Surfing the Broad...
Follow
Find
120.0K views | +1 today
 
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

Wyden To White House: Protecting Nuclear Power Plants Is Different Than Protecting Facebook | Techdirt

Wyden To White House: Protecting Nuclear Power Plants Is Different Than Protecting Facebook | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Last week, we wrote about a leaked copy of an executive order being worked on by the White House to deal with the lack of "cybersecurity" legislation being passed. We've since learned that this is one of two different executive orders being worked on concerning this issue.

 

We are working on getting the other, more focused, draft as well. That said, we noted numerous problems in the draft we did see, including the broad definition of "critical infrastructure," which basically leaves it pretty open for the feds to declare almost anything "critical infrastructure," thereby putting tremendous pressure on private companies to comply with a set of rules that may not make much sense.

 

This is, quite reasonably, raising some concerns. Senator Ron Wyden has sent a letter to the White House's Cybersecurity Coordinator, J. Michael Daniel, to point out that there's a pretty big difference between things like nuclear power plants and social networks online -- and any executive order that fails to take that into account seems problematic. The full letter is embedded below, but a snippet:

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Sports not holding cable bundles together | Advanced-Television.com

Sports content often has the most expensive TV subscription prices, but a survey by Clearleap says it isn’t how cable companies can deter cord-cutting. Sixty-seven per cent of US cable subscribers said sports weren’t the reason they kept their service, the survey reveals.

As more traditional television migrates online outside traditional pay-TV subscriptions, live sports is often viewed as a key deterrent against cord-cutting. However, Clearleap’s data suggest cable companies don’t necessarily need sports to keep many people as subscribers.

Clearleap’s data indicates sports programmers and leagues face demand for streaming sports outside a pay-TV subscription. Among people who indicated they often watch at least one sport, 49 per cent said they’d pay to stream their favourite sport without a cable subscription. The most popular pay level was, obviously, the cheapest: 37 per cent said that they would pay $20 per month or less, while 8.1 per cent said they would pay $21 to $49 and a hardcore 4 per cent would pay $50 or more.

“People want to watch it whenever it is convenient right now,” said David Mowrey, Clearleap’s vice president of product management. “There’s still a lot of opportunity to create better experiences particularly around streaming sports.”


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Economist: Charter Communications' Buyout of Time Warner Cable Structured So It Will Pay No Taxes for Years | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

The Economist: Charter Communications' Buyout of Time Warner Cable Structured So It Will Pay No Taxes for Years | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Economist reports Charter Communications’ acquisition of Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks has been structured so that “it should pay no tax for several years, at least.”

The merger deal, which intimately involves John Malone, the boss of Liberty Media — a cable and media conglomerate, has all the hallmarks of a classic Malone-inspired deal: complex ownership structures, high debt levels, assiduous tax planning and a refusal to overpay.

Unlike many other dealmakers, Malone seems to want to avoid the spotlight. His firm Liberty Media is Charter’s biggest single investor and will kick in at least $5 billion in Charter stock purchases to help consummate the transaction, which will be handled primarily by Charter’s management.

The deal comes at Malone’s insistence the American cable landscape must be consolidated into just 2-3 large companies. For now, he is content standing aside while the public faces of the merger are Charter’s CEO Thomas Rutledge and Time Warner Cable’s Rob Marcus. (Bright House Networks is also a part of the transaction but has been completely overshadowed by its larger deal partners.)

While coverage of the transaction has been relegated to the Business section of newspapers and has evoked shrugs from American reporters, The Economist calls it nothing short of an extraordinary landmark.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Sky Brazil expands TD-LTE coverage to 85 municipalities | TeleGeography.com

Brazilian pay-TV operator Sky Brasil Servicos (Sky Brazil), which is part of the US-based DirecTV group, has expanded its 4G Time-Division Long Term Evolution (TD-LTE) coverage to 85 municipalities, BN Americas reports.


The website claims that Sky’s broadband user base now stands at 150,000. According to TeleGeography’s GlobalComms Database, Sky Brazil activated its TD-LTE network on 14 December 2011, with the service initially going live in Brasilia (Distrito Federal).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Why Congress should not pass USA Freedom | Sascha Meinrath Opinion | CSMonitor.com

Why Congress should not pass USA Freedom | Sascha Meinrath Opinion | CSMonitor.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

What happens when the Senate passes a law that a federal court has already ruled is illegal? That's what is now in motion due to the Senate vote this past Sunday night to move forward with the process of renewing mass surveillance. The proposed legislation – the ill-named USA Freedom Act – is diametrically opposed to the Bill of Rights and the Constitution. It is a law that legalizes mass surveillance targeting tens of millions of US citizens, whether or not they're guilty of any wrongdoing.

Amazingly, due to the incredible work of a massive left-right coalition of civil liberties organizations, we've managed to garner a momentary sunsetting of several provisions of the Patriot Act that have been used to legally justify mass surveillance. But the sad reality is that the USA Freedom, which reauthorizes these provisions, has been pushed forward by the Senate and may very well pass later this week. If so, the mass surveillance programs that the National Security Agency has just shut down on Monday will be immediately ramped back up – once again collecting billions and billions of records about our everyday actions (including who we talk with and when those conversations are taking place).

While supporters of mass surveillance continue their fear-mongering – declaring that the government needs this mass surveillance program to fight terrorists – the overwhelming preponderance of evidence is that these programs have been both wildly expensive and ineffective.

The White House's NSA review group concluded that the program “was not essential to preventing attacks” – an analysis backed up by a thorough analysis by my old colleagues at the New America Foundation's International Security Program, which found that the program “has had no discernible impact on preventing acts of terrorism.”

Meanwhile, President Obama's independent advisory, the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, concluded earlier this year, “The Section 215 bulk telephone records program lacks a viable legal foundation under Section 215, implicates constitutional concerns under the First and Fourth Amendments, raises serious threats to privacy and civil liberties as a policy matter, and has shown only limited value. As a result, the Board recommends that the government end the program.”

Given the illegality of this mass surveillance program, given its expense, given that it doesn't work, and given that the reviews of the program, both by national security experts as well as by the US government itself, have concluded that it's a boondoggle that infringes upon the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, why is Congress going to such extremes to maintain mass surveillance?


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Nvidia Shield Caters to Cord Cutters | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com

Nvidia Shield Caters to Cord Cutters | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Timed with Google’s I/O developers conference this week, Nvidia has launched the Shield, a high-end gaming console/streaming device that’s equipped with the Android TV OS and the ability to stream 4K content from sources such as Netflix.

Though the device will support HBO Go, Watch ESPN and several other authenticated TV Everywhere apps that require a pay TV subscription, the Shield also provides access to services such as Sling TV, Dish’s new OTT-TV service, and will soon do the same for HBO Now, the standalone OTT service from HBO. Google’s Channels app supports live TV when the supporting device is paired to a separate tuner and digital over-the-air antenna.

Shield isn't cheap. Available outlets such as Amazon, Best Buy and Fry’s Electronics, the console starts at $199.99 (for the 16 GB version), while the Shield Pro (500 GB) fetches $299.99. Nvidia also sells Shield accessories such as an advanced, voice-enabled remote control ($49.99), extra gaming controllers ($59.99 each), and a vertical stand ($29.99).

Some of the initial reviewers on Nvidia’s new creation were mixed, noting that the Shield could have trouble gaining mass appeal.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Charter Charts Course in D.C. For Time Warner Cable Deal | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

Charter Charts Course in D.C. For Time Warner Cable Deal | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Look for Charter to make a strong public interest pitch in Washington that it will bring a culture of no broadband caps and fast speeds to a combined Charter-Time Warner Cable deal. But you can also expect it to face pushback from the usual suspects—anti-consolidation groups for whom bigger amounts to badder.

The $77.8 billion deal (equity plus debt) was announced last week, coming about in the rubble of the collapsed Comcast-TWC merger proposal. The FCC had indicated the latter combo put too many broadband subscribers into the hands of one company. Technically, the FCC didn’t have to say anything officially, since the deal was scrapped before it had to weigh in, but the message was clear nonetheless, with FCC chairman Tom Wheeler saying it was the right call.

Fast-forward to last week, when Charter was talking about bringing Time Warner Cable and—through a separate deal, BrightHouse—into the Charter fold.

Charter wasn’t coming right out and saying the deal would create a stronger competitor to top cable operator Comcast, particularly in broadband, but that was clearly part of the argument it will make on Capitol Hill.

As with the Comcast deal, the key for approval in Washington likely depends on whether the approximately 30% of high-speed broadband subs the new company says it will have is too much for an FCC and a Department of Justice currently focused on what they have called ISP “gatekeepers.”

Here are some of the points Charter will be pressing in Washington as it tries to succeed where Comcast failed.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

High-speed Internet gaps leave rural New Mexicans lacking a ‘basic right’ | Chris Quintana & Staci Matlock | Sante Fe Mexican

High-speed Internet gaps leave rural New Mexicans lacking a ‘basic right’ | Chris Quintana & Staci Matlock | Sante Fe Mexican | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Alan Cozzens could sympathize when he read recently that Taos residents were complaining about paying $70 a month for Internet service that provides sluggish download speeds of 10 Megabits per second. But if you want to know what slow is, he said, drive an hour south to his home in the Pojoaque Valley, where the fastest service he can get is 3 Mbps — at a cost of $96 a month.

“It’s not the money,” Cozzens said. “It’s the principle of the matter. They’re taking advantage of us, and we have no remedy. None.”

At a time when high-speed Internet has become as essential to the everyday lives of most Americans as telephone and mail service, many rural communities in New Mexico are stuck with services that provide achingly slow speeds at prices exceeding much faster plans in urban areas. Cozzens, for example, could get Internet service 16 time faster for $18 less if he lived in Albuquerque. In New York, he could get 300 Mbps for about $30 less.

The high prices paid by many rural residents for slow Internet stem from a combination of factors, including a lack of competition and government incentives and the high cost of installing fiber-optic cable in far-reaching, thinly populated areas.

The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission last week proposed a dramatic expansion of a federal subsidy program designed to ensure that low-income Americans have reliable, high-speed Internet. The changes, if passed by the commission, could help close the so-called “digital divide” between the economically comfortable and the poor.

But the proposal doesn’t address the gaping divide between urban and rural residents. And despite hundreds of millions of dollars in federal stimulus money spent over the last few years to spread fixed broadband to rural areas, an estimated 14 million people in rural areas continue to lack access, according to the FCC.

For some Northern New Mexico residents, that means relying on costly cellular data plans that severely hinder their Internet usage.


Click headline to read more and view map--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Apple TV's 4K Future | Bob Cringely | I, Cringely

Apple TV's 4K Future | Bob Cringely | I, Cringely | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

On June 8th at the Apple World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC), CEO Tim Cook will reportedly introduce a new and improved Apple TV. For those who live under rocks this doesn’t mean a television made by Apple but rather a new version of the Apple TV set top box that 25 million people have bought to download and stream video from the Internet. But this new Apple TV — the first Apple TV hardware update in three years — will not, we’re told, support 3840-by-2160 UHD (popularly called 4K) video and will be limited to plain old 1920-by-1080 HD. Can this be true? Well, yes and no. The new Apple TV will be 4K capable, but not 4K enabled. This distinction is critical to understanding what’s really happening with Apple and television.

First we need to understand Apple’s big number problem. This is a problem faced by many segment-leading companies as they become enormous and rich. The bigger these companies get the harder it is to find new business categories worth entering. Most companies, as they enter new market segments with new products, hope those products come to represent at least five percent of their company’s gross revenue over time. The iPhone, for example, now drives more than 60 percent of Apple’s revenue. Well the Apple TV has been around now for a decade and has yet to approach that five percent threshold, which is why they’ve referred to the Apple TV since its beginning as a hobby.

Let’s say Apple sells five million Apple TVs per year at $79 wholesale for gross hardware revenue of just under $400 million annually. While $400 million sounds like a lot, for a company with Apple’s fiscal 2014 sales of $182 billion, it’s at best a rounding error, if that — just over two tenths of a percent of total sales. So in an MBA textbook sense the Apple TV wasn’t (and isn’t) worth doing. The business simply isn’t big enough to bother.

But this is Apple, a company that loves to redefine product categories. And by definition every new product category starts at zero. So if Apple wants to start anything truly new it will have to start small, which it did with the Apple II, Macintosh, iPod, iTunes, iPhone, iPad, and the Apple TV.

Everybody knows a new Apple TV is coming but the press reports to date have had very few details other than the fact that the box won’t support 4K. You know Apple had to deliberately leak that one detail for some strategic reason. So why introduce a new Apple TV at all if the performance being asked of it (decoding H.264 1080p video) hasn’t changed?


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Senate delays vote on NSA phone records dragnet | Grant Gross | NetworkWorld.com

Senate delays vote on NSA phone records dragnet | Grant Gross | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A controversial program allowing the U.S. National Security Agency to collect millions of domestic telephone records expired Sunday night after the Senate failed to vote on a bill to extend the authority for the surveillance.

The Senate, meeting on Sunday as provisions of the counterterrorism Patriot Act were hours from expiring, voted on a so-called cloture to limit debate and move toward a vote on the USA Freedom Act, a bill that would rein in the NSA’s bulk collection of U.S. telephone records while allowing the agency to collect records in a more targeted manner.

The 77-17 vote for cloture on the USA Freedom Act sets up a final vote on the bill, but the Senate isn’t likely to take action before Tuesday.

Section 215 of the Patriot Act, the provision that allows the NSA to collect any domestic telephone and business records relevant to a counterterrorism investigation, sunset at midnight Sunday.

Still, the Senate’s cloture vote moves lawmakers closer to passage of the USA Freedom Act, which passed in the House of Representatives earlier in May.

Just eight days ago, a group of Republican senators who wanted to extend the Patriot Act with no new limits on bulk collection successfully blocked a final vote on the USA Freedom Act. At the same time, senators opposed to a straight extension of Section 215 also blocked efforts to make that happen.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, had pushed for an extension of the Patriot Act with no new limits, but conceded Sunday that opposing senators had forced a vote on the USA Freedom Act. McConnell and his allies argued the Patriot Act’s Section 215 is an important tool the U.S. government uses to fight terrorism, while critics argue the bulk collection of domestic phone records violates the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, protecting citizens from unreasonable searches and seizures.

While a handful of senators spoke in favor of the USA Freedom Act, Senator Rand Paul, another Kentucky Republican, raised several concerns. The USA Freedom Act would prohibit the NSA from retaining U.S. telephone records, but telecom carriers would still hold those records, he said.

“The bill may be replacing one form of bulk collection with another,” Paul said. “My concern is that under the new program, the records will still be sucked up into NSA computers, but the computers will be at the phone company.”

In addition, the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, the same secret court that allowed the NSA to collect U.S. phone records in bulk by defining all domestic phone records as relevant to a counterterrorism investigation, will be interpreting the new law, Paul said. “That doesn’t give me a lot of comfort,” he said.

Paul will push to introduce a handful of amendments to the USA Freedom Act, although it’s unclear if other Senate Republicans will allow votes.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Canada: Opposition to Bill C-51 continues to grow across the country | Peter Ewart | 250 News

More and more Canadians just don’t believe the federal government’s claims about Bill C-51, the controversial anti-terror legislation. This has been demonstrated by the hundreds of rallies and meetings across the country, and the numerous public statements of opposition from law associations, constitutional law experts, civil liberties groups, First Nations, unions, community organizations, business leaders, newspaper editors, media pundits, academics, former prime ministers and Supreme Court justices, and many others.

A number of petitions have been launched across the country with OpenMedia’s “StopC51.ca” gathering over 213,000 signatures so far, making it one of the largest petitions in Canadian history to oppose federal government legislation (1). For its part, the organization Canadian Journalists for Free Expression has denounced the Bill as “irresponsible, dangerous, and ineffective,” and argues that as Canadians learn more about the Bill their opposition will only continue to grow (2).

The widespread opposition is also reflected in the polls which now show that the majority of Canadians do not agree with this anti-democratic legislation. The Parliamentary hearings were themselves controversial with the Conservative majority on the Committee refusing to allow various experts to speak, including the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, and using rude and insulting language towards a number of the presenters. Despite that, many of the presenters strongly criticized the legislation on the basis that it threatens the fundamental rights of Canadians, and almost all argued that the Bill was flawed in one way or another.

Nonetheless, the Bill was passed in Parliament on May 6th by a vote of 183 to 96, with Conservative and Liberal MPs voting in favour and NDP, Greens, Bloc Quebecois and several independents opposed. The Bill has now moved on to the Senate where hearings will be held for the next several weeks before a final vote.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

LRG Finds More Than Half of U.S. Households Pay for OTT Video Service | Andrew Burger | Telecompetitor

LRG Finds More Than Half of U.S. Households Pay for OTT Video Service | Andrew Burger | Telecompetitor | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

More American households are connecting to the Internet via smart TV sets, video game controllers, Blu-ray disc players or stand-alone devices, such as Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Chromecast or Roku, according to new market research from LRG (Leichtman Research Group). Well over half (56 percent) of U.S. households have at least one TV set connected to the Internet, LRG finds, up from 44 percent in 2013 and 24 percent in 2010.

Moreover, LRG found that while 27 percent have a TV set connected via one device, 29 percent are connected via multiple devices. That’s up from 17 percent in 2013.

Americans are also watching more Internet video via connected TV sets, according to LRG. Nearly 3 in 10 (29 percent) of U.S. adults watch Internet video via their connected TV sets weekly as compared to 17 percent in 2013 and 5 percent in 2010.

The same goes for Netflix subscribers specifically. Eighty-five percent of Netflix streaming video viewers said they watch Netflix content via their connected TVs. That’s up slightly from previous LRG surveys.

LRG surveyed 1,215 households nationwide in producing its latest connected TV market research, part of a study entitled, “Emerging Video Services IX.” Other highlights include:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Here’s how badly we’re getting ripped off by our mobile phone providers | Cyrus Farivar | Ars Technica

Here’s how badly we’re getting ripped off by our mobile phone providers | Cyrus Farivar | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It is hard to overstate how much I love the British mobile provider Three and how I wish it would come to the United States.

My fellow Americans, let me (again) re-iterate how badly we’re all getting overcharged: Three offers a 30-day prepaid plan with unlimited data, unlimited texts, and 200 minutes of domestic calling, all for £20 ($31). That’s about one-third less than what I pay right now Stateside.

Last month, I traveled to the United Kingdom for a reporting trip on the new Welsh drone startup behind the Zano handheld drone. Before I left California, I had my new Ars UK colleague Sebastian Anthony go to a Three shop, buy a SIM, and send it to me in the mail (or post, whatever). He didn’t have to register it or show an ID. When I landed at Heathrow, I could just pop it in, and boom, I was off and running.

As I learned on this trip, I was also able to roam to Ireland at no extra cost. Seriously, zero. Three has a list of countries, which it calls “Feel At Home”—including the US, Israel, Indonesia, Hong Kong—where your plan (even my prepaid one) that you had in the United Kingdom stays with you. Heck, I could even roam and use this sweet data plan back to the US, if I didn’t mind the hassle of only having a +44 phone number in my pocket, for less than what I currently pay.

I have yet to find any American company, whether one of the Big 4 (T-Mobile, Verizon, AT&T, or Sprint), or a prepaid mobile virtual network operator (MVNO), that comes anywhere close to Three's offering at this price.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

5 reasons your Internet bill keeps climbing | Erik Sherman | CBS News

5 reasons your Internet bill keeps climbing | Erik Sherman | CBS News | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Charter Communications' $55 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable would give the merged company roughly a quarter of the burgeoning broadband market. But removing one more major competitor from the scene may do less for consumers, who have seen their bills for Internet service keep climbing in recent years.

According to a Quartz analysis of public filings from Time Warner Cable, the country's second-largest cable provider, average monthly paid-TV costs have gone up only a dollar to $76.08 over the last two years. By contrast, over the same period the average cost of broadband has shot up 21 percent to $47.30 per month.

Why is Internet service is getting more expensive, especially as cost of transmitting data online continues to plummet? There are five reasons your broadband bid keeps climbing:


Click headline to red more, access hot links and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Kimmelman: Charter/TWC Lacks Same Problems of Comcast/TWC | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable

Kimmelman: Charter/TWC Lacks Same Problems of Comcast/TWC | John Eggerton | Broadcasting & Cable | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Gene Kimmelman, president of Public Knowledge, says he does not think the proposed Charter/Time Warner Cable merger has "the same problems" that the Comcast/TWC proposed merger had in terms of competition issues, but says it has some that will need inspecting.

Kimmelman and former FCC commissioner Harold Furchtgott-Roth weighed in on the prospect of a Charter/Time Warner Cable deal in an interview for C-SPAN's Communicators series.

A former antitrust official with Justice in the Obama Administration, Kimmelman emphasized that the merger would almost double the size of Time Warner Cable, and said for that reason it was going to get a "very serious review" by law enforcement officials. "They are a pure transmission play, so it will be a very different transaction under review."

But he said a big difference between this deal and Comcast/TWC was that it was a combination of companies that don't own content (outside of a few regional sports nets).

Kimmelman said the big question in the deal is the impact on cable bills and whether the result of the deal will be better speeds and new services. Charter is arguing it will do just that.

He also talked about over-the-top video, another key issue. "Will the new online-delivered video products be more available, or will this combined entity try to cut off my options." He said he thought Internet-delivered video is his biggest concern. It is certainly one of the FCC's, which has been probing that issue in regards to the AT&T/DirecTV deal.

Given that the video competition is coming over the same wire controlled by ISPs, those ISPs have incentive to favor its own bundled service, so Washington will have to make sure there are no unfair benefits to cable.

Furchtgott-Roth laughed off the over-the-top concerns. He said every consumer has multiple paths to broadband. While Kimmelman argued, as has the FCC, that a single ISP generally controls that key wire into the home, Furchtgott-Roth said there are actually three wires. He said he was not saying people were getting video over all three wires, but did say they had that option over at least two, the cable and telephone company.

In addition, he said, there are wireless options, with increasing speeds. Kimmelman said that wireless was not yet a competitor for video streaming.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Facebook will send encrypted emails as users add PGP key to profile | Fred O'Connor | NetworkWorld.com

Facebook will send encrypted emails as  users add PGP key to profile | Fred O'Connor | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Some Facebook users should soon be able to receive encrypted emails from the social networking site if they add PGP public keys to their profiles.

Facebook called the PGP feature “experimental” and said it is slowly rolling it out, although a timeline wasn’t provided. The PGP key details will be added to the “contact and basic info section” of a person’s profile under “contact information.”

Facebook sends messages to private email accounts to inform users when they have a private message or friend request, for example. It currently uses TLS to establish secure connections to a person’s email provider, but this won’t keep the details of an email private from prying eyes.

By enabling PGP, Facebook will protect the content contained in an email, Facebook said Monday. Email service providers like Yahoo and Google scan a person’s inbox and run ads based on the content of a message, a practice some users don’t like. Revelations about widespread government surveillance programs have also made many people more concerned about online privacy.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Movistar outlines 4G progress in Argentina | TeleGeography.com

Argentinean mobile operator Movistar has reportedly switched on a total of 1,000 Long Term Evolution (LTE) base transceiver stations (BTS), and expects its 4G network to comprise 1,850 cell towers by the end of 2015.


According to an unconfirmed report by TeleSemana, LTE connectivity is now available in more than 100 locations across twelve provinces. In 2015 alone the cellco expects to spend ARS8.5 billion (USD946 million) on its network rollout.

TeleGeography notes that the latest coverage metrics suggest Movistar is undertaking a brisk rollout schedule. As previously reported by CommsUpdate, in January this year the cellco’s 4G network comprised just 60 BTS, covering Buenos Aires, Mar del Plata, Carilo and Pinamar.


The network went live in December 2014, one month after Movistar won a nationwide concession pairing frequencies in the 1710MHz-1720MHz and 2110MHz-2120MHz bands; the cellco paid USD209.14 million for the spectrum permit.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

AT&T: Broadband Usage Caps Are Awesome, And Preventing Us From Abusing Them Is A Horrible Injustice | Karl Bode | Techdirt

AT&T: Broadband Usage Caps Are Awesome, And Preventing Us From Abusing Them Is A Horrible Injustice | Karl Bode | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

While AT&T is now a part of two lawsuits to try and overturn the FCC's new net neutrality rules, there's probably no company singularly more responsible for the rules being necessary in the first place.


It was AT&T that really got the neutrality debate rolling in the States just about a decade ago, when then CEO Ed Whitacre proudly proclaimed he was going to start charging companies like Google a "troll toll" just for touching his network.

AT&T's been on the bleeding edge of exploring creative new ways to violate net neutrality for an extra buck ever since, whether that's blocking video services to drive users to pricier plans, using throttling to drive users to costlier plans, using interconnection to sock content companies with extra costs, or using zero rating to generate new revenue at the cost of a steeply tilted playing field.

Telco CEO Randal Stephenson has been making the media rounds lately proudly proclaiming that AT&T will surely be victorious in court, and the the FCC's net neutrality rules will be vacated. But AT&T lawyers are working hard to prevent regulators from including conditions on its $49 billion acquisition of DirecTV related to neutrality as well.


Despite countless instances where AT&T has used usage caps to unfair advantage, AT&T's telling regulators there's no need for neutrality conditions on the merger (with a specific eye on usage caps and zero rating some services) because history shows AT&T is a saint on that front:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Web Activists Claim Congressional Blackout | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com

Web Activists Claim Congressional Blackout | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Web activist group Fight for the Future (FFTF) said somewhere north of 14,000 edge providers (Web sites) are currently blocking access to their sites from congressional IP addresses to make a policy point.

That point is their opposition to renewal of Patriot Act data collection authorizations, which will sunset June 1 unless the Congress can agree on either a straight renewal or a bipartisan bill, the USA Freedom Act, which would reduce (some say eliminate) indiscriminate bulk data collection, but which FFTF calls "fake" reform.

Congress is on a Memorial Day break, but the Senate is reconvening for a Sunday session (May 31) -- The House has passed the USA Freedom Act -- debate whether to find some legislative way to renew at least some of the surveillance authorities, or let them expire.

Although it sounds like something that a net neutrality activist like FFTF would protest if it were coming from an ISP, the group, which organized the protest, says the protest is warranted because "no one wants to live in a world without privacy where they aren’t free to express themselves," Tiffiniy Cheng, Fight for the Future co-founder, said.

"If an ISP had the guts to temporarily block the Internet for a day to protest an atrocity like NSA mass surveillance, we think that would be amazing," FFTF co-founder Holmes Wilson said. "I don’t think they would though," he added, saying many IP's had themselves been complicit for in mass spying, "having given government access to their records even though it was unconstitutional."

Participating sites are redirecting those congressional IP addresses to a protest site featuring pictures of Patriot Act opponents in various states of undress talking about feeling naked in the face of Patriot Act surveillance.

The White House supports USA Freedom, as do numerous members of both parties. But FFTF says Congress has made a mess that it needs to clean up.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MA: Five things about Eric Nakajima, Director of the Mass Broadband Institute | Hiawatha Bray | The Boston Globe

MA: Five things about Eric Nakajima, Director of the Mass Broadband Institute | Hiawatha Bray | The Boston Globe | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Slowly but surely, broadband Internet service is coming to Western Massachusetts, and Eric Nakajima, director of the Massachusetts Broadband Institute,cq is making it happen, with $135 million in federal and state funds committed so far, and more to come. A Globe reporter recently spoke with Nakajima to learn how this urban planning expert is leading this major upgrade of the state’s digital infrastructure.

1. Nakajima, 48, has led the state-funded Massachusetts Broadband Institute since last December. The institute, founded in 2008, was created to bring high-speed Internet service to underserved parts of the state. Broadband access is vital for economic growth in Western Massachusetts, Nakajima said.

“There are 45 communities that don’t have any broadband access right now,” Nakajima said. “Until we built the Massachusetts broadband ‘middle mile’ network, which was completed just this past year, there were over 1,000 community organizations and institutions like town halls, libraries, elementary schools, as well as public safety, that lacked broadband access. Broadband is what telephony and electricity and other basic infrastructure were in the last century.”


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Jonathan A. Bennett
Scoop.it!

LG Revealed Super-Thin OLED TV | | Jonathan Bennett | 3DSmartLEDTV.com

LG Revealed Super-Thin OLED TV | | Jonathan Bennett | 3DSmartLEDTV.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Gone are those days when people use to watch 20 inches CRT televisions. Those sets used to be very heavy and weigh almost thousands of pounds. But gradually the technology is changing and so is the TV sets. The displays of TV sets have become quite thinner from before with the launch of LED and LCD TVs. But now the LED TVs are no more the thinnest TV sets as LG has revealed the stunning and super-thin OLED TV. It is so thin and light in weight that it appears like a wallpaper and can be even mounted on the wall with the help of magnets.

This OLED TV comes with a super thin 55 inch screen which is about 0.04 inches thick. It is so light that it weighs only about 4.2 pounds. That is why it can be easily stuck onto the wall using a magnetic mat. This wallpaper television comes with a lot of great features. These features are:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Cloud gaming at 4K still years away, Nvidia CEO says | Agam Shah | NetworkWorld.com

Cloud gaming at 4K still years away, Nvidia CEO says | Agam Shah | NetworkWorld.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Don’t expect online games to stream to your TV or PC at 4K resolution anytime soon.

While it is possible to stream 4K movies from online services like Netflix to PCs, TVs and set-top boxes, streaming games from the cloud requires many infrastructure changes, said Jen-Hsun Huang, CEO of Nvidia, during a media briefing at Computex.

Nvidia can currently stream 1080p games at 60 frames per second from its Grid online gaming service, but the technology needs to be developed for 4K streaming and a lot of fine-tuning is needed at the server level, Huang said.
INSIDER: 5 ways to prepare for Internet of Things security threats

“It’s going to be a while,” Huang said.

Many 4K TVs and monitors are already available, and display images at the 3840 x 2160-pixel resolution. Games typically require two-way communications, and servers process bits related to games differently than video streams.

Nvidia currently uses high-end GPUs on the server side for the Grid service to optimize games for Internet connections. The resolution of the game stream, however, depends on the quality of the connection, and streaming 4K games would likely require faster Internet connections.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Universal Service in an All-IP World: All the People, All the Places | Edyael Casperalta | Public Knowledge

Universal Service in an All-IP World: All the People, All the Places | Edyael Casperalta | Public Knowledge | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Today Public Knowledge released a white paper about the tech transitions, authored by Jodie Griffin. The following blog post provides some background. The paper can be downloaded here.

Most Americans can’t remember a time when they did not have access to a telephone, whether in their neighborhood, their house, or more recently, their back pocket. This almost ubiquitous availability of telephones is not an accident. For decades we have made it our goal to ensure that 100% of Americans have access to communications services that allow them to participate in our society. Today, 97% of Americans have access to a telephone line thanks to carefully thought out policy decisions born out of our commitment to Universal Service.

Universal Service is the principle at the heart of American policymaking in the communications sector: that the tremendous benefits communications services offer to society should be universally available. We are committed to connecting “all the people, all the places.”[1] And the strides we have made towards this goal are commendable. The reach of our telephone network has positioned our country as a leader not only in communications services, but also in efforts to create an inclusive society. Further, the open, reliable network we nurtured became a platform to launch technological advancements. Fax machines, phones, medical alert monitors, cell phones, and the World Wide Web, among other devices and applications, were all developed on the shoulders of a reliable landline network.

But, the way the network works is changing. Carriers have traditionally used copper wires and TDM technology to bring telephone service to your home and business. Now, they have begun to transition to networks that use wireless, fiber, and/or Internet Protocol (IP) technologies. This change in the underlying technology of our telephone network is a process called the Technology Transitions.

The transitions present us with the opportunity to improve communications services for all Americans, and most importantly, to reaffirm our commitment to provide all people and all places with the tools that allow them to participate in our society. Public Knowledge’s new “Universal Service in an All-IP World” paper helps us think through the questions we must grapple with if we are to continue to uphold 100% access as our communications policy goal, regardless of the technology underlying the network. The paper provides us with a brief history of the communications network in our country and the policies that shaped it. This history is a departure point to ask ourselves what basic communications service means in today’s world, how we should measure it, and what tools policymakers can use to achieve universal access in new technologies.


Click headline to read more and access hot link to download the white paper--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

US Senate advances NSA reform — but program to lapse at midnight | Julian Hattem | The Hill

US Senate advances NSA reform — but program to lapse at midnight | Julian Hattem | The Hill | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The Senate voted on Sunday to advance legislation reforming National Security Agency surveillance programs in a 77-17 vote.

The bipartisan approval sets up a vote on final passage that will send the legislation to the White House, where President Obama has vowed to sign it. Sixty votes were needed to move forward.

But the legislation will not reach Obama’s desk until after midnight, when Patriot Act provisions authorizing the NSA programs expire.

That means there will be a lapse of the programs until the Senate can take a final vote on the legislation.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who has made the spying programs unearthed by former government contractor Edward Snowden a central part of his presidential candidacy, has vowed to force the expiration of the Patriot Act.

Paul argues the USA Freedom Act approved by the House does not go far enough to rein in spying programs that he and his allies argue are unconstitutional.

“Are we going to so blithely give up our freedom? Are we going to so blindly go along and take it?” Paul said in heated remarks on the Senate floor before the vote.

“I’m not going to take it anymore,” he declared, as his voice rose to a shout. “I don’t think the American people are going to take it anymore.”

Paul’s comments came during a rare Sunday session of the Senate that was scheduled because of the deadline.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What Periscope Reveals About U.S. Telecom Infrastructure | Vienna Rye | Medium.com

What Periscope Reveals About U.S. Telecom Infrastructure - Tendigi Insights - Medium

When Periscope exploded onto the scene a month ago, it quickly set a new industry standard for the possibilities of video-streaming. Launched by Twitter, Periscope carries significant potential to change not only the speed and intimacy by which we interact, but to ultimately redefine the power of citizen journalism. Amplified by Spotify’s newly announced video-streaming service and the recent launch of Reddit’s own video curation service, the demand for digital video shows no signs of slowing down, leaving us with a very important question: can the current telecom infrastructure keep up with consumer data demand?


Manhattan show Verizon as the clear leader with average download speeds of 32 Mbps, while AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint all performed with terribly disappointing download speeds. Many carriers today find themselves perpetually scrambling to keep pace with increasing data demand, bringing questions of imminent, real-world limitations to the forefront. Are we prepared for video-streaming en masse, on a structural, network level? And if we are not, how can we be?


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Time Warner Deal: Big Cable Is Coming for Big Wireless | Joshua Brustein | Bloomberg.com

The Time Warner Deal: Big Cable Is Coming for Big Wireless | Joshua Brustein | Bloomberg.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Time Warner Cable is once again at the center of a cable megamerger, in the form of a $55 billion deal with Charter. The last time a cable giant tried to buy Time Warner Cable, the deal collapsed, largely over concerns about how bad it would be for customers. Charter is already hard at work arguing why it’s different this time around. And while Charter will be talking largely about how the cable industry will stay competitive, the deal could also result in some new competition in another arena dominated by a small number of companies that wield immense power: wireless.

Cable companies and wireless companies haven’t traditionally infringed on each others’ territory. The cable industry has focused on pay television; the wireless industry was all about phone calls. Today the main business of both industries is selling access to the Internet. Cable companies are developing their own wireless services in which people spend most of their time connected to Wi-Fi networks and fall back on cellular service to fill the gaps.

Doing this requires some access to cellular spectrum. Both Comcast and Time Warner Cable sold Verizon their rights to wireless spectrum in a $3.6 billion deal in 2011 but maintained the ability to access Verizon’s network for their own services. Verizon was largely seen to have gotten a sweetheart deal at the time, says Jonathan Chaplin, an analyst at New Street Research. But he doesn’t think Verizon would strike a similar deal today.

“Nobody was talking about Wi-Fi-first wireless models,” he says. “Between then and now, though, a couple of these businesses were launched in Europe by cable companies and have been incredibly successful.” One of them, notably, was Telenet, a Belguim-based company owned by Liberty Global. John Malone is chairman of both Liberty Global and Liberty Media, Charter's largest shareholder.

Wi-Fi-first wireless services are slowly coming to the U.S. Smaller players have offered similar services for years at very low prices, Google used the approach when it launched its own wireless service last month, and Cablevision recently launched its own Wi-Fi-first wireless service. T-Mobile and Sprint have been happy to sell wholesale access to their networks for companies looking to resell wireless service. None of the existing products seem quite ready to compete with standard cellular plans -- but the big players haven’t yet arrived. The Charter-Time Warner deal would give the combined company about 17.8 million Web subscribers second only to Comcast's 22.4 million, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Comcast is planning its own service Wi-Fi-first service while Charter believes it will inherit its access to Verizon’s spectrum if the Time Warner deal moves forward.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.