Surfing the Broad...
Follow
Find
76.9K views | +158 today
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

TN: Pole question: How much should MLGW charge Comcast for attaching wires? | The Commercial Appeal

TN: Pole question: How much should MLGW charge Comcast for attaching wires? | The Commercial Appeal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Memphis Light, Gas & Water Division and Comcast are locked in a no-holds-barred fight over pole rent.

 

For three months now, MLGW has effectively blocked Comcast’s expansion of service in Memphis and Shelby County until the cable company agrees to pay about $24 per pole per year, up from about $12.

 

The broadband communications company has countered by seeking, with the help of its industry trade association, new legislation in the Tennessee General Assembly that would establish a fair-market rent and have administrative law judges settle any disputes.

 

Comcast is dropping verbal bombs, too. LGW’s actions are “borderline criminal,” John Gauder, Comcast’s area vice president, told The Commercial Appeal Tuesday. The utility is “monopolistic” and “anti-consumer” and “anti-Shelby County resident,’’ he said.

 

Comcast attaches its wires to 93,000 utility poles owned by LG&W, but continues to pay $12.43 per pole yearly instead of the $24.75 other telecommunications companies have agreed to pay, said LGW president and CEO Jerry Collins.

 

“We have been very nice to allow them to continue to use the poles without benefit of a contract for a five-year period,” Collins said. But he added it’s wrong for LGW to continue to discriminate in Comcast’s favor.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Mexico: Carlos Slim's America Movil to trim assets in the face of tough pro-competition laws | TeleGeography.com

Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim’s America Movil (AM) has announced plans to sell assets in Mexico, with a view to lowering its market share, in order to cease being a ‘preponderant economic agent’. The move comes at a time when Mexico’s Congress is busy passing new laws to overhaul the telecoms sector and bolster competition.


The telco notes that as-yet unspecified assets ‘must be sold at market conditions at their commercial value’. Further, all of the company’s base stations, including towers and related passive infrastructure, ‘will be separated from Telcel for their corresponding operation and commercialisation to all interested parties’.


Slim’s company has frequently argued that the difficulties rivals face in competing with America Movil are down to their lack of investment. The company’s statement continues: ‘America Movil’s investments in Mexico and Latin America have been instrumental in the expansion of its telecommunications network and services, and have resulted in America Movil having the most advanced technology. These investments have resulted in important and continuous productivity increases which have been passed on to our clients.’


America Movil said its board approved the measures to cut its market share to less than 50%, which is the threshold for dominance under the new telecoms laws.


According to TeleGeography’s GlobalComms Database, as of 31 March 2014 America Movil subsidiary Telcel controlled 70.6% of the Mexican mobile market, while sister company Telmex occupied 64.2% of the broadband market and over 90% of the wireline sector.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

We Join Dozens of Organizations and Businesses to Protest TPP Copyright Proposals | EFF.org

We Join Dozens of Organizations and Businesses to Protest TPP Copyright Proposals | EFF.org | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Today, EFF and its partners in the global Our Fair Deal coalition join together with an even more diverse international network of creators, innovators, start-ups, educators, libraries, archives and users to release two new open letters to negotiators of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).


The TPP, although characterized as a free trade agreement, is actually far broader in its intended scope. Amongst many changes to which it could require the twelve negotiating countries to agree are a slate of increased rights and privileges for copyright rights holders.


With no official means of participating in the negotiations, the global community of users and innovators who will be affected by these proposed changes have been limited to expressing their concerns through open letters to their political representatives and to the officials negotiating the agreement.


Each of the two open letters released today focuses on a separate element of the heightened copyright regime that the TPP threatens to introduce, and is endorsed by a separate groups of signatories representing those most deeply impacted by the proposed changes in each case.


Click headline to read more and access hot links to the two letters--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Rupert Murdoch Reportedly Interested In Buying Time Warner, Creating A Terrifying Corporate Super-Monster | HuffPost.com

Rupert Murdoch Reportedly Interested In Buying Time Warner, Creating A Terrifying Corporate Super-Monster | HuffPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Rupert Murdoch, who already controls one of the world's biggest conglomerates, has expressed interest in buying Time Warner, another one of the world's biggest conglomerates, according to a Reuters article on Monday.


The wire service reported that, as he gears up for the annual Sun Valley conference in Idaho, Murdoch is casting about to make a big new purchase. One big rumor? That he has his eyes on Time Warner:


"Murdoch's interest in Time Warner despite its $62 billion market value has been the subject of industry speculation. He still covets the owner of HBO, among other potential targets, according to a former News Corp employee told by executives recently about Murdoch's interest."


The company that would be formed by the combination of Murdoch's empire and Time Warner's holdings would be bigger than big. It would be a mega-colossus, a giant of almost unimaginable proportions.

If Murdoch were to successfully buy Time Warner, here is some of what he would own (our thanks to the News Corp, Time Warner and 21st Century Fox websites for their handy lists of the insane number of companies they run):


Click headline to read the list--

Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc's insight:

Keep in mind this is not Time Warner Cable, which Comcast is trying to merge with should they get approval.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

House Commerce Marking Up Rogue Patent Letters Bill | Broadcasting & Cable

House Commerce Marking Up Rogue Patent Letters Bill | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The House Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade Subcommittee has scheduled a July 10 markup for a bill that would crack down on "illegitimate" patent demand letters. Those are ones that show a pattern of threatening lawsuits over vague or unsubstantiated patent claims.


The bill, the Targeting Rogue and Opaque Letters Act (H.R. 4450), is billed as protecting legitimate patent holders but protecting businesses from "abusive" patent assertion entities (sometimes called patent "trolls"). The bill would try to discourage such deceptive communications to consumers, end users or "systems integrators" by spelling out the ways in which those would be illegally unfair and deceptive and thus subject to Federal Trade Commission action.


Subcommittee chairman Lee Terry (pictured) (R-Neb.) introduced a discussion draft of the bill in May.


Demand letters warn people of infringing conduct and often try to solicit a settlement under the threat of legal action. Some are legitimate warnings, but others are attempts to extort money on the basis of vague and broad claims that, as one Federal Trade Commission official put it at a May hearing on the subject, "may be sent very broadly and without prior investigation, may assert vague claims of infringement, and may be designed to obtain payments that are based more on the costs of defending litigation than on the merit of the patent claims."


A copy of the latest draft of the bill is available here.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

White House pulls plug on controversial Patent Office nominee after tech sector backlash | GigaOM Tech News

White House pulls plug on controversial Patent Office nominee after tech sector backlash | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Obama Administration has changed its mind over a plan to name pharmaceutical executive Phil Johnson as head of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, according to multiple sources. The reversal is a victory for the technology industry and other proponents of patent reform.


The plan to appoint Johnson surfaced in late June, and was met with outrage on social media, where critics claimed the choice reflected hypocrisy on the part of President Obama, who had called for fixes to the patent system in his January State of the Union address.


Johnson, a longtime attorney for Johnson & Johnson, was a controversial nominee in part because he helped lead opposition to a bipartisan bill, which died in May, that would have made it easier for companies to challenge bad patents and to seek legal fees from so-called “patent trolls.” He has also publicly scorned previous attempts to reform the patent system.


News of the White House’s decision to backtrack on the appointment came via a person close to the Administration, and was confirmed by several industry sources. The final decision to pull the plug may have occurred after Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) vocally declared his opposition to Johnson. Schumer, who was one of the authors of the failed reform bill, has regularly blasted the harm the current patent system is inflicting on start-ups and young companies.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

CIA Didn't Bother Informing Obama About Blown Cover Of German Double Agent Before His Call With Merkel | Techdirt.com

CIA Didn't Bother Informing Obama About Blown Cover Of German Double Agent Before His Call With Merkel | Techdirt.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

We've pointed out before how bizarre it is that President Obama seems to gleefully admit that he's almost totally in the dark about what the intelligence community is doing. Last year, he admitted that he keeps finding out what the NSA is doing from the press reports on the Snowden documents and then he goes to ask what the NSA has been up to. It appears this "keep him in the dark" status is reaching new and ridiculous heights.


As you probably heard, over the weekend the Germans arrested an employee of the German BND, who had apparently been spying for the Americans (via the CIA), and who had been tasked with keeping tabs on the German investigation into the Snowden leaks.


This morning, there are reports about a second spy as well. Reports suggest that the first guy was a bit of a bumbling buffoon who was caught because he sent via email classified documents to the Russians, offering to spy for them as well (leading to an investigation that turned up his existing spying activities for the CIA), but it's still a diplomatic black eye for the US.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The people who created E-Rate think the FCC’s going about it all wrong | WashPost.com

The people who created E-Rate think the FCC’s going about it all wrong | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Two of the Senate's most respected members on educational technology aren't satisfied with the FCC's plan to get schools and libraries wired with Internet and Wi-Fi.


Sens. Ed Markey and Jay Rockefeller are putting pressure on the Federal Communications Commission to vastly expand the amount of money the agency spends on E-Rate, the program that provides government subsidies to schools and libraries for broadband and phone service. In a letter to the FCC Wednesday, the two lawmakers demanded that the commission increase what it sets aside every year for the program.


"The E-Rate program has been frozen at a level designed for the dial-up era," the lawmakers wrote. "This type of thinking does our children a disservice."


The lawmakers object to how the FCC has suggested funding WiFi upgrades in schools and libraries according to a per-student or per-square-foot formula, arguing that it unfairly allocates more money to large and wealthy institutions over smaller, poorer ones where the need may be greater.


The letter from Markey and Rockefeller — two of the legislators who first shepherded E-Rate through Congress in the mid-1990s — is a sign that funding battles over educational broadband and WiFi are spilling over into the public eye, just as the FCC prepares to vote Friday on a proposal to modernize how it gets money to schools and libraries (and how much). It also reveals a bit about the internal politics of the FCC, which have gotten more fractious in the months since Chairman Tom Wheeler took office.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MA: June Project Update | WiredWest.net

MA: June Project Update | WiredWest.net | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Considerable progress is being made toward financing last-mile broadband in western Massachusetts. After a long period of little activity in the state legislature, the IT Bond Bill is on the verge of passage, with $50 million allocated to the Massachusetts Broadband Institute (MBI).


WiredWest has been working on a mechanism for the borrowing authority of its member towns to support a bond issued by WiredWest for an additional $50 million needed for the project. In support of that objective, MBI retained the services of Gregory Sandomirsky, a leading municipal finance attorney with the Boston firm of Mintz Levin.  He held meetings and conference calls with several members of WiredWest’s Executive Committee and its Executive Director. As a result, a step-by-step implementation plan for such an issuance has been drafted which WiredWest will be reviewing with its Board of Directors and town officials.


WiredWest continues to explore possible project funding through the Connect America Fund.  In March it previously submitted an “Expression of Interest” to the Federal Communications Commission for what are called “experiments” in rural broadband deployment.  Further details about the program and procedures to submit proposals are expected to be announced by the FCC in July. A key issue underlying the financing of a regional broadband network is the financial viability of such a project.


WiredWest has developed and continues to refine a detailed pro forma model.  Consultants to MBI have also developed models, and MBI is working closely with WiredWest to develop a consensus model that ideally will serve as the basis for development of a regional network.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

3.5 GHz: Debate continues on spectrum sharing, band plan and unlicensed use | FierceWirelessTech.com

3.5 GHz: Debate continues on spectrum sharing, band plan and unlicensed use | FierceWirelessTech.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Comments and presentations are rolling in to the FCC regarding its plan to use spectrum-sharing techniques to open up the 3.5 GHz band for wireless broadband use. The idea to create a Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS) in this band is revolutionary in many aspects, but some are concerned that this uniqueness--particularly as it applies to the spectrum band plan--might have unintended ramifications in the United States as well as globally.


There is much to be decided before the 3.5 GHz CBRS is finally launched. Comments on the FCC's proceeding are due July 14, with replies due Aug. 1.


Much of the focus of participants has been on the ground-breaking effort to use complicated spectrum-sharing techniques to free up the targeted spectrum. According to the FCC's Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (FNPRM), released in April 2014, the commission intends to apply spectrum sharing to 3550-3650 MHz spectrum and is also pondering extending the service to 3700 MHz, providing a total of 150 MHz of spectrum for the CBRS.


The FCC's three-tiered access and sharing model would be comprised of federal and non-federal incumbents, priority access licensees (PALs) and general authorized access (GAA) users. GGA users would basically be unlicensed users like Wi-Fi users today, while PALs, such as mobile operators, would likely use the spectrum for multiple applications, including mobile broadband and small cell operations.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Level 3 calls for net neutrality rules to extend to all ISP activities | GigaOM Tech News

Level 3 calls for net neutrality rules to extend to all ISP activities | GigaOM Tech News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Even if advocates for net neutrality win the battle at the FCC over “no discrimination” rules, they could still lose the war if ISPs subvert the spirit of those rules by applying chokepoints at deeper layers of the internet. For practical purposes, this would mean that any internet traffic would reach your house at the same speed — but that some types of that traffic, especially from video-heavy websites like Netflix, would arrive in a degraded condition.


This, anyway, is the fear of Level 3, an internet communication company that has been  raising the alarm over ISPs that demand “tolls” behind the scenes to guarantee certain types of internet traffic get passed through to the end customer.


On Monday, Level 3 proposed in a blog post that the FCC adopt interconnection rules that would require ISPs to accept traffic without requiring a fee beyond what they charge to their customers:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Republican Commissioners rip FCC's spendy school Wi-Fi plan | NetworkWorld.com

Republican Commissioners rip FCC's spendy school Wi-Fi plan | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A proposal by U.S. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler to pump billions of dollars into Wi-Fi deployment at schools and libraries has run into a snag, with the commission’s two Republican suggesting the money will come from U.S. residents’ pocketbooks


The commission is scheduled to vote Friday on Wheeler’s proposal to revamp the agency’s E-Rate program, but Republican Commissioners Ajit Pai and Michael O’Rielly questioned where the money will come from. E-Rate, a 17-year-old program funded through telephone service fees, helps schools and libraries connect to the Internet.


Wheeler’s plan to spend US$5 billion to improve Wi-Fi networks at schools and libraries over the next several years doesn’t add up, Pai said in a statement released Tuesday.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How the Target Breach Has Affected Small Business Data Security | NetworkWorld.com

How the Target Breach Has Affected Small Business Data Security | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Small and medium-sized businesses may think they're immune to the kinds of attacks that wreaked havoc on Target last year, but they're susceptible to the same nefarious forces – sometimes even more so, as they can lead hackers to a bigger prize.


Since the Target breach, other retailers have been affected, including Neiman Marcus, eBay and P.F. Chang's. But the Target breach was huge – information on 40 million credit and debit cards was stolen, along with records of 70 million customers, including name, address, email address and phone number.


The breach obviously hurt Target – both CEO Gregg Steinhafel and CIO Beth Jacob have resigned, and costs continue to add up. Cards were affected across financial institutions – 10 percent at big banks, 14 percent at credit unions and nine percent at community banks, according to a Discover Financial Services study. Overall, 84 percent of financial institutions were impacted; after a typical data breach, that number is only 29 percent.


More directly, small businesses that keep customer cards on file to for recurring monthly charges, such as gyms, couldn't process transactions on cards that had been closed.


It's easy to think that your small business won't be affected by hackers, says Dr. Larry Ponemon, chairman and founder of the Ponemon Institute, a research firm and think tank dedicated to advancing privacy and data protection practices. "Large companies have a bull's eye on their backs. A lot of small companies thought they were immune. It's just at small company. Who's going to hack them?"


Click headline to read more--

more...
Sarah Clarke's curator insight, Today, 2:43 PM

It's the breach that just keeps on giving.  

Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Making Sense of Copyright’s Volition Requirement After Aereo | Disruptive Competition Project

Making Sense of Copyright’s Volition Requirement After Aereo | Disruptive Competition Project | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

One of the great attractions (or frustrations) of copyright law is that it is based on metaphysical distinctions. The most obvious of these is the idea/expression dichotomy. The Second Circuit in Computer Associates v. Altai observed that “drawing the line between idea and expression is a tricky business.” Judge Learned Hand, one of the leading copyright jurists, stated that “nobody has ever been able to fix that boundary, and nobody ever can.” He also noted “no principle can be stated as to when the imitator has gone beyond copying the ‘idea’ and has borrowed its expression. Decisions must therefore inevitably be ad hoc.”


Other similarly metaphysical (and ad hoc) distinctions in copyright law are whether the idea and the expression have “merged,” whether two works are “substantially similar,” and whether a use is fair. And after the Supreme Court’s decision in American Broadcasting Cos. v. Aereo, we can add the identification of who is the volitional actor to this list of abstract, ad hoc determinations.


One of the conceptual flaws of the Second Circuit’s decision in Aereo was that the Second Circuit never decided definitely who was the “volitional actor,” i.e., who was doing the transmitting, Aereo or the subscriber.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Uraguay: Antel FTTH connections reach 350,000 | TeleGeography.com

Uruguay’s national telecoms operator Administracion Nacional de Telecomunicaciones (Antel) has connected around 350,000 households to its high speed fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) network, El Pais cites the company’s general manager, Horacio Andres Tolosa, as saying.


The total represents around 50% of all Uruguayan homes with a connection to the internet, he added. Antel is aiming to increase the number of FTTH households to 500,000 by the end of this year.


Last year the state-owned company said it will invest USD1.112 billion in its operations by 2017, around USD727 million of which will be spent on its access network, including the rollout and expansion of its FTTH infrastructure.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Survey: Wireless Net Neutrality is dead | Advanced Television

Flash Networks, specialists in mobile Internet optimisation and monetisation, has published a study revealing that 69 per cent of operators and,  74 per cent of subscribers think that mobile operators should be allowed to offer a fast lane connection to premium content providers. Flash Networks’ annual LTE survey conducted at LTE World Summit polled both subscribers and mobile operators to uncover quality of experience trends.


Flash Networks’ survey also revealed that although 84 per cent of subscribers believe that operators are responsible for video stalls and buffers, only 63 per cent of operators claim responsibility for an unsatisfactory quality of experience. However, 80 per cent of operators already optimise or plan to optimise video and data to adapt to network conditions. These responses suggest that while operators are reluctant to admit responsibility, they recognise that video quality is vital to customer satisfaction.


Compared with last year’s survey, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of operators who felt that their network was “Super fast – 20Mpbs download throughput” (48 per cent in 2013 versus 31 per cent in 2014), leading 75 per cent of operators this year to report that they already accelerate or plan to implement an acceleration solution within the next year. These results reflect both a higher bar for 4G network speeds and operators’ concerns about their ability to provide their users with the best possible quality of experience while managing the rapid increase in mobile data traffic.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MN: Broadband brings baseball hall of fame to Kanabec County | Blandin on Broadband

MN: Broadband brings baseball hall of fame to Kanabec County | Blandin on Broadband | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

This looks like a very fun event! I wanted to share the invitation for folks who might be interested but also to spur ideas in other communities. It’s a great way to use technology to start conversations…


Many of you have heard about the interactive video events (sometimes called video field trips) that our area schools have been involved with for many years (through services provided by our technology cooperative, ECMECC). You also may have heard about the KBI project that has installed multimedia equipment and high-speed Internet capabilities in Mora’s Life Enrichment Center – a community facility that is part of the Eastwood senior living complex in Mora.


Through this Blandin Foundation funded project, we have done two live video events from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and the Great Barrier Reef in Australia.


Now, with the Major League Baseball All-Star game here in Minnesota, we thought we would focus an activity on Baseball. So….


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Limited Government Group Wants to Limit Satellite Bill | Broadcasting & Cable

Limited Government Group Wants to Limit Satellite Bill | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Americans for Limited Government want a limited satellite reauthorization bill as well, or preferably no new compulsory license at all.


In a letter to Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), ranking member of the Senate Commerce Committee, Americans for Limited Government president Nathan Mehrens said that it would be better for the satellite compulsory license to expire and program negotiations revert to the marketplace. But if it has to be extended, any such reauthorization should exclude retransmission consent reforms.


"Congress has recognized broadcasters' right to compensation for the product of their labor from cable and satellite providers for retransmission of their stations' valuable signals to subscribers," Mehrens said. "Under the current system, broadcasters and pay television providers negotiate in the free market to reach mutually beneficial agreements — with agreements successfully reached an overwhelming majority of the time.  It would be a mistake for the federal government to hobble broadcasters' right to negotiate fair market value for their product."    


The government reform group Council for Citizens Against Government Waste sees it differently. In a letter to Senate Judiciary Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Ranking Member Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) last month, it asked that the retrans reforms be included in a satellite bill. “These changes to the legislation would reflect the current, competitive marketplace, which includes satellite TV, and are therefore appropriate to be included in any reauthorization of STELA,” said the group’s president, Thomas Schatz.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

US House Judiciary to Mark Up 'Clean' STELA July 10 | Broadcasting & Cable

US House Judiciary to Mark Up 'Clean' STELA July 10 | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The House Judiciary Committee has scheduled a July 10 markup for a satellite television reauthorization bill that mirrors a "clean" version proposed in the Senate Judiciary that does not have video reforms being pushed by cable operators and opposed by broadcasters.


A House Energy & Commerce Committee version of the bill included provisions disallowing some coordinated retrans negotiations and getting rid of the ban on integrated cable set-tops, but the Judiciary draft being teed up for markup—which means amendments could be added—at least at this stage is a simple five-year renewal of the compulsory license that allows importation of distant network affiliated TV station signals—which affects about 1.5 million subs without in-market access to a comparable affiliate.


If it stayed that way, it would be a big victory for broadcasters, who fought the additional provisions in the House Energy & Commerce Version.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NYC: The big city library as Internet provider | WashPost.com

NYC: The big city library as Internet provider | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

As our Brian Fung detailed last week, some of the United States' bigger urban library systems have begun lodging a public protest against the formula federal rulemakers are considering for the distribution of billions of dollars for wireless Internet infrastructure.


The Federal Communications Commission is thinking of divvying up so-called E-Rate funds to libraries based on square footage rather than users or some other metric, a calculation that city libraries argue gives an unfair advantage to their more sprawling suburban counterparts.


And now perhaps the biggest name in the U.S. public libraries has dipped into the debate. On Thursday, the New York Library system — a billion-dollar entity with 92 branches and some 17 million volumes — sent a letter to the FCC under the signature of Anthony W. "Tony" Marx, its chief executive and president. Marx reiterated the "smaller footprints but higher attendance rates" argument made by his peers in Hartford, Memphis, Seattle and elsewhere, but he put a local twist on it, writing that Internet access and Internet-enabled training programs, like ESL classes, are "essential in helping to address the inequalities we face in New York City and across the country."


NYPL’s outreach to the FCC is eye-catching for a few reasons. Putting aside the library’s sheer size, the 119-year-old system has a cultural significance that goes even beyond the opening scene of  "Ghostbusters." The library has long been a core part of New York life, only now it finds itself in a city where the mayor is aggressively trying to rework how people get broadband.


Mayor Bill de Blasio has talked about using his administration’s considerable purchasing power — the City of New York buys a lot of broadband — to help drive down costs for other consumers. In an interview, Marx said that the library has been doing something similar to bring digital resources to the public: "We negotiated with the commercial publishers to be able to offer e-books," and they now buy about 45,000 digital book copies a year.


“Increasingly, the library has so much more to offer online,” Marx said, “and people are lining up for hours for our computers at our branches.”


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Why the Internet of Things scares the “living crap” out of this security guru | Brandon Butler Opinion | NetworkWorld.com

Why the Internet of Things scares the “living crap” out of this security guru  | Brandon Butler Opinion | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things could be the next big thing in tech: A world of connected devices, from thermostats, refrigerators to enterprise tools like fleets of cars and data center switches.


But it could also turning into a real headache for security folks.


“The more data there is, the more opportunity there is for something to go wrong,” says Christopher Budd, a global threat communications manager at Trend Micro. Budd says a world of unsecured connected devices “scares the living crap out of me.”


“The kind of data we’re talking about is a lot scarier and a lot more meaningful than the information that has typically been stored on a PC five or 10 years ago,” he says. “As the devices connected to the Internet get closer to the physical person, the information they collect becomes more personal.” And so therefore the loss or illicit use of that data is that much more personal.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Dish's Ergen to FCC: Deny Comcast/TWC Merger | Multichannel.com

Dish's Ergen to FCC: Deny Comcast/TWC Merger | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Dish has told the FCC to disallow the Comcast/Time Warner Cable merger.

 

In meetings this week with all the commissioners, FCC staffers, and bureau chiefs, Dish chairman Charlie Ergen said the proposed Comcast/TWC deal presented "serious competitive concerns" and "therefore should be denied."

 

Comcast and TWC have argued to the FCC and Congress that their merger would allow them to be more competitive with national platforms like Dish, but according to FCC documents, Ergen told the FCC assemblage that the combined company would have too much leverage over the "lifeblood of over-the-top video": high-capacity "cable" broadband connections.

 

Ergen said Comcast/TWC would have three "choke" points it could use to harm competing for video service: the last mile connection, interconnections, and specialized services.

 

"It will be able to extract lower prices from programmers, which, in turn, will force programmers to extract even higher rates from smaller pay-TV providers like DISH in order to compensate the programmers for lost revenue," Ergen and other Dish execs said. "And a combined Comcast/TWC will have the incentive and ability to restrict programmers’ ability to grant digital rights to competing pay-TV and OTT video providers."

 

They also talked about competitive concerns with AT&T/DirecTV, saying that deal "will also be able to combine their market power to leverage programming content, to the potential detriment of consumers."


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Netflix's Problem Is Its Transit Network - Report | Carol Wilson | LightReading.com

Netflix's Problem Is Its Transit Network - Report | Carol Wilson | LightReading.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A veteran engineer with decades of Internet experience is challenging Netflix's claims that ISPs are slowing the performance of its streaming video service, attributing the problem instead to insufficient middle-mile bandwidth from the transit companies Netflix uses to connect its content delivery network to last-mile networks. Also in play are other factors, including choices Netflix users can control.


Peter Sevcik, president of engineering consultant NetForecast Inc. , has been engaged in network design and performance analysis since the early days of the Internet, when he was part of the team at BBN Technologies, whose work in packet-switching led to the founding of the Internet. Today he runs a consulting company that advises ISPs, and also is engaged in the SamKnows project in support of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) 's Measuring Broadband America project.


His conclusions are largely based on analyzing the way Netflix Inc. (Nasdaq: NFLX) delivers its streaming video service, and on the Netflix ISP Speed Index , which the video company itself created to assess how different ISPs are delivering its streaming video service. The details of Sevcik's analysis can be found in his report, "How the Netflix ISP Speed Index Documents Netflix Speed Problems." 


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

CenturyLink Unfazed by AT&T/Verizon’s Rural Wireless Broadband; ‘Caps Too Low, Prices Too High’ | Stop the Cap!

CenturyLink Unfazed by AT&T/Verizon’s Rural Wireless Broadband; ‘Caps Too Low, Prices Too High’ | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

CenturyLink does not believe it will face much of a competitive threat from AT&T and Verizon’s plans to decommission rural landline service in favor of fixed wireless broadband because the two companies’ offers are too expensive, overly usage-capped and too slow.


Both AT&T and Verizon have proposed mothballing traditional landline service in rural areas because both companies claim wireline financial returns are too low and ongoing maintenance costs are too high. In its place, both companies are developing rural fixed wireless solutions for voice and broadband service that will rely on 4G LTE networks.


CenturyLink does not traditionally compete against either AT&T or Verizon because their landline service areas do not overlap. But as both AT&T and Verizon Wireless continue to emphasize their nationwide wireless networks, independent phone companies are likely to face increased competition from wireless phone and broadband services.


CenturyLink isn’t worried.


“About two-thirds of our customers can get access to 10Mbps or higher [from us and] that continues to increase year by year,” CenturyLink chief financial officer Stewart Ewing told attendees at Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s 2014 Global Telecom & Media Conference. “Our belief is that with the increasing demands customers have for bandwidth — the Netflix bandwidth requirement — just the increasing amount of video that customers are watching and downloading over their Internet pipes, we believe will drive customers to using a provider that basically has a wire in their home because we believe you will get generally higher bandwidth and a much better experience at lower cost.”


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The enterprise may be ready for Internet of Things, but networks are not | Charlie Osborne | ZDNet.com

The enterprise may be ready for Internet of Things, but networks are not | Charlie Osborne | ZDNet.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Enterprises are ready to profit from the Internet of Things (IoT), but security concerns and network capacity worries are holding back deployment.


According to a recent survey commissioned by network control company Infoblox, the majority of IT professionals believe that IoT is a potentially lucrative market, but there may not be enough network capacity to handle the demand that will accompany an anticipated explosion in the number of connected devices.


The research, carried out in May, was conducted online and collected 400 responses from US and UK network managers and executives involved in building, running, and managing enterprise networks at firms with over 1,000 employees. The majority of respondents — 90 percent — are either planning or already implementing solutions to cope with the increased demands on networking caused by IoT projects.


The resources necessary to implement IoT projects are already on hand, with 78 percent of respondents saying they have a large enough budget and 75 percent sufficient staff numbers. Despite low-growth IT budget trends, 89 percent believe they’re "very" or "quite" likely to receive more budget in the next year due to IoT demands, and 73 percent believe the same to be true for staffing.


According to research firm Gartner, IoT devices — excluding PCs, tablets and smartphones — will grow to 26 billion units in 2020.


Despite budget, staff optimism and 46 percent of IT professionals believing IoT deployments will eventually become part of existing IT networks, more than half — 57 percent — reported their current network is already at full capacity, and may not be able to cope with IoT additions. Unless companies pour more funds into networks, they may be missing out on the deployment of potentially lucrative IoT projects.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Verizon Questions Our Accuracy: We Challenge Verizon to a Debate | Bruce Kushnick Blog | HuffPost.com

Verizon Questions Our Accuracy: We Challenge Verizon to a Debate | Bruce Kushnick Blog | HuffPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Here is a letter from Verizon to the Huffington Post editors, followed by my reply:


Ed McFadden, Verizon Communications:


"I run media affairs for Verizon public policy, and was wondering which editor has some oversight of Bruce Kushnick. Who reviews his material before it is posted? In his latest, he makes several inaccurate statements, the facts for which were publicly available and where he appears to be making an effort to misdirect your readers.


  • He accuses Verizon of lying to regulators: "It is clear that Verizon simply didn't tell the truth" about the objections to our copper retirement. This is false.
  • He claims Verizon is working "to shut off the copper in areas that have been upgraded to FiOS and force customers onto FiOS." This is false. The areas he sites are areas where we are replacing copper lines with fiber (not "FiOS, which is a data and video service). In these areas, customers are being provided with phone services over fiber, including the same POTS service they had previously received, at the same price. Nothing more.
  • He claims we didn't "notify anyone." This is false. All affected customers, as well as local and state officials in the areas where we are deploying fiber, as well as the FCC were provided all notices of the planned copper retirement. We also provided notice to interconnecting carriers.


There are additional inaccuracies as well. How can we go about correcting the record? Or is this something that we must take up directly with the writer? Thanks in advance for your consideration.

_____


Verizon also sent along the following links:



My Reply


Note: I take full and sole responsibility for the content of these articles.


Huffington Post suggested I address Verizon's issues.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.