 1Mbps upstream. The FCC ignored AT&T's protests in December, raising the Connect America Fund download standard to 10Mbps while leaving the 1Mbps requirement unchanged.

Eight months later, AT&T is now willing to provide at least 10Mbps/1Mbps service to 1.1 million rural homes and businesses in 18 states in exchange for "$427,706,650 in annual, ongoing support from the Connect America Fund," yesterday's FCC announcement said. The FCC said this will bring broadband to 2.2 million customers, apparently assuming an average of two people for each home and business.


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Verizon Walks Away From $550M+ In Federal Broadband Money | CWA | SpeedMatters.org

Verizon Walks Away From $550M+ In Federal Broadband Money | CWA | SpeedMatters.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Verizon today became the only major U.S. telecommunications company to turn down federal funding to build broadband in unserved, primarily rural, communities, leaving many residents in eight states and the District of Columbia without access to vital communications options. The company was offered $568 million over six years by the Federal government to bring broadband to 270,000 locations in Washington, DC, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Virginia.

“Verizon’s track record is clear,” said Bob Master, Assistant to the Vice President of District One of the Communications Workers of America. “Even while raking in a billion dollars per month in profits, Verizon is turning its back on underserved communities by refusing federal subsidies to expand high-speed internet access. Instead, its top priority is slashing job and retirement security for its employees and eliminating benefits for workers injured on the job.”

In April, the Federal Communications Commission launched Phase II of the Connect America Fund. The FCC offered major telecommunications companies nearly $1.7 billion a year over six years to provide high-speed internet and voice to unserved, primarily rural, communities. The carriers had until August 27 to decide whether to participate. The program was based on the successful universal service program, which ensured telephone service was available in rural communities.

Verizon accepted funding for two states where it is selling its network to Frontier Communications and rejected funding in the other states it operates.


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CenturyLink accepts $54 million in CAF to improve service in Minnesota | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

Hot off the presses from the FCC…

CenturyLink Accepts Nearly $506 Million in Annual Support from Connect America Fund to Expand and Support Broadband for Over 2.3 Million Consumers in 33 States

WASHINGTON, August 27, 2015 – CenturyLink, Inc. has accepted $505,703,762 in annual, ongoing support from the Connect America Fund (CAF) to expand and support broadband for over 2.3 million of its rural customers.

The Connect America Fund support will enable CenturyLink (CL) to deliver broadband at speeds of at least 10 Mbps for downloads and 1 Mbps uploads to nearly 1.2 million homes and businesses in its rural service areas where the cost of broadband deployment might otherwise be prohibitive. “CenturyLink’s acceptance of over one-half billion dollars from the Connect America Fund represents a huge investment in broadband for its rural customers,” said FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. “This is the largest amount accepted by any company to date – and the opportunities that modern broadband will provide for the rural communities CenturyLink serves are priceless.”


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Uber adds lunch to its list of services in D.C. | Hayley Tsukayama | WashPost.com

Uber adds lunch to its list of services in D.C. | Hayley Tsukayama | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Feeling hungry...but lazy? Tied up at your desk with no time for a decent lunch? Put the change for the vending machine away and pull out your smartphone instead. As of now, you can call up your meal with a tap of your Uber app.

UberEats, Uber's on-demand food delivery service, launched in Washington on Tuesday. Lunchtime, according to Uber, is between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. on weekdays; the D.C. delivery area stretches from Dupont Circle and Downtown to Capitol Hill. The food should arrive in 10 minutes or less, according to the UberEats Web site.


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Alaska Communications partners with Akeela for telehealth | DJ Summers | Alaska Journal of Commerce

In yet another movement into telehealth space, Alaska Communications Systems Group Inc. has partnered with Alaska behavioral health facility Akeela to provide remote care to rural patients.

“With these relationships, we demonstrate how we work with customers to understand their needs, and then design, custom build and manage complex network solutions,” wrote Alaska Communications Senior Vice President Bill Bishop in an email. “We’re proud to say our track record of providing secure, reliable connections to clinics across Alaska means we’re improving access to health care, improving the quality of care, and reducing costs for our new partners at Chugachmiut, JAMHI and Akeela.”

In July, Alaska Communications partnered with the Juneau Alliance for Mental Health, Inc., or JAMHI, and Sitka Community Hospital to provide the equipment and necessary bandwidth to give rural patients behavioral and primary healthcare access.


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Savings that telecom expense management providers miss | Theresa Knutson, Julie Gardner & Janis Stephens | NetworkWorld

Savings that telecom expense management providers miss | Theresa Knutson, Julie Gardner & Janis Stephens | NetworkWorld | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If you use a Telecom Expense Management (TEM) provider to audit your telecommunications invoices, you may be in for a surprise. TEM providers claim to catch all supplier billing errors and overcharges. They don’t. In fact, often what they miss is bigger than what they find.

We’ve spent much of the past decade coming in behind the TEMs, finding the overcharges they’ve missed, and turning them into client refunds. We have found something in every post-TEM audit we’ve completed. After creating our master issues list, we were struck by the diverse nature of the errors the three of us have uncovered at one time or another. Here are some of our favorites:


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