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Now that’s “fast” roadside assistance: AT&T’s LTE will power GM’s OnStar | GigaOM Tech News

Now that’s “fast” roadside assistance: AT&T’s LTE will power GM’s OnStar | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

General Motors’ OnStar system is going to get a turbo boost. AT&T and GM revealed at Mobile World Congress that starting in 2015 the automaker would embed LTE chips in millions of vehicles allowing them to connect back to AT&T’s 4G network. The deal would add considerable heft to the typical OnStar connection, which today utilize 2G connections.

 

GM said it would use the increased bandwidth to offer new infotainment features such as audio and video streaming direct to the car in addition to the usual complement of OnStar navigation, security and emergency services.

 

The deal is a bit puzzling because it contradicts the bring-your-connectivity strategy GM has adopted of late. While GM cars are all linked via cellular networks for its low-bandwidth telematics services, GM has relied on it customer’s smartphones to provide the heftier connections necessary to support infotainment services.

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LTE-A Now Live on More Than 20 Networks Around the Globe | Dan Jones | Light Reading

LTE-A Now Live on More Than 20 Networks Around the Globe | Dan Jones | Light Reading | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

There are now more than 20 networks with LTE-Advanced live around the globe, and that number could double by the end of 2015.

Chris Pearson, the president of the 4G Americas trade group, told Light Reading recently that he expects the number of live LTE-A networks to at least double by the end of the year. The early deployments are in North America, parts of Asia and North America.

The Global Mobile Suppliers Association (GSA) , meanwhile, said this week that 79 operators have launched or are deploying or trialing LTE-Advanced technologies in their networks. It says there are 21 networks worldwide with LTE-Advanced features switched on now.

Clearly, 2015 will be a year of growth for LTE-A networks and services around the world. As 4G Americas' Pearson says, 4G LTE still has "a lot of road," with LTE-Advanced and other updates such as VoLTE now starting to go live.


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North Kansas City Residents Get 1 Gbps Free (After $300 Fee) | Karl Bode | DSLReports.com

North Kansas City Residents Get 1 Gbps Free (After $300 Fee) | Karl Bode | DSLReports.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Residents of North Kansas City are unable to get Google Fiber, but they will soon have the option of getting 1 Gbps connections for free from another company -- after an initial $300 installation fee.


Earlier this month the City Council of North Kansas City voted to approve a 10-year agreement with DataShack for the operation of the city's liNKCity fiber optic network. While the taxpayer-funded network will still collect revenue from business, it will soon offer 1 Gbps connections for free to residential customers after a $300 installation fee (users also have the option of paying $100 for 100 Mbps or $50 for 50 Mbps), after which they won't pay another dime for a decade.


"For the longest time, our taxpayers have been paying in to fund liNKCity," states liNKCity's Mellissa Hopkins. "We decided it was the right time to give something back to our residents."

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FirstNet Releases RFI, Budget | GovTech.com

FirstNet Releases RFI, Budget | GovTech.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet), an independent authority within the National Telecommunications and Information Administration that's responsible for deploying the nation’s first unified communications network for first responders, took three steps forward on Sept. 17. The FirstNet board released a public notice, a request for information (RFI), and a budget for fiscal 2015.

The released public notice and RFI are both intended to enrich the development of the nationwide network and ensure FirstNet’s objectives are in line with the legal requirements and technical capabilities of the telecommunications industry. The public notice reportedly serves to reach a wider audience through publication in the Federal Register.


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Cox Insists Selective 1 Gbps Deployments 'Not Cherry Picking' | Karl Bode | DSLReports.com

Cox Insists Selective 1 Gbps Deployments 'Not Cherry Picking' | Karl Bode | DSLReports.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Cox Communications says the company is on schedule to deploy 1 Gbps services in the Phoenix area sometime before the end of the year.


Back in May Cox announced that they'd soon offer 1 Gbps fiber in parts of Phoenix, Las Vegas and Omaha, with most of the company's other areas getting such speeds starting in 2016 once the DOCSIS 3.1 standard sees commercial launch.


Despite the fact the speeds, like most 1 Gbps deployments, will only be made available to very select areas, Cox insists to Multichannel News that they aren't cherry picking:


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FCC's Wheeler: We Shouldn't Subsidize Broadband Slower Than 10 Mbps | Karl Bode | DSLReports.com

FCC's Wheeler: We Shouldn't Subsidize Broadband Slower Than 10 Mbps | Karl Bode | DSLReports.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In a speech made yesterday before the U.S House of Representatives Committe on Small Business, FCC boss Tom Wheeler declared that the United States should stop funding the deployment of any speeds slower than 10 Mbps downstream. The speech is part of Wheeler's recent push to raise the minimum broadband definition from 4 Mbps down, 1 Mbps up -- something that has been greeted with a significant amount of hand-wringing from incumbent ISPs.

In his speech yesterday, Wheeler put forth his case that if you're going to subsidize broadband deployment, you should at least get speeds in tune with modern consumer needs. Ars Technica notes that Wheeler hammered this point home in a subsequent Q&A on Capitol Hill.

"When 60 percent of the Internet’s traffic at prime time is video, and it takes 4 or 5Mbps to deliver video, a 4Mbps connection isn’t exactly what’s necessary in the 21st century," said Wheeler.

"And when you have half a dozen different devices, wireless and other connected devices in a home that are all going against that bandwidth, it’s not enough. What we are saying is we can’t make the mistake of spending the people’s money, which is what Universal Service is, to continue to subsidize something that’s subpar."


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FCC's Wheeler: Minimum Broadband Definition Should be 10 to 25 Mbps | Karl Bode | DSLReports.com

FCC's Wheeler: Minimum Broadband Definition Should be 10 to 25 Mbps | Karl Bode | DSLReports.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler spoke to Multichannel News in an interview that touches on a number of subjects, covering everything from net neutrality and the reclassification of ISPs under Title II, to the possible renaming of the Washington Redskins. Wheeler doesn't show his hand on most of the subjects related to neutrality and Title II, given the agency is still fielding comments (and about to have a series of roundtable discussions on the matter over the next two months.

Wheeler was however willing to talk a little bit about the FCC's push to raise the current minimum broadband definition of 4 Mbps down, 1 Mbps up. According to Wheeler, he's aiming for at least 10 Mbps down (for rural, subsidized deployments) and 25 Mbps in most developed markets:


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PACER Finally Agrees To Put Back Court Documents That Were Deleted | Mike Masnick | Techdirt.com

PACER Finally Agrees To Put Back Court Documents That Were Deleted | Mike Masnick | Techdirt.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Sooner or later this had to happen. Back in August, with no warning, the PACER electronic court document system, overseen by the Administrative Office of the judicial system, announced that as part of an "upgrade" it had deleted a bunch of cases.


Once this started getting some attention, officials gave a weak, nonsensical "explanation" for why no one could figure out how to take some PDFs and move them to the new system. As for why it couldn't work with many, many public-service oriented archivers -- who all offered to host the deleted works -- no answer was ever given.


Recently, however, Congress started to ask questions, and then all of a sudden the Administrative Office decided to wake up to the fact that this was a bad idea. The missing documents will soon be back.


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Comcast Extends Free 6 Months of Internet Essentials Offer An Extra 10 Days As Regulators Ponder Merger | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

Comcast Extends Free 6 Months of Internet Essentials Offer An Extra 10 Days As Regulators Ponder Merger | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As regulators ponder Comcast’s application to acquire Time Warner Cable, the issue of affordable Internet has been a hot topic as part of the merger review. So it is no surprise Comcast has announced it is extending its recent offer of six free months of Internet Essentials service to income-challenged families with school age children an extra 10 days.

“On August 4th, we made a special announcement: we are offering any family that has not yet signed up for Internet Essentials, up to six months of free service, if they apply before September 20th,” said Comcast executive vice president David Cohen on Comcast’s blog. “Today, I’m thrilled to announce we’re going to extend that offer through Tuesday, September 30th.”

Comcast admits that only families that have never applied for Internet Essentials in the past can receive free service. Those already enrolled or who attempted to enroll in the past do not qualify.

The cable company does not make participation easy and is intent on protecting the revenue it earns selling regularly priced Internet service by keeping current customers out of the Internet Essentials program.

Just qualifying for Internet Essentials requires navigating an obstacle course:


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Letter from the Resilient Region to the Minnesota Broadband Task Force | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

I wanted to share the following – an impassioned request from the Resilient Region to the Minnesota Broadband Task Force…

On behalf of the Resilient Region theme champions and the public/private health care providers working with us on the telehealth project funded by the Blandin Foundation, I wish to share our request to have the Governor’s Broadband Task Force consider looking into the issues of Reimbursement Parity for Telehealth, Interstate Licensure, and Tele-Home Monitoring.

August 18, 2014


Dear Senator Klobuchar, Senator Franken, and Members of the Governor’s Broadband Task Force,


On behalf of the Region V Virtual Highway Taskforce, we are asking you to resolve the following issues surrounding telehealth, in order to provide more effective and efficient healthcare services in our rural areas:


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Newest Androids will join iPhones in offering default encryption, blocking police | Craig Timberg | WashPost.com

Newest Androids will join iPhones in offering default encryption, blocking police | Craig Timberg | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The next generation of Google’s Android operating system, due for release next month, will encrypt data by default for the first time, the company said Thursday, raising yet another barrier to police gaining access to the troves of personal data typically kept on smartphones.

Android has offered optional encryption on some devices since 2011, but security experts say few users have known how to turn on the feature. Now Google is designing the activation procedures for new Android devices so that encryption happens automatically; only somebody who enters a device's password will be able to see the pictures, videos and communications stored on those smartphones.

The move offers Android, the world’s most popular operating system for smartphones, a degree of protection that resembles what Apple on Wednesday began providing for iPhones, the leading rival to devices running Android operating systems. Both companies have now embraced a form of encryption that in most cases will make it impossible for law enforcement officials to collect evidence from smartphones – even when authorities get legally binding search warrants.

“For over three years Android has offered encryption, and keys are not stored off of the device, so they cannot be shared with law enforcement,” said company spokeswoman Niki Christoff. “As part of our next Android release, encryption will be enabled by default out of the box, so you won't even have to think about turning it on.”


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Interference on the Line | Joan Marsh | AT&T Public Policy Blog

In May, the FCC issued a comprehensive incentive auction framework order that represented a substantial step toward a successful auction. While the order resolved many open issues, it also set the stage for a series of new ones and the published list of follow-on proceedings made clear that significant work remains to be done.

Of the open issues, the one that is of greatest concern for auction success is the service rules that will be adopted for the unlicensed services that the FCC has concluded should be permitted in the 600 MHz duplex gap. In the order, the FCC expressed confidence that unlicensed TVWS (TV white space) devices can operate in a 6 MHz channel in the duplex gap adjacent to a 4 MHz licensed wireless microphone channel without causing interference to neighboring licensed allocations. The FCC further tentatively concluded that unlicensed devices operating at 40 mWs were viable, even with no separation from licensed wireless uplink. Importantly, the order contained no technical analysis supporting this conclusion, leaving open the question of how these proposals were justified.

The Commission, however, correctly concluded that, consistent with the Spectrum Act, use of the guard bands would be subject to the Commission’s ultimate determination that such use will not cause harmful interference to licensed services. We agree that such a determination is essential – interference issues that were left unresolved in the 700 MHz band plan created significant post-auction deployment challenges. Indeed, the 700 MHz A block remains significantly under-deployed even today, six years after the auction.


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World Wide Web inventor slams Internet fast lanes: ‘It’s bribery.’ | Brian Fung | WashPost.com

World Wide Web inventor slams Internet fast lanes: ‘It’s bribery.’ | Brian Fung | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A quarter-century ago, Timothy Berners-Lee designed the world's first Web browser and server, kicking off a thing that people started calling the World Wide Web.

In a visit to The Washington Post, on Thursday, Berners-Lee said that system is now in danger from Internet service providers (ISPs) who stand to amass too much power over what was intentionally built as a decentralized network — one where no single actor could dictate outcomes to everyone else.

Berners-Lee pushed back against opponents of net neutrality regulation who argue that applying new rules on ISPs is tantamount to regulating the Internet. There's a difference between regulating providers of broadband and the services that run on top of it, said Berners-Lee. Strong net neutrality rules would help preserve that line dividing the two and limit the incentive of ISPs to meddle in the market for services.

"A lot of congressmen say, 'Well, sign up for the free market' and feel that it's just something you should leave to go by itself," said Berners-Lee. "Well yeah, the market works well so long as nobody prints money. So we have rules, okay? You don't steal stuff, for example. The U.S. dollar is something that everyone relies on. So the government keeps the dollar a stable thing, nobody steals stuff, and then you can rely on the free market."

When Berners-Lee built the Web, he took the telephone wire coming out of his wall, plugged it into his computer and could instantly connect to any other computer. He didn't have to ask his telephone company's permission to introduce a new feature, he said.

But the rules currently being deliberated by the Federal Communications Commission, which would tacitly allow ISPs to charge content companies for priority access to consumers, would change how easily inventors can spread their ideas. In such a future, Berners-Lee warned, new technologies and companies might crop up faster in other countries if services were forced to "bribe" their way to success.


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Malicious advertisements distributed by DoubleClick, Zedo networks | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com

Malicious advertisements distributed by DoubleClick, Zedo networks | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Two online advertising networks, Google’s DoubleClick and Zedo, have been delivering malicious advertisements that could install malware on a person’s computer, according to the security vendor Malwarebytes.


The Times of Israel, The Jerusalem Post and the Last.fm music services were among the websites serving the malicious advertisements, wrote Jerome Segura, a senior security researcher with Malwarebytes, in a blog post.

“We rarely see attacks on a large scale like this,” he wrote.

Although ad networks try to filter out malicious ones, occasionally bad ones slip in, which on a high-traffic site means a large pool of potential victims. Websites that serve the ads are usually unaware of the problem.

“What is important to remember is that legitimate websites entangled in this malvertising chain are not infected,” Segura wrote. “The problem comes from the ad network agency itself.”

DoubleClick and Zedo officials couldn’t immediately be reached for comment.


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FCC: E-Rate Reforms Could Bring Wi-Fi to Every Student in Five Years | Joan Engebretson | Telecompetitor.com

FCC: E-Rate Reforms Could Bring Wi-Fi to Every Student in Five Years | Joan Engebretson | Telecompetitor.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The FCC estimates that 10.5 million students per year could gain Internet connectivity inside their schools if the commission moves ahead with E-Rate reforms outlined in July. Within five years, all U.S. schools would have internal Internet connectivity, the FCC says.

The E-Rate program is an element of the Universal Service program administered by the FCC and funded by the telecom industry. In July the commission adopted an order that phases out E-Rate support for voice services and shifts funding toward internal connectivity, which most likely would take the form of Wi-Fi.

The FCC’s five-year internal connections estimate assumes E-Rate funding levels remain the same, that a total of $1 billion per year is directed toward internal connectivity and that the amount of support per student is capped at $150. If funding per student were not capped, fewer than four million new students per year would gain internal connectivity, the FCC said.

According to the FCC proposal, schools would be required to contribute at least 15% of the cost of a Wi-Fi deployment – up from a 10% level today.


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AT&T's Stankey: The wireline portion of Project VIP is on track | Sean Buckley | FierceTelecom.com

AT&T's Stankey: The wireline portion of Project VIP is on track | Sean Buckley | FierceTelecom.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

AT&T is on track with completing the upgrades to its last mile network to support both new U-verse video and broadband customers and new fiber-based connections as part of its Project VIP initiative.

That was the message at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Media, Communications and Entertainment Conference, where John Stankey, group president and chief strategy officer for AT&T, told investors that it still has work to do on the wireline portion.

"We're on pace with everything we said we wanted to do on the business side with fiber to the building," Stankey said. "We're on pace with everything we said we wanted to do in additional U-verse coverage as well as additional broadband coverage on the consumer side."

While he did not provide specific numbers, Stankey said that the company is seeing positive take-up of fiber-based business services and U-verse services in the areas it rolled out service.

"The penetration assumptions we made in the business case are tracking to our expectations," Stankey said. "The ARPUs are tracking to our expectations and in some cases we're ahead of plan so we feel really good that the validation of investing in broadband and investing in additional bandwidth and infrastructure was the right thing to do and is bearing the fruits we need to do with it."

One of the key elements of driving out costs in the Project VIP initiative is its ongoing migration of business customers from TDM to IP-based services.


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Silicon Valley has a proud record on innovation, a shameful one on equality | Jesse Jackson Op Ed | The Guardian

Silicon Valley has a proud record on innovation, a shameful one on equality | Jesse Jackson Op Ed | The Guardian | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A new climate of change, hope and progress is now gripping Silicon Valley and the hi-tech industry. Inclusion and equal opportunity in the technology industry are the 21st-century civil rights imperatives. They are today's dynamic, disruptive change agents reshaping the culture and character of the hi-tech industry.

Technology is supposed to be about innovation, opportunity and inclusion, but, sadly, patterns of exclusion remain the order of the day. In fact, the tech industry is perhaps America's worst industry when it comes to inclusion and diversity.

Rainbow Push, the social justice organisation I founded, has brought this message to the industry through direct participation and speaking at the shareholder meetings of HP, eBay, Facebook and Google. What we've been saying is that Silicon Valley is America's valley: built through American R&D, American education, American tax credits and tax havens. It should reflect America's best values and principles.

We also focused on the hard data documenting the race and gender composition of the tech industry's workforce, challenging an industry that staunchly resisted efforts to reveal data about minority participation in the industry. In 2010 and 2013, major technology companies successfully went to court to prevent the release of such data.

Since Rainbow Push launched its digital connections initiative in March of this year, these same companies, including Google, Apple, Linkedin, Yahoo, Salesforce and Pandora, have now released it.

The facts don't lie: black people comprise just 1–2% of the tech workforce of most companies, Latinos just 2–4%. Women lag far behind men. But we've gone from resistance to release, creating an unprecedented climate of transparency. The industry is now facing up to the sobering facts on inclusion and diversity and moving to change them.


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1 Gbps-enabled communities have higher GDP, says FTTH Council study | Sean Buckley | FierceTelecom.com

1 Gbps-enabled communities have higher GDP, says FTTH Council study | Sean Buckley | FierceTelecom.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Communities that have a service provider that offers a 1 Gbps fiber-based broadband service have per capita GDP that's 1.1 percent higher than other communities that have either little or no gigabit services present, says the Fiber to the Home (FTTH) Council Americas, citing a new study.

The study, which was conducted by financial and strategy firm Analysis Group, examined 55 communities in nine states, finding a positive impact on economic activity in the 14 communities where gigabit services are widely available.

However, the 41 communities in the study that did not have gigabit broadband service available "likely experienced forgone GDP in 2012 of as much as $3.3 billion."

"The study results suggest that gigabit broadband communities exhibit a per capita GDP approximately 1.1 percent higher than the similar communities with little to no availability of gigabit services," said FTTH Council President Heather B. Gold in a release. "In dollar terms, this suggests that the 14 gigabit broadband communities studied enjoyed approximately $1.4 billion in additional GDP when gigabit broadband became widely available."


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Canada Appears To Be Split On Whether To Extend Culture Tax To Internet Services | Tim Geigner | Techdirt.com

Canada Appears To Be Split On Whether To Extend Culture Tax To Internet Services | Tim Geigner | Techdirt.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As you may or may not be aware, Canada, similar to many European countries, has what is commonly referred to as a "culture tax." The idea is that Canadian broadcasters must pay into a platform specifically used to fund Canadian content, lest Canada be overrun with the sweet, delicious programming offered by 'Merica. I mean, we've got, like, eight different shows that revolve around singing/dancing competitions, and some of them even include celebrities you've never heard of!


You can't resist that kind of thing, right? Well, as you can imagine, the television broadcasters to our north have noticed how much content is now delivered on the internet, having previously asked for regulators to likewise tax ISPs. Now, they, as well as some in government, have their sights set on companies like Netflix as well.

At the “Let’s Talk TV” hearings now underway before Canada’s broadcast regulator, provincial governments like Ontario and Quebec have argued that Netflix should be subject to the levy. The country’s powerful cable industry and the national broadcaster, the CBC, have made the same arguments, arguing that companies like Netflix and iTunes should not get a free pass when their own services must pay for Canadian content.

It's a good point because...wait, no, it isn't a good point at all. The internet isn't television, Netflix isn't a "channel", and iTunes isn't radio. Are they places where culture, both foreign and domestic, are distributed? Well, sure, but then again so are a great many other things. Shall we tax Steam to help Canadians produce more Canadian video games? Amazon for more Canadian books? Hell, some of those levies may already be in place, but that doesn't mean they make sense.


Frustratingly, the Canadian broadcasters aren't making the argument they should be making: in a hyper-connected world where content distribution is varied, global, and fast, taxing anyone to prop up local content is at best a losing battle and likely entirely worthless. How about just making good content that Canadians and (gasp!) international communities want to get?


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How Medieval-Style Guilds Will Remake the Tech Behind Facebook and Google | Cade Metz | WIRED.com

How Medieval-Style Guilds Will Remake the Tech Behind Facebook and Google |  Cade Metz | WIRED.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In his native England, James Pearce says, the guilds are everywhere.

Drawing on a practice that dates back to medieval times, a guild is a group of craftspeople or merchants who’ve banded together because they all do the same thing. One guild is for vintners, another for masons, and so on. There are hundreds of guilds across England, Pearce says, and each provides a way for craftspeople to share certain tricks of their craft. The members of a guild come together, he explains, to “figure out how best to run their trades,” to hone their operations in ways they couldn’t hone them on their own.

So, when Pearce was named the head of open source at Facebook, charged with overseeing the vast collection of open source software that helps run one of the largest online operations on earth, he felt that something was missing. “When I took over the Facebook open source portfolio, I was waiting for the invite,” he says. “I was like: ‘Is someone going to invite me to the open source guild?’”

This is played for laughs. But Pearce felt a very real need for something akin to an open source software guild, so much so that he and Facebook have now started one. Known as TODO, this new group made its debut yesterday at an event for hardcore web engineers hosted by Facebook, and it spans some of the biggest names in tech, including Google, Twitter, Dropbox, and GitHub. In one sense, this is a small thing. But in the long run, given the egalitarian nature of open source software, it could benefit practically any company that relies on computer code.


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Consumers Need Greater Internet Access and Faster Broadband Speeds | Fred Pilot | Eldo Telecom

Consumers Need Greater Internet Access and Faster Broadband Speeds | Fred Pilot | Eldo Telecom | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Consumers Need Greater Internet Access and Faster Broadband Speeds: Washington, D.C. – The Internet Association submitted comments to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) today calling on the agency to implement pro-consumer policies to bring faster and better broadband service to all Americans, promote competition and choice in the broadband market, and protect an open Internet.

“The Internet is an indispensable tool that is necessary to stay competitive globally, and the Commission has a mandate to ensure the deployment of advanced broadband services nationwide,” said Michael Beckerman, President and CEO of The Internet Association. “Access to high speed Internet service is not a luxury in today’s economy. It is a necessity. Policymakers must encourage broadband abundance and ensure high speed Internet service is deployed everywhere.”

Of course there is little competition at the network edge controlled by incumbent legacy telephone and cable companies because the microeconomics make it a natural monopoly or duopoly with little incentive to invest in upgrades and expansions.

If the Internet Association wants to see the edge upgraded and expanded to fiber to the premise (FTTP) infrastructure needed to create the abundance it wants, it will have to build that infrastructure as its member company Google is doing with its Google Fiber unit.

But as an open access network. The incumbent telephone and cable companies would be hard pressed to respond. But they too could win in the end with open access FTTP since they could offer services to customers over it.

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Planning for More BYOD Laws | Tech Spotlight | Gil Cattelain | Mobile Enterprise

Planning for More BYOD Laws | Tech Spotlight | Gil Cattelain | Mobile Enterprise | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It's not news to anyone in business or IT that BYOD and resulting device policies are becoming more and more common. Gartner recently predicted that half of companies will require employees to bring their own device by 2017.

However, the California Court of Appeal took BYOD policy to a new level a few weeks ago, when they ruled that companies are required to reimburse employees "a reasonable percentage of their cellphone bills" if employees use personal devices for work.

As the ruling stands today, only business-related phone calls made on personal devices are impacted, but there is very real concern that applications, file storage and data will be impacted soon.

Many industry experts are asking questions and sharing their opinions regarding where the future of BYOD management is headed.

Forrester analyst David Johnson said "just about anything an employee has to spend money on should be included, including software, file sharing services, and even Skype."

There are varying approaches to handling business versus personal costs if devices become more regulated, or if the ruling spreads to additional states. Similar legislation would be unsurprising, and California's status as a tech hub means the ruling is important to many, and will be carefully watched.

The situation leaves us to examine how affected companies will manage or reimburse their workers’ calls.


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FL: Fiber to the Press Release: Atlantic Broadband Announces 1Gbps in Miami… For 40 Homes | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

FL: Fiber to the Press Release: Atlantic Broadband Announces 1Gbps in Miami… For 40 Homes | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

More people will read this story than Atlantic Broadband has current customers for its 1Gbps broadband project in Miami.


“Atlantic Broadband is proud to be the first company to deliver 1 Gigabit Internet service to its customers here in the Miami Beach area,” said David Keefe, Atlantic Broadband’s senior vice president and general manager of the South Florida region. “While other companies are talking about what they will be doing, Atlantic Broadband moved forward and started offering this service in one of its communities. We look forward to extending access to our Gigabit Internet service to other properties and communities within our Miami footprint.”


Although Mr. Keefe isn’t being modest, his company’s gigabit broadband coverage area certainly is.


At present, the company serves just 40 properties with the super high-speed broadband service in high-income Indian Creek Village — the 8th richest community in the United States.


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AT&T & Verizon: We have enough capacity so spectrum isn't a big issue | Dave Burstein | Fast Net News

Ralph de la Vega & Lowell McAdam are pros. More spectrum makes adding capacity cheaper but any wireless engineer can tell you the "spectrum crisis" is political bunkum. This week at Goldman Sachs, CEO McAdam of Verizon and President de la Vega of AT&T made clear they can move forward whether or not they get more spectrum.


That confirms what the previous Verizon CEO Ivan Seidenberg and AT&T's John Stankey had said in 2009. Both were comfident they'd do just fine. Five years later, their average customer speed on LTE is about 15 megabits, ten times as high as 2009.

Ralph, one of the most respected executives in the business, told investors "We feel really good about where we are. ... we don't have this burning desire for the need of coverage or for other reasons to go aggressively after Wi-Fi. Other operators that may have less coverage or have other needs, may pursue it more aggressively." Both Verizon and AT&T have boxed in the unused capacity of their customers DSL & fiber connections. Turning it on would add ?30%-50% more capacity in territory.

Lowell, a trained engineer, "We have a lot of AWS spectrum, We have great capacity in place. We’re densifying the network with either small cells or LTE unlicensed. So the network has the capacity. ... We have the assets in place. I don’t think we need a heckuva lot more. ... It goes a long way beyond just getting the spectrum. ... Always looking for efficiency. The small cell technology being deployed gives us a lot more capacity. ... WiFi is a critical part of the ecosystem managing the network. Using unlicensed spectrum is going to be important for us as we go forward. We intend to deploy LTE-U with the small cell technology, integrate it within the wider macro network, There are many dynamics that are involved in being more efficient. ,,, Even working with content providers to make sure you have the right formats to put less load on the networks."

"We expect to see capex as a % of revenue to fall. I hope it continues at least at the absolute level," confirms that Verizon is not squeezed.


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3.8 Gigabit LTE. 3.8 Gigabit? Just a demo, but definitely feasible | Dave Burstein | Fast Net News

3.8 Gigabit LTE. 3.8 Gigabit? Just a demo, but definitely feasible | Dave Burstein | Fast Net News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Masayoshi Son at Sprint or Korea Telecom in Rwanda could deliver a gigabit in a few years. Nokia used 200 MHz, about 5 times the spectrum advanced carriers are using today, and achieved about 15 times the performance of today's better networks. Nokia has just demonstrated 3.8 gigabits, as you can see in this video. http://bit.ly/Nokia38

A team at Rice & Cornell Universities have designed a chip they believe will support a similar 3.8 gigabits in only 100 MHz, the amount of spectrum available to Sprint as well as most of Latin America and Africa. (Note below) Henry Samueli of Broadcom in a Marconi webinar predicted chips like that. Since 2011 and 3GPP release 10, every informed wireless engineer has known speeds will pass a gigabit (shared) on many commercial networks.


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Local Tennessee Communities Rally Behind Chattanooga's EPB | Lisa Gonzalez | community broadband networks

Local Tennessee Communities Rally Behind Chattanooga's EPB | Lisa Gonzalez | community broadband networks | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As the FCC contemplates the fate of the Chattanooga EPB's ability to expand to surrounding communities, some of those Tennessee communities are publicly announcing their support.


The Town of Kimball and Marion County, both part of the Chattanooga metro area, have passed resolutions asking state legislators to reconsider Tennessee's anti-muni law.


The Times Free Press reports that Kimball's Board of Mayor and Alderman unanimously and officially asked their state officials to introduce legislation enabling local authority. They requested action as early as the next legisaltive session.


Marion County passed a similar resolution in August - also unanimously. According to Kimball's City Attorney Bill Gouger:


"It is a situation where there are providers out there who would like to extend fiber-optic cable and high-speed Internet-type systems throughout our county," Gouger said. "The simple fact is, right now, our state laws make that really difficult to do, if not impossible."


County Mayor David Jackson is reaching out to the other municipalities in Marion County to increase support. From the article:


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