Surfing the Broad...
Follow
Find
116.0K views | +81 today
 
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

The Need For Speed | TechCrunch

The Need For Speed | TechCrunch | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

This week’s iPhone announcement and last week’s release of the new Kindle Fire, Windows 8/Nokia Phone, and Droid RAZR by Google/Motorola offer the latest evidence that, over the past few years, the U.S. has regained global leadership in key areas of communications technology.

 

These high-powered devices, and the demands they place on our broadband networks, underscore a critical challenge. To ensure the U.S. is at the forefront of the next wave of Internet innovation, we need to drive continued improvements in our wired and wireless broadband infrastructure – super-fast, high-capacity, and ubiquitous broadband networks.

 

To risk the colloquial, we feel the need – the need for speed. As Tom Friedman and others have written, in this flat global economy a strategic bandwidth advantage will help keep the U.S. as the home and most desired destination for the world’s greatest innovators and entrepreneurs.

 

It wasn’t long ago that Asia and Europe were seen as ahead of the U.S. in broadband-powered innovation and infrastructure. Take mobile. As a 2008 Businessweek story said, America’s reputation for too long was as a “wireless backwater.” But thanks to America’s innovative technology and broadband companies, and to smart government policies, the story today is different. It’s one of comeback and leadership.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Everything about Broadband Policy, Network Infrastructure, Voice, Video and Data Services, Devices and Applications for Managing our Planet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Nevada must get serious about workforce development | Mike Kazmierski Blog | Reno Gazette-Journal

Nevada must get serious about workforce development | Mike Kazmierski Blog | Reno Gazette-Journal | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

We are at the cusp of historic growth in the region, due in part to Tesla's announcement to expand here, but even more as a result of the more than 60 additional new companies that have relocated to the region over the past few years. Add to this the scores of additional companies we are working with; many that have already decided to come here; and the countless local companies that are expanding. The projections are staggering, that more than 50,000 new jobs will be added to this region in the next five years. This is a 25% increase in employment, but with far less than 50,000 available workers in the region, it is time to get serious about workforce attraction and development.

Workforce "attraction" is simply attracting talent to the region to help meet the needs of the employers in the area now and in the near future. With a significant percentage of our job opportunities in the advanced manufacturing sector there are several things we can do now to get in front of this challenge.


There is little doubt that the needs of Tesla will be met, as there are employees across the country that would be excited to work for a company like Tesla. We must consider the needs of the many other manufacturing companies in the area and market our region as the "manufacturing hub of the West", using the surge of manufacturing growth in the region as our proof. In promoting this region as a manufacturing hub, a developing technology center (with data center additions like Apple and Switch) and a growing and vibrant economy, we will attract talent across all disciplines to the region in search of a quality job in an up-and-coming economy.


However, to be truly effective at attracting talent, especially in the technology sector, we must ensure that the millennials and the creative class find our region welcoming and attractive. There are certain things that are important to these employees and we are fortunate to have many of these qualities already: a great outdoor environment, an exciting arts and culture scene, countless events and activities, a growing entrepreneurial ecosystem and an increasing number of great restaurants. Yet there is more work to be done. We must continue to revitalize our downtown and engage and promote the college town atmosphere that will make us "the cool place to be" in the years ahead.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Moore's Law Is Dead. Long Live Moore's Law. | Alex Lidow | Re/Code.net

Moore's Law Is Dead. Long Live Moore's Law. | Alex Lidow | Re/Code.net | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The year is 1965. The Beatles release four albums. The war rages on in Vietnam. And a research-and-development professional by the name of Gordon Moore makes a bold prediction that will have irrevocable implications on technological development, impacting many sectors of the global economy for decades to come.

Over the last 50 years, Moore’s observation — that the number of transistors on silicon chips and therefore their processing power was doubling approximately every 24 months — has evolved from observation to market demand to Moore’s law.

As we reflect on Moore’s law at its 50th anniversary, we cannot overlook its significance. It is at the heart of the entire technology industry and beyond, driving productivity, the economy and, indeed, human society.

And in fact, Moore’s predictions became a self-fulfilling prophecy. The computing power of chips not only did double every 24 months, they had to double every 24 months or the tech industry — and the economy at large — would suffer dire consequences, stifling innovation and economic advancement.


Looking ahead, the real implications of Moore’s law provide far greater value than the technological advantages alone. Over the last few years, next-generation applications have been dreamed about in labs that will make the past decades of advances appear trivial. Sensors, actuators and overall connectivity between our physical world and networks are booming, with some estimates claiming that today’s 12 billion devices produced annually will grow to more than 50 billion or even a trillion over the next decade. Semiconductors will transform entire industries by helping monitor and manage supply chains with great precision and efficiency.


But here’s the rub. Moore’s law is running out of gas. In 2012, for example, the cost per silicon transistor started to climb due to the investment required for each new, more powerful generation of chip. Further, silicon has reached its performance limitations, failing to fuel innovation at the speed to which we have become accustomed.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Will Amazon.com Inc.’s Internet of Things Ambitions Pan Out? | Leo Sun | Motley Fool

Will Amazon.com Inc.’s Internet of Things Ambitions Pan Out? | Leo Sun | Motley Fool | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Amazon.com recently unveiled the Dash Button, a tiny button that can be stuck or clipped to various surfaces around the home. When pressed, the device automatically orders preset consumable products such as Glad trash bags, Gillette razors, Cottonelle toilet paper, Huggies diapers, and Tide detergent.

The Dash Button synchronizes to Amazon's mobile shopping app via Wi-Fi, and the user sets the quantities that are ordered with each press of the button. The device will be available to select Prime members who request an invitation. Amazon will give up to three Dash Buttons for free to accepted members.


Amazon is also working with companies to integrate the same technology into household gadgets. Brita is developing a pitcher that can automatically order water filters, Brother is making a printer that can order ink, and Whirlpool is creating a washer and dryer that can automatically order detergent. Amazon's goal is to streamline the shopping process, while companies will benefit from branded buttons encouraging brand loyalty.


This isn't the first time Amazon has tried to expand its presence in homes. Last year, it launched the Fire TV and Fire TV Stick, which tether TVs to Amazon's ecosystem. It launched the Dash bar-code scanner, a wand-like device that uses a bar-code scanner and voice commands to order groceries and other products through AmazonFresh. Last November, it launched Echo, an always-on speaker that can answer questions, stream music, and perform other virtual assistant tasks.


These devices all expand Amazon's presence in the Internet of Things, or IoT, where sensors connect everyday objects to the cloud and each other. IDC forecasts the IoT market will grow from $1.9 trillion in 2013 to $7.1 trillion by 2020. Networking giant Cisco believes the number of connected devices worldwide will double from 25 billion in 2015 to 50 billion by 2020.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Community Foundations: A New Anchor Mission for a New Century | Democracy Collaboration

Community Foundations: A New Anchor Mission for a New Century | Democracy Collaboration | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

It was in 2005 that the highly regarded Monitor Institute report declared that the field of community foundations was “On the Brink of New Promise,” and in the decade since, there have been countless working groups and initiatives to introduce innovative approaches to the field.


At the same time, largely beneath the radar, a small but growing group has begun pursuing the innovative path we explore here. Mostly in small steps—but sometimes in larger ways—they are adopting elements of what could emerge as a new anchor mission to deploy all resources to build community wealth.

Why are these community foundations moving in this direction? What exactly are they doing? To find the answer, we examined a representative group of 30 innovative community foundations, of varying sizes, in various stages of development.


For some, the shift involves a focus on catalyzing economic development. This generally involves a move beyond simply disbursing grants toward a leadership or catalytic role, proactively shaping initiatives, and using grantmaking in partnership with approaches like convening, piloting projects, and influencing policy.


Others are rethinking how they use their assets and are experimenting with impact investing, which we define here as making investments that seek both financial return and social impact. In the process, these foundations are sometimes engaging donors and other investors around how they make investments. Some foundations examined here are doing both economic development and impact investing.


Click headline to read more and access hot link to download report--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Why livestreaming apps like Meerkat and Periscope will be a huge boon for cops | Brian Fung | WashPost.com

Why livestreaming apps like Meerkat and Periscope will be a huge boon for cops | Brian Fung | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

When a building in New York recently caught fire and partially collapsed, injuring 30, many people's first instinct was to turn to social media. On Periscope, Twitter's livestreaming video app, users could watch in real time as first-responders arrived on the scene and closed down the street.

It's easy to see why services like Periscope — and its slightly older rival, Meerkat — are taking off. They let us experience viscerally — and anonymously — what's happening to other people as though we're behind the camera ourselves. The last generation of social media could only hint at that kind of engagement through short snippets of text and pretty pictures.

But as empowering as these apps are, expect them to grant even greater capabilities to law enforcement — who, through watching live videos of people screwing up, will gain an unprecedented ability to catch criminals in the act and gather embarrassing evidence of wrongdoing.

"There'll be thieves showing off their goods" on these services, said Stephen Balkam, president of the Family Online Safety Institute. "That's as stupid as it gets."

If you think that's far-fetched, you clearly haven't been introduced to the wealth of crazy that's already pervasive on Periscope and Meerkat. Vice has an exhaustive rundown of users broadcasting themselves smoking pot, driving cars and showing skin (or promising to do so). One recent stream I watched was simply pointed at the TV, where an episode of "Family Guy" appeared to be playing.

Many of these behaviors might be considered illegal in some jurisdictions. Unless you're in Colorado, Alaska, the nation's capital or a couple other places, it's still against the law to use marijuana. Rebroadcasting a TV show you're watching? That's not much different from walking into a movie theater with Google Glass, a decision that can get you thrown out — or worse.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Lobbyists for Spies Appointed To Oversee Spying for Congress | Lee Fang | The Intercept

Lobbyists for Spies Appointed To Oversee Spying for Congress | Lee Fang | The Intercept | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Who’s keeping watch of the National Security Agency? In Congress, the answer in more and more cases is that the job is going to former lobbyists for NSA contractors and other intelligence community insiders.

A wave of recent appointments has placed intelligence industry insiders into key Congressional roles overseeing intelligence gathering. The influx of insiders is particularly alarming because lawmakers in Washington are set to take up a series of sensitive surveillance and intelligence issues this year, from reform of the Patriot Act to far-reaching “information sharing” legislation.

After the first revelations of domestic surveillance by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, President Obama defended the spying programs by claiming they were “subject to congressional oversight and congressional reauthorization and congressional debate.” But as Rep. Alan Grayson, D-Fla., and other members of Congress have pointed out, there is essentially a “two-tiered” system for oversight, with lawmakers and staff on specialized committees, such as the House and Senate committees on Intelligence and Homeland Security, controlling the flow of information and routinely excluding other Congress members, even those who have asked for specific information relating to pending legislation.

The Intercept reviewed the new gatekeepers in Congress, the leading staffers on the committees overseeing intelligence and surveillance matters, and found a large number of lobbyists and consultants passing through the revolving door between the intelligence community and the watchdogs who purportedly oversee the intelligence community. We reached out to each of them earlier this week and have yet to hear back:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

FBI can’t cut Internet and pose as cable guy to search property, judge says | David Kravets | Ars Technica

FBI can’t cut Internet and pose as cable guy to search property, judge says | David Kravets | Ars Technica | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A federal judge issued a stern rebuke Friday to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's method for breaking up an illegal online betting ring. The Las Vegas court frowned on the FBI's ruse of disconnecting Internet access to $25,000-per-night villas at Caesar's Palace Hotel and Casino. FBI agents posed as the cable guy and secretly searched the premises.

The government claimed the search was legal because the suspects invited the agents into the room to fix the Internet. US District Judge Andrew P. Gordon wasn't buying it. He ruled that if the government could get away with such tactics like those they used to nab gambling kingpin Paul Phua and some of his associates, then the government would have carte blanche power to search just about any property.

"Permitting the government to create the need for the occupant to invite a third party into his or her home would effectively allow the government to conduct warrantless searches of the vast majority of residents and hotel rooms in America," Gordon wrote in throwing out evidence the agents collected. "Authorities would need only to disrupt phone, Internet, cable, or other 'non-essential' service and then pose as technicians to gain warrantless entry to the vast majority of homes, hotel rooms, and similarly protected premises across America."

The government had urged the court to uphold the search, arguing that it employs "ruses every day in its undercover operations." (PDF) The government noted that US judges have previously upheld government ruses to gain access into dwellings.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

After 50 years, Moore's Law teaches the power in a grain of rice | Drew Clark | DeseretNews.com

After 50 years, Moore's Law teaches the power in a grain of rice | Drew Clark | DeseretNews.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

The world that we live in today is fundamentally different because of a four-page article published 50 years ago today in Electronics magazine. It is inspiring for me to try to quantify its impact.

The article, "Cramming More Components onto Integrated Circuits," was written by Gordon Moore, then director of research and development at Fairchild Semiconductor in what would later be called Silicon Valley. Three years later, in 1968, Moore teamed up with Robert Noyce to co-found Intel. That company’s name is an abbreviation for the integrated electronics on a silicon-based computer chip.

Moore's Law was Gordon Moore’s prediction that computing power would double every 18 months. Each new generation of microprocessor contains twice as many transistors as the last one. Each new hard drive, smartphone and smartwatch stores more bits of data than the last. Each new form of fiber-optic wires or radio transmission passes information faster.

The aspirational projection embedded in Moore's Law is the reason we now enjoy the benefits of the digital world in which we live. It has been bountiful for our economy, our culture and our society.

Consider what Moore's Law’s has wrought:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Congress cannot be taken seriously on cybersecurity | Trevor Timm | The Guardian

Congress cannot be taken seriously on cybersecurity | Trevor Timm | The Guardian | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Members of Congress - most of whom can’t secure their own websites, and some of whom don’t even use email - are trying to force a dangerous “cybersecurity” bill down the public’s throat. Everyone’s privacy is in the hands of people who, by all indications, have no idea what they’re talking about.

Leaders are expected to bring its much-maligned series of “cybersecurity” bills to the floor sometime in the next couple weeks - bills that we know will do little to help cybersecurity but a lot to help intelligence agencies like the NSA vacuum up even more of Americans’ personal information. The bills’ authors deny that privacy is even an issue, but why we’re trusting Congress at all on this legislation, given their lack of basic knowledge on the subject, is the question everyone should be asking.

Just look at Congress’ own cybersecurity practices. None of the members of the Senate’s Intelligence Committee - the most influential cybersecurity oversight body in Congress - have websites that use HTTPS encryption, which is increasingly becoming the standard for websites who want to provide basic security protections for the people who visit them (Google and others have had it for years).

It’s such a vital tool that the executive branch recently promised to move all its websites over to HTTPS within two years - many of its agencies, though not all, have already made the switch. But there’s not even a hint that Congress is attempting to do the same. (The website of the Senate Intelligence Committee, which is in charge of cybersecurity oversight on the Senate side, also looks like it was designed in 1996.)

An overlooked but important Politico article published in January examined Congress’ own cybersecurity practices when it comes to defending their networks. Reporter Tal Kopan quoted several Congressional staffers saying Congress barely does anything to protect itself from cyberattacks, despite being a juicy target for foreign intelligence agencies. “Few could remember any kind of IT security training, and if they did, it wasn’t taken seriously”, Kopan reported

And how many Congressional staffers and their bosses protect their emails or phone calls with encryption? ACLU’s Chief technologist Chris Soghoian told me yesterday that using any sort of encryption tools “is the exception rather than the norm.” He said: “Most members of Congress and most congressional staff use unencrypted email and unencrypted telephones. Their communications are undoubtedly targeted by foreign intelligence services, just as the NSA targets the communications of foreign political leaders and their staff.” Not exactly encouraging.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NWI: Leaving tech center a sign of success | Karen Caffarini | Post-Tribune.com

NWI: Leaving tech center a sign of success | Karen Caffarini | Post-Tribune.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

In one room of the Purdue Technology Center of Northwest Indiana (NWI), phone IT professionals from as far away as France and Costa Rica are nearing the end of a two-week advanced class on the CISCO phone system.

In another, students learn how to become ultrasound technicians, using a machine to probe an actual heart. Elsewhere in the building, people are doing cancer research.

The modern 60,000-square-foot building, which is turning 10 in July, is almost 70 percent full with 40 tenants, about 95 percent of which are tech-related in one way or another, according to operations manager David LaMere.

LaMere said the center, part of the Purdue Research Park in Ameriplex at the Crossroads at 101st and Broadway, gets new tenants all the time, which in its case, is a positive.

An incubator designed to help start-up companies with the aid of conference rooms, videoconferencing capabilities and a receptionist and telephone answering service, the hope is that tenants grow and move on to their own, larger spaces.

"Tenants can stay here a year or forever," he said.

One success case has grown and decided to expand in the center.

IT hardware and software solutions firm CSO IT Procurement went from one small office to four, one of which houses its data center, vice president Ray Govert said.

"The Purdue Tech Center is a perfect fit for us. It's affiliated with Purdue University Calumet in Hammond, IN and we're involved in education. It's looking for upstart companies and has conference rooms for up to 50 to 60 people. We're just getting rolling and need some conference space," Govert said.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

KS: Jeff Fluhr to head new, broader Wichita economic development effort | Dan Voorhis | The Wichita Eagle

KS: Jeff Fluhr to head new, broader Wichita economic development effort | Dan Voorhis | The Wichita Eagle | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Saying it’s time to speed up the area’s economic growth, senior Wichita business leaders went public with a plan Friday to reorganize and broaden the area’s economic development apparatus.

They also changed personnel: Jeff Fluhr, president of the Wichita Downtown Development Corp., will head a new economic development umbrella group, the Greater Wichita Partnership.

Tim Chase is out as head of the Greater Wichita Economic Development Coalition.

The Greater Wichita Partnership will oversee the Greater Wichita Economic Development Coalition, Wichita Downtown Development Corp. and committees working on education and entrepreneurship – and the partnership could eventually extend to include other groups throughout the community and region.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Can a happy, crunchy company like Etsy really survive on Wall Street? | Drew Harwell | WashPost.com

Can a happy, crunchy company like Etsy really survive on Wall Street? | Drew Harwell | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

When American companies go public, most make a promise — that they will “maximize shareholder value” — without saying exactly what those three words mean. Does that include paying hard-working employees minimum wage? Jacking up prices? Or cutting jobs even when they make a profit?

Then there's Etsy, the online bazaar of often bizarre artisanal wares that set Thursday for its stock debut. When it announced its initial public offering last month, the Brooklyn-based craft marketplace made it clear that it valued social consciousness more than making sure stockholders made the most dough.

“For decades now, the conventional and dominant retail model has relentlessly focused on delivering goods at the lowest price, valuing products and profit over community,” Etsy chief executive Chad Dickerson wrote in securities filings. “I do not believe that this race to the bottom is a sustainable, successful model. ... If we succeed, then other companies might replicate our model. We think the world will be a better place for it.”

Etsy's share price roughly doubled on its first day on the market, ending Thursday at $30 and helping the firm raise about $300 million. Valuing the company at about $3 billion, investors made Etsy one of the largest initial public offerings for a tech company this year.

Etsy leaders said they hope the offering will give them more visibility in a crowded tech marketplace and leave them with cash they need to grow. But Etsy's long-term success on the stock market will be determined largely by just how much conscious capitalism Wall Street investors are willing to bet on.

If too many are turned off by all the hand-holding and altruism, Etsy's stock price could sink — or, as some Etsy regulars worry, the firm could give in, and become exactly the type of company they hoped to avoid.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

A crisis in telecommunications infrastructure as Moore's Law turns 50 | Fred Pilot | Eldo Telecom

A crisis in telecommunications infrastructure as Moore's Law turns 50 | Fred Pilot | Eldo Telecom | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Silicon Valley marks 50 years of Moore's Law - ContraCostaTimes.com: Thanks to Moore's Law, people carry smartphones in their pocket or purse that are more powerful than the biggest computers made in 1965 -- or 1995, for that matter. Without it, there would be no slender laptops, no computers powerful enough to chart a genome or design modern medicine's lifesaving drugs. Streaming video, social media, search, the cloud -- none of that would be possible on today's scale.

"It fueled the information age," said Craig Hampel, chief scientist at Rambus, a Sunnyvale semiconductor company. "As you drive around Silicon Valley, 99 percent of the companies you see wouldn't be here" without cheap computer memory due to Moore's Law.

As I've blogged in this space before, Moore's Law is directly affecting and redefining Internet telecommunications where bandwidth demand is growing at a pace comparable to microprocessor capacity.

That's creating a crisis because the fiber optic telecommunications infrastructure serving homes, businesses and institutions that's needed to accommodate this growth isn't in place in most areas or plans drawn up for its construction and financing.


Click headline to access hot link--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Rise of the Digital Capital Economy | Irving Wladawsky-Berger Blog | WSJ.com

The Rise of the Digital Capital Economy | Irving Wladawsky-Berger Blog | WSJ.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

I just read an interesting article that was published last summer in Foreign Affairs, New World Order: Labor, Capital, and Ideas in the Power Law Economy. The article was written by MIT professor Erik Brynjolfsson and MIT Principal Research Scientist Andy McAfee, who are also director and co-director respectively of the Initiative on the Digital Economy; and by Michael Spence, professor in NYU’s Stern School of Business, professor and dean emeritus of the Stanford Graduate School of Business, and recipient of the 2001 Nobel Prize in economics.

A major transition is now taking place in our digital economy. Over the past few decades, advances in technology, and the Internet in particular, have helped create an increasingly global marketplace for labor and capital. A highly connected, global economy has been rising all around us, whose magnitude and implications were brought to light by NY Times columnist Tom Friedman in his 2005 bestseller The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Globalized World in the Twenty-first Century.

Another bestseller, The Second Machine Age, published last year by Mssrs. Brynjolfsson and McAfee, is now helping to explain our new era of data science, AI and advanced automation. These second age machines are being increasingly applied to activities requiring intelligence and cognitive capabilities that not long ago were viewed as the exclusive domain of humans, while enabling us to process vast amounts of information and tackle ever more complex problems.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Connected Nation Maps and Data – new Minnesota maps on the way | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

Here’s the word from the Office of Broadband Development:

The Office of Broadband Development is pleased to announce that it has entered into a contract with Connected Nation to continue mapping broadband availability in Minnesota. Connected Nation is in the process of collecting data from providers in the state and updated maps should be available in June 2015. Information on broadband availability can be found at http://mn.gov/deed/programs-services/broadband/maps-tests/index.jsp Updated information will also be posted at that location.

I guess that’s the inspiration I need to finish tracking the county profiles based on the last maps. It will be interesting to see how we’ve progressed. I guess it’s too early to track the impact of the Minnesota Broadband Funds – but maybe not too early to track in the impact of the discussions leading up to the proposals and awards.


Click headline to read more and access hot link--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

KY: Statewide broadband by 2018 | Gary Wollenhaupt | Lane Report

KY: Statewide broadband by 2018 | Gary Wollenhaupt | Lane Report | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Imagine downloading an entire movie in just a few seconds, or a business sending massive 3D printing files around the world. That’s the kind of jumpstart Gov. Steve Beshear hopes to provide with the Next Generation Kentucky Information Highway, a plan to extend high-speed broadband service via fiber optic lines to all 120 counties by 2018.

In December 2014, Gov. Steve Beshear and U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers, the Somerset Republican who since the 1980 election has represented most of the commonwealth’s Appalachian region, announced a contract with Australia-based Macquarie Capital to bring high-speed Internet connectivity to the state. The project will include more than 3,000 miles of fiber in all 120 counties, and Eastern Kentucky will be the first priority area.

Rogers and Beshear have spearheaded the Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR) initiative, aimed at improving economic development and public infrastructure in the Appalachian region. Having long endured fewer jobs, lower incomes and lagging infrastructure, Eastern Kentucky in the past few years has lost half the coal mining jobs that were among the best paying to residents there. SOAR’s aim is to move the economic needle broadly upward.

Across the state, most home Internet services are delivered via telephone lines or cable TV connections that don’t qualify as broadband service today – defined now as download speeds of 25 megabits per second rather than the 2010 benchmark of 4Mbps. Businesses in some large cities have fast options for Internet service through telecommunications providers, but at a high cost and not at the level this project will provide.

The project is designed to address the fact that Kentucky ranks 46th in broadband availability, and slow service is still a reality in the 23 percent of the state’s rural areas that do not have access to broadband of any type.

The contract with Macquarie, estimated at $250 million to $350 million depending on how much existing infrastructure is used, will target Eastern Kentucky first for fiber optic installation and connectivity.


Click headline to read more, view map and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NY pledges $200 million for photonics center in Rochester | Matthew Daneman | Democrat & Chronicle

NY pledges $200 million for photonics center in Rochester | Matthew Daneman | Democrat & Chronicle | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

New York state is promising to pony up $200 million toward a photonics prototyping and testing facility in Rochester if Uncle Sam also kicks in.

The SUNY Research Foundation, the University of Central Florida and the University of Southern California all are vying for $110 million from the U.S. Defense Department for a high-tech Institute for Manufacturing Innovation focused on photonics. That Institute has to be matched with at least $110 million in non-federal funding.

The SUNY Research Foundation pitch revolves around numerous educational institutions and companies partnering up, including the University of Rochester, Rochester Institute of Technology, SUNY Polytechnic Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Arizona, as well as Corning Inc. and IBM.

The SUNY Research proposal is significantly Rochester-centric and points out the significant number of optics and photonics companies locally. Its ultimate aim is cutting the cost of photonics-related technology as well as making an easier path for turning those technologies into products.

In a letter released Thursday by the office of U.S. Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-Fairport, state Department of Economic Development Commissioner Howard Zemsky wrote the Air Force — the lead agency in the Defense Department project — saying that if the New York-centric application is chosen, the Empire State would chip in $250 million over the next five years.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How Google Is Trying to Make Its Employees Less Prejudiced | Joe Pinsker | The Atlantic

How Google Is Trying to Make Its Employees Less Prejudiced | Joe Pinsker | The Atlantic | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Self-driving cars, balloons that beam Internet service to previously unconnected citizens below, immortality—these are the farsighted, high-risk pursuits that Google calls its "moonshots." But another one of its wildly ambitious projects isn't classified as such, and falls a lot closer to campus: curbing workplace discrimination. The company, which has roughly two male employees for every female employee, has spent three years making data-based revisions to its hiring and promotion processes.

No company—and certainly no tech company—has figured out how to dissolve the unconscious biases that govern human-resources decisions. And even if Google found a proven fix for its diversity problem, change would still come slowly. “At our rate of hiring, if we wanted to move to 50-50, we'd have to hire only women for something like the next four, five, or six years,” says Laszlo Bock, the senior vice president of people operations at Google. “To have a meaningful change in the numbers and representation is actually going to take a while because it turns out it's illegal to only hire women or only hire African Americans. So it's going more slowly than I'd like, and more slowly than we'd like."


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Justice Department Nearing Decision to Block Comcast-Time Warner Cable Merger | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

Justice Department Nearing Decision to Block Comcast-Time Warner Cable Merger | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Staff attorneys that have reviewed details of the Time Warner Cable/Comcast merger proposal are prepared to make a recommendation as early as next week that the Department of Justice should block the deal because it is anti-competitive and anti-consumer.

The staff in the Justice Department’s antitrust division have spent more than a year reviewing documents submitted by both cable companies to determine what impact the merger would have on the cable television and broadband landscape.

Bloomberg News today reported the attorneys did not like what they saw and believe the merger would harm consumers. For the first time, a cable company merger deal was reviewed not so much for its impact on cable television programming, but on broadband.

When the Federal Communications Commission redefined broadband as an Internet connection of at least 25Mbps, Comcast suddenly found itself the largest broadband provider in the country. If the merger with Time Warner Cable is approved, Comcast will have a 56.8 percent market share of U.S. broadband customers, far exceeding any other provider.

In upstate New York, Comcast would have more than a 75% market share — nearly 9o% if you just consider non-Verizon FiOS areas. In California, Comcast would control more than 80% of the market, not only picking up Time Warner Cable customers, but Charter customers in Southern California as well.

Comcast and Time Warner Cable have argued competition is not affected because the two companies never compete with each other. But a de facto broadband monopoly could allow Comcast to raise rates at will and bring a return to usage-related billing. It would also discourage new competitors from entering the market – particularly those relying on broadband to deliver video services, and hand Comcast more leverage to force compensation from online content companies like Netflix.

Under consideration by the Justice Department:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The NSA wants tech companies to give it 'front door' access to encrypted data | Lizzie Plaugic | The Verge

The National Security Agency (NSA) is embroiled in a battle with tech companies over access to encrypted data that would allow it to spy (more easily) on millions of Americans and international citizens. Last month, companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple urged the Obama administration to put an end to the NSA's bulk collection of metadata. The NSA, on the other hand, continues to parade the idea that the government needs access to encrypted data on smartphones and other devices to track and prevent criminal activity. Now, NSA director Michael S. Rogers says he might have a solution.

During a recent speech at Princeton University, Rogers suggested tech companies could create a master multi-part encryption key capable of unlocking any device, The Washington Post reports. That way, if the key were broken into pieces, no single person would have the ability to use it.

"I don’t want a back door," Rogers said. "I want a front door. And I want the front door to have multiple locks. Big locks."

The suggestion comes as Congress considers a new framework for handling encrypted data. Government and law enforcement officials say total encryption could stand in the way of national security operations, while leaders in the tech industry and advocacy groups say the government shouldn't have complete, unobstructed access to citizens' private communications.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Hollywood Collectively Loses Its Mind About Latest Set Of Livestreaming Apps | | Mike Masnick | Techdirt

Hollywood Collectively Loses Its Mind About Latest Set Of Livestreaming Apps | | Mike Masnick | Techdirt | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

If you (lucky you!) don't pay attention to the latest craze among the internet media, you may have missed the mid-to-late-March hype cycle around two livestreaming apps that are available via Twitter.


The initial darling was Meerkat, which became this year's annual darling-for-a-week at SXSW. Soon after, it was eclipsed by Periscope, a startup that Twitter bought, just about the same time it pulled Meerkat's ability to push notifications out to users.


Both offer the same basic idea: enabling Twitter users to easily livestream video to their followers. Of course, livestreaming is not a new concept. It's been around for ages, and things like Ustream and JustinTV are well-known.


Even BitTorrent has tried to get into the livestreaming game. Not surprisingly, livestreaming technology has been particularly useful for newsworthy situations -- and have been used extensively in violent clashes around the globe or at protests like in Ferguson, Missouri last summer.

But, of course, Hollywood absolutely hates such things. For years, they've argued that Ustream and JustinTV were destroying their businesses because some people would turn on a television and set up their phone or computer to livestream whatever they were seeing.


So it should come as little shock that right after the media hype cycle around Periscope and Meerkat, a whole series of silly articles started appearing about the copyright consequences of livestreaming.


The Guardian warned that these new livestreaming apps "could cost unwary brands dear." Billboard warned that these two new apps created a "legal minefield" because a song playing in the background might (*gasp*) infringe on someone's copyrights. The Atlantic warned that these apps were enabling "a new kind of internet pirate."


And, CBS really went the distance with a fearmongering headline about how Periscope and Meerkat "threatened" the "multi-billion dollar sports broadcast copyrights," even though they do no such thing (and, in fact, that article speaks to no actual sports officials, whereas when Major League baseball was asked, it noted that it sees no real threat).

And, rather than admit that (1) livestreaming has been around for ages and hasn't really been a serious drag on revenue, and (2) it's not a particularly good user experience for watching broadcast content anyway, various folks in Hollywood lost their minds about these two new services.


The main culprit? HBO. After there were a few scattered reports of various Game of Thrones fans using Periscope to broadcast the latest episode of the popular show, HBO decided that it's all Twitter's fault, and who cares about DMCA safe harbors, something must be done, and Twitter has to do it:

"We are aware of Periscope and have sent takedown notices," an HBO spokeswoman said in a statement. "In general, we feel developers should have tools which proactively prevent mass copyright infringement from occurring on their apps and not be solely reliant upon notifications."

There are two issues there.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Google got it wrong. The open-office trend is destroying the workplace. | Lindsey Kaufman | WashPost.com

Google got it wrong. The open-office trend is destroying the workplace. | Lindsey Kaufman | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

A year ago, my boss announced that our large New York ad agency would be moving to an open office. After nine years as a senior writer, I was forced to trade in my private office for a seat at a long, shared table. It felt like my boss had ripped off my clothes and left me standing in my skivvies.

Our new, modern Tribeca office was beautifully airy, and yet remarkably oppressive. Nothing was private. On the first day, I took my seat at the table assigned to our creative department, next to a nice woman who I suspect was an air horn in a former life. All day, there was constant shuffling, yelling, and laughing, along with loud music piped through a PA system. As an excessive water drinker, I feared my co-workers were tallying my frequent bathroom trips. At day’s end, I bid adieu to the 12 pairs of eyes I felt judging my 5:04 p.m. departure time. I beelined to the Beats store to purchase their best noise-cancelling headphones in an unmistakably visible neon blue.

Despite its obvious problems, the open-office model has continued to encroach on workers across the country. Now, about 70 percent of U.S. offices have no or low partitions, according to the International Facility Management Association. Silicon Valley has been the leader in bringing down the dividers. Google, Yahoo, eBay, Goldman Sachs and American Express are all adherents. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg enlisted famed architect Frank Gehry to design the largest open floor plan in the world, housing nearly 3,000 engineers. And as a businessman, Michael Bloomberg was an early adopter of the open-space trend, saying it promoted transparency and fairness. He famously carried the model into city hall when he became mayor of New York, making “the Bullpen” a symbol of open communication and accessibility to the city’s chief.

These new floor plans are ideal for maximizing a company’s space while minimizing costs. Bosses love the ability to keep a closer eye on their employees, ensuring clandestine porn-watching, constant social media-browsing and unlimited personal cellphone use isn’t occupying billing hours. But employers are getting a false sense of improved productivity. A 2013 study found that many workers in open offices are frustrated by distractions that lead to poorer work performance. Nearly half of the surveyed workers in open offices said the lack of sound privacy was a significant problem for them and more than 30 percent complained about the lack of visual privacy. Meanwhile, “ease of interaction” with colleagues — the problem that open offices profess to fix — was cited as a problem by fewer than 10 percent of workers in any type of office setting. In fact, those with private offices were least likely to identify their ability to communicate with colleagues as an issue. In a previous study, researchers concluded that “the loss of productivity due to noise distraction … was doubled in open-plan offices compared to private offices.”

The New Yorker, in a review of research on this nouveau workplace design, determined that the benefits in building camaraderie simply mask the negative effects on work performance. While employees feel like they’re part of a laid-back, innovative enterprise, the environment ultimately damages workers’ attention spans, productivity, creative thinking, and satisfaction. Furthermore, a sense of privacy boosts job performance, while the opposite can cause feelings of helplessness. In addition to the distractions, my colleagues and I have been more vulnerable to illness. Last flu season took down a succession of my co-workers like dominoes.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Iowa's role growing as Internet industry backbone | Matthew Patane | The Des Moines Register

Iowa's role growing as Internet industry backbone | Matthew Patane | The Des Moines Register | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Iowa's increasing role in America's mushrooming Internet industry received another boost Friday when Google confirmed it would invest an additional $1 billion to expand its Council Bluffs data farm.

The additional money, which will finance construction of a four-story data center building, will bring the tech giant's total investment to $2.5 billion — cementing the Council Bluffs project as one of the largest, if not the largest, economic development projects in Iowa.

The announcement comes as Iowa sees more data centers locate in the state as the need for more data storage and Internet services continues to climb. Microsoft and Facebook are also spending billions to build data centers in Iowa, because the state has cheap land, a low natural disaster risk and access to renewable energy, such as wind, experts say.

"Google has the issue that the Internet is growing fast, so they have to grow fast. ... Everything we do says we have to have more data," said Doug Jacobson, an electrical and computer engineering professor at Iowa State University.

Chris Russell, manager of the Council Bluffs data center, said Google saw the need for additional data centers to support its cloud data storage systems and other services, such as Google search, YouTube and Android smartphone operating systems.


Click headline to read more and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NYC: Jukay Hsu is Making Queens a More Tech-Savvy Place | Terence Cullen | Commercial Observer

NYC: Jukay Hsu is Making Queens a More Tech-Savvy Place | Terence Cullen | Commercial Observer | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Jukay Hsu couldn’t seem to remember the school he attended in Flushing, Queens.

He half-laughed, half-moaned that he’s 30 (in his 30s, as he puts it) and forgetting things. But a “senior” moment is forgivable for Mr. Hsu who has a lot on his plate as he tries training the next wave of tech employees and figuring out where their companies will be based.

Mr. Hsu is running a nonprofit focused on advancing technology companies in Queens—organizing conferences that draw the likes of Google, BuzzFeed and Reddit. Mr. Hsu wants Queens to be the leader in tech development with more companies coming to the city thanks to a massive campus at Roosevelt Island, a stone’s throw away from his Long Island City office.


An Iraq War veteran, the Queens native was the youngest member of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s transition team and one of the youngest on the board of the Queens Library and tourism-promotion agency NYC & Company (he’s headed to the White House this week, too, for a meeting with the chief technology officer).

His group, the Coalition for Queens, or C4Q, has been trying to figure out what technology companies need to expand their already growing foothold in LIC. So far it has found that it needs to best utilize the physical space in the bustling neighborhood, and that diversity is crucial in the process. C4Q has been training people of all backgrounds for free in how to code software with the ultimate goal of bringing them to a higher pay grade.

“Bringing the digital economy to the boroughs outside Manhattan is obviously critical to our overall city economy,” said Kathryn Wylde, the president of the Partnership for New York City, a nonprofit focused on Gotham’s economy. “And Jukay has been the leader of that effort in Queens. He really has become a citywide force in extending the benefits of the innovation economy into all the communities of the city—the communities of color, lower-income communities and the outer boroughs.”


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Tech hubs in D.C. and Arlington combine with 1776 acquisition of Disruption Corp. | Jonathan O'Connell | WashPost.com

Tech hubs in D.C. and Arlington combine with 1776 acquisition of Disruption Corp. | Jonathan O'Connell | WashPost.com | Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream | Scoop.it

Two of the Washington area’s top hubs of tech networking and venture capital are combining, as District-based incubator and seed fund 1776 is acquiring Crystal City’s Disruption Corp, launched more than a year ago by venture capitalist Paul Singh.

Co-founders Donna Harris and Evan Burfield said they envision 1776 as a center of information, networking and data with deep connections in the Washington area that could benefit start-ups and investors from around the world.

The deal gives 1776 ownership of Disruption Corp.’s software products and management of Singh’s venture fund.

Harris said the expansion to Northern Virginia should deepen 1776’s links to government agencies and companies that purchase, invest in and regulate start-ups.

“Much as we say we’re only a few blocks from the White House, now we’ll be within a couple blocks of the Pentagon,” Harris said.

Neither company disclosed terms of the transaction, which was scheduled to close Thursday.

Two years after launching with the help of a $200,000 grant from the D.C. government, 1776 has more than 270 start-up members, many of them based locally and focused on energy, health or transportation.

Its 15th Street offices draw top government officials — including President Obama — and industry experts as speakers. Its Challenge Cup attracts hundreds of competing start-ups, and big-name corporations including Microsoft, Comcast and MedStar Health have signed on as partners.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.