MWA 3 | Saving the Corals
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July/August 2001 HUNTING - Sierra Magazine - Sierra Club

Duvall Winns's insight:

Bass, Rick. "Why I Hunt." July/August 2001 HUNTING - Sierra Magazine - Sierra Club. Sierra Club, n.d. Web. 08 Apr. 2014.

 

In the story “Why I Hunt” readers have a chance to get a passionate hunter’s perspective in what hunting is like. Rick Bass shares his story of an unplanned immigration west to the Yak valley next to the Kootenai National Forest with his wife. The immigration near this well-resourced forest obligated Bass to become more involved in hunting. In the story he helps readers understand how he feels as he hunts in a natural forest rich with a variety of prey. In “Why I Hunt” Rick Bass emphasizes his deep love for hunting and argues that it is an enjoyable activity that helps develop a type of imagination that is almost impossible for non-hunters to obtain. People who are animal activist may not see his purpose in hunting, but he make light to a dim subject for people oppose to hunting. Same a coral conservation; one may not see the purpose of saving a dying sea creature, but it can be proven to be a vital source to the ecosystem of the ocean. The ocean is very important to our food chain.

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Rescooped by Duvall Winns from Coral Conservation
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Underwater Photography by Tommy Schultz

Underwater Photography by Tommy Schultz | MWA 3 | Saving the Corals | Scoop.it

Via Vina
Duvall Winns's insight:

Schultz, Tommy. Digital image. Underwater Photography Portfolio: Coral Reefs, Clown Fish, Sea Turtles and SCUBA Divers | Underwater Photography and Travel Photography by Tommy Schultz. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Apr. 2014.


This collection of images is a piece of the spectrum of many animals that thrive off the coral reefs in their tropical environment. Big or small each animal has a significant role on the food chain. But coral is where they are started from. Small fish like clown fish feature in some of the photos feed off the algae on the coral and live in the shelter of the sea anemone. Which then they become prey for a larger fish that trickles up the food chain. Without the coral reef our beautiful sea will lack in diversity of fish and marine life. The ocean can’t strive to stay balance without the coral reef being a part of the food chain. Not only is coral a great food source for marine life. Many fish and sea turtle featured in the picture call this home. Some marine life lay their eggs upon the coral for protection from hungry predators. We allow they coral reefs to be destroyed, we kill off other important marine animals.

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Vina's curator insight, February 4, 2013 2:07 AM

Inspiring undersea photographs ... if I could only dive, let alone swim :) 

Rescooped by Duvall Winns from Rescue our Ocean's & it's species from Man's Pollution!
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Wildlife & Habitat Conservation News: Study reveals #Coral reef decline rates are directly related to pollution

Wildlife & Habitat Conservation News: Study reveals #Coral reef decline rates are directly related to pollution | MWA 3 | Saving the Corals | Scoop.it
Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News (RT @OceanChampions: Kenya study proves #overfishing and coastal #pollution damaging coral reefs and preventing the possibility of recovery.)...

Via Marian Locksley
Duvall Winns's insight:

Adhiambo, Mercy. "Study Reveals Coral Reef Decline Rates Are Directly Related to Pollution." Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News: Study Reveals Coral Reef Decline Rates Are Directly Related to Pollution. Environmental News Network, 24 Sept. 2012. Web. 08 Apr. 2014.


Agriculture and urbanization are leading to the destruction of coral reefs and make their recovery difficult. Kenya witnesses a decrease in coral reefs when they had over-fishing and land drainage problems. This contributes to the other amount of coral that is killed off due to bad weather. These tragic events cause the speed of the coral’s death to be a catalyst to their endangerment. Researcher McClanahan found out that the more pollution in the water the faster they coral break down and die. This was found through studying the skeletons that had already died over many years. Worms break down the reef structure by dissolving the calcium carbonate that make up the reef. Where there was a lot of fishing is where a lot of worms were found. Intense fishing throws off the balance of the coral reefs’ ecosystem.

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#Wildlife and #Habitat Conservation News: #NoisePollution Affects #CoralReef #Fish

#Wildlife and #Habitat Conservation News: #NoisePollution Affects #CoralReef #Fish | MWA 3 | Saving the Corals | Scoop.it
Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News (Yahoo!: Noise Pollution Affects Coral Reef Fish: While fish don't have ears that we can see, they do have ear ...

Via Marian Locksley
Duvall Winns's insight:

Winter, Allison. "Noise Pollution Affects Coral Reef Fish." Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News: Noise Pollution Affects Coral Reef Fish.


Environmental News Network, 23 June 2013. Web. 08 Apr. 2014.

When people think of pollution they normally don’t have noise pollution at the top of their head. Coral reefs have suffered from the pollution of trash and waste we put into the water. But Noise pollution is another way humans are harming the coral reef. The noise of the engine from boats, shipping vessels, and military sonar startle the fish. The coral fish can pick up on the sounds. These coral reef fish help to maintain a balance between the coral’s ecosystem and the other animals in the ocean. The sounds of the boats have even shown an impact of coral reef fish larva’s behavior. Studies from researchers at the universities of Bristol, Exeter and liege found that reef fish are more likely to swim away from recordings of reefs when boat noise is added. This is where it is important to have restricted marine habitats in order for the coral’s ecosystem to thrive.

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Marian Locksley's curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:23 PM

Sophie Holles, a PhD researcher at the University of Bristol and one of the study's authors, said: "Natural underwater sound is used by many animals to find suitable habitat, and traffic noise is one of the most widespread pollutants. If settlement is disrupted by boat traffic, the resilience of habitats like reefs could be affected."

Rescooped by Duvall Winns from Marine Conservation
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Aquarium hopes to turn tide for coral - Yorkshire Post

Aquarium hopes to turn tide for coral - Yorkshire Post | MWA 3 | Saving the Corals | Scoop.it

Aquarium hopes to turn tide for coral Yorkshire Post HULL aquarium The Deep is taking part in an international coral conservation project, and creating its own coral “life support system”.


Via Prof Brendan Godley
Duvall Winns's insight:

"Aquarium Hopes to Turn Tide for Coral." Aquarium Hopes to Turn Tide for Coral. N.p., 26 Aug. 2013. Web. 07 Apr. 2014.


The Yorkshire post released a news article where one of the staff members took a trip to the Pacific island of Guam. The staff member got to experience a massive feature to coral reefs’ life style, mating. The release sperm and egg that floats to surface and fertilization happens. Even though coral have a massive mating process; coral is still showing up badly damaged due to tourism. Tourists who harm the coral are shortening their life span due the damage they suffer. Scientist is conserving the coral by maximizing their reproduction process. A team collects gametes (offspring of coral) at Guam University where they care and monitor the growth of the coral. When they are mature enough; they are released back into the ocean. These measures taken will help perfect breeding in the deep of the ocean, making the breeding process easy on the coral reef. Helping breed coral in a safe environment is a huge step in coral conservation.

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Rescooped by Duvall Winns from Coral Conservation
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It's not too late for coral reefs, experts say

It's not too late for coral reefs, experts say | MWA 3 | Saving the Corals | Scoop.it
Coral reefs – ecosystems of incredible environmental and economic value – are showing evidence of significant degradation, but do not have to be doomed. We can make a difference, researchers say.

Via Vina
Duvall Winns's insight:

"It's Not Too Late for Coral Reefs, Experts Say." ScienceDaily. Nova Southeastern University, 3 Oct. 2012. Web. 08 Apr. 2014.


Many may say saving the coral seems like a good benefit to society, it offers a lot money and food resource; but we may be a little too late to save them. Not according to this article from Nova Southern University. Coral has an economical valve for tourist and fisheries.  Coral reef generates over 172 billion dollars a year in services. But these industries drain coral which is why scientist wants to preserve coral and is taking a global action towards making conservation tactics which will be affective with the help of local contributions. There are simple solutions like stopping over fishing, controlling pollution, and having protected environments. There are even positive signs from offshore coral nurseries that coral restoration is possible. With more research facilities and control coral environments; scientist are able to dig deeper into learning how to balance a healthy coral ecosystem. 

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Vina's curator insight, February 4, 2013 12:49 AM

In July, hundreds of scientists joined in a consensus statement written at the recently held 12th International Coral Reef Symposium in Cairns Australia, stating: "Across the globe, these problems cause a loss of reef resources of enormous economic and cultural value. A concerted effort to preserve reefs for the future demands action at global levels, but also will benefit hugely from continued local protection."

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"Prescription: Oceans"

The oceans are part of America's newest medical frontier. In Florida, scientists are studying a variety of marine invertebrates which may hold the key to unl...

Via Vina
Duvall Winns's insight:

"Prescription: Oceans" Pt. 1. YouTube. YouTube, 14 June 2011. Web. 08 Apr. 2014.


Science is showing us of that sponge and coral are tomorrow’s modern medication for diseases. Researchers are seeing properties from these organisms that can prevent cancer and chronic pain. Coral and sponges are a valuable resource for finding cures and helping make treatments. Complex technology allows the researchers to go in the depth of the ocean and collect the specimen and test them for anti-cancer properties. This can be the new fight against cancer and help with cancer prevention. The sponges help restore cell production and build healthy new cells by killing of cancerous cells. The sponge cell even kills more cancer cells than normal cell which make the cancer treatment less painful for the cancer patient. This is worth conserving if it can help rid cancer. Soon the sponge cells can be manipulated enough to cure cancer. We must keep these sponges alive to use their healing properties.

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What a Waste: Human Sewage Is Laying Waste to Coral Reefs | Cool Green Science: The Conservation Blog of The Nature Conservancy

What a Waste: Human Sewage Is Laying Waste to Coral Reefs | Cool Green Science: The Conservation Blog of The Nature Conservancy | MWA 3 | Saving the Corals | Scoop.it
A new study says pathogens from human sewage are killing a coral species off Florida's coast. But is people poop a worldwide issue for coral?

Via Will Moreno
Duvall Winns's insight:

Lalasz, Bob. "What a Waste: Why Human Sewage Is Laying Waste to      Coral Reefs Globally."Nature Conservancy Blogs Conservation Science      Green Living. N.p., 16 Sept. 2011. Web. 07 Apr. 2014.


Author Bob Lalasz writes about the discovery from coral reef specialist that shows human sewage is killing off the coral reef population in his "what a waste". With the evidence that scientist have isolate a pathogen in human waste that kills off Elkon coral; they can prove that human waste has an impact on coral reefs' life span. What the waste does to the coral is make the tropical waters coral grows in full of nutrients, which is not stable to the balance of a coral's environment. Apart of marine conservation is to reduce man's negative impact on the waters coral thrives in. Even though Elkon is just one type of coral affected by human waste this blog said we should suspect that it does impact coral in general. There is an obvious solution, which is sewage treatment. Place such as the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico have poor sewage system or none at all. Nature conservancy group can get governments to invest in better practices and commit to paving the way for cleaner water.

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Scientists Urge Preservation of Deep Ocean Coral Reefs: Scientific American

Scientists Urge Preservation of Deep Ocean Coral Reefs: Scientific American | MWA 3 | Saving the Corals | Scoop.it
Deep water reefs are largely unexplored and unprotected (Marine Conservation Institute Scientists Urge Preservation of Deep Ocean Coral Reefs: Scientific American http://t.co/ZAtc5WRAPw via @sciam)...

Via Gaye Rosier
Duvall Winns's insight:

Ogburn, Stephanie. "Scientists Urge Preservation of Deep Ocean Coral Reefs." Scientific American Global RSS. ClimateWire, 29 May 2013. Web. 08 Apr. 2014.


Besides coral being unprotected from humans; coral also faces danger from storms and climate change. Coral is damaged from bleaching, which is due to too warm waters and ocean acidification. The coral take up excess carbon dioxide released by humans into the atmosphere. By mapping out the vast area covered by the mesophotic coral, which are deep ocean coral. Scientists are able to identify the amount of regions where the coral are, which can help highlight where conservation areas are needed. A lot of regions of coral have been undiscovered. The coral reefs need to be found before they are destroyed by climate change and people. Places such as Israel have expanded their marine protected area due to more findings of coral in red sea. Expanding technology has also helped researchers find their way to the bottom of the ocean remotely.

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Rescooped by Duvall Winns from Dive Jobs Worldwide
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THE CONSERVATION COLUMN: Coral reefs - mysterious, vital and vulnerable

THE CONSERVATION COLUMN: Coral reefs - mysterious, vital and vulnerable | MWA 3 | Saving the Corals | Scoop.it
Scientist talks shares insights into his work on Seychelles coral reefs (#scuba #diving THE CONSERVATION COLUMN: Coral reefs - mysterious, vital and vulnerable: Scientist talks shares i...)...

Via Jeff Scott
Duvall Winns's insight:

"THE CONSERVATION COLUMN: Coral Reefs - Mysterious, Vital and Vulnerable."Sport Diver. N.p., 21 Dec. 2011. Web. 08 Apr. 2014.


Coral reefs support more marine life than any other ecosystem according to this article. Many divers love exploring coral reefs, for they put on spectacular shows and are full of information on how other sea animals strive down under. These coral reefs are under threat by the climate change and ocean acidification. With help from local communities, protect of the coastline can help stop wave action and erosion. Researchers are experimenting with different ways to protect coral from weather change. This will allow for the coral reef to have protected areas to be unharmed. The coral may have a chance to survive if people have a better understanding on how to protect them. The more people take an interest in scuba diving and biology the more people will know how to continue on a mission to safe the coral. There is a need for people who are interested in saving coral.

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